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Prevalence Of Diabetes In Canada 2017

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevalence (per 1,000 inhabitants) of diabetes worldwide in 2000 - world average was 2.8%. no data ≤ 7.5 7.5–15 15–22.5 22.5–30 30–37.5 37.5–45 45–52.5 52.5–60 60–67.5 67.5–75 75–82.5 ≥ 82.5 Disability-adjusted life year for diabetes mellitus per 100,000 inhabitants in 2004 No data <100 100–200 200–300 300–400 400–500 500–600 600–700 700–800 800–900 900–1,000 1,000–1,500 >1,500 Globally, an estimated 422 million adults are living with diabetes mellitus, according to the latest 2016 data from the World Health Organization (WHO).[1] Diabetes prevalence is increasing rapidly; previous 2013 estimates from the International Diabetes Federation put the number at 381 million people having diabetes.[2] The number is projected to almost double by 2030.[3] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 85-90% of all cases.[4][5] Increases in the overall diabetes prevalence rates largely reflect an increase in risk factors for type 2, notably greater longevity and being overweight or obese.[1] Diabetes mellitus occurs throughout the world, but is more common (especially type 2) in the more developed countries. The greatest increase in prevalence is, however, occurring in low- and middle-income countries[1] including in Asia and Africa, where most patients will probably be found by 2030.[3] The increase in incidence in developing countries follows the trend of urbanization and lifestyle changes, including increasingly sedentary lifestyles, less physically demanding work and the global nutrition transition, marked by increased intake of foods that are high energy-dense but nutrient-poor (often high in sugar and saturated fats, sometimes referred to as the Western pattern diet).[1][3] The risk of getting type 2 diabetes has been widely found to be associat Continue reading >>

Mortality Due To Diabetes

Mortality Due To Diabetes

Key Messages Canada receives a “C” and ranks 15th out of 17 peer countries on mortality due to diabetes. Two million Canadians suffer from diabetes, a figure that is expected to increase to three million over the next decade. The prevalence of diabetes in Canada continues to increase. Putting mortality due to diabetes in context Diabetes is a global epidemic and, according to the International Diabetes Federation, “one of the most challenging health problems in the 21st century.” In 2011, diabetes accounted for about 4.6 million deaths worldwide.1 Globally, it is estimated that more than 350 million people suffer from diabetes; this number is expected to jump to over 550 million by 2030, if nothing is done.2 An estimated 280 million people worldwide have an impaired glucose tolerance—a precursor to diabetes. This number is projected to reach 398 million by 2030, or 7 per cent of the adult population.3 Diabetes has also shifted down a generation—from a disease of the elderly to one that affects those of working age or younger. According to the International Diabetes Federation, as a result of decreasing levels of physical activity and increasing obesity rates, type 2 diabetes in children has the potential to become a global public health issue.4 If you enjoyed this research, get regular updates by signing up to our monthly newsletter. Please enter your e-mail. Your e-mail was not in the correct format. It should be in the form [email protected] What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic, often debilitating, and sometimes fatal disease that occurs when there are problems with the production and use of insulin in the body, ultimately leading to high blood sugar levels. Long-term complications from diabetes include kidney disease, diminishing sight, loss of feeling in t Continue reading >>

4.2 Million Canadians Will Have Diabetes By 2020, Finds Study

4.2 Million Canadians Will Have Diabetes By 2020, Finds Study

As the rate of diabetes continues to rise in Canada, so do the related healthcare costs; however, results from a recent study show implementing certain measures could save billions of dollars. Researchers at The Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto conducted this study with the objective of estimating the future related costs over a 10-year period. According to information published on the National Center for Biotechnology Information’s (NCBI) website, a Diabetes Population Risk Tool predicted the number of new cases in people aged 20 years and older until 2022, using 2011 and 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey data. Researchers derived attributable costs, “due to diabetes from a propensity-matched case control study using the Ontario Diabetes Database and other administrative data.” Furthermore, they, “calculated total costs by applying the respective attributable costs to the incident cases, accounting for sex, year of diagnosis and annual disease-specific mortality rates.” The foreseen 10-year risk for Canadians to develop diabetes in 2011/2012 was 9.98 per cent, corresponding to 2.16 million new cases. “Total health care costs attributable to diabetes during this period were $7.55 billion for females and $7.81 billion for males ($15.36 billion total),” stated the study. The research also showed $2.03 billion in healthcare costs could be saved with a population intervention of a five per cent loss in body weight. As well, a 30 per cent risk-reduction intervention focusing on focusing on those with the highest diabetes risk would save $1.48 billion. Type 2 diabetes is a result of an unhealthy, sugar-filled diet, which is not set off by the required amount of exercise for adults. Diabetes.ca states it, “is a disease in whic Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Canada - Canada.ca

Diabetes In Canada - Canada.ca

Highlights from the Canadian Chronic Disease Surveillance System Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects Canadians of all ages. If left uncontrolled, diabetes results in consistently high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia), which can lead to serious complications such as cardiovascular disease, vision loss, kidney failure, nerve damage, and amputation. Fortunately, it is possible to remain healthy with diabetes through appropriate management and care. The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), in collaboration with all provinces and territories, conducts national surveillance of diabetes to support the planning and evaluation of related policies and programs. This fact sheet presents an overview of diagnosed diabetes data (type 1 or type 2 combined) from the Canadian Chronic Disease Surveillance System (CCDSS, Box 1 ). Diabetes is a chronic condition that occurs when the body loses its ability to produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that controls sugar levels in the blood. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. Other types are uncommon. Footnote 1 Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, leaving the individual dependent on an external source of insulin for life. It typically develops in children and youth, but it can also occur in adults. Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder. It occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin and/or when the body does not properly use the insulin produced. Individuals who are overweight or obese, physically inactive, or of certain ethnic origins, and those who have a family history of diabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. It typically appears in adults older than 40 years, but it can a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Statistics In Canada

Diabetes Statistics In Canada

Key Statistics[1] 2015 2025 Estimated diabetes prevalence (n/%) 3.4 million/9.3% 5 million/12.1% Estimated prediabetes prevalence in Canada (n/%) (age 20+) 5.7 million/22.1% 6.4 million/23.2% Estimated diabetes prevalence increase (%) 44% from 2015-2025 Estimated diabetes cost increase (%) 25% from 2015-2025 Impact of diabetes Diabetes complications are associated with premature death. It is estimated that one of ten deaths in Canadian adults was attributable to diabetes in 2008/09.[2] People with diabetes are over three times more likely to be hospitalized with cardiovascular disease, 12 times more likely to be hospitalized with end-stage renal disease and over 20 times more likely to be hospitalized for a non-traumatic lower limb amputation compared to the general population.[3] Thirty per cent of people with diabetes have clinically relevant depressive symptoms; individuals with depression have an approximately 60% increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes.3 Foot ulceration affects an estimated 15-25% of people with diabetes. One-third of amputations in 2011-2012 were performed on people reporting a diabetic foot wound.[4] Some populations are at higher risk of type 2 diabetes, such as those of South Asian, Asian, African, Hispanic or Aboriginal descent, those who are overweight, older or have low income. Diabetes rates are 3-5 times higher in First Nations, a situation compounded by barriers to care for Aboriginal people.3 Fifty-seven percent of Canadians with diabetes reported they cannot adhere to prescribed treatment due to the high out-of-pocket cost of needed medications, devices and supplies. The average cost for these supports is >3% of income or >$1,500.[5] As a result of stigma or fear of stigma, 37% of Canadians with type 2 diabetes surveyed by the Cana Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Diabetes In Canada Over 10 Years: Applying Attributable Health Care Costs To A Diabetes Incidence Prediction Model

The Cost Of Diabetes In Canada Over 10 Years: Applying Attributable Health Care Costs To A Diabetes Incidence Prediction Model

Go to: Methods Diabetes risk and incidence To estimate the predicted risk and number of new diabetes cases within the next 10 years, we used the Diabetes Population Risk Tool version 2.0. DPoRT 2.0 is an updated iteration of DPoRT, a predictive algorithm developed to calculate future population risk and incidence of physician- diagnosed diabetes in those aged 20 years and over. DPoRT was derived using national survey data individually linked to a chart-validated diabetes registry. This cohort was then used to create sex-specific survival models using baseline risk factors from the survey for diabetes incidence. Specifically, we assessed the probability of physician-diagnosed diabetes from the interview date until censoring for death or end of follow-up. The model was developed in the Ontario cohort and predictions from the model were validated against actual observed diabetes incidence in two external cohorts in Ontario and Manitoba. Variables used within its two sex-specific models include a combination of hypertension, ethnicity, education, immigrant status, body mass index, smoking status, heart disease and income. Full details on the model specification and validation can be found elsewhere. 7 The regression model can run on nationally available population health surveys and has been updated (DPoRT 2.0) and used to established prevention targets for diabetes.8 For this study, we used DPoRT 2.0 to generate incidence predictions based on the recent 2011 and 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). The CCHS collects information on the demographics, health status and determinants of health of the Canadian population. It is a nationally representative survey that uses a crosssectional study design and is administered on an ongoing basis, with annual data reporting. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

About T1D Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which a person’s pancreas stops producing insulin, a hormone that enables people to get energy from food. It occurs when the body’s immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, called beta cells. While its causes are not yet entirely understood, scientists believe that both genetic factors and environmental triggers are involved. Its onset has nothing to do with diet or lifestyle. There is nothing you can do to prevent T1D, and—at present—nothing you can do to get rid of it. Affects Children and Adults T1D strikes both children and adults at any age. It comes on suddenly, causes dependence on injected or pumped insulin for life, and carries the constant threat of devastating complications. Needs Constant Attention Living with T1D is a constant challenge. People with the disease must carefully balance insulin doses (either by injections multiple times a day or continuous infusion through a pump) with eating and daily activities throughout the day and night. They must also test their blood sugar by pricking their fingers for blood six or more times a day. Despite this constant attention, people with T1D still run the risk of dangerous high or low blood sugar levels, both of which can be life-threatening. People with T1D overcome these challenges on a daily basis. Not Cured By Insulin While insulin injections or infusion allow a person with T1D to stay alive, they do not cure the disease, nor do they necessarily prevent the possibility of the disease’s serious effects, which may include: kidney failure, blindness, nerve damage, amputations, heart attack, stroke, and pregnancy complications. Perseverance and Hope Although T1D is a serious and difficult disease, treatment Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease Epidemic In Canada

Type 2 Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease Epidemic In Canada

T he mission of the Cardiac Health Foundation of Canada (CHFC) is aimed at cardiovascular disease prevention, education, and rehabilitation. We are pleased to contribute to this supplement in support of raising awareness of heart health. This includes addressing concerns regarding the rising rate of Type 2 diabetes and its connection to cardiovascular disease. Diabetes can lead to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, which are diseases of the heart and circulatory system respectively. According to Diabetes Canada (formerly the Canadian Diabetes Association), people with diabetes who develop heart disease do so 10 to 15 years earlier than individuals without diabetes, and are 2 to 4 times more likely to have a heart attack or stroke. Coronary artery disease is the most common form of heart disease associated with diabetes, and occurs when the arteries that supply the heart with blood become blocked or narrowed by fatty deposits. These blockages are often referred to as a hardening of the arteries. If the arteries supplying blood to the heart become hardened, it can lead to a heart attack. High blood glucose (sugar) is a key risk factor for angina (chest pain caused by reduced blood flow to the heart), heart attack and stroke. Often, people with diabetes also have other associated risk factors, including high blood pressure, being overweight (especially around the waist), inactive lifestyles, and high cholesterol. As well, smoking can double the risk of cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes. Troubling implications of Type 2 diabetes rates Today, more than 10 million Canadians are living with diabetes or pre-diabetes. In its 2015 Diabetes Report: Driving Change, Diabetes Canada reported that the incidence of Type 2 diabetes in Canada doubled between 2000 an Continue reading >>

Health-care Costs More Than Double For Canadians With Diabetes: Study

Health-care Costs More Than Double For Canadians With Diabetes: Study

The subject who is truly loyal to the Chief Magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures. A new study has determined that the average cost of health care for Canadians with diabetes is $16,000 over eight years, compared to $6,000 for those without the disease. The analysis published in the journal Diabetic Medicine shows that caring for the 3.4 million Canadians with diabetes costs the health system billions of dollars each year. Lead author Laura Rosella of the University of Toronto says diabetes is one of the biggest public health challenges of the 21st century because of how much it costs to manage. The study captured health care costs for almost three million people with diabetes from 2004 to 2012 using patient data that included hospitalizations, emergency room visits, surgery, kidney dialysis and medications. Rosella says the prevalence of diabetes is expected to rise as a result of the aging population, as well as increasing rates of obesity and sedentary lifestyles. She says it's critical that diabetes-related costs be estimated in order to properly allocate future health care resources and to determine cost-savings from prevention strategies. Dr. Janet Hux, chief science officer at the Canadian Diabetes Association, says the disease decreases a person's quality and length of life. "This study documents the heavy and potentially unsustainable burden the condition poses to the health care system," she says. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Burden And Prevention

Diabetes Burden And Prevention

Diabetes Canada estimates that, as of 2015, 3.4 million Canadians (9.3% of the population) have type 2 diabetesa number they expect will increase by 2025, when a predicted 5 million Canadians (12.1% of the population) will suffer from the disease. The pervasiveness of diabetes is amplified by its side effects, including: cardiovascular complications, end-stage renal disease, and lower limb amputation are all corollary to untreated, debilitating diabetes. The already-widespread, but still growing prevalence of diabetes, and the variety of complications it incurs, demand a rigorous investigation into its social, cultural and environmental causes. Our team leads a number of research studies related to the health and economic burden of type 2 diabetes. To learn more about our work in this area, please see the following resources: Hillmer M., Sandoval G.A., Elliott J.A., Jain M., Barker T., Prisniak A., Astley S., Rosella L.C. Diabetes risk reduction in primary care: Evaluation of the Ontario Primary Care Diabetes Prevention Program. Canadian Journal of Public Health. 2017; 108(2): e176-e184. Available from: Zuk A., Quionez C., Lebenbaum M., Rosella L.C. The Association between Undiagnosed Glycemic Abnormalities and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors with Periodontitis: Results from 2007-2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey. Journal of Clinical Periodontology. In Press. 2017 Available at: . Campbell, T.K., Alberga, A., Rosella, L.C. The impact of access to health services on prediabetes awareness: A population-based study. Preventive Medicine. 2016; 93(7): 7-13. Available from: . Rosella L.C., Lebenbaum M., Fitzpatrick T., ORiley D., Wang J., Booth G.L., Stukel T.A., Wodchis W. Impact of diabetes on healthcare costs in a population-based cohort: A cost analysis. Diabetic Medicine Continue reading >>

T1d And T2d

T1d And T2d

Most people know at least one person with diabetes – a great uncle, a young neighbour. The disease is often described as a worldwide epidemic with a growing number of reported cases each year. Despite such incidence, diabetes is still not very well known. For instance, how many people know that there are different “types” of diabetes? And who is not taken aback when they learn that a child or a teenager is diabetic? Let’s review the facts and rectify some common myths. STATISTICS ON TYPE 1 DIABETES According to statistics from the Canadian Pediatric Society, 33,000 school age children (5-18 years old) in Canada have Type 1 Diabetes, and there are several thousands under the age of 5. An estimated 9 to 10% of all diabetics, including children and adults, are insulin-dependent. Based on data from the National Diabetes Surveillance System (NDSS), the Canadian Diabetes Association forecasts that diabetes will affect nearly 11% of the population by the year 2020. Approximately one million Canadians currently have diabetes without knowing it. Type 2 diabetes is affecting more and more people, young and old. A better awareness of diabetes among the general population is necessary, including the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. This disease, often described as an epidemic, is frequently misunderstood due to assumptions and misinformation. The media and people in general are rarely able to explain the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. The Diabetic Children’s Foundation would like to increase public awareness about both types of diabetes and dispel the myths that lead to a great deal of prejudice against children. For this reason, the Foundation seeks to encourage the media, its partners and its member families to raise public awareness abou Continue reading >>

Diabetes, 2015

Diabetes, 2015

In 2015, 6.9% of Canadians aged 12 and older (roughly 2.1 million people) reported being diagnosed with diabetes.1 Overall, males (7.8%) were more likely than females (5.9%) to report that they had diabetes.2 Diabetes increased with age3 for both males and females up to age 64. The prevalence did not increase significantly for those aged 75 or older (Chart 1). The proportion of residents aged 12 and older who reported being diagnosed with diabetes was lower than the national average (6.9%) in Alberta (4.7%).4 The proportion of residents who reported being diagnosed with diabetes was higher than the national average in: Newfoundland and Labrador (10.5%) Nova Scotia (10.1%) New Brunswick (8.8%) The proportion of residents who reported being diagnosed with diabetes was about the same as the national average in the other provinces. Canadians aged 18 and older who were either overweight or obese were more likely than those who were classified as having a normal weight5 to report that they had been diagnosed with diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes among obese Canadians was 13.6% in 2015, compared with 6.6% among overweight Canadians and 3.2% among those classified as having a normal weight. Start of text box Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin, or when the insulin produced is not used effectively. Diabetes may lead to a reduced quality of life as well as complications such as heart disease, stroke and kidney disease.6 Survey respondents were asked to report if they had been diagnosed with diabetes by a health professional. Included in the reports were: type 1, which is usually diagnosed in children and adolescents; type 2, which usually develops in adulthood; and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy. End of text box References James, Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

The presence of diabetes is based on the population aged 12 or older who reported that a health professional diagnosed them as having diabetes. This includes females 15 or older who reported that they have been diagnosed with gestational diabetes. The definition does not distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Diabetes is an important indicator of population health because of its increasing prevalence, association with lifestyle risk factors, and far-reaching consequences. Common complications include heart disease and stroke, vision problems or blindness, kidney failure, and nerve damage1. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing worldwide2. Formerly considered a disease of adults and the elderly, it is now appearing in children3,4. The burdens imposed by diabetes include shortened life expectancy and fewer years lived in good health, as well as health care costs for those afflicted. The aging population is the most important demographic change affecting diabetes prevalence worldwide. Even if incidence rates were to remain stable, because of the growing number of seniors, the overall prevalence of diabetes would increase2,5. Being overweight or obese is an important risk factor for diabetes6. Rising percentages of Canadians in these categories7 could increase the prevalence of diabetes. Physical activity reduces the risk of developing diabetes and inhibits the progression of the disease by increasing sensitivity to insulin. Even when body mass index (BMI) and other factors were taken into account, diabetes incidence was higher among inactive people5. Family history (parent or sibling with diabetes) was associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes5. While this may indicate a genetic predisposition, shared behaviours and increased awareness that Continue reading >>

New Name, New Campaign For The Canadian Diabetes Association

New Name, New Campaign For The Canadian Diabetes Association

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) – The Canadian Diabetes Association has changed its name, kicking off a fresh campaign to bring awareness to a disease that affects about one-third of Canadians. The association, now known as Diabetes Canada, has launched “End Diabetes” with a music video highlighting a need for support for people living with the disease. Rogers Media uses cookies for personalization, to customize its online advertisements, and for other purposes. Learn more or change your cookie preferences. Rogers Media supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles. By continuing to use our service, you agree to our use of cookies. We use cookies (why?) You can change cookie preferences. Continued site use signifies consent. Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Subtitles captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected Captions Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Caption Settings Dialog Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaque Font Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400% Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadow Font FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall Caps DefaultsDone Create a new password We've sent an email with instructions to create a new password. Your existing password has no Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Banting and Best Laboratory Banting and Best's laboratory where insulin was discovered (courtesy University of Toronto Archives/A1965-0004). Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes, is a disease in which the body either produces insufficient amounts of insulin or cannot use insulin properly. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Treatment for the disease received a monumental breakthrough when a team of researchers at the University of Toronto (Frederick Banting, Charles Best, John Macleod and James Collip) isolated insulin between 1921 and 1922. Background and Symptoms Everyone needs insulin to break down food. What and how much someone eats affects blood glucose levels. When someone has diabetes, there is either not enough insulin in the body or the body cannot use the insulin it produces. Rather than being used as energy, glucose in a diabetic person is stored in the body’s cells and collects in the bloodstream. Over time, elevated blood glucose can cause serious damage to the body. Specific symptoms include fatigue, thirst, frequent urination, damage to nerves, blurred vision and muscle cramps. Even when diabetes is controlled, the insulin supply of the body is limited. Types of Diabetes There are two main types of diabetes, type 1 and type 2, as well as related conditions including prediabetes and gestational diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Medical illustration of the symptoms of type 1 diabetes. 29046518 © Rob3000 | Dreamstime.com Type 1 diabetes is found in 10 per cent of people with diabetes. Also known as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, type 1 was formerly called juvenile-onset diabetes because it generally develops at a young age. Autoimmunity is a major cause of type 1 diabetes, meaning that the body mistakenly Continue reading >>

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