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Pancreas Transplant Side Effects

After Kidney/pancreas Transplant

After Kidney/pancreas Transplant

As you recover from surgery, the transplant team will follow you closely. In the first few weeks after transplant, you will be seen frequently in our outpatient clinic. If you live outside the St. Louis area, you can arrange temporary lodging near the hospital for the first few weeks of observation. Once you are home, you will be in regular contact with your nurse coordinator. You will return periodically to Barnes-Jewish Hospital for follow-up exams. Throughout the entire transplant process, the transplant team will continue to communicate with your primary care physician. Over time, routine care will be transitioned to your primary care physician. However, for continuity of care and to ensure the best outcome for you, we will follow you for the life of your transplant, while working closely with your primary care physician. After transplant, your decisions and dedication to your own self-care will be vital to your health and the success of your transplant. You can help yourself by taking your medications as directed, being aware of side effects or signs of rejection, following a healthy lifestyle with good nutrition and exercise and by seeking support. And our transplant team will be with you every step of the way to answer questions and offer guidance and care. As a transplant recipient, medications will become a significant part of your life. Our transplant team will help you manage and understand your medications. We also will advise you about taking any over-the-counter medications. You will require anti-rejection medications to suppress your immune system so your body doesn't reject the transplanted kidney. Because your immune system is suppressed, you will be more prone to infection, especially during the first three to six months after transplant. While you're Continue reading >>

Pancreas Transplant - Rejection And Complications

Pancreas Transplant - Rejection And Complications

Rejection is a term used when the body reacts against the transplanted organ(s). The transplant team will monitor you for any signs of rejection. You should be aware of the following symptoms and report any of them to the nursing staff or transplant team: pain, tenderness, or swelling of the new organ(s) anything that is red, swollen, warm to touch or that has a discharge Most patients experiencing rejection have no symptoms and the diagnosis is made solely on the basis of blood tests, such as an increase in blood B.U.N., glucose, creatinine or amylase. A rejection episode does not mean that you have lost your new organ or that it has failed. It means that your body has realized that the new organ does not belong to you, and tries to fight the organ off, just as your body tries to fight off an infection, cold, virus, etc. There are medications available to treat rejection. Your transplant team will determine which type of medication will be most effective for you. Some complications from pancreas transplant surgery include: vascular thrombosis (clotting of blood vessels) pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) These may occur when taking prednisone. Your blood sugar is checked whenever your blood is drawn. Symptoms of high blood sugars may include feeling extremely thirsty, weak, dizzy, having blurry vision, and urinating large amounts. If diabetes occurs, a patient may be required to be on a diabetic diet, take a pill, or take insulin shots to regulate his/her blood sugar. Your transplant team works closely with the diabetic center to best manage your blood sugar, in case this becomes a problem. Some transplant recipients will get high blood pressure from being on cyclosporine. A combination of weight control, regular walking or other exercise, and medication will Continue reading >>

Pancreas Transplant For Diabetes | Healthline

Pancreas Transplant For Diabetes | Healthline

Medically reviewed by George Krucik, MD Written by Natalie Wyatt on January 20, 2012 Although often a last resort, the pancreas transplant has become a key treatment for patients with diabetes, especially those who suffer from Type 1 diabetes. Pancreas transplants are also sometimes carried out in Type 2 diabetes patients who are insulin dependent. The first human pancreas transplant was completed in 1966; in 2009, more than 23,000 patients in the United States received a pancreas transplant. The aim of a transplant is to restore normal blood glucose levels to the body. The transplanted pancreas is able to produce insulin to manage blood glucose levels a task a transplant candidates existing pancreas can no longer perform properly. There are several types of pancreas transplants. Some people may have a pancreas transplant alone (PTA). Patients suffering from diabetic nephropathy (damage to the kidneys) will often receive a pancreas and kidney in a procedure called simultaneous pancreaskidney (SPK) transplant. Similar procedures include pancreas after kidney (PAK) and kidney after pancreas (KAP) transplants. A pancreas donor is usually someone who has suffered brain death but remains on a life support machine. This donor has to meet common transplant criteria including being a certain age and otherwise healthy. The donors pancreas also has to match immunologically with the recipients body. This is important to help reduce rejection risk. Rejection occurs when the bodys immune system reacts to the transplanted organ. Unfortunately, there is a long national waiting list for a pancreas transplant; according to the United Network for Organ Sharing, the average wait for a pancreas is 300 to 400 days, and there are over 2,200 people on the wait list. Occasionally, pancreatic Continue reading >>

Pancreas Transplant

Pancreas Transplant

Introduction A pancreas transplant is a surgical procedure to provide a new source of insulin in the form of a new pancreas for a patient with type 1 diabetes. Most pancreas transplants are performed on people with type 1 diabetes who have kidney failure. The pancreas transplant is performed at the same time as a kidney transplant. Pancreas transplants are also given to diabetic patients who don’t need a kidney, but who have life-threatening hypoglycaemic attacks. Hypoglycaemic attacks are a serious complication of diabetes caused by low levels of glucose in the blood. About one in 10 pancreas transplants are carried out for this reason. Pancreas transplantation is less common than kidney or liver transplantation. The pancreas and type 1 diabetes The pancreas is a tadpole-shaped organ, around 10–15cm long that is located in the top half of the abdomen. The pancreas has two main functions: it produces juices which the body uses to digest fats and proteins it produces the hormone insulin which the body needs to break down glucose into energy In cases of type 1 diabetes the pancreas does not produce any insulin because the insulin-producing cells, the islets, have been destroyed by the patient's own immune system. Most people with type 1 diabetes are able to control the condition with regular injections of insulin. However, a small number of people go on to develop serious complications despite being given the best available treatment, such as: end stage kidney disease – when the kidneys are no longer able to filter waste products from the blood diabetic retinopathy – where high levels of glucose in the blood causes damage to the eyes, which can lead to loss of vision diabetic neuropathy – where high sugar levels have damaged the nerves in the hands and feet, mea Continue reading >>

Complications After Pancreas Transplantation.

Complications After Pancreas Transplantation.

Curr Opin Organ Transplant. 2010 Feb;15(1):112-8. doi: 10.1097/MOT.0b013e3283355349. Complications after pancreas transplantation. Department of Surgery, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, California 95817, USA. [email protected] The history of transplantation of the pancreas, unlike that of transplantation of other abdominal organs, has largely been shaped by the associated surgical complications. After more than three decades of progress, surgical-technical pancreas graft failure rates have decreased to approximately 8%. The most recent developments in this area are systematically reviewed in this article. Vascular graft thrombosis remains, by far, the most common cause of technical graft failure. Recent reports suggested that pancreas preservation with histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution (HTK) might be a risk factor for reperfusion pancreatitis, graft thrombosis and decreased short- and long-term graft survival. It remains unclear whether these results are, at least in part, related to HTK flush volumes and extended preservation (e.g.,>12 h). For selected thrombosed pancreas grafts, there has been renewed interest in pharmacological, interventional, and surgical salvage. For selected recipients with early pancreas graft thrombosis not amenable to a salvage intervention, transplant pancreatectomy in conjunction with immediate retransplantation has emerged as a viable option. For graft thrombosis prevention, the enhanced backtable pancreas vascular reconstruction techniques (e.g., gastroduodenal artery revascularization) proposed by some authors await more formal study. For prevention of native vascular complications in high-risk recipients, several technical modifications have been reported. Developments with respect to other sur Continue reading >>

Kidney-pancreas Transplant

Kidney-pancreas Transplant

What is a simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplant (SKP)? A kidney-pancreas transplant is an operation to place both a kidney and a pancreas — at the same time — into someone who has kidney failure related to type 1 diabetes. In many cases, both transplanted organs may come from one deceased donor. However, it is also possible for the kidney to come from a living donor (a family member or friend) and the pancreas from a deceased donor. The first successful kidney-pancreas transplant in the United States took place in 1966. Since then, many of these operations take place each year. In 2015, about 700 were done at transplant centers in the United States. Who is a candidate for kidney-pancreas transplant? Adults who have kidney failure because of type 1 diabetes are possible candidates for a kidney-pancreas transplant. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin, a hormone that controls the blood sugar level in your body. The transplanted pancreas can make insulin and correct this type of diabetes. In order to become active on the transplant waiting list you must be: 18 years or older Have both Type 1 diabetes and kidney failure Complete evaluation and be approved by transplant center for a kidney and pancreas transplant Am I a candidate for kidney-pancreas transplant if I have type 2 diabetes? No. People with type 2 diabetes are not candidates for a combined kidney-pancreas transplant. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas makes insulin, but the body is not able to use this insulin very well. For this reason, a pancreas transplant would not help to correct type 2 diabetes. However, people with this type of diabetes can still have a kidney transplant if they have kidney failure because of their diabetes. Which patients may not be considered for kidney-pancr Continue reading >>

Pancreas Transplant

Pancreas Transplant

Overview A pancreas transplant is a surgical procedure to place a healthy pancreas from a deceased donor into a person whose pancreas no longer functions properly. Your pancreas is an organ that lies behind the lower part of your stomach. One of its main functions is to make insulin, a hormone that regulates the absorption of sugar (glucose) into your cells. If your pancreas doesn't make enough insulin, blood sugar levels can rise to unhealthy levels, resulting in type 1 diabetes. Most pancreas transplants are done to treat type 1 diabetes. A pancreas transplant offers a potential cure for this condition. But it is typically reserved for those with serious diabetes complications, because the side effects of a pancreas transplant are significant. In some cases, pancreas transplants may also treat type 2 diabetes. Rarely, pancreas transplants may be used in the treatment of pancreatic, bile duct or other cancers. A pancreas transplant is often done in conjunction with a kidney transplant in people whose kidneys have been damaged by diabetes. Why it's done A pancreas transplant can restore normal insulin production and improve blood sugar control in people with diabetes, but it's not a standard treatment. The side effects of the anti-rejection medications required after a pancreas transplant can often be serious. For people with any of the following, a pancreas transplant may be worth considering: Type 1 diabetes that can't be controlled with standard treatment Frequent insulin reactions Consistently poor blood sugar control Severe kidney damage Type 2 diabetes associated with both low insulin resistance and low insulin production A pancreas transplant usually isn't a treatment option for people with type 2 diabetes, because type 2 diabetes occurs when the body becomes res Continue reading >>

Long-term Outcome After Pancreas Transplantation.

Long-term Outcome After Pancreas Transplantation.

Curr Opin Organ Transplant. 2012 Feb;17(1):100-5. doi: 10.1097/MOT.0b013e32834ee700. Long-term outcome after pancreas transplantation. College of Public Health, University of Arizona, 1295 N. Martin Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724-5163, USA. [email protected] Pancreas transplantation provides the only proven method to restore long-term normoglycemia in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Although many studies describe the very important risk factors for short-term survival of a pancreas transplant, there is not a lot of information available about factors that distinguish short-term from long-term graft function. The analysis of 18,159 pancreas transplants from the International Pancreas Transplant Registry, performed from 25 July 1978 to 31 December 2005, showed an improvement not only in short-term but also in long-term graft function. Most recent 5-year, 10-year and 20-year graft function for transplants with the appropriate follow-up time showed 80, 68 and 45%, respectively, for simultaneous pancreas/kidney transplants; 62, 46 and 16%, respectively, for pancreas after kidney; and 59, 39 and 12%, respectively, for pancreas transplants alone. Important factors influencing long-term function were factors that described the quality of the deceased donor. Pancreas transplants in younger or African-American recipients showed a higher risk of graft failure. Anti-T-cell induction therapy had a significant impact on long-term survival in solitary transplants. With a careful donor selection, not only short-term but also long-term pancreas graft function and, therefore, good metabolic control can be achieved for the diabetic patient. Continue reading >>

Pancreas Transplant - Risks - Nhs.uk

Pancreas Transplant - Risks - Nhs.uk

Apancreas transplant is a major operation. As withall types of surgery, there is a risk of complications. Some complications can occur soon after the procedure, while others may develop months, or even years, later. Some of themain risks associated with a pancreastransplant are described below. One of the most common complications of apancreas transplant is rejection of the donor pancreas. This is where the immune system recognises the transplantedpancreas as foreign and attacks it. Rejection usually occurs in the days, weeks or months after the transplant, although it can sometimes happen years later. Immunosuppressant medication can reduce the risk of this happening, but can't always prevent it completely. Contact your GP or transplant team as soon as possible if you have these symptoms. Rejection can usually be treated by increasing your dose of immunosuppressant medication. The immunosuppressant medications you need to take to prevent rejection can have a number of significant side effects. an increased risk of certain types of cancer , particularly skin cancer Speak to your transplant team if you experience any troublesome side effects. Don't stop taking your medication without getting medical advice first. Immunosuppressant medication will weaken your immune system and make you more vulnerable to infection. While taking the medication, it's a good idea to: report any possible symptoms of an infection to your GP or transplant team immediately things to look out for include a high temperature (fever), aching muscles, diarrhoea or headaches ensure your vaccinations are up-to-datespeak to your GP or transplant team for advice about any additional vaccines you might need, as some aren't safe if you're taking immunosuppressant medicines avoid close contact with anyone Continue reading >>

Transplant Surgery - Pancreas Transplant

Transplant Surgery - Pancreas Transplant

Transplant Surgery Conditions & Procedures Pancreas Transplant The pancreas is an organ about the size of a hand located in the abdomen in the vicinity of the stomach, intestines, and other organs. It lies behind the stomach and in front of the spine. The pancreasproduces juices that help digest food andhormones such as insulin and glucagon that maintain optimal blood sugar levels and help the body to use and store energy from food. A pancreas transplant is an organ transplant that involves implanting a healthy pancreas (one that produces insulin) into a person whose pancreasno longer can supply sufficient insulin to the body.The healthy pancreascomes from either a deceased donor,orin the form ofa partial pancreas from a living donor. A pancreas transplant offers a potential cure fortype 1 or insulin-dependent diabetes. A successful pancreas transplant will eliminate the need for insulin injections, reduce or eliminate dietary and activity restrictions due to diabetes, and decrease or eliminate the risk of severe low blood sugar reactions. A pancreas transplant can also help manage thedamage to other organs including the kidneys that may result from type 1 diabetes. Pancreas transplants areprimarily offered topersons with type 1withseverekidney disease or other life-threatening consequencesfrom uncontrolled glucose levels.Type 1 diabetes is caused by a loss or malfunction of the insulin producing cells, called pancreatic beta cells. Beta cells ( cells) are a type of cell found in the pancreatic islets of the pancreas. They make up 65-80% of the cells in the islets. Patients withtype 2 diabetes are generally not offered pancreas transplants because their disease results from the body's inability to use insulin properly,notfrom an inability to produceininsulin in the pan Continue reading >>

Pancreas Transplant: Use, What To Expect, And Recovery

Pancreas Transplant: Use, What To Expect, And Recovery

Pancreas transplant: Use, what to expect, and recovery A pancreas transplant replaces a person's pancreas when it can no longer produce insulin. A healthy insulin-producing pancreas is transplanted from a donor who has died. The first pancreas transplant was in 1966 . However, it was not until the 1990s that this kind of transplant was widely accepted by doctors. A pancreas transplant is necessary when the pancreas no longer produces insulin. The pancreas is the source of insulin in the human body. In people with type 1 diabetes , the pancreas is unable to produce insulin. Having a pancreas transplant allows people with type 1 diabetes to maintain their blood sugar levels normally without receiving extra insulin or having to carry out the intensive monitoring typical of diabetes care. There are three types of pancreas transplant: Pancreas transplant alone: This is performed on people who have type 1 diabetes but no kidney problems. Simultaneous kidney and pancreas transplant: This is done on a person who has type 1 diabetes and end-stage renal disease. Pancreas after kidney transplant: This is when a kidney transplant is performed first, from a living donor. The pancreas transplant from a deceased donor occurs later when an organ becomes available. A pancreas transplant is an option for people with type 1 diabetes who cannot control their condition with insulin or oral diabetic medicine. The surgery is only appropriate for people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes who might benefit from a pancreas transplant include those who: have to regularly visit the emergency room because of their blood sugar level have uncontrolled average blood sugar levels need a caregiver to be present constantly in case of an emergency, despite using recommended medical therapi Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About A Pancreas Transplant

What You Need To Know About A Pancreas Transplant

What You Need to Know about a Pancreas Transplant This information will help you understand the risks, benefits and possible complications involved in a pancreas transplant. Please read it carefully. Ask questions about anything you do not understand. Before you can have a pancreas transplant, you must be evaluated to see if: A transplant is the right treatment for you. Another treatment besides a pancreas transplant could help you. You are well enough to have pancreas transplant surgery. An evaluation for a pancreas transplant involves many tests. More tests may be needed based on the results of these tests. As part of the evaluation, you may get one or more of the following: Your blood and tissue type, to help find a matching donor pancreas. Whether you have certain viruses, such as hepatitis or HIV. A chest X-ray. This helps show any problems with your lungs. A urine test. This helps tell us how well your kidneys are working and if you have any urinary disease. Heart tests. An electrocardiogram (EKG) shows if you have any heart rhythms that are not normal. An echocardiogram uses sound waves to look at how well your heart is working. A stress test shows how well your heart works under stress. These tests can help your doctors decide if your heart is strong enough for transplant surgery. They can also help your doctors decide if another test, such as an angiogram, is needed. (An angiogram tests to see if one of your blood vessels is blocked.). Breathing tests. Breathing tests (called pulmonary function tests) show how well your lungs are working. They may be needed if you have a history of smoking or lung disease. As part of the evaluation, you will also meet with members of the transplant team, including: Transplant coordinator. The transplant coordinator will explai Continue reading >>

Mtor Inhibitors In Pancreas Transplant: Adverse Effects And Drug-druginteractions.

Mtor Inhibitors In Pancreas Transplant: Adverse Effects And Drug-druginteractions.

1. Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol. 2017 Apr;13(4):367-385. doi:10.1080/17425255.2017.1239708. Epub 2016 Sep 28. mTOR inhibitors in pancreas transplant: adverse effects and drug-druginteractions. Fernandes-Silva G(1), Ivani de Paula M(1), Rangel B(1)(2). (1)a Universidade Federal de So Paulo/Hospital do Rim e Hipertenso, Nephrology Department , So Paulo , SP , Brazil. (2)b Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Instituto Israelita de Ensino e Pesquisa , So Paulo , SP , Brazil. INTRODUCTION: Patient and pancreas allograft survival improved followingreductions in surgical complications, tighter donor selection and optimization inimmunosuppressive protocols. However, long-term survival of pancreas allograftsis adversely affected by rejection and immunosuppressive regimen toxicity. Areas covered: This article reviews the existing literature and knowledge of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi). Some clinically relevant drug-druginteractions are highlighted. We summarize the nephrotoxic and diabetogenicmechanisms of mTORi after pancreas transplant, the alternatives to minimize theseeffects, and report on other adverse events. Expert opinion: Calcineurininhibitor (CNI)-based regimens remain the mainstay treatment afterpancreas-kidney transplant. However, long-term use of CNIs may be associated withnephrotoxicity. Switching from CNIs to mTORi (sirolimus/SRL and everolimus/EVR)may preserve kidney function, mainly EVR conversion. However, mTORi promote animbalance of mTOR signaling during long-term follow-up and may ultimatelycontribute to proteinuria and hyperglycemia. These drugs disrupt autophagy,inhibit cell proliferation, and downregulate VEGF. Therefore, it is important to comprehend and interpret the experimental data. It is equally important tocritically analyze Continue reading >>

Diabetes/pancreas Transplant

Diabetes/pancreas Transplant

Since 1993, UCLA has offered pancreas transplant to help certain patients overcome the challenges of diabetes, in a highly personalized environment. A pancreas transplant can help patients with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes improve their lives, often without insulin dependence and free of the dangerous side effects of diabetes. Our team of expert physicians and surgeons offers benefits and experience other programs cannfot provide, including: Multi-organ transplant: Many patients require kidney transplant as well as pancreas transplant, either simultaneously or separately. Our team includes specialists in both types of transplant, as well as dedicated transplant coordinators and nurses to offer seamlessly coordinated care. Meet our team. Expertise in pancreatic conditions: The UCLA Center for Pancreas Care helps support patients through all aspects of pancreatic disease. Highly personalized care: Before, during and after transplant, we offer highly personalized care, along with unmatched surgical expertise. At UCLA, we see each patient as an individual with unique health needs. Learn more about what to expect in our patient education materials. Top-ranked patient care: Our patients benefit from the technology and sophisticated services of UCLA Health, which consistently ranks Best in the West and among the top five hospitals in the country, according to U.S. News & World Report's Best Hospitals survey. Learn more about pancreas transplantation . Who Might Be Eligible for Pancreas Transplant? At UCLA, we offer pancreas transplantation as a treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus. Pancreas transplant is a treatment for patients with Type 1 diabetes who: Have not been able to control their diabetes despite treatment Have consistently poor control of their blood sugar levels Continue reading >>

Pancreas Transplant - Solid Organ Transplant - Department Of Surgery - University Of Rochester Medical Center

Pancreas Transplant - Solid Organ Transplant - Department Of Surgery - University Of Rochester Medical Center

At the University of Rochester Medical Center, we believe a pancreas transplant is a lifelong commitment for you and for us. We will stay involved with you and your family through the entire transplant process. We get to know you very well and recognize that preparing for and living with a transplant will affect your lifestyle in many ways. We will help you maintain and resume many of your activities and even become involved in new ones. We are committed to the time, effort, and resources required to make your transplant a success. Our definition of success extends far beyond the operating room. We will work with you to make your life after the transplant as successful as possible. The pancreas is a small (5 to 6 inches) gland that produces insulin and enzymes used for digestion. Insulin regulates the use of blood sugar throughout the body and is therefore necessary for life. In a pancreas transplant, the patients diseased pancreas is replaced by a healthy pancreas from a donor. Usually, the healthy pancreas comes from someone who has recently died but did not have injury to the pancreas. This is called deceased donor transplantation. However, a segment of pancreas can be taken from a living organ donor who may be a family member or friend. Because type 1 diabetes is often associated with kidney failure, a person who needs a pancreas transplant may also need a kidney transplant. Therefore, there are three types of pancreas transplants: Pancreas-only transplant: For people who have a kidney that works. About 85% of people who have this procedure stay insulin free one year after surgery. Pancreas-only transplant after a kidney transplant: For people who have already had a kidney transplant. About 70% of people who have this procedure stay insulin free one year after surg Continue reading >>

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