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Painless Insulin Injection Pens

Insulin Pens Provide More Convenience And Accuracy

Insulin Pens Provide More Convenience And Accuracy

MANILA, Philippines – Many people with diabetes require insulin therapy to maintain optimal blood glucose control and prevent complications. Insulin is recognized as one of the most effective treatments for diabetes mellitus. However, one of the greatest difficulties facing individuals with diabetes who need to inject insulin is the social stigma associated with insulin shots. Use of needles and syringes seem to have a negative connotation, and diabetics are embarrassed or fearful about being thought of as drug addicts when they inject themselves in public. Other barriers to injecting insulin are the fear of needles and the resulting pain from using them. The good news is that insulin needles today are smaller and thinner than ever before, making injections virtually painless. Moreover, an insulin delivery device called an insulin pen is now available and has made injecting not only less painful but more convenient, more discrete and more accurate than syringes. In many surveys, insulin users prefer pens rather than syringes due to greater social acceptability, ease of use, accuracy, convenience, reduction of needle phobia and even cost-effectiveness. Insulin pens provide several advantages. They are easier to carry around than traditional vial and syringe, making them ideal for patients who go to school, work in an office or travel. Insulin pens can be used for most types of insulin. They provide more accurate, repeated dosages and are easier to use for patients with visual or fine motor skills impairments. Unlike conventional syringes, insulin pens result in less injection pain because they do not require drawing insulin from a vial, which can dull the needle prior to its insertion into the skin. For some people, insulin pens are less scary than syringes. They are l Continue reading >>

Painless Needle For Diabetics Launched

Painless Needle For Diabetics Launched

BANGALORE: The pain of pricking oneself twice a day is a reality for the growing tribe of diabetics in India. A painless needle launched in Bangalore on Thursday aims at reducing this anguish. The insulin syringe, with which one can give oneself injections, has the thinnest needle in the world and is also short compared to ordinary syringe needles. The company, Becton Dickinson India, a global leader in medical devices, had a few months ago launched auto disable (AD) syringes which prevent reuse or misuse. The insulin syringe does not displace much muscle tissue, thus causing no pain. ``The look of the needle also helps the patient psychologically and physiologically,'' says Ram Sharma, managing director, Becton Dickinson, which has also developed a web community for diabetics with a view to making the patient feel and live better. The website — www.bd.com/diabetes — has information on handling one's insulin syringe, managing diet or monitoring glucose every day for better diabetes care. AD syringes come in the form of a pre-filled injection device and one which can be used with a separate vial. Why AD syringes? A WHO research revealed that 66 per cent of injections provided in India are unsafe. On an average, 40 injections per syringe and eight injections per needle are administered to the patients. More than 50 per cent of vaccine goes waste after immunisation. Syringe re-use is responsible for transmission of infectious diseases. AD syringes are easier to use, quicker and preferred by health workers. They are highly effective in eliminating re-use of unsterile syringes between patients. The biggest onus of promoting safe immunisation process rests with the government and the medical community. The Government of India recently constituted a health task force to st Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Insulin Injections From Hurting

How To Prevent Insulin Injections From Hurting

The other day I wrote about an article in USA Today, dispelling some of the myths surrounding diabetes. In addition to the 5 myths debunked in the article, the article started with a 6-question quiz to test the reader's knowledge about diabetes. One of the questions was about whether insulin injections should hurt — the quiz said no. I was amazed at how many people took exception to that in the comments. A whole lot of adults started whining about needles hurting them, as one commenter put it. The thing is, I agree with the author of the quiz — with the advancements in medical technology, injections don't hurt if you are doing them right. The needles are 30 gauge or smaller these days, and shorter than a centimeter. I take between 5 and 8 injections every single day, and I hardly even feel them unless I do something wrong. The vehemence in the comments made me wonder how many people don't know how to properly give themselves an injection. Many of these people said they had been diabetic for many years, and that's how they know it hurts. But that just makes me wonder whether they have seen an diabetes educator since the early days of their diagnoses, to make sure they are injecting themselves properly and using the most modern technology available. I am not a diabetes educator by any means, but I can offer some tips from my own experience. Here is what I would recommend: 1. Make sure you are using the smallest needles available. With an insulin pen delivery system, you should be able to get ultra fine short needles, which are 30 or 31 gauge, and about a centimeter long (if not shorter). These are the needles I use, and I can tell you, I hardly feel them. 2. Choose your injection sites carefully. There are certain, more sensitive spots you should avoid. I like to give Continue reading >>

Injecting Insulin: Tips For Success

Injecting Insulin: Tips For Success

There’s definitely an art and a science to injecting insulin. If you take insulin, you may have been taught that there’s a “proper technique” for how to give injections, whether you use a syringe or a pen. In an ideal world, a diabetes educator reviews your technique periodically, especially if you’re noticing unusual blood sugar readings or lumpiness around your injection site, or if you experience pain with injections. But if that’s not the case, read on to learn some tips to make insulin injections a little easier and help troubleshoot some common injection issues. Tip #1: Injection sites Insulin should be injected into the layer of fat that lies right under the skin. There are several areas on the body where you can inject your insulin. These include the: • Abdomen (stomach), staying a few inches away from the belly button • Outer thighs • Hips • Upper buttocks • Backs of the arms Today’s newer insulins are generally absorbed the same no matter where you inject them. However, for consistent blood sugar readings, it’s a good idea to stick with the same area of the body for your injections. Make sure, though, that you “rotate” your injections within that particular site on a daily basis. If you continue to inject into the same spot time after time, you can develop skin problems, including lumpiness, scarring, or loss of fat. And avoid injecting into or near moles, scars, or skin that is swollen or inflamed. Tip #2: Painful injections Thanks to super-thin needles, for most people, insulin injections are pretty much painless. If you’re finding that your injections hurt, try the following: • Use a new needle for every injection. It’s tempting to reuse needles, but they can become dull even after just one or two injections. And the dull Continue reading >>

Insulin Injections Are Today Virtually Painless

Insulin Injections Are Today Virtually Painless

DEAR DOCTOR K: I have to start taking insulin for my Type 2 diabetes. It sounds complicated. What do I need to know before I start? DEAR READER: The first thing you need to know is that it is simple to learn and do, and the discomfort is minimal. Tens of millions of people all over the world do it every day -- and probably most of them were afraid that it would be complicated and painful before they actually started taking insulin. Insulin is a natural hormone that lowers blood sugar in all of us. In people with diabetes, the body no longer can make enough insulin to keep the blood sugar level normal. Doctors usually recommend insulin for people with Type 2 diabetes when diet, exercise and pills cannot keep blood sugar levels low enough. Insulin lowers blood sugar levels more effectively than any other available diabetes drug. Insulin can't be taken as a pill; it must be taken by injection or with an insulin pump. (Insulin pumps are generally reserved for people with Type 1 diabetes.) A diabetes educator will teach you how to measure, prepare and administer the injections. The equipment available today makes injections virtually painless. The needles are very small; you barely feel them when they pierce your skin. Most people use syringes or insulin "pens." A pen injector uses disposable needles and insulin cartridges. It's portable and discreet, and it provides multiple accurate doses without your needing to measure and fill syringes. There are several formulations of insulin. They vary based on how quickly they start working, how long it takes for the insulin to peak and how long it remains active. Different types of insulin can be used alone or in combination. The type of insulin and how much and how often you use it varies from person to person. You'll work with you Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Good Insulin Injection Practices In Diabetes Management

The Importance Of Good Insulin Injection Practices In Diabetes Management

Abstract: Abstract Time constraints are often significant when treating patients with diabetes with insulin. In such settings, focus is often placed on the type of insulin the patient is taking, with an even greater emphasis placed on the amount. However, how much emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of insulin use? Is the patient using proper injection techniques? Are the insulin syringes or pens being cared for correctly? Are needles being quietly re-used without the medical staff’s knowledge? Are sharps being disposed of safely? Diabetes education regarding the proper use of insulin takes much time and effort. Without it, however, the appropriate type of insulin at the correct dose might not necessarily give the intended outcome. Instead, marked glycemic excursions could occur, leaving the goal of good diabetes control unachievable and the medical staff baffled. Keywords Diabetes, insulin, injection technique, insulin pens, insulin syringes, insulin needle re-use, patient education Disclosure: Richard Dolinar, MD, is a member of the speakers’ bureaus of Amylin, Eli Lilly, and Takeda and a consultant for BD Medical and Pfizer. Received: October 22, 2009 Accepted: December 2, 2009 Correspondence: Richard Dolinar, MD, Arizona Endocrinology Center, 5130 W. Thunderbird Road, Suite 1, Phoenix, AZ 85306. E: [email protected] When insulin-requiring patients with diabetes are seen in the clinic,there is usually a great emphasis placed on the type of insulin the patient is taking and an even greater emphasis on the amount. However, how much emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of insulin use? Which technique is the patient using to inject the insulin? Is he or she injecting it correctly? What sites are being used? Are the insulin syringes or pens being ca Continue reading >>

Are Diabetes Insulin Injections Painful?

Are Diabetes Insulin Injections Painful?

Injecting yourself with insulin several times a day to manage your diabetes might be easier than you think. Follow these expert steps to help minimise the pain and calm your fears. 1. Know that it won't be as bad as you imagine Most people are nervous about injecting themselves but soon realise they can handle it. In fact thinking about it is worse than doing it and once you get over the 'hurdle' of the first few injections and become more confident, it's usually pretty smooth sailing. It could be that myths about what's involved are fuelling your fears. Some people think they'll have to inject the medication with a large needle into a muscle or a vein or that insulin injections will hurt more than the finger pricks they've been doing to test their blood sugar. This isn't true. The reality is the needles used to inject insulin are small as the insulin only needs to be injected under the skin (subcutaneously) and you inject into areas that have far fewer nerve endings than your fingertips. There may be some discomfort when the needle is first inserted but to ease any anxiety your doctor or a specialist diabetes nurse can show you the correct way to inject. 2. Use the right tool If big needles freak you out, downsize. Insulin syringes and pen needles range in size and thickness (gauge), so ask your doctor or pharmacist for the most suitable shortest, thinnest one available. It's also important to use a fresh needle every time as just one use will dull the needle causing discomfort if it's reused. Wondering whether you should opt for a syringe or a pen? If you're anxious about getting the dose right then a pen may be the best choice. It's easier to dial the dose on a pen than it is to see the markings on a syringe. Some people also think pens are easier to grasp and that t Continue reading >>

How To Give Yourself Insulin

How To Give Yourself Insulin

Expert Reviewed Six Methods:Monitoring Your Blood Glucose LevelsGiving Yourself Insulin Using a SyringeUsing a Pen Device to Inject InsulinRotating Your Injection SitesUsing Other Methods to Administer InsulinFollowing Recommended Safety PrecautionsCommunity Q&A Nearly three million people in the United States use insulin to treat either type 1 or type 2 diabetes.[1]. In people with diabetes, the pancreas does not produce enough insulin to manage the carbohydrates, sugars, fats, and proteins in your diet. The use of insulin in people that suffer from type 1 diabetes is an absolute necessity in order to sustain life. Many people with type 2 diabetes often reach a point where medication, diet, and exercise, are not enough to control blood sugar levels, and begin a regimen that includes insulin administration. The correct administration of insulin takes a solid understanding of the type of insulin you are using, your method of administration, and a commitment to follow recommended safety precautions to prevent harm or injury. Consult with your doctor for a thorough demonstration before attempting to administer insulin. Continue reading >>

A Painless Needle

A Painless Needle

Terumo's trademark is registered at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Background For diabetes patients, daily injections are an uncomfortable and often painful part of life. With multiple injections required every day, anxiety and fear are typical emotions a patient may have when diagnosed with diabetes, especially for children and those with a fear of needles. Traditionally thought of as an unavoidable part of treatment, injection therapy and the pain and discomfort it causes has become one of the major concerns of diabetes patients. However, thanks to Terumo Corporation (Terumo), a Tokyo based medical equipment manufacturer, this traditionally held view is changing. To increase the quality of life of patients, alleviate discomfort and dispel fears surrounding diabetes injection therapy, in 2005 Terumo proposed a challenge to itself: make a needle so fine that it makes injections painless. With over 600,000 people living with diabetes in Japan, Terumo felt a strong social obligation to help provide them with physical and psychological relief. The company called on Mr. Tetsuya Oyauchi, one of its best engineers who has a string of patents to his name for medical syringes, and Mr. Masayuki Okano, the head of Okano Industrial Corporation (Okano), a company involved in metal pressing, to make this vision a reality. Invention The usual method of manufacturing needles is to hollow out a tiny cylinder of metal. But it is extremely difficult to make ultra thin needles this way, because the thinner the cylinder, the more difficult the procedure becomes. Terumo’s quest for an ultra thin needle proved technically difficult, and after one year of research they were not making much progress. Terumo was turned down by a string of large metalwork firms, which th Continue reading >>

Go Needle Free – For Painless Diabetes Management

Go Needle Free – For Painless Diabetes Management

1. GO NEEDLE FREE – FOR PAINLESS DIABETES MANAGEMENT 2. Table of Contents 1. Diabetes –Complexity of the Disorder.............................................................. 1 2. Traditional Insulin Delivery Procedures ........................................................... 2 3. Non-Invasive Techniques for Insulin Delivery ................................................. 3 4. Oral Delivery ....................................................................................................... 4 5. Pulmonary Delivery............................................................................................ 6 6. Patenting Trend in Non-Invasive Technologies............................................... 7 7. Overall Market Trend in Insulin Delivery Systems........................................... 8 8. Key Players in the Industry................................................................................ 9 9. Conclusion........................................................................................................ 11 3. Page # 1 1. Diabetes –Complexity of the Disorder With the changing life style, diabetes has become a common health disorder among people of all ages, which was a predominantly elderly disease. Onset of diabetes results in various complications that cause excess morbidity/mortality, resulting in loss of independence and deteriorated quality of life. Diabetes can turn out acute if not treated properly on time. If left unattended, it can cause serious complications to virtually every system of the body. Diabetes is a key risk factor for coronary artery diseases, cerebral vascular diseases, peripheral vascular diseases and heart failure. It can also lead to other critical complications such as blindness (due to diabetic retinopathy), e Continue reading >>

The Best Insulin Pen Needles The Long And The Short Of It

The Best Insulin Pen Needles The Long And The Short Of It

If you a diabetic, chances are that you have heard of insulin. When pancreas no longer makes enough insulin to control blood glucose, injecting of insulin is necessary. People with type one diabetes need insulin early. People with type two diabetes also require insulin if diet, exercise and oral medication do not bring blood glucose under control. Currently, the only way to get insulin into the body is by injecting it. Most people with diabetes not already using insulin dread the thought of injections. However, the benefits of bringing blood glucose under control make it worth overcoming this fear. The good news is that insulin injections today are quite painless. Technology has advanced. Needles are finer and shorter than ever before, but still deliver insulin effectively. Insulin delivery devices have come a long way since the days of the needle and syringe. Although syringes are still available, most people who inject insulin daily use a pen delivery device. Whether you choose an insulin syringe or pen, the cost is comparable. An insulin pen can be a pre-filled pen, or a re-useable pen that is reloaded with insulin cartridges. Each injection requires a new pen needle (or tip) to be attached to the pen before the injection. After the pen needle has delivered a dose of insulin, it must be safely discarded into an approved sharps container. Another method is to clip the needle off using a safe-clip device. Use each pen needle only once. Reusing a pen needle can cause various problems at the injection site. Problems include lipodystrophy (build-up of lumpy fat tissue), pain, bleeding, bruising, or even having a needle break off under the skin. Pen needles are coated with a lubricant for a smoother insertion into the skin. This lubricant will not be as effective in furthe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insulin Injections: Overcoming The Fear

Diabetes Insulin Injections: Overcoming The Fear

Our experts demystify insulin injection therapy for diabetes and show you how to avoid weight gain, hypoglycemia and needle pain. When your doctor tells you she wants to start you on insulin therapy, it's normal to have some questions: Will it be painful? Will I be at risk for low blood sugar? Will I gain weight? These are valid questions. Unfortunately, insulin has been so shrouded in mystery and misinformation, it's easy sometimes to forget all the good it can do—allowing you to keep tight control of your blood glucose. In fact, insulin was regarded as a miracle drug less than a century ago, when Canadian researchers first isolated the hormone, in 1921. Now, injectable insulin allows anyone whose pancreas no longer manufactures insulin to live a full, healthy life. Though once considered a last resort for treating type 2 diabetes, insulin injection is now increasingly recommended earlier. Some doctors will prescribe it if your hemoglobin A1c is above 10 percent, and recent research suggests starting insulin injections earlier can keep complications such as heart and kidney disease at bay. If you're approaching insulin with confusion and fears about injecting yourself or handling the potential side effects of insulin, here's some expert advice and a few strategies that will help you make this powerful therapy as effective as possible. Make insulin injections practically painless. Many people assume insulin injections will hurt. Often this is just a fear of needles dating back to childhood. But sometimes the fear goes much deeper: Some are concerned that injecting insulin means their disease is getting worse. But that notion is outdated. The important thing is not to avoid needles but to do everything that's in your power to control your diabetes and prevent damage to Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Take Insulin

8 Ways To Take Insulin

How to take insulin Need insulin? While the drug itself may be old—nearly 90 years to be exact—there’s lots of new things happening when it comes to ways to take it. From the old-fashioned needle and syringe to injector pens to pumps, you’ve got choices to make. There’s even a plethora of devices that can help you inject if you have poor vision or mobility issues. Check out these eight options and talk with your certified diabetes educator to determine which insulin delivery system or injection aids are right for you. Needle and syringe With this type of delivery system, you insert a needle into a vial, draw up the appropriate amount of insulin, and then inject into the subcutaneous space—the tissue just under your skin. Here are 5 types of insulin and 9 factors that affect how insulin works. Even though there are other options, needles and syringes remain the most common way to take insulin. Some of the new insulin injection methods, such as the insulin pen, carry only a preset amount of insulin. Thinner needles and other advancements, such as syringe magnifiers, have made syringes easier to use. Syringe magnifier Have poor vision? You’re not alone. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20–74 years. Needle guides can help you keep the syringe or pen steady at the desired location and at the correct angle both for drawing up insulin out of the vial and injecting. Some needle guides also come with magnifiers, which help by enlarging the numbers and allowing you to read the fine print and dosages on the syringe. Syringe-filling device These devices are another example of innovations designed to help make insulin needles more palatable. Syringe-filling devices allow a person Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin is a hormone that helps cells use glucose (sugar) for energy. It works as a “key,” allowing the sugar to go from the blood and into the cell. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t make insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin correctly, which can lead to the pancreas not being able to produce enough — or any, depending on the progression of the disease —insulin to meet your body’s needs. Diabetes is normally managed with diet and exercise, with medications, including insulin, added as needed. If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin is required for life. This may seem difficult at first, but you can learn to successfully administer insulin with the support of your healthcare team, determination, and a little practice. There are different ways to take insulin, including syringes, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and jet injectors. Your doctor will help you decide which technique is best for you. Syringes remain a common method of insulin delivery. They’re the least expensive option, and most insurance companies cover them. Syringes Syringes vary by the amount of insulin they hold and the size of the needle. They’re made of plastic and should be discarded after one use. Traditionally, needles used in insulin therapy were 12.7 millimeters (mm) in length. Recent research shows that smaller 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm needles are just as effective, regardless of body mass. This means insulin injection is less painful than it was in the past. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, which means into the fat layer under the skin. In this type of injection, a short needle is used to inject insulin into the fatty layer between the skin and the muscle. Insulin should be injected into the fatty tissue just below your skin. If you inject the insulin deeper int Continue reading >>

How To Improve The Insulin Injection Experience

How To Improve The Insulin Injection Experience

If you have type 1 diabetes, or if you have type 2 and have recently begun injecting insulin, you may have a bit of trouble getting used to the process of preparing and administering your own insulin shots. Andrea Penney, RN, CDE, of the Joslin Diabetes Center, says that injection technique is important to master not only for accurate dosing, but for comfort, too. "With proper practice and good technique, you can avoid pain during an injection," she states. Penney sat down with us recently to answer some common questions about insulin injection. If after reading and practicing insulin injections you still find you’re having trouble, Penney suggests seeing a Certified Diabetes Educator for more assistance. Q: How do I decide where to inject? A: People often select injection sites based on many factors: accessibility, presence of fatty tissue, and rate of insulin absorption (which will be discussed shortly). As a result, popular sites for injection include the stomach, outer thigh, the back of the arm (between the shoulder and the elbow), or the upper outside "wallet" area of the buttock (but not into the lower buttock area). Q: Once I decide on a location for an injection, how do I pick the right "spot"? A: Here are some easy guidelines: -Stomach If you’re going to inject into the stomach, stay at least two inches away from the bellybutton and/or any scars you may already have when using the abdomen for injections. -Thigh For an injection in your thigh, inject at least four inches or about one hand’s width above the knee and at least four inches down from the top of the leg. Do not inject insulin into your inner thigh because of the large number of blood vessels and nerves in this area. - Arm The area between the shoulder and elbow on the outside of the arm is usua Continue reading >>

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