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Painless Insulin Injection Pens

Pens And Needles

Pens And Needles

It has been estimated that world-wide around 7.5 billion disposable needles are used outside a medical setting to treat diabetes and other conditions requiring self-administration of injected drugs. Insulin pens are generally preferred by patients but are tied to the use of specific (and more expensive) brands of insulin, supplied in specially made cartridges. Plastic syringes and needles can be used with any insulin supplied in a standard vial. These are recommended for single use only by the manufacturers, but in practice both are frequently re-used by people with diabetes for reasons of convenience and economy. This article reviews practical aspects of insulin administration and delivery, with special reference to resource-poor settings, and considers problems associated with faulty injection technique, the evidence for and against single use of needles, potential problems with storage, and some of the health and environmental hazards associated with disposal of insulin needles. Background Insulin needles used during the first 50 years of insulin therapy were intended for repeated use; in some cases patients were provided with a pumice stone with which to sharpen them. They were used with glass insulin syringes which were stored in methylated spirit and boiled periodically to ensure sterility. New technologies introduced in the 1980s produced much sharper needles with siliconized tips designed to reduce friction as they are pushed through the skin, and attached to plastic syringes. About 7.5 billion are used each year [1]. First generation needles were detachable, allowing reuse of the syringe, but these were soon followed by single unit devices in which the needle was fused with the syringe. Insulin pen devices came into wide use in the 1990s. These are produced by Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Good Insulin Injection Practices In Diabetes Management

The Importance Of Good Insulin Injection Practices In Diabetes Management

Abstract: Abstract Time constraints are often significant when treating patients with diabetes with insulin. In such settings, focus is often placed on the type of insulin the patient is taking, with an even greater emphasis placed on the amount. However, how much emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of insulin use? Is the patient using proper injection techniques? Are the insulin syringes or pens being cared for correctly? Are needles being quietly re-used without the medical staff’s knowledge? Are sharps being disposed of safely? Diabetes education regarding the proper use of insulin takes much time and effort. Without it, however, the appropriate type of insulin at the correct dose might not necessarily give the intended outcome. Instead, marked glycemic excursions could occur, leaving the goal of good diabetes control unachievable and the medical staff baffled. Keywords Diabetes, insulin, injection technique, insulin pens, insulin syringes, insulin needle re-use, patient education Disclosure: Richard Dolinar, MD, is a member of the speakers’ bureaus of Amylin, Eli Lilly, and Takeda and a consultant for BD Medical and Pfizer. Received: October 22, 2009 Accepted: December 2, 2009 Correspondence: Richard Dolinar, MD, Arizona Endocrinology Center, 5130 W. Thunderbird Road, Suite 1, Phoenix, AZ 85306. E: [email protected] When insulin-requiring patients with diabetes are seen in the clinic,there is usually a great emphasis placed on the type of insulin the patient is taking and an even greater emphasis on the amount. However, how much emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of insulin use? Which technique is the patient using to inject the insulin? Is he or she injecting it correctly? What sites are being used? Are the insulin syringes or pens being ca Continue reading >>

How To Give A Painless Injection

How To Give A Painless Injection

If you have Type 2 diabetes, sooner or later you may require insulin injections, either temporarily (as during infections) or permanently. This is nothing to be afraid of, even though many people with long-standing Type 2 diabetes literally spend years worrying about it. I usually teach all my patients how to inject themselves at our first or second meeting, before there’s any urgency. Once they give themselves a sample injection of sterile saline (salt water), they find out how easy and painless it can be, and they are spared years of anxiety. If you’re anxious about injections, after you read this section, please ask your physician or diabetes educator to allow you to try a self-administered injection. Insulin is usually injected subcutaneously This means Into a layer of fat under the skin The regions of the body that usually contain appropriate deposits of fat are illustrated in Figure 1 Examine your body to see if you have enough fat at the illustrated sites to comfortably grab a big hunk between your thumb and first finger. Fig 1 Potential sites for subcutaneous injections. To show you how painless a shot can be, your teacher should give himself or herself a shot and leave the syringe dangling in place, illustrating that no pain is felt Your teacher should next give you a shot of saline to prove the point. Now it’s time for you to give yourself an injection, using a syringe that’s been partly filled for you with about 5 “units” of saline. 1. With your “nonshooting” hand, grab as big a chunk of skin plus underlying fat as you can hold comfortably. If you have a nice roll of fat around your waist, use this site. If not, select another site from those illustrated in Figure 1 Nearly everyone has enough subcutaneous buttocks fat to inject there without g Continue reading >>

Insulin Injections Are Today Virtually Painless

Insulin Injections Are Today Virtually Painless

DEAR DOCTOR K: I have to start taking insulin for my Type 2 diabetes. It sounds complicated. What do I need to know before I start? DEAR READER: The first thing you need to know is that it is simple to learn and do, and the discomfort is minimal. Tens of millions of people all over the world do it every day -- and probably most of them were afraid that it would be complicated and painful before they actually started taking insulin. Insulin is a natural hormone that lowers blood sugar in all of us. In people with diabetes, the body no longer can make enough insulin to keep the blood sugar level normal. Doctors usually recommend insulin for people with Type 2 diabetes when diet, exercise and pills cannot keep blood sugar levels low enough. Insulin lowers blood sugar levels more effectively than any other available diabetes drug. Insulin can't be taken as a pill; it must be taken by injection or with an insulin pump. (Insulin pumps are generally reserved for people with Type 1 diabetes.) A diabetes educator will teach you how to measure, prepare and administer the injections. The equipment available today makes injections virtually painless. The needles are very small; you barely feel them when they pierce your skin. Most people use syringes or insulin "pens." A pen injector uses disposable needles and insulin cartridges. It's portable and discreet, and it provides multiple accurate doses without your needing to measure and fill syringes. There are several formulations of insulin. They vary based on how quickly they start working, how long it takes for the insulin to peak and how long it remains active. Different types of insulin can be used alone or in combination. The type of insulin and how much and how often you use it varies from person to person. You'll work with you Continue reading >>

The Best Insulin Pen Needles The Long And The Short Of It

The Best Insulin Pen Needles The Long And The Short Of It

If you a diabetic, chances are that you have heard of insulin. When pancreas no longer makes enough insulin to control blood glucose, injecting of insulin is necessary. People with type one diabetes need insulin early. People with type two diabetes also require insulin if diet, exercise and oral medication do not bring blood glucose under control. Currently, the only way to get insulin into the body is by injecting it. Most people with diabetes not already using insulin dread the thought of injections. However, the benefits of bringing blood glucose under control make it worth overcoming this fear. The good news is that insulin injections today are quite painless. Technology has advanced. Needles are finer and shorter than ever before, but still deliver insulin effectively. Insulin delivery devices have come a long way since the days of the needle and syringe. Although syringes are still available, most people who inject insulin daily use a pen delivery device. Whether you choose an insulin syringe or pen, the cost is comparable. An insulin pen can be a pre-filled pen, or a re-useable pen that is reloaded with insulin cartridges. Each injection requires a new pen needle (or tip) to be attached to the pen before the injection. After the pen needle has delivered a dose of insulin, it must be safely discarded into an approved sharps container. Another method is to clip the needle off using a safe-clip device. Use each pen needle only once. Reusing a pen needle can cause various problems at the injection site. Problems include lipodystrophy (build-up of lumpy fat tissue), pain, bleeding, bruising, or even having a needle break off under the skin. Pen needles are coated with a lubricant for a smoother insertion into the skin. This lubricant will not be as effective in furthe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insulin Injections: Overcoming The Fear

Diabetes Insulin Injections: Overcoming The Fear

Our experts demystify insulin injection therapy for diabetes and show you how to avoid weight gain, hypoglycemia and needle pain. When your doctor tells you she wants to start you on insulin therapy, it's normal to have some questions: Will it be painful? Will I be at risk for low blood sugar? Will I gain weight? These are valid questions. Unfortunately, insulin has been so shrouded in mystery and misinformation, it's easy sometimes to forget all the good it can do—allowing you to keep tight control of your blood glucose. In fact, insulin was regarded as a miracle drug less than a century ago, when Canadian researchers first isolated the hormone, in 1921. Now, injectable insulin allows anyone whose pancreas no longer manufactures insulin to live a full, healthy life. Though once considered a last resort for treating type 2 diabetes, insulin injection is now increasingly recommended earlier. Some doctors will prescribe it if your hemoglobin A1c is above 10 percent, and recent research suggests starting insulin injections earlier can keep complications such as heart and kidney disease at bay. If you're approaching insulin with confusion and fears about injecting yourself or handling the potential side effects of insulin, here's some expert advice and a few strategies that will help you make this powerful therapy as effective as possible. Make insulin injections practically painless. Many people assume insulin injections will hurt. Often this is just a fear of needles dating back to childhood. But sometimes the fear goes much deeper: Some are concerned that injecting insulin means their disease is getting worse. But that notion is outdated. The important thing is not to avoid needles but to do everything that's in your power to control your diabetes and prevent damage to Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens

Insulin Pens

Tweet Insulin pens are common in the United Kingdom, and are generally characterised by a different shape and the fact that they use an insulin cartridge as opposed to a vial. Some insulin pens use replaceable cartridges, and others use non-replaceable cartridges and must be disposed of after being used. Most insulin pens use replaceable insulin pen needles, which have become extremely short and thin. The replaceable cartridges for insulin pens come in 3 and 1 ½ ml sizes, although 3 is more common and has become dominant. Prefilled insulin pens are disposed of when the insulin within the cartridge is used up. Prefilled pens are often marketed for type 2 diabetics who need to use insulin. Insulin Pens Browse through our list of insulin pen reviews. You can also buy the insulin pens from the Diabetes Shop. Simply click on an insulin pen name to read the guide. How do I use an insulin pen to treat my diabetes? Using a pen is a relatively easy process. Some pens require gentle shaking before use. Once the cartridge is loaded, screw on a needle and prime the pen to clear air. Then dial in the exact dose that you require to deliver the insulin to the body. What is good about insulin pens as opposed to syringes? Insulin pens are very easy to use. They are great for young diabetics who need to deliver insulin at school. Furthermore, many diabetics find insulin pens almost painless. They are also portable and discreet, as well as not being as time-consuming as syringes. An accurate dose can be pre-set on the dosage dial, which can be useful for diabetes sufferers who also have impaired vision. Why might I not like insulin pens? Insulin pens are not right for 100% of diabetes patients. Insulin in pens and cartridges is generally more expensive than bottled insulin and syringes. Continue reading >>

Choosing A Needle To Inject Insulin: What’s The Difference?

Choosing A Needle To Inject Insulin: What’s The Difference?

For a person with diabetes who is beginning insulin therapy, the range of products can be overwhelming. The options are often limited by the patient’s healthcare plan, however, and the initial selection of a product is frequently influenced by the healthcare provider. With diabetes education tailored to the individual patient, the delivery of insulin through a particular device is achieved by teaching proper injection technique and selecting an appropriate needle. Because people using insulin to manage their diabetes prefer a painless, easy-to-use, and affordable device, manufacturers have worked to improve the injection experience. Over the past 25 years, needle size has evolved from a 16-mm (length), 27-gauge (thickness) needle in 1985, to a 4-mm, 32-gauge needle in 2010. A shorter, thinner needle reduces pain and anxiety during insulin injection. But does this type of needle work as well as a bigger needle, especially in people with more body fat? One concern when using a thin, short needle is whether or not the tip of the needle actually gets through the skin to deliver the full dose of insulin into the fat layer. For a long time, skin thickness has been a factor in product selection. The tendency has been to choose a larger needle for larger patients, using the skin-pinch method of injection to prevent intramuscular administration and subsequent pain and variable glycemic control. Recently, a study was conducted using ultrasound to measure the skin thickness at four injection sites in 338 patients with diabetes. Patients ranged in age from 18 to 85 years, and their BMIs ranged from 19.4 to 64.5 kg/m2. Investigators found minimal variation in skin thickness according to age, gender, race, and body mass. Most patients had a skin thickness of less than 2.8 mm, with Continue reading >>

Go Needle Free – For Painless Diabetes Management

Go Needle Free – For Painless Diabetes Management

1. GO NEEDLE FREE – FOR PAINLESS DIABETES MANAGEMENT 2. Table of Contents 1. Diabetes –Complexity of the Disorder.............................................................. 1 2. Traditional Insulin Delivery Procedures ........................................................... 2 3. Non-Invasive Techniques for Insulin Delivery ................................................. 3 4. Oral Delivery ....................................................................................................... 4 5. Pulmonary Delivery............................................................................................ 6 6. Patenting Trend in Non-Invasive Technologies............................................... 7 7. Overall Market Trend in Insulin Delivery Systems........................................... 8 8. Key Players in the Industry................................................................................ 9 9. Conclusion........................................................................................................ 11 3. Page # 1 1. Diabetes –Complexity of the Disorder With the changing life style, diabetes has become a common health disorder among people of all ages, which was a predominantly elderly disease. Onset of diabetes results in various complications that cause excess morbidity/mortality, resulting in loss of independence and deteriorated quality of life. Diabetes can turn out acute if not treated properly on time. If left unattended, it can cause serious complications to virtually every system of the body. Diabetes is a key risk factor for coronary artery diseases, cerebral vascular diseases, peripheral vascular diseases and heart failure. It can also lead to other critical complications such as blindness (due to diabetic retinopathy), e Continue reading >>

How To Give Yourself Insulin

How To Give Yourself Insulin

Expert Reviewed Six Methods:Monitoring Your Blood Glucose LevelsGiving Yourself Insulin Using a SyringeUsing a Pen Device to Inject InsulinRotating Your Injection SitesUsing Other Methods to Administer InsulinFollowing Recommended Safety PrecautionsCommunity Q&A Nearly three million people in the United States use insulin to treat either type 1 or type 2 diabetes.[1]. In people with diabetes, the pancreas does not produce enough insulin to manage the carbohydrates, sugars, fats, and proteins in your diet. The use of insulin in people that suffer from type 1 diabetes is an absolute necessity in order to sustain life. Many people with type 2 diabetes often reach a point where medication, diet, and exercise, are not enough to control blood sugar levels, and begin a regimen that includes insulin administration. The correct administration of insulin takes a solid understanding of the type of insulin you are using, your method of administration, and a commitment to follow recommended safety precautions to prevent harm or injury. Consult with your doctor for a thorough demonstration before attempting to administer insulin. Continue reading >>

10 Tips For A Fear Of Needles With Diabetes (+1 Bonus!)

10 Tips For A Fear Of Needles With Diabetes (+1 Bonus!)

back to Overview Tips & Tricks Type 1 It is what it is, right? When living with type 1 diabetes there's no getting around the jab of a needle. Whether it's from an insulin pen, a syringe or a pump infusion set, you have to do it. Ilka asked our team for tips on dealing with a fear of shots and needles, and here's what she found... For some, needles are no big deal. For others, each injection is a challenge to overcome – even after many years. The reasons are usually different, and no matter how necessary it is (we all know it, logically) who can criticize? Is there anything normal about stabbing yourself with a sharp metal object? I think not! We have a lot of diabetes experience here at mySugr, collectively more than 150 years under our belts. And who better to ask for tips and tricks for overcoming a fear of needles/needle phobia than a bunch of people living well with diabetes? 1. Injectors Clara: I didn’t do my own injections right away. The day where everything changed was when I watched another girl my age in the hospital do her own injection. I thought, “if she can do it, so can I!” But some time later I developed an “injection-crisis” again and used an injection device, which hides the needle completely, to help me get through it. 2. Build Confidence Marlis: I’ve been helping children with diabetes for a long time, and fear of needles is very common. It can really help if mom or dad offers to let the child inject them, or even put in a pump infusion set. When those little ones see that you trust them to poke you and that it doesn’t hurt when they put the needle in it builds a lot of confidence and trust. Another step is to watch mom or dad do an injection and see that it’s fine. I have often let the kids inject me and they were so incredibly pr Continue reading >>

25 September 12 Tips For Reducing Pain With Insulin Injections

25 September 12 Tips For Reducing Pain With Insulin Injections

For those of you with diabetes who take insulin, take heart! While insulin injections can sometimes cause pain or discomfort, there are tips for reducing or eliminating pain. Most of the tips reported here are taken from a presentation given by Stacey Seggelke, MS, RN, CNS, CDE, BC-ADM at the Rocky Mountain Metabolic Syndrome Symposium on May 14, 2010. Alcohol After swabbing your injection site with alcohol, wait for it to DRY before injecting insulin. Alcohol can feel like a burning sensation if it gets pushed in along with the insulin. Temperature Injecting insulin that is cold will hurt more than if it is at room temperature. Remove your unopened insulin from the refrigerator long enough in advance before use so that it is at room temperature when you need to use it. Once your vial or pen is in use, you can store it at room temperature (59F – 86F). Insulin vials can be stored at room temperature for up to 1 month. Most rapid-acting or long acting insulin pens can be stored for up to 28 days at room temperature. However, premixed insulin or intermediate N or NPH pens should be stored for up to only 10 – 14 days. Never guess at your insulin's room temperature storage guidelines - always check the information provided with your insulin for number of days it can be used at room temperature. Unopened insulin can be stored in the refrigerator (36F-46F) up until the expiration date. However, once the expiration date is reached, do not use the insulin – discard it. Dose Higher doses can hurt more than lower doses of insulin. For those of you with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight and regular exercise could improve your insulin sensitivity enough so that less insulin is needed to control your diabetes. And for folks with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, good carb counting skills Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin is a hormone that helps cells use glucose (sugar) for energy. It works as a “key,” allowing the sugar to go from the blood and into the cell. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t make insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin correctly, which can lead to the pancreas not being able to produce enough — or any, depending on the progression of the disease —insulin to meet your body’s needs. Diabetes is normally managed with diet and exercise, with medications, including insulin, added as needed. If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin is required for life. This may seem difficult at first, but you can learn to successfully administer insulin with the support of your healthcare team, determination, and a little practice. There are different ways to take insulin, including syringes, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and jet injectors. Your doctor will help you decide which technique is best for you. Syringes remain a common method of insulin delivery. They’re the least expensive option, and most insurance companies cover them. Syringes Syringes vary by the amount of insulin they hold and the size of the needle. They’re made of plastic and should be discarded after one use. Traditionally, needles used in insulin therapy were 12.7 millimeters (mm) in length. Recent research shows that smaller 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm needles are just as effective, regardless of body mass. This means insulin injection is less painful than it was in the past. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, which means into the fat layer under the skin. In this type of injection, a short needle is used to inject insulin into the fatty layer between the skin and the muscle. Insulin should be injected into the fatty tissue just below your skin. If you inject the insulin deeper int Continue reading >>

A Guide To Injecting For Your Child With Diabetes

A Guide To Injecting For Your Child With Diabetes

4 Diabetes. The basics. – Why does my child need insulin? – How did my child get diabetes? – Controlling diabetes 7 Emotional issues. Coming to terms with the news. 8 Getting started. Explaining diabetes to your child. 10 Monitoring blood sugar. Knowing where your child stands. 12 Injecting. It’s easier than you think. – Using a pen – Using a syringe – Mixing insulin in a syringe 16 Injecting correctly. The best sites, the best way. 18 Injecting correctly. Ensuring the right technique. 20 Preventing lipos. Using sites correctly. 22 Sharp thinking. The importance of using new needles. 24 Useful information. Facts, resources, help. Contents Very Important Points! This booklet contains lots of important information about diabetes. Look out for the VIP icon.VIP! Caring for children with diabetes 3 You’re reading this booklet because your child needs to start insulin injections. You may be anxious or shocked at your child’s diagnosis. Don’t worry. We’re in this together. With diabetes properly managed, your child can lead a perfectly normal life. Around 650,000 people in Canada inject to manage their diabetes1. Children can usually do their testing and injections themselves once they feel ready. Injecting isn’t difficult. It’s easy to learn. It’s quick and more comfortable than you would think. It’s just about getting into a good, regular routine. This simple guide explains how to get started. Along with advice from your child’s Doctor or Diabetes Educator, this booklet will help. We’re in this together. 4 Caring for children with diabetes Why does my child need insulin? Your child has diabetes because their pancreas, an organ close to their stomach, doesnâ Continue reading >>

How To Improve The Insulin Injection Experience

How To Improve The Insulin Injection Experience

If you have type 1 diabetes, or if you have type 2 and have recently begun injecting insulin, you may have a bit of trouble getting used to the process of preparing and administering your own insulin shots. Andrea Penney, RN, CDE, of the Joslin Diabetes Center, says that injection technique is important to master not only for accurate dosing, but for comfort, too. "With proper practice and good technique, you can avoid pain during an injection," she states. Penney sat down with us recently to answer some common questions about insulin injection. If after reading and practicing insulin injections you still find you’re having trouble, Penney suggests seeing a Certified Diabetes Educator for more assistance. Q: How do I decide where to inject? A: People often select injection sites based on many factors: accessibility, presence of fatty tissue, and rate of insulin absorption (which will be discussed shortly). As a result, popular sites for injection include the stomach, outer thigh, the back of the arm (between the shoulder and the elbow), or the upper outside "wallet" area of the buttock (but not into the lower buttock area). Q: Once I decide on a location for an injection, how do I pick the right "spot"? A: Here are some easy guidelines: -Stomach If you’re going to inject into the stomach, stay at least two inches away from the bellybutton and/or any scars you may already have when using the abdomen for injections. -Thigh For an injection in your thigh, inject at least four inches or about one hand’s width above the knee and at least four inches down from the top of the leg. Do not inject insulin into your inner thigh because of the large number of blood vessels and nerves in this area. - Arm The area between the shoulder and elbow on the outside of the arm is usua Continue reading >>

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