diabetestalk.net

Omnipod Insulin Pump

Why I Chose The Omnipod

Why I Chose The Omnipod

Deciding to get an insulin pump & CGM was one of the best decisions I’ve made in my life. The amount of control I have with my Omnipod insulin pump is UNREAL. Gone are the days of shooting up with liquid lava (aka lantus) 2x a day and struggling with highs and lows because a pen and syringe just couldn’t offer the precision I needed. Once I decided to get an insulin pump I had to figure out which one I wanted. The Reasons Why I Chose the Omnipod Insulin Pump There were two main qualities I was looking for in a pump. It had to be tubeless and it had to be waterproof for me to make the switch from MDI to a pump. I knew it was a tall order, but what I didn’t expect was that it would narrow my selection down from six pumps to just one. 1. It’s the Only Tubeless Pump on the Market The #1 reason I was so against having an insulin pump was because of the tubing. I thought all insulin pumps had tubes, so clearly, I was not interested. The hassle of getting undressed, trying on clothes, always having it clipped to my belt or jeans, worrying about where to clip it when I wear a dress or have to pee, the fear of it getting tangled or ripped when working out or getting frisky, and just that feeling of being tethered down by something all made it a big fat NO for me. Now, of course, type 1’s are pretty savvy and those that have non-Omnipod insulin pumps have found ways to get around the above list, but for me it wasn’t worth jumping the MDI ship to be tethered down by tubing. Tubing can also cause a siphoning effect which studies have shown contributes to inaccurate dosing. While this isn’t a reason to jump ship if you have a tubed insulin pump, it is interesting. The Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology studied [1] the position of the pump relative to its infusi Continue reading >>

How The Omnipod System Works | Omnipod Insulin Management System

How The Omnipod System Works | Omnipod Insulin Management System

An Innovative Approach to Continuous Insulin Delivery The Omnipod System provides all the benefits of insulin pump therapy while providing more flexibility and freedom than other traditional tubed pumps. Customizable insulin delivery settings to give you what you need, when you need it. Insulin pumps work by continuously delivering insulin at set and variable rates,mimicking the insulin release of a healthy pancreas. The Omnipod System delivers insulin in two ways: Basal rate: A small, constant supply of insulin is delivered automatically at a personalized, preset rate around the clock. Bolus: Additional doses of insulin can be delivered when you need them, either around mealtime or to correct high blood glucose. The Omnipod System communicates wirelessly2 to program insulin delivery, eliminating the need for cumbersome tubes. You can wear the Pod comfortably and discreetly under your clothes while carrying the Personal Diabetes Manager separately in a backpack or purse. The Personal Diabetes Manager needs to be within 5 feet of the Pod to deliver a bolus, but does not need to be kept in proximity for basal insulin delivery2 after activation. 3 days of truly continuous insulin delivery3 thanks to its waterproof1 design. Theres no need to take the Pod off to shower, exercise, or sleep. Plus, youll never have to worry about finding a place to hang your insulin pump in the shower or accidentally disconnecting the pump in your sleep. The cannula inserts automatically with the push of a button, with no needles in sight. Simply press a button on the Personal Diabetes Manager, and the Pod automatically inserts the cannula beneath the skin, virtually pain-free. Continuous Innovation for the Diabetes Community The Omnipod System has changed the lives of over 100,000 individuals Continue reading >>

The Omnipod Insulin Management System: The Latest Innovation In Insulin Pump Therapy

The Omnipod Insulin Management System: The Latest Innovation In Insulin Pump Therapy

Go to: Abstract This review of insulin pump therapy focuses on the OmniPod® Insulin Management System (Insulet Corp., Bedford, MA, USA). The OmniPod System is the first commercially available “patch pump.” It is a fully integrated wearable pump, controlled wirelessly through a handheld device containing a built-in blood glucose meter. This is an evaluation of the OmniPod System, with the aim of providing an educational tool for physicians who are considering recommending this product to their patients. The review includes a discussion of the traditional insulin pump configuration and its limitations, a detailed overview of the OmniPod System, references to clinical study data, planned product enhancements, its use as an insulin delivery system in the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation’s Artificial Pancreas Project, and its use to deliver additional compounds. Keywords: continuous glucose monitor, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, insulin pump, multiple daily injections, patch pump, wireless pump Go to: Introduction This review is intended to provide an educational tool for physicians who want to recommend an insulin pump to their patients and need to learn about the current technologies available to them. The review focuses on the OmniPod® Insulin Management System (Insulet Corp., Bedford, MA, USA), comparing it to traditional insulin pumps and explaining its value within the range of products. Traditional Insulin Pump Therapy Insulin pumps were first developed for commercial use in the late 1970s. Over the past 30 years, the components have changed little. The components of traditional pump systems used for diabetes management include: A device about the size of a deck of cards that contains an insulin reservoir, a pumping mechanism, batteries, and a Continue reading >>

Omnipod Insulin Pump Review 2016

Omnipod Insulin Pump Review 2016

We have been using the Omnipod Insulin Pump now for 2 years. It’s time to write a review to help those considering the Omnipod for their child. Choosing the right pump can feel like you’re navigating a minefield, all pumps do the same job, but different insulin pumps offer different features. Hopefully our review of the Omnipod will answer many questions you have, if not feel free to leave any questions in our comments section. Here we will run through what we believe are the features and benefits of the Omnipod, and describe the reality of using this insulin pump. Our hospital offered the full range of Insulin Pumps for us to choose from, I researched each pump and made a wish list, then chose the pump that ticked the most boxes on our wish list, for us that was the Omnipod, though everyone will be attracted to different pumps for different reasons. The Omnipod is rather unique compared to other Insulin Pumps on the market currently. It is the only tubeless insulin pump that is readily available, also known as a patch pump. There are 2 components, the Pod and the PDM (Personal Diabetes Manager), though we tend to call it the handset or the remote control. THE POD The Pod measures 3.9 cm × 5.2 cm × 1.45 cm. Essentially around the size of a custard cream biscuit. It has a self adhesive strip and you simply stick it to the body, it can be worn on many different areas, though the most popular seem to be the lower back, tummy, arms and thighs. Inside the Pod is all the mechanical workings, the cannular and the insulin reservoir. The reservoir holds 200 units of insulin. It can be worn for a maximum of 3 days, it is a recommendation across all insulin pumps to change cannular after 3 days. 200 Units is a pretty average sized reservoir, it may not be big enough for teen Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump For Hassle-free Diabetes Care

Insulin Pump For Hassle-free Diabetes Care

AUSTIN, Texas--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Freescale Semiconductor (NYSE: FSL) has designed a fully integrated microcontroller (MCU) solution that powers the second generation of Insulet’s OmniPod, the revolutionary tubeless, wireless insulin pump. Freescale’s integrated technology has helped make the new OmniPod one-third smaller, one-quarter lighter and much more power-efficient to help people with diabetes lead a more active life. “The OmniPod is a revolutionary, tubeless insulin pump, and Freescale has helped make possible the second generation, which gives people an even easier and more discreet way to deliver insulin and manage their diabetes” Tweet this The OmniPod System – comprised of a body-worn Pod and a handheld Personal Diabetes Manager (PDM) – relies on Freescale technology to wirelessly control insulin delivery and management. People with diabetes attach the waterproof Pod to a discrete and convenient location on the body, where it delivers both basal and bolus doses of insulin for up to three days. For connectivity, the OmniPod relies on a Freescale custom 8-bit MCU (based on the ultra-low-power S08 architecture) with integrated RF wireless technology. The PDM measures and displays blood glucose levels, wirelessly programs insulin delivery and even calculates suggested doses based on a food database. This handheld device is powered by a Freescale i.MX applications processor, in addition to the wireless 8-bit MCU. Tweet this: @Freescale powers new @OmniPodNA – 1/3 smaller and 1/4 lighter. What kind of #wearable devices power your world? “This application-specific system-on-chip for Insulet’s OmniPod is the latest example of an innovative Freescale medical solution aimed at helping people live healthier lives,” said Geoff Lees, senior vice preside Continue reading >>

Omnipod Insulin Pump - Review

Omnipod Insulin Pump - Review

Greg Nickleski isn't the biggest fan of needles and pricks -- so he discusses why he uses the new, slimmer OmniPod insulin pump. REVIEWER'S BREAKDOWN - PROs: tubeless and wireless -- no need for long plastic tubing patch-style attachment allows discreet wearing (can hide the pump) PDM (controller unit) has a built-in fingerstick meter, so it cuts down on the diabetes devices the user needs to carry around the Pod (insulin unit) is waterproof up to 25 feet, so even good for snorkelers or scuba divers PDM provides precise doses down to .25 units Continue reading >>

Omnipod Review: Tubeless Is Good, Alarms Are Bad

Omnipod Review: Tubeless Is Good, Alarms Are Bad

A few months ago, my 8-year-old and 11-year-old daughters, both of whom have Type 1 diabetes, switched from the Tandem t:slim and the Animas insulin pumps to Omnipod. After a summer spent disconnecting from their insulin pumps for swim team, a pump with no tubing was a welcome relief. But it hasn’t been all good. Here is an OmniPod review from a D-mom with way too much insulin pump experience. The Good: The good, of course, is that there is no tubing. No more priming the tubing, no more air bubbles in the tubing, and no more getting your tubing stuck on kitchen cabinet knobs. There is now no disconnecting for the shower or for swimming or for gymnastics, so basal insulin is always being delivered. And with no disconnecting, there is no forgetting to reconnect after those activities. I know I’m not the only one who has bolused into a bookbag. In addition to the major perk of not having tubing, the OmniPod offers more placement choices since you don’t have to worry about how you will feed the tubing through clothing. This can give the areas most commonly used a much needed break. My daughters have, for the most part, continued to use the same areas for the pods as they did with their former infusion sets, but even an occasional use of a new location is a plus. Another nice thing about the OmniPod is that the process to change the infusion set is simpler. This means that my daughters can do it themselves more easily and at a younger age. It still hurts, though. But, because you can decorate the pods with colored markers before you use them, there is a little added joy to what is otherwise an unpleasant process. My daughters delight in turning their pods into ladybugs, sneakers, and bumblebees. With OmniPod, I appreciate that I can make all basal rate changes and temp Continue reading >>

Insulet: Omnipod Insulin Management System

Insulet: Omnipod Insulin Management System

Diabetes is a life-threatening disease that affects more than 24 million people in the United States alone. Continue reading >>

Asknadia: Why Doesn’t Medicare Cover The Omnipod Insulin Pump

Asknadia: Why Doesn’t Medicare Cover The Omnipod Insulin Pump

Whys doesn’t Medicare cover the OmniPod tubeless insulin pump? I sure wish it was covered. Cathy diabeteshealth.com Subscriber Dear Cathy, Medicare has their own formula for calculating what is medically necessary for medical devices, which they classify as “Durable Medical Equipment” also known as DME. Insulin pumps and blood glucose meters are classified as medically necessary under the Medicare DME coverage. Medication like insulin for an insulin pump, is also considered medically necessary. The issue with the OmniPod coverage under the Medicare classification, is how the OmniPod device delivers the medically necessary part, which is the case is the insulin. Medicare covers other insulin pumps that use infusion sets because the insulin pump itself is classified as a device which is necessary in delivering the insulin. By definition insulin pumps that require tubing to deliver the insulin is medically necessary and is covered under Medicare benefits. Medicare does not cover the OmniPod system because they view the OmniPod system as being two separate items; the tubeless insulin pods and the Personal Diabetes Manager (PDM). Although the insulin is considered medically necessary, the tubeless insulin pods that delivers the insulin is disposable, which disqualifies it as being medically necessary. The Personal Diabetes Manager (PDM) is also disqualified as a medically necessary device because it does not deliver the insulin which medicare classifies as not being medically necessary. I believe everyone should have a choice on how to best manage their diabetes. This includes the medical devices they choose for better diabetes mangement and outcomes. Medicare covers insulin pumps because it offers tighter control and benefits people living with diabetes. This includes Continue reading >>

Medicare Part D To Cover Omnipod Insulin Delivery System

Medicare Part D To Cover Omnipod Insulin Delivery System

Medicare Part D to Cover Omnipod Insulin Delivery System The Omnipodinsulin management system (Insulet Corporation) may be covered now under the Medicare Part D (prescription drug) program, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Omnipod performs the same functions as a traditional insulin pump, but with a different design. Rather than a pump that attaches via tubing connected to an infusion site on the body, the insulin-containing "pods" are worn directly on the body and insulin infusion is controlled wirelessly by a "personal diabetes manager [PDM]" that also houses a glucose meter. Because of its unique design the PDM is nondisposable, but the pods that delivers the insulin are replaced every 3 days the system does not meet the criteria for durable medical equipment under Medicare Part B, the way other insulin pumps are covered. Instead, CMS has deemed the system reimbursable under Part D as a medical supply "associated with the injection of insulin," a category that also includes syringes and pens, needles, and alcohol swabs. Another insulin delivery device, the V-Go (Valeritas), is also covered under Medicare Part D. "We expect that technology will continue to advance and 'medical supplies associated with the injection of insulin' will become significantly more sophisticated. Part D sponsors may include such supplies in their benefit," Jennifer R Shapiro, Acting Director of the Medicare Drug Benefit and C&D Data Group, Baltimore, Maryland, wrote in a letter to Part D Plan carriers. But coverage isn't mandatory, she said. "While CMS recognizes such products as medical supplies that are alternatives to insulin syringes, CMS does not require Part D sponsors to include them on their formularies, and sponsors may apply utilization management Continue reading >>

Pod Failure: The Omnipod Problem

Pod Failure: The Omnipod Problem

This past January, I celebrated my first insulin pump anniversary. I wrote a blog post in which I discussed the pros and cons of the insulin pump that I use, the OmniPod, to mark the occasion. Generally speaking, my post was a glowing review of the system and I still firmly believe that choosing to go on the OmniPod is one of the best decisions I have made regarding my diabetes. It shouldn’t come as a surprise, then, that my post focused more so on what I like best about the pump and how these features help me. It wouldn’t have been a true review, though, if I didn’t highlight what I dislike about the pod. The most prominent item on my list of cons was pod failures—they’re disruptive, discouraging, and downright frustrating. Fortunately for me, I experienced less than a handful of pod failures in my first year in a half of using the OmniPod. This all changed this past April and May, when I experienced nearly ten pod failures total. It all started one Monday morning—I was getting settled at work when I heard an aggressive and ceaseless beeping sound, indicating pod failure. I joked about it with my manager, brushing it off as a random incident and saying something to the effect of, “I guess my pod didn’t feel like showing up to work today, either!” I drove home, retrieved my insulin, drove back to work, and changed my pod in a meeting room. It was not the ideal way to start a fresh work week, but I took it in stride. But then it happened a second time, that same week. It was nearly the same scenario as what had unfolded that Monday. Except this time, it pissed me off. I knew it was odd to experience a second pod failure in one week. Again, I drove home and got what I needed, and applied a fresh pod. I called OmniPod (again) and asked for another replace Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Insulets New Omnipod Diabetes Management System

Fda Approves Insulets New Omnipod Diabetes Management System

16aprallday17alldayWorld Congress on Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2018Dubai, United Arab Emirates WCGO 2018 has been designed in an interdisciplinary manner with a multitude of tracks to choose from every segment and provides you with a unique opportunity to WCGO 2018 has been designed in an interdisciplinary manner with a multitude of tracks to choose from every segment and provides you with a unique opportunity to meet up with peers from both industry and acad emia and establish a scientific network between them. We cordially invite all concerned people to come join us at our event and make it successful by your participation. 16aprallday17alldayWorld Congress on Nursing and Health Care 2018Dubai, United Arab Emirates PULSUStakes immense pleasure in inviting all the participants from across the globe to attend World Congress on Nursing and Health Care during April 16-17, 2018 at Dubai, UAE. PULSUS takes immense pleasure in inviting all the participants from across the globe to attend World Congress on Nursing and Health Care during April 16-17, 2018 at Dubai, UAE. This comprises of proficient keynote presentations, verbal speeches, productive poster presentations and exhibitions providing insights to the importance and efficiency of nursing in Healthcare. WCN 2018 Conference highlights the theme Pivotal Role of Nursing in Leading and Advancing Healthcare . WCN 2018 is an event intended to provide an exclusive platform for new researchers, scholars, nurses, surgeons, physicians, students and educators to show case their novel ideas and discuss the most recent innovations, trends and key concerns adopted in the field of nursing and health care. The two days of educational program will include keynote presentations, oral presentations, and poster presenters on the advance Continue reading >>

Omnipod Insulin Pump From Ypsomed

Omnipod Insulin Pump From Ypsomed

Tweet The history of the mylife Omnipod insulin pump technology comes down to a young boy who was diagnosed with diabetes in 1992. Doing his research, his father found that insulin pump therapy offered dramatically better control than injections combined with a reduced risk of long-term complications with greater freedom for his son in terms of diet and exercise freely. But pump technology still had some limitations - particularly the tubing that runs from the pump to the infusion site and needing to take the pump off for some activities - non-waterproof ones even having to be removed for showering. So dad gathered the best diabetes and technology experts he could find to form Insulet Corporation to improve on the traditional insulin pump. OmniPod System Hence the OmniPod System, initially launched in the United States in 2005. In January 2010, Insulet signed an international distribution agreement for the OmniPod System with Ypsomed AG, a leading independent diabetes specialist and technology provider that is bringing the technology to the UK. The mylife OmniPod from Ypsomed was the first tubeless insulin pump to be released and together with the Cellnovo pump, these are the only insulin pumps available in the UK that can boast of being tubeless. The OmniPod system consists of a small pump, called the ‘pod’, which is worn directly on the skin and controlled by a Personal Diabetes Manager that also functions as a blood glucose monitor. Features Tubeless –so no catching tubing on doors or worrying about bubbles within tubing Very small – the pod’s dimensions are around 5 by 4 by 1.5 cm Waterproof at depths of up to 7.6 m for up to an hour Separate remote – saves needing access the pump itself to give bolus doses or change settings Personalised integrated food Continue reading >>

Next-generation Omnipod(r) Insulin Pump Cleared By Fda

Next-generation Omnipod(r) Insulin Pump Cleared By Fda

Next-Generation OmniPod(R) Insulin Pump Cleared by FDA Next-Generation OmniPod(R) Insulin Pump Cleared by FDA (NASDAQ: PODD), the leader in tubeless insulin pump technology, today announced that the Company has received 510(k) clearance from the (FDA) for the next-generation OmniPod Insulin Management System. The new OmniPod insulin pump is more than one-third smaller and one-quarter lighter than the original model, while maintaining the same 200-unit insulin reservoir capacity and easy-to-use features. In addition to the smaller, lighter Pod, the new OmniPod System includes an updated Personal Diabetes Manager (PDM) that also features a series of enhancements. "The OmniPod revolutionized insulin delivery with its tubeless and wireless design when it was introduced in 2005 and today, the next-generation OmniPod raises the bar for insulin pump therapy again," said , President and Chief Executive Officer of approval and it is my hope that our new Omnipod insulin pump will continue to make living with diabetes easier for our customers across "When technology can make diabetes management easier for my patients, they have better clinical outcomes," said , MD, Clinical Professor of Medicine at the and founder of Taking Control of Your Diabetes (TCOYD), a not-for-profit organization with the goal of teaching and motivating patients in diabetes self-care. "As an OmniPod wearer myself, I love its ease of use and no tubing! Now with its smaller and sleeker design, it will make it even easier for more people to take control of their diabetes." "Preparations are underway to launch the new OmniPod, including training of healthcare professionals and transitioning the rest of our manufacturing production," said . "We expect that these initiatives will take approximately two to three Continue reading >>

Maude Adverse Event Report: Insulet Corporation Omnipod Insulin Pump Pump, Infusion, Insulin

Maude Adverse Event Report: Insulet Corporation Omnipod Insulin Pump Pump, Infusion, Insulin

MAUDE Adverse Event Report: INSULET CORPORATION OMNIPOD INSULIN PUMP PUMP, INFUSION, INSULIN It was reported that the patient's blood glucose level reached high (>500 mg/dl) while wearing the pod longer than 48 hours. The patient stated that the cannula was dislodged from the insertion site. The device was not returned for evaluation. The customer reported that the cannula had dislodged from the infusion site. This condition could interrupt insulin delivery and contribute to hyperglycemia. Lot release records were reviewed and the product lot met all acceptance criteria. The omnipod user guide warns "check often to make sure the pod and soft cannula are securely attached and in place. A loose or dislodged cannula may interrupt insulin delivery. Verify that there is no wetness or scent of insulin, which may indicate the cannula has dislodged," "because insulin pods use only rapid-acting insulin, users are at increased risk for developing hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) if insulin delivery is interrupted," and "test results greater than 250 mg/dl mean high blood glucose (hyperglycemia). If you get results above 250 mg/dl, but do not have symptoms of hyperglycemia, repeat the test. If you have symptoms or continue to get results that fall above 250 mg/dl, follow the treatment advice of your healthcare provider. ". Continue reading >>

More in insulin