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Old Glucose Meters

When Should I Replace My Blood Glucose Meter?

When Should I Replace My Blood Glucose Meter?

Replace your blood glucose meter for diabetes every one to two years. That's how long a typical glucose monitor will last if you're diligent about proper maintenance—like cleaning the lens, keeping batteries fresh and using the "check strip" with each new container of diabetic test strips. If an unusually high or low blood sugar result occurs, retest to verify the result; when the blood glucose meter stops being 100 percent reliable, check with your health insurance company about replacing it. When you do get a new glucose machine, keep the old one as a backup unless the doctor treating your diabetes feels it has become too unreliable. By Joyce A. Generali, M.S. FASHP, R.Ph., director of the University of Kansas Drug Information Center and the author of The Pharmacy Technician’s Pocket Drug Reference From our sister publication, Diabetes Focus, Summer 2011 Continue reading >>

Newer Portable Glucose Meters—analytical Improvement Compared With Previous Generation Devices?

Newer Portable Glucose Meters—analytical Improvement Compared With Previous Generation Devices?

Background: Newer glucose meters are easier to use, but direct comparisons with older instruments are lacking. We wished to compare analytical performances of four new and four previous generation meters. Methods: On average, 248 glucose measurements were performed with two of each brand of meter on capillary blood samples from diabetic patients attending our outpatient clinic. Two to three different lots of strips were used. All measurements were performed by one experienced technician, using blood from the same sample for the meters and the comparison method (Beckman Analyzer 2). Results were evaluated by analysis of clinical relevance using the percentage of values within a maximum deviation of 5% from the reference value, by the method of residuals, by error grid analysis, and by the CVs for measurements in series. Results: Altogether, 1987 blood glucose values were obtained with meters compared with the reference values. By error grid analysis, the newer devices gave more accurate results without significant differences within the group (zone A, 98–98.5%). Except for the One Touch II (zone A, 98.5%), the other older devices were less exact (zone A, 87–92.5%), which was also true for all other evaluation procedures. Conclusions: New generation blood glucose meters are not only smaller and more aesthetically appealing but are more accurate compared with previous generation devices except the One Touch II. The performance of the newer meters improved but did not meet the goals of the latest American Diabetes Association recommendations in the hands of an experienced operator. Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG)1 is widely used because intensive insulin therapy has become a standard treatment regimen in type 1 diabetic patients (1)(2)(3) and recommendations for Continue reading >>

Glucose Meter

Glucose Meter

Four generations of blood glucose meter, c. 1993–2005. Sample sizes vary from 30 to 0.3 μl. Test times vary from 5 seconds to 2 minutes (modern meters typically provide results in 5 seconds). A glucose meter is a medical device for determining the approximate concentration of glucose in the blood. It can also be a strip of glucose paper dipped into a substance and measured to the glucose chart. It is a key element of home blood glucose monitoring (HBGM) by people with diabetes mellitus or hypoglycemia. A small drop of blood, obtained by pricking the skin with a lancet, is placed on a disposable test strip that the meter reads and uses to calculate the blood glucose level. The meter then displays the level in units of mg/dl or mmol/l. Since approximately 1980, a primary goal of the management of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus has been achieving closer-to-normal levels of glucose in the blood for as much of the time as possible, guided by HBGM several times a day. The benefits include a reduction in the occurrence rate and severity of long-term complications from hyperglycemia as well as a reduction in the short-term, potentially life-threatening complications of hypoglycemia. History[edit] Leland Clark presented his first paper about the oxygen electrode, later named the Clark electrode, on 15 April 1956, at a meeting of the American Society for Artificial Organs during the annual meetings of the Federated Societies for Experimental Biology.[1][2] In 1962, Clark and Ann Lyons from the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital developed the first glucose enzyme electrode. This biosensor was based on a thin layer of glucose oxidase (GOx) on an oxygen electrode. Thus, the readout was the amount of oxygen consumed by GOx during the enzymatic reaction with the substra Continue reading >>

All-in-one Blood Glucose Monitoring System

All-in-one Blood Glucose Monitoring System

Turn your smartphone into the original smart glucose meter and measure your blood sugar in less than 10 seconds. Your browser does not support the video tag. Say good-bye to bulky diabetes kits and old pen-and-paper journals. Get the Dario Kit today! What is Dario? Dario is the new generation in blood glucose monitoring systems, and is making headlines across the country. So much so it recently appeared on The Dr. Oz Show. Dario Starter Kit Includes Carry your lancing device, meter and test strips anywhere you go Perfect for any lifestyle. Automatically record your entire glucose levels with the free Dario app (included in kit). On Demand Sharing Share real-time glucose data with friends and family to give them peace of mind. Share glucose levels, charts and statistics directly with your doctor. Low blood sugar? The Dario app will send your glucose levels and location to 4 people for your safety. Carb Counting Tool Count your carbs and stay on top of your diet for better glucose management. “The {Dario} device has been perfect, I love it. I love that it's small and discreet enough. I can now test my sugars within 20 seconds, all from the bottom of my iPhone and no one around is none the wiser... I also love that it's "all in one". I've been using it now for around 4 - 5 months. The app is great at logging and motivation with its % scoring system.” “My son is 9 years old. Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at 5 years old. We have had the Dario for about 4 weeks now. Absolutely loving it. It has given us the freedom for him to attend birthday parties and I can see his levels from home and have peace of mind…. I love Dario so much I purchased a second one… We find the blood glucose readings on the Dario much more reliable too…I must add he had his first sleepover b Continue reading >>

Old Glucose Meters - Monitoring - Diabetes Forums

Old Glucose Meters - Monitoring - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I have several old blood sugar monitors that I don't need because I keep upgrading. Does anyone know of any organizations, charities, etc. that accept them as donations. Thanks for any suggestions--I hate to just throw them in the trash. Many are reluctant to accept them due to a perception that there is no way to use a blood glucose meter with out its becoming contaminated. It is a challenge to sterilize them without ruining them. You can wipe the outside with 10% bleach, isopropanol etc., but there are still questions. I agree that it is a shame that they can't be used, but....... Blood glucose monitors really are not worth anything. New ones can easily be obtained for free or at a minimal cost. I remember reading somewhere on the Internet a while back that veterinarians will sometimes take them for their clients who have diabetic dogs/cats. I've also read that some people have given theirs to homeless or women's shelters. Good luck--it does seem wasteful to trash them. I think it is really shameful that we waste something that could be used by someone less fortunate than ourselves. I guess it is true that they are almost a freebee, but many people can't even afford to go to a doctor. I think that a local dog rescue group would be a great way to use them. Many are reluctant to accept them due to a perception that there is no way to use a blood glucose meter with out its becoming contaminated. It is a challenge to sterilize them without ruining them. You can wipe the outside with 10% bleach, isopropanol etc., but there are still questions. I agree that it is a shame that they can't be used, Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association, Jdrf And Insulin For Life Respond To Catastrophic Flooding Due To Hurricane Harvey In Texas

American Diabetes Association, Jdrf And Insulin For Life Respond To Catastrophic Flooding Due To Hurricane Harvey In Texas

American Diabetes Association, JDRF and Insulin for Life Respond to Catastrophic Flooding Due to Hurricane Harvey in Texas More than 3,750 pounds of supplies, to serve the Houston, Galveston, Harris County and Corpus Christi communities, will arrive by this Friday, and 1-800-DIABETES to have extended phone hours this week and weekend In a landmark partnership, the American Diabetes Association (ADA), JDRF and Insulin for Life (IFL USA) have secured and shipped more than 3,750 pounds of donated diabetes supplies to people with diabetes affected by Hurricane Harvey. Five pallets, each of which includes 200,000 syringes, 50,000 pen needles and 20,000 alcohol pads, are already en route to the Houston area. Accompanying each pallet are separate packages containing dozens of blood glucose meters along with thousands of glucose test strips and lancets, which will allow an individual to test his or her blood glucose three times per day for nearly two months. More than 25,000 units of analogue and human insulins, in both vial and pen forms, will also be delivered for each pallet, pending safe delivery and temperature control conditions at the locations. One pallet is for immediate distribution by the Houston Health Department to evacuees with diabetes who are sheltered at the George R. Brown Convention Center. The second pallet will be distributed by Sen. Larry Taylors office to the Galveston communities of Clear Creek, Friendswood, League City and Victory Lakes. Two pallets are being delivered to the Harris County Health Department. And the fifth pallet is going to the City of Corpus Christi Health Department. The ADAs Center for Information, 1-800-DIABETES, will have extended phone hours this week to assist anyone in need: - 8:30 a.m. ET to 10:00 p.m. ET, Tuesday, August 29 t Continue reading >>

When To Get A New Blood Glucose Meter?

When To Get A New Blood Glucose Meter?

I have had my current glucose meter for over 10 years. When should one consider getting a new meter? As long as the manufacturer still makes the strips, does it matter? Can meters become unreliable? Karen Adsit, Chattanooga, Tennessee Belinda Childs, ARNP, MN, BC-ADM, CDE, responds: When I am asked this question in the office, I usually answer that the glucose meter you are using is acceptable as long as it is giving you accurate readings. The best way to know if your meter is accurate is to use the "glucose control" solution for your brand of glucose meter and strips. The meter companies recommend that you do this with each new bottle of test strips and any time you suspect that you may not be getting accurate readings. However, the glucose control solution is generally only good for 30 days after you open the bottle. Some health care providers correlate meters with lab readings, but you must remember that there can be as much as a 10 to 15 percent variation between the readings you get with your meter from one test to the next, as well as between a home test and a lab result. The key to your question, though, is that you have not had a new meter in more than 10 years. Technology has improved significantly over the past decade. Meters now require much less blood, and thus a smaller needle stick. This means less pain on the fingers. With many meters, you can also use alternate site testing and give your fingertips a break. Test strip technology is better, too. Some strips allow reapplying blood on the same strip if there's not enough there to get a reading, so you do not use as many strips (and save on cost). Most manufacturers have removed the need to enter a code or change a code strip with each new bottle of strips. Many meters now have data management programs to h Continue reading >>

Meter Accuracy

Meter Accuracy

Two things landed on my desk recently. One was a newspaper article saying that the Food and Drug Administration has asked the international body that sets standards for home blood glucose meters to tighten its accuracy requirements. (A public meeting on the topic is scheduled for March 16 and 17.) The other was a letter from a Diabetes Self-Management subscriber who described how she had attempted to compare two home meters with a plasma glucose measurement done in a laboratory — and how she was unnerved when she got three different readings. Stricter standards for meter accuracy would be a welcome development: Currently, most available blood glucose meters are accurate only to within 10% to 15% of the actual blood glucose level. But it will likely be a while before standards are changed and more accurate meters become the norm. In the meantime, there are steps you can take to get the best possible results from your meter. One of the most important is to use only strips made for your meter and to use them correctly. This includes making sure the strips have not passed their expiration date, coding your meter for each new batch of strips (if you use a meter that requires coding), and being careful to store your strips in their original container, away from sources of heat, cold, or humidity. Improperly used or stored strips are one of the biggest sources of error in home blood glucose monitoring. To check whether a batch of strips is OK, use a drop of the control solution (unexpired!) that’s compatible with your meter on one of the strips in the batch. If you still want to check the accuracy of your meter by comparing it to a laboratory measurement, there is a way to do that. But getting meaningful results requires doing it right — both on your end and on the labor Continue reading >>

Recycling Old Meters & Equipment

Recycling Old Meters & Equipment

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I've amassed quite a ridiculous number of blood glucose meters (fully working) over the years and was wondering if someone has recent knowledge of charities that might be interested in such? Same with lancet devices, boxes of pen needles...? Thank you. Some they can use, others they can't, but what you can give is immensely useful to them Unused in date insulin is always welcome too. Not sure how true this is, but I read that meters cannot be recycled, due to the fact that they may have come into contact with blood. So... If anyone else is wondering what to do with a surplus of d paraphernalia: IDDT is happy to get unused meters & lancets, unfortunately they cannot take used ones. Bit of a shame as this rules out quite a few of mine (why do I have 4 contours...?), but no can do. Pen needles they can use as well, a fine new home for my pre-pump stash. Enclave Type 2 (in remission!) Moderator If you gather enough items ( thinking outside the box .. So the wife says ) could you not make an art installation demonstrating what diabetes means to you ..using the meters and everything .. Maybe a calibration of some of the arty ones here ... How cool would that be ( yes the wife is standing over me to write this Hah! I kinda did that for a BA project (film, photography, & digital media) a long time ago and got a really shit score. Admittedly, it was a last minute divine inspiration (desperation) sort of thing but Damien Hirst has nothing on me... Try emailing IDDT and listing what you have to see if they can use it in their help for developing countries : Some they can use, others they can't, but what you can give is immensely useful to them Unused in date ins Continue reading >>

Inaccurate Blood-glucose Readings Can Be Caused By A Number Of Factors

Inaccurate Blood-glucose Readings Can Be Caused By A Number Of Factors

If you have diabetes, your blood-glucose meter is a critical tool that gives you the necessary insight as to what’s going on inside your body at a given moment—an absolutely essential piece of knowledge, particularly if you use insulin. That’s why it’s important to ensure that your meter is functioning correctly and giving you accurate readings. Start by periodically using a glucose solution provided by your meter’s manufacturer to test the accuracy of the results you’re getting. And watch out for these factors that can affect your meter readings: Outdated test strips. Incompatible test strips. It’s actually possible with some meters to insert a strip that is not meant to be used with that meter. This can be a problem if you buy strips that are manufactured by another company; while test strips from non-meter manufacturers are usually fine, be sure that you’re buying the strip that that is made for your meter. Substances on your hands. For example, substances on the finger used for lancing, even a small amount that can’t be seen, may cause a high blood-glucose reading. Temperature changes. Your meter’s user’s manual (or web site) will tell you the temperature range in which your meters will function correctly. Wet fingers. Fluid mixing with blood may cause an inaccurate reading. So, with these potential problems in mind, the Certified Diabetes Educators in the clinic at Joslin Diabetes Center recommend following these steps in testing: Before using the meter for the first time and again every few weeks, check your meter using the control solution. Once opened, the control solution is only good for three months. Label the control-solution bottle with the date when you opened it. Check the date and shake the control solution before using it. The valu Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

Newsflash: Abbott Recalls Freestyle Strips & Meters

Newsflash: Abbott Recalls Freestyle Strips & Meters

** See our UPDATE Post on this topic, published Feb. 25, 2014 ** Many of you have already heard about the double product recalls issued by Abbott Diabetes Care about 48 hours ago. This is huge, especially for everyone using the OmniPod system, because the recalled strips are those used in the PDM's built-in FreeStyle meters! Abbott hasn't yet contacted customers directly, but say they're in the process of sending out letters -- but the D-Community hasn't yet received those and many are confused about what's going on. We've got some pertinent info to share, and will update this post as details come in. A news release on the Abbott Diabetes press room page details the issue and has recommendations from Kelly Duffy, VP of Quality Assurance and Compliance: Recently, it has come to our attention that FreeStyle Blood Glucose Test Strips may produce erroneously low blood glucose results when using the FreeStyle blood glucose meter built into the OmniPod Insulin Management System. Erroneously low blood glucose results that are not recognized may pose significant risks to your health. In a second related recall, the same is apparently true for the FreeStyle Flash and older FreeStyle blood glucose meters (both of which are no longer made), i.e. they "may produce erroneously low blood glucose results when using FreeStyle Lite and FreeStyle blood glucose test strips." What should you do if you use any of these? Abbott is recommending that you discontinue use of the effected strips and meters immediately, and call for replacements: For the OmniPod Personal Diabetes Manager (PDM) - to receive replacement strips at no cost contact Abbott Diabetes Care Customer Service at 1-877-584-5159. We're being told they'll replace up to 400 strips immediately, and more can be replaced later once Continue reading >>

Do You Have Extra Diabetes Supplies You No Longer Need?

Do You Have Extra Diabetes Supplies You No Longer Need?

By Nicole Kofman and Kelly Close Twitter Summary: Learn how you can donate your unused diabetes supplies to help save peoples lives around the world: donate at this link. Before insulin was discovered in 1921, a diabetes diagnosis was often a death sentence. Nearly 100 years later, it still is in many places on our planet. This is particularly true in less developed parts of the world, where hundreds of thousands of people with diabetes don’t have access to the most basic life-saving resources that we often take for granted: insulin, strips, and meters. There are several organizations dedicated to bringing these resources to people across the world with diabetes – Life for a Child, Insulin for Life, Team Type 1 Foundation, and Marjorie’s Fund are just a few. We were fortunate to sit down recently with Dr. Mark and Carol Atkinson, President and Director of Insulin For Life USA (IFL USA), to learn more about their work and how people can get involved. We hugely support the work of IFL USA, which gathers unused diabetes supplies from the U.S. and sends them, free of charge, to people in need in disadvantaged regions. You can learn how to donate your unused supplies (insulin, strips, and more) at this link, and read below why and how IFL USA came to be. What amazing efforts the Atkinsons are making – and this is in addition to all that Dr. Atkinson is already doing at the University of Florida and with the nPOD Program. The Problem As Dr. Atkinson outlined in a recent highly praised piece published in the research journal The Lancet, there are several barriers to accessing diabetes supplies, including: High cost of insulin and blood glucose test strips; Insufficient health system resources applied to diabetes; Lack of diabetes education; and Lack of home refrigerati Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Use Expired Blood Glucose Test Strips?

Can People With Diabetes Use Expired Blood Glucose Test Strips?

There has long been the debate of whether people with diabetes can use expired test strips. So, can you? Rather than simply answering yes or no, it is important to first understand what exactly a test strip is, and why the argument over expiration first came to pass. The key aspect is enzymes. Enzymes, which are proteins made by cells in all living organisms, coat the end of the strip, which is made of plastic. These enzymes are either glucose oxidase or glucose dehydrogenase. The enzyme reacts with the glucose in a person’s blood and converts it into an electrical current. Upon the electricity being sent through the strip, the glucose concentration is presented by the blood glucose meter.[1] Here’s the thing, though. Enzymes break down over time. The activity of enzymes can decrease following exposure to humidity or extreme temperatures. This can alter the accuracy of glucose readings long before a scheduled expiration date. Subsequently, errors can begin to appear with rogue readings of either a high or low nature. Because the enzymes break down, manufacturers therefore place an expiration date on the strips. This is a necessity for manufacturers. Even if they are confident the strips will display accurate readings for x amount of time, one faulty test strip could lead to a diabetic patient making a management decision that could cost them their lives. The dates may differ depending on how the strips are made. The use of different enzymes can provide greater accuracy with a shorter life or vice versa. Some companies may go for the cheapest alternatives. The accuracy of expiration dates No-one is expected to believe that an expiration date scheduled for a Wednesday will enable to you test accurately on Tuesday, and then not again the day after. However, anecdotal e Continue reading >>

Diabetes Before Glucose Meters: Not So Long Ago

Diabetes Before Glucose Meters: Not So Long Ago

and by Susan Pierce, MPT, CDE I am truly honored to interview one of my most treasured friends and colleagues, Susan Pierce, MPT, CDE, who has worked with me since 2002. Q. You were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 10 in 1981. Your dad was a doctor and your mom was a dietician. Was it harder for you or your parents to accept your diabetes? A. Initially, they were probably more in shock than I was because they worked in healthcare and knew the ravages of uncontrolled diabetes. I didn’t know anything about the disease, so when the pediatrician gave us the diagnosis, I thought, “How long do I have until I die?” Once I stayed in the hospital for a few days and learned how to take my own injections, I thought I knew what it took to keep my sugars stable, so I faced this disease head on, whether I was ready or not. Over the years, my parents and I, both, experienced a great deal of denial. I tried to do the best I could, but the tools that were available at the time were not the best. The only testing available to approximate glucose was urine testing. NPH and Regular insulin were the only insulin options that I had and these were clearly insufficient for managing blood sugars, so I quickly stopped trying, rather than face failure day after day. For me, better sugars didn’t become a real possibility until Humalog became available for me to use in 1997. Q. We see adolescents and teenagers with type 1 in our practice who are pretty angry about having diabetes. I remember one teenager who threw his pump in the toilet. Did you find that there was a point of diabetes overload when you couldn’t bear to hear anything else about your diabetes? A. Absolutely, but I seem to have tried not to remember so many of the difficult times. When I was in high school, I clearly di Continue reading >>

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