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Novorapid Dosage

Calculating Insulin Dose

Calculating Insulin Dose

You'll need to calculate some of your insulin doses. You'll also need to know some basic things about insulin. For example, 40-50% of the total daily insulin dose is to replace insulin overnight. Your provider will prescribe an insulin dose regimen for you; however, you still need to calculate some of your insulin doses. Your insulin dose regimen provides formulas that allow you to calculate how much bolus insulin to take at meals and snacks, or to correct high blood sugars. In this section, you will find: First, some basic things to know about insulin: Approximately 40-50% of the total daily insulin dose is to replace insulin overnight, when you are fasting and between meals. This is called background or basal insulin replacement. The basal or background insulin dose usually is constant from day to day. The other 50-60% of the total daily insulin dose is for carbohydrate coverage (food) and high blood sugar correction. This is called the bolus insulin replacement. Bolus – Carbohydrate coverage The bolus dose for food coverage is prescribed as an insulin to carbohydrate ratio. The insulin to carbohydrate ratio represents how many grams of carbohydrate are covered or disposed of by 1 unit of insulin. Generally, one unit of rapid-acting insulin will dispose of 12-15 grams of carbohydrate. This range can vary from 6-30 grams or more of carbohydrate depending on an individual’s sensitivity to insulin. Insulin sensitivity can vary according to the time of day, from person to person, and is affected by physical activity and stress. Bolus – High blood sugar correction (also known as insulin sensitivity factor) The bolus dose for high blood sugar correction is defined as how much one unit of rapid-acting insulin will drop the blood sugar. Generally, to correct a high bloo Continue reading >>

Appropriate Insulin Initiation Dosage For Insulin-naive Type 2 Diabetes Outpatients Receiving Insulin Monotherapy Or In Combination With Metformin And/or Pioglitazone.

Appropriate Insulin Initiation Dosage For Insulin-naive Type 2 Diabetes Outpatients Receiving Insulin Monotherapy Or In Combination With Metformin And/or Pioglitazone.

Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Provincial Hospital affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250021, China. Few studies have given suggestions on appropriate initiation insulin dosage when combined with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs). This research was to investigate appropriate initiation insulin doses for insulin-naive type 2 diabetes patients with different combinations and the relationship between insulin dosage and relevant factors. This was a randomized, open-label, treat to target study. The target was 20% decrease of both fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2 hours post-breakfast blood glucose (P2hBG). One hundred and forty-seven insulin-naive Chinese patients recruited were randomly assigned to 3 groups: group A, patients received insulin monotherapy; group B, received insulin plus metformin (0.5 g, tid) and group C, received insulin plus metformin (0.5 g, tid) and pioglitazone (15 mg, qd). Insulin doses were initiated with a dose of 0.3 Ukg(-1)d(-1) and titrated according to FPG and P2hBG till reached the targets. Both the time of getting 20% reduction of FPG and P2hBG showed significant differences among the three groups. The time was shortest in Group C. The insulin doses needed to achieve glucose reduction of 20% in three treatment groups were (0.40 0.04) Ukg(-1)d(-1) for Group A, (0.37 0.04) Ukg(-1)d(-1) for Group B, and (0.35 0.03) Ukg(-1)d(-1) for Group C, respectively. Multiple linear stepwise regression analysis showed that insulin doses correlated with body weight, FPG, diabetes duration, age and history of sulfonylurea treatment. The standardized regression coefficients were 0.871, 0.322, 0.089, 0.067 and 0.063 (with all P < 0.05). To achieve blood glucose's reduction of 20% within safety context, initial insulin doses were Continue reading >>

Insulin Aspart Dosage

Insulin Aspart Dosage

Applies to the following strengths: 100 units/mL The information at Drugs.com is not a substitute for medical advice. Always consult your doctor or pharmacist. Usual Adult Dose for: Usual Pediatric Dose for: Additional dosage information: Usual Adult Dose for Diabetes Type 1 Individualize dose based on metabolic needs, blood glucose monitoring results, and glycemic goal -Total daily insulin requirements are generally between 0.5 to 1 unit/kg/day; 50% to 70% of total daily requirements are generally provided by prandial insulin with the remainder provided by intermediate-acting or long-acting basal insulin -Use HbA1c values to guide therapy; consult current guidelines for optimal target ranges Multiple-daily injection (MDI): -Insulin aspart (Novolog[R]): Administer subcutaneously within 5 to 10 minutes before a meal OR -Insulin aspart with nicotinamide (Fiasp[R]): Administer at the start of a meal or within 20 minutes after starting a meal -Match prandial insulin dose to carbohydrate intake, pre-meal blood glucose, and anticipated activity -Use in combination with an intermediate-acting or long-acting basal insulin Intravenous Administration: -Insulin aspart (Novolog[R]): Dilute to a concentration of 0.05 to 1 unit/mL in an infusion system using polypropylene infusion bags -Insulin aspart with nicotinamide (Fiasp[R]): Dilute to a concentration of 0.5 to 1 unit/mL in infusion system using polypropylene infusion bags -Closely monitor blood glucose and serum potassium during administration Continuous Subcutaneous Infusion (Insulin Pump): -Initial programming should be based on the total daily insulin dose of previous MDI regimen; check with pump labeling to ensure the pump has been evaluated with this insulin -While there is significant interpatient variability, approximate Continue reading >>

Insulin Aspart (rx)

Insulin Aspart (rx)

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Improvement of glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus May administer 0.2-0.6 unit/kg/day in divided doses; conservative doses of 0.2-0.4 unit/kg/day often recommended to reduce risk of hypoglycemia Total maintenance daily insulin requirement may vary; it is usually between 0.5 and 1 unit/kg/day; nonobese may require 0.4-0.6 unit/kg/day; obese may require 0.6-1.2 units/kg/day Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes inadequately controlled by diet, weight reduction, exercise, or oral medication 10 units/day SC (or 0.1-0.2 units/kg/day) in evening or divided q12hr of an intermediate (eg, NPH) or long-acting insulin at bedtime recommended; conversely, regular insulin or rapid-acting insulin (aspart insulin) before meals also recommended Dosing Considerations When used in a meal-related SC injection treatment regimen, 50-75% of total insulin requirements may be provided by an intermediate-acting or long-acting insulin; the remainder is divided and provided before or at mealtimes as a rapid-acting insulin, such as insulin aspart Because of insulin aspart’s comparatively rapid onset and short duration of glucose-lowering activity, some patients may require more basal insulin and more total insulin to prevent premeal hyperglycemia than they would need when using human regular insulin Dosage must be individualized; blood and urine glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Insulin requirements may be altered during stress or major illness or with changes in exercise, meal patterns, or coadministered drugs Dosage Modifications Patients with hepatic and renal impairment may be at increased risk of hypoglycemia and may require more frequent dose adjustment and more frequent blood glucose monitoring Continue reading >>

How To Interpret Blood Glucose Monitoring Charts And Adjust Insulin Doses

How To Interpret Blood Glucose Monitoring Charts And Adjust Insulin Doses

Interpreting blood glucose results and being able to adjust insulin doses are useful skills for pharmacists to possess.The key to acquiring these skills is in understanding: The insulin regimen and the onset, peak and duration of action for the insulins used The glucose levels to aim for How to titrate insulin doses How all of the above relates to patients’ lifestyles and eating habits Understanding the regimen Insulin may be given alone or, for those with type 2 diabetes, with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs), often metformin. Although this article focuses on adjusting insulin doses, readers should bear in mind that oral doses may also need to be adjusted. The three most commonly used insulin regimens are: Once daily intermediate-acting or long-acting insulin — normally given at bedtime or during the day, usually with an OAD Twice-daily pre-mixed insulin — one injection before breakfast, one before the evening meal (pre-mixed insulins contain fixed ratios of short- and long-acting insulins) Basal-bolus insulin — three daily injections of rapid- or short-acting insulin with meals and one or two injections of intermediate- or long-acting (basal) insulin The onset, peak and duration profiles of insulin products currentlyavailable in the UK are in the table. These should be used wheninterpreting a blood glucose result, to determine which insulin wasexerting its effect at the time of glucose measurement. Insulin preparations and their onset, peak and duration of action Preparation Onset (hr) Peak (hr) Duration (hr) Soluble insulin Human Actrapid 0.5 2–5 8 Humulin S 0.5 1–3 5–7 Hypurin Bovine Neutral 0.5/1 2–5 6–8 Apidra (Insulin glulisine) 0.25 1 3–4 Humalog (Insulin lispro) 0.25 1–1.5 2–5 Novorapid (Insulin aspart) 0.25 1–3 3–5 Hypurin Porcine Neu Continue reading >>

Commencing Of Insulin Therapy During Pregnancy

Commencing Of Insulin Therapy During Pregnancy

You have commenced insulin therapy because diet therapy is not enough to keep your blood sugar levels stable. If your blood sugar is too high in the morning before breakfast, it will be treated by long-acting insulin Protaphane in the evening. But if blood sugar rises too high after meals, fast-acting insulin Novorapid will be used. You may possibly need both fast-acting bolus insulin and long-acting basal insulin. Usually insulin therapy is discontinued at delivery. During insulin therapy your blood sugar level may be too low (less than 4.0 mmol/l) in case you take too much insulin. If you follow the instructions given to you, too low blood sugar levels will not occour. The symptoms of low blood sugar level are headache, trembling and anxiety. In addition skin can be pale and sweaty. If you feel somehow unwell or any kind of strange or abnormal symptoms appear, check your blood sugar to see if it is too low or too high. If your blood sugar is too low, you should eat something containing sugar, for example rye bread and milk. How to use a prefilled insulin pen Prefilled insulin pen contains 300 iu of insulin. Iinsulin pen is disposed when empty. 1. How to prepare a prefilled insulin pen for use · Wash your hands. · Remove the cap of the pen. · Check that the insulin pen contains correct insulin. · If you use Protaphan-insulin which looks cloudy, roll the pen 10 times between your palms and flip/turn the pen up and down 10 times to mix it completely. Do not shake. · Meal/bolus insulin is clear and needs no mixing. 2. How to attach needle to pen · Remove the needle's cover paper. · Screw the needle with cap on tightly to the pen clockwise. · Always attach needle to pen before you select the dose. · Replace a new needle for each injection. 3. Dos Continue reading >>

Is There A Maximum Single Dose Of Insulin?

Is There A Maximum Single Dose Of Insulin?

Is there a maximum single dose of insulin? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Is there a maximum single dose of insulin? Hi, I was diagnosed as a Type 1 almost a year ago and I have never really delt with the condition properly (mostly because I hate the needles so have neglected to take my insulin as regularly as I should). I think I will take it more seriously in time, this is just my way of coping with it for the immediate future. But what I am more worried about is that I seem to be take far more units than anybody else. I am on Levemir and Novorapid, I take 10-12 units a day of Lev (when i do take it), but, based on the 1-15 ratio, I am currently taking around 16-20 units of Novorapid per meal. This is because, though I am average weight, I tend to eat large carb-based meals, followed by a sweet dessert. I do not go hypo very often, infact my blood sugar is often too high, but it feels strange putting 20 units of insulin into my body in one go. Is this a bad idea and should I be eating smaller or less carb-based meals? It always seems to help me to lower my carb intake when my numbers get out of whack. You will have to get over your fear of needles, it will just add more pain and suffering to your life if you neglect to take care of yourself. 10-12u of Levemir seems like a low dosage considering the 16-20u per meal Novorapid. If you could just give some general information: if you took the insulin regularly you could likely take less by your description you regularly eat a 300 gram carb meal and take enough insulin for it, yet you admit youare high often. I would encourage you to take this more seriously and take better c Continue reading >>

Is It Normal To Need Pretty High Doses Of Novorapid?

Is It Normal To Need Pretty High Doses Of Novorapid?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Is it normal to need pretty high doses of Novorapid? I'm 26 years old and had type 1 since I was 22. I got changed over from 30/70 insulin to basal bolus last October. It's helped my control and given me more freedom with food, however, I find that some weeks I need (in my opinion) stupid high doses of Novorapid for not much carbohydrate. In general for meals, I eat a lot of salads, vegetables, cauliflower rice, chicken. And I snack on frozen banana slices, cinnamon coated apple slices and frozen grapes. Sometimes I have those Yushoi rice snacks since they're made from green peas or something and low fat/calorie. That is 90% of my food apart from Wednesdays is my day off so I eat more like a normal person. I do eat the basic vanilla carbs like bread, rice, etc but not nearly as much as most people. For instance once a week or fortnight we have takeout food, but even then I give myself small portions of carbs and try to pick the chicken out so I don't eat all the fattening sauce in a curry. My nurse told me I need 20 units of basal (taking 26 now), and 1-2 units of Novorapid per 10g of carbohydrate. I'm finding I need about 5 per 10g. I've just had a small bag of those sunbites low fat crackers and had to take 7 units for 14g of carbs, and I guarantee you my blood sugar will still be about 10 later. Last night, I had a medium sized burrito for dinner since it was cheat day. I took about 23 units of Novorapid, and my blood sugar was still 10.9 this morning. I took 8 units, had a 7g of carb cereal bar for breakfast... 2 hours later blood sugar is still 10.7. This isn't a constant thing, and I find it weird that I still have to take like 7 units even if I Continue reading >>

Novorapid | Drugs.com

Novorapid | Drugs.com

Marketing Authorisation Holder: Novo Nordisk A/S Pharmacotherapeutic Group: Drugs used in diabetes NovoRapid is indicated for treatment of diabetes mellitus in adults, adolescents and children aged 1 year and above. What is NovoRapid and what is it used for? NovoRapid is used to treat adults, adolescents and children over one year old who have diabetes. It contains the active substance insulin aspart, a rapid-acting insulin. NovoRapid is a solution for injection available in vials, cartridges (PenFill and PumpCart) and pre-filled pens (FlexPen, FlexTouch and InnoLet) and can only be obtained with a prescription. It is given by injection under the skin in the abdominal (belly) wall, the thigh, the upper arm, the shoulder or the buttock. The injection site should be changed for each injection. Patients can inject themselves under the skin with NovoRapid if they have been trained appropriately. NovoRapid is usually given immediately before a meal, although it may be given after a meal if necessary. NovoRapid is normally used in combination with an intermediate- or long-acting insulin given at least once a day. The patients blood glucose (sugar) should be tested regularly to find the lowest effective dose. The usual dose is between 0.5 and 1.0 units per kilogram body weight per day. When it is used with meals, 50 to 70% of the insulin requirement may be provided by NovoRapid and the remainder by an intermediate or long-acting insulin. NovoRapid can be used in pregnant women. NovoRapid can also be used in a pump system for continuous insulin infusion under the skin or alternatively, it can be given into a vein but only by a doctor or a nurse. Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce enough insulin to control the level of blood glucose. NovoRapid is a replace Continue reading >>

Novorapid Full Prescribing Information, Dosage & Side Effects | Mims.com Malaysia

Novorapid Full Prescribing Information, Dosage & Side Effects | Mims.com Malaysia

Treatment of diabetes mellitus in adults, adolescents and children aged 2 years and above. Posology: NovoRapid is a rapid-acting insulin analogue. NovoRapid dosage is individual and determined in accordance with the needs of the patient. It should normally be used in combination with intermediate-acting or long-acting insulin given at least once a day. Blood glucose monitoring and insulin dose adjustment are recommended to achieve optimal glycaemic control. The individual insulin requirement in adults and children is usually between 0.5 and 1.0 U/kg/day. In a basal-bolus treatment regimen, 50-70% of this requirement may be provided by NovoRapid and the remainder by intermediate-acting or long-acting insulin. Adjustment of dosage may be necessary if patients undertake increased physical activity, change their usual diet or during concomitant illness. NovoRapid has a faster onset and a shorter duration of action than soluble human insulin. Due to the faster onset of action, NovoRapid should generally be given immediately before a meal. When necessary NovoRapid can be given soon after a meal. Due to the shorter duration, NovoRapid has a lower risk of causing nocturnal hypoglycaemic episodes. Special populations: As with all insulin products, in elderly patients and patients with renal or hepatic impairment, glucose monitoring should be intensified and the insulin aspart dosage adjusted on an individual basis. Paediatric population: NovoRapid can be used in children in preference to soluble human insulin when a rapid onset of action might be beneficial. For example, in the timing of the injections in relation to meals. Transfer from other insulin products: When transferring from other insulin products, adjustment of the NovoRapid dose and the dose of the basal insulin may Continue reading >>

Interactive Dosing Calculator

Interactive Dosing Calculator

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Novorapid

Novorapid

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. Insulin aspart is a rapid-acting insulin. It takes 10 to 20 minutes to begin working after the injection, has its maximum effect between 1 hour and 3 hours, and stops working after 3 to 5 hours. Insulin aspart should be used along with an intermediate or long-acting insulin. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? NovoRapid® 3 mL P Continue reading >>

Novorapid

Novorapid

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. Insulin aspart is a rapid-acting insulin. It takes 10 to 20 minutes to begin working after the injection, has its maximum effect between 1 hour and 3 hours, and stops working after 3 to 5 hours. Insulin aspart should be used along with an intermediate or long-acting insulin. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? NovoRapid® 3 mL P Continue reading >>

Novorapid (insulin Aspart)

Novorapid (insulin Aspart)

What is it used for? How does it work? NovoRapid vials, prefilled pens (FlexPen and Flextouch pens) and penfill cartridges (for use with NovoPens) all contain the active ingredient insulin aspart. They are used to treat diabetes. People with diabetes have a deficiency or absence of a hormone manufactured by the pancreas called insulin. Insulin is the main hormone responsible for the control of sugar (glucose) in the blood. People with type 1 diabetes need to have injections of insulin to control the amount of glucose in their bloodstream. Insulin injections act as a replacement for natural insulin and allow people with diabetes to achieve normal blood glucose levels. The insulin works in the same way as natural insulin, by binding to insulin receptors on cells in the body. Insulin causes cells in the liver, muscle and fat tissue to increase their uptake of glucose form the bloodstream. It also decreases the production of glucose by the liver, and has various other effects that lower the amount of glucose in the blood. NovoRapid injections contain a type of insulin called insulin aspart. This is known as a fast-acting insulin. When it is injected under the skin it starts to lower blood sugar within approximately 10 to 20 minutes, and its effects last for three to five hours. This type of insulin should be injected shortly before or if necessary shortly after a meal, to control increasing blood glucose levels after eating. Insulin aspart is usually given in combination with intermediate or longer-acting types of insulin, which provide control over blood glucose throughout the day. It is important to monitor your blood glucose regularly and adjust your insulin dose as required. Your doctor or diabetic team will explain how to do this. Keeping your blood glucose level as cl Continue reading >>

Basal Bolus Regimes

Basal Bolus Regimes

Diabetes Service Adjusting Your Insulin Doses Basal Bolus Regimes This leaflet contains some general guidelines on how to adjust your insulin doses safely. Aim to keep your blood glucose levels between 4-8 mmols before meals. There may be a number of reasons why your blood glucose is unusually high or low on an occasion. Reasons why your blood glucose may be HIGH: ï‚· You have forgotten to take your insulin injection. ï‚· You have taken a smaller dose of insulin than usual. ï‚· You have eaten a larger amount of carbohydrate containing food than usual. ï‚· Stress/anxiety. ï‚· Illness or an infection. ï‚· Poor rotation of injection sites. ï‚· You did not undertake your usual routine e.g. exercise, holidays, weekend. ï‚· Faulty pen device. ï‚· Out of date test strips. Reasons why your blood glucose may be LOW: ï‚· You have taken a larger dose of insulin than usual. ï‚· Forgetting a meal or being late with a meal. ï‚· You have left a long gap between your insulin injection and meal (particularly if your insulin is Humalog or Novorapid). ï‚· You have only eaten a small amount of carbohydrate food. ï‚· Very hot or cold weather. ï‚· Physical exercise which can also have a delayed effect on blood glucose levels following exercise. ï‚· Alcohol, which could be from many hours before. ï‚· Long needle length. ï‚· Injecting into muscle by accident. ï‚· You are unaware that your blood glucose levels are dropping (hypoglycaemic unawareness). If your blood glucose level is consistently too high or too low at a particular time of day on at least 3 occasions then you should consider adjusting your insulin doses. Increasing the dose of insulin will lower your blood glucose levels Insulin  = Blood Glucose ï Continue reading >>

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