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Novolog Vial Price

What's The Price Of Novolog In Canada? - Diabetes

What's The Price Of Novolog In Canada? - Diabetes

Depending on province medicare will pick up a portion. Prices are similar on both sides of the border though. Novolog is called Novorapid in Canada. Lantus has the same name. For Novorapid you are looking at roughly $60-$70 for a box of the penfill cartridges. It depends on the province of course. Lantus is about $110-$115 for a box of penfill cartridges. Canada sucks when it comes to covering prescription medicine with healthcare. I pay $35 for a vial of humalog or novorapid over the counter. I would advise looking into Great West Life prescription insurance. The thing about Ontario at least is that all drugs are zero co-pay, if they're on Ontario's required coverage list. Practically, this has been everything we've needed diabetes-wise. The insurance is ~$250/mo. but if it makes all the medicine free, it's a good deal IMO. It has even covered some advanced / really new / really expensive drugs. Though we have been disallowed for one. GWL has been great at reimbursing within a few days (!). We have to pay for pump supplies and then get reimbursed. Oh! I should mention that we're American. I think citizens may get pump supplies through OHIP or provincial heath. We were told we would if we became landed immigrants, but GWL pays for it anyhow. If you live anywhere near Kingston, you're pretty much shit out of luck for an endo. In general, I'd say it's likely to be MUCH cheaper for you overall, but the accessibility to endos or specialists in my experience is very much "who you know" and jumping huge wait lists. Continue reading >>

The Rising Price Of Insulin

The Rising Price Of Insulin

Diabetes is a chronic disease that afflicts 25.8 million Americans. Insulin, one of the primary treatments for diabetes, has been around since the 1920s. Yet, somehow the drug is still priced beyond the reach of many Americans. One of our advocates recently left a comment on our Facebook page regarding this problem, which encouraged us to take a closer look at it. Medication nonadherence (patients not taking medicine as prescribed) is undeniably related to diabetes-related health complications that result in emergency room visits and lost productivity. Diabetes is an expensive and deadly disease. It is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. and cost the country $245 billion last year. A few big pharmaceutical firms dominate the insulin market due to lengthy patents and lack of generic competition. Insulin is a biologic drug, which means that it is made up of living organisms rather than chemical compounds. This makes it more difficult to copy, which biotech companies often use as justification for the exorbitant prices they charge for the drugs. We’ve had anecdotal evidence from a consumer of a big price hike on her Humalog insulin this year. When she was trying to find out further information about the price increase, she was told by her insurance company to expect the drug to go up 25 percent more in December. News reports indicate that the cost of Lantus, a top-selling insulin produced by Sanofi, has gone up twice already this year, first 10 and then 15 percent. In addition, Novo Nordisk has also increased the price of Levemir, another common insulin treatment, by 10 percent. What’s going on here? Overall drug spending is slightly down due to generic drug utilization being up. And generic competition isn’t too far off for many of these drugs. It looks l Continue reading >>

Buy Novolog/novorapid (insulin Aspart) Vials Online

Buy Novolog/novorapid (insulin Aspart) Vials Online

NovoLog/NovoRapid (Insulin Aspart) Vials 10 mL QTY TYPE PRICE COST PER UNIT 1 10 mL Vial $80.91 $80.91 2 10 mL Vial $125.80 $62.90 3 10 mL Vial $170.67 $56.89 4 10 mL Vial $215.56 $53.89 5 10 mL Vial $260.45 $52.09 6 10 mL Vial $305.34 $50.89 7 10 mL Vial $350.21 $50.03 8 10 mL Vial $395.12 $49.39 9 10 mL Vial $442.53 $49.17 10 10 mL Vial $484.90 $48.49 VIEW ALL INSULIN PRODUCTS PLACE A NEW INSULIN ORDER What is NovoLog Vial? NovoLog, known as NovoRapid in Canada, contains insulin aspart, which is a fast-acting mealtime insulin. Insulin aspart is a man-made insulin that is similar to naturally occurring human insulin. Only a single amino acid has been modified, compared to the structure of human insulin (which consists of 51 amino acids in total). This small change allows this medication to be absorbed quickly. It starts to work in minutes, which lets you eat soon after its administration. What is it used for? NovoLog is used for the control of blood sugar levels in adults and children with diabetes. It has a relatively low likelihood of causing hypoglycemia, which is low blood sugar, the most common side effect of insulin therapy. How does it work? NovoLog is a type of mealtime or bolus insulin, which works quickly to regulate blood sugar levels during and after eating. You can start to eat within 5 to 10 minutes after taking it, with its peak action taking effect between 45 to 90 minutes, while lasting approximately 3 to 5 hours. These times are based on averages and can vary due to which injection site you use, the temperature of the medication, your blood flow and exercise. NovoLog is similar in structure to naturally occurring insulin and works similarly, too. Naturally occurring insulin is a hormone produced in a large organ near the stomach called the pancreas. I Continue reading >>

The Prices For Life-saving Diabetes Medications Have Increased Again

The Prices For Life-saving Diabetes Medications Have Increased Again

A Type 1 diabetes patient holds up bottles of insulin. Reuters/Lucy Nicholson Insulin prices have been rising — increases that mean some people are spending as much on monthly diabetes-related expenses as their mortgage payment. It's led some people living with diabetes to turn to the black market, crowdfunding pages, and Facebook pages to get access to the life-saving drug. At the same time, the companies that make insulin have faced pressure from politicians including Senator Bernie Sanders, class-action lawsuits that accuse the companies of price-fixing, and proposed legislation in Nevada. Even in the face of this criticism, two of those drugmakers — Eli Lilly and Novo Nordisk — raised the list price of their insulins again in 2017. Diabetes is a group of conditions in which the body can't properly regulate blood sugar that affects roughly 30 million people in the US. For many people living with diabetes — including the 1.25 million people in the US who have type-1 diabetes — injecting insulin is part of the daily routine. Insulin, a hormone that healthy bodies produce, has been used to treat diabetes for almost a century, though it's gone through some modifications. As of May 2, the list price of Humalog, a short-acting insulin, is $274.70 for a 10 ml bottle, an increase of 7.8% from what the list price had been since July 2016. On May 2, Lilly also took a 7.8% list price increase to Humulin, an older form of insulin. Novo Nordisk, which also makes a short-acting insulin, increased its prices to the drug in 2017. In February, the drugmaker raised its price to $275.58 for a 10 ml bottle, up 7.9% from what the list price had been since July 2016. In December, Novo Nordisk committed to limiting all future drug list price increases from the company to single d Continue reading >>

Insulin Prices Have Skyrocketed, Putting Drug Makers On The Defensive

Insulin Prices Have Skyrocketed, Putting Drug Makers On The Defensive

Here’s a sticking point for diabetics: the cost of insulin more than tripled — from $231 to $736 a year per patient — between 2002 and 2013, according to a new analysis. The increase reflected rising prices for a milliliter of insulin, which climbed 197 percent from $4.34 per to $12.92 during the same period. Meanwhile, the amount of money spent by each patient on other diabetes medications fell 16 percent, to $502 from $600, according to a research letter published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. “Insulin is a life-saving medication,” said Dr. William Herman, a coauthor of the analysis and a professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. “There are people with type 1 diabetes who will die without insulin. And while there have been incremental benefits in insulin products, prices have been rising. So there are people who can’t afford them. It’s a real problem.” The analysis also found that the cost of various widely used oral diabetes drugs either dropped in price or did not rise nearly as significantly as insulin. Metformin, for instance, which is available as a generic, fell to 31 cents in 2013 from $1.24 per tablet in 2002. And the newer class of diabetes drugs known as DPP-4 inhibitors rose 34 percent since becoming available in 2006. The researchers analyzed data from nearly 28,000 diabetes patients found in the Medical Expenditure Panel, a database on health care costs maintained by the US Department of Health and Human Services. About 1 in 4 people used insulin and two-thirds took a pill. Toward the end of the study period, a small percentage began taking new injectable medicines that are designed to complement pills. There have been previous efforts to track insulin pric Continue reading >>

How To Find A Lantus Coupon

How To Find A Lantus Coupon

It looks like this page may be out of date. Please visit NerdWallet’s health hub for our latest content. Diabetics don’t have much of a choice when it comes to taking their insulin, and the costs can be very high, so a Lantus coupon can be invaluable. Paired with diabetic supplies like syringes and blood glucose testing equipment, diabetes is an expensive disease. But with a little bit of information and some resourcefulness, you may be able to save on your monthly prescriptions. Lantus is a long-acting insulin made by Sanofi-Aventis and prescribed to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics. Diabetics are unable to naturally produce or use insulin like most people, so they take injections of synthetic insulin to help regulate their blood sugar. Generic Lantus At this time, there is no generic form of Lantus available. However, that may soon change. The patents protecting Lantus from cheaper generic alternatives expired in February 2015, so less expensive forms of the drug may be coming. When this happens, opting for generic will likely be the best way to save on Lantus, and because of FDA requirements, you don’t have to worry about the generic version being less effective or less safe. Although some people avoid buying generics because they are afraid they won’t work as well as the name brands, those fears are largely unfounded. Lantus coupons from the manufacturer One carton of Lantus can cost close to $400 without insurance, according to GoodRx.com, though Lantus may very well be part of your insurance formulary. Currently, the maker of the drug offers a Lantus Savings Card. According to its website, the card can reduce your prescription cost to no more than $25. However, it also says there is a maximum benefit of $100 off each prescription for the duration of the pr Continue reading >>

Novolog Prices, Coupons And Patient Assistance Programs

Novolog Prices, Coupons And Patient Assistance Programs

Novolog (insulin aspart) is a member of the insulin drug class and is commonly used for Diabetes - Type 1, Diabetes - Type 2, Diabetic Ketoacidosis and others. Novolog Prices This Novolog price guide is based on using the Drugs.com discount card which is accepted at most U.S. pharmacies. The cost for Novolog injectable solution (100 units/mL) is around $296 for a supply of 10 milliliters, depending on the pharmacy you visit. Prices are for cash paying customers only and are not valid with insurance plans. Novolog is available as a brand name drug only, a generic version is not yet available. For more information, read about generic Novolog availability. Injectable Solution Important: When there is a range of pricing, consumers should normally expect to pay the lower price. However, due to stock shortages and other unknown variables we cannot provide any guarantee. Drugs.com Printable Discount Card Print Now The free Drugs.com Discount Card works like a coupon and can save you up to 80% or more off the cost of prescription medicines, over-the-counter drugs and pet prescriptions. Please note: This is a drug discount program, not an insurance plan. Valid at all major chains including Walgreens, CVS Pharmacy, Target, WalMart Pharmacy, Duane Reade and 63,000 pharmacies nationwide. Novolog Coupons and Rebates Novolog offers may be in the form of a printable coupon, rebate, savings card, trial offer, or free samples. Some offers may be printed right from a website, others require registration, completing a questionnaire, or obtaining a sample from the doctor's office. NovoLog Instant Savings Card: Eligible patients may pay no more than $25 per prescription for NovoLog plus up to 2 years of additional savings on other Novo Nordisk products; also receive 1 FREE box of needles wi Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: What’s The Difference?

Humalog Vs. Novolog: What’s The Difference?

The two leaders in the fast acting insulin market, Humalog and Novolog, are the most common types of fast acting insulin used by those with diabetes today. Fast Acting, mealtime insulin is a type of insulin that is injected before or right after eating. When you eat your blood glucose begins to rise. Fast acting insulin, Humalog and Novolog work to help manage these rises or spikes to keep your blood glucose levels more within range and balanced. When you use a fast acting insulin like Humalog or Novolog, you typically will continue to take a long acting insulin to help manage your levels between your meals and throughout the night. The question is though, is there really a difference between the two? Endocrinologists and other medical professionals don’t seem to really think there is, stating the two are virtually interchangeable. But that’s not really the full story. Humalog (Insulin Lispro) Insulin Lispro (Humalog) has been on the market since 1996, when it was first introduced by Eli Lily. Humalog is the first insulin analogue that was used clinically. Insulin Lispro received its name due to its structure. The difference between it and regular insulin was the switch between the lysine B28 (an amino acid) and proline B29. The formula consists of a hexametric solution available in vials and pen form. After a subcutaneous injection, the formula converts into a monomeric formula which allows it to have a fast absorption in the body. The one noted negative factor of Humalog is its short term control of glucose levels. Additionally, if it is injected and mealtime happens to be delayed, a hypoglycemic episode may occur. For Humalog to be most effective it is to be injected 15 minutes prior to the start of a meal. I recommend reading the following articles: Humalog is a Continue reading >>

Buying Novolog In Canada?

Buying Novolog In Canada?

I live in Northeast Ohio and recently learned that my pharmacy provider, ExpressScripts, will no longer cover Novolog effective January 1, 2014. I am about a three-hour drive from Windsor, so I am wondering if it might be worthwhile for me to try to buy it in Canada instead. Does anybody in the Detroit area go over the border to Windsor to buy their insulin? If so, can you recommend a pharmacy? Depends on how much you are going to be charged for insulin. When I left 3 yrs ago, a box of insulin cartridges for a pen was about $120. Google Shopper's Drug Mart which is the CVS of Ontario and speak to their pharmacist. The price of insulin is pretty much the same at all pharmacies so you only need to talk to one. I'm willing to bet that it would be worth the drive. Just ask them what you need to buy several month's supply. Thanks, Nancy. I will call Shopper's Drug Mart and see what they have to say. I called Hunter's Pharmacy in Windsor yesterday. I read about them in an article about those senior bus trips that go into Canada to buy Rx drugs. They are all set up to receive Americans and their Rxs. Novolog is $33/vial plus a $12 dispensing fee. The dispensing fee is paid per fill, so it is to my advantage to get as many vials as possible per refill. You also have to pay $40/year to an on-site doctor to maintain your medical file and approve your US Rx. The lady explained to me that insulin is actually available without an Rx in Canada, but it is to my advantage to buy it with an Rx because you don't have to pay taxes on the purchase then - something like 12%. She also said you get an "official" receipt that details the drugs you bought so that you can use it when you files your taxes. I was thinking that the receipt might make the purchase eligible for my HSA account. They Continue reading >>

Soaring Insulin Prices Are A Case In Point: A 'free Market' In Healthcare Is Doomed

Soaring Insulin Prices Are A Case In Point: A 'free Market' In Healthcare Is Doomed

A key feature of Republican plans to replace Obamacare is allowing market forces to boost innovation and competition among healthcare providers. “Unleashing the power of choice and competition is the best way to lower healthcare costs and improve quality,” declares House Speaker Paul Ryan in his conservative manifesto “A Better Way.” The problem with that, however, is that the healthcare industry — hospitals, drug companies, insurers — have worked tirelessly to prevent the medical marketplace from functioning with sufficient transparency and efficiency to allow consumers to benefit from classic supply-and-demand economics. Instead, the opaque and frequently unfathomable healthcare market promotes runaway corporate greed that often can be countered only by shaming businesses into behaving fairly and responsibly. Insulin is a perfect example. Pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly announced last week that people with diabetes in high-deductible insurance plans or who are otherwise paying full price for insulin will be eligible for a 40% discount. The move follows Danish insulin maker Novo Nordisk announcing it will limit annual price increases to single digits. However, it’s not like the heads of these companies woke up one morning and realized they’d been despicably taking advantage of people with a chronic disease. Rather, they’re facing heat from lawmakers and are desperate to make a show of sensitivity before anyone demands that they appear on Capitol Hill to explain themselves — as other drugmakers have been forced to do. Sen. Bernie Sanders and Rep. Elijah Cummings said in a letter to the Justice Department and Fair Trade Commission last month that officials need to look into whether drug companies “colluded or engaged in anticompetitive behavior” in Continue reading >>

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. NovoLog® (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin therapy. The timing of hypoglycemia may reflect the time-action profile of the insulin formulation. Glucose monitoring is re Continue reading >>

Why Is Insulin So Expensive In The U.s.?

Why Is Insulin So Expensive In The U.s.?

Dr. Jeremy Greene sees a lot of patients with diabetes that's out of control. In fact, he says, sometimes their blood sugar is "so high that you can't even record the number on their glucometer." Greene, a professor of medicine and history of medicine at Johns Hopkins University, started asking patients at his clinic in Baltimore why they had so much trouble keeping their blood sugar stable. He was shocked by their answer: the high cost of insulin. Greene decided to call some local pharmacies, to ask about low-cost options. He was told no such options existed. "Only then did I realize there is no such thing as generic insulin in the United States in the year 2015," he says. Greene wondered why that was the case. Why was a medicine more than 90 years old so expensive? He started looking into the history of insulin, and has published a paper about his findings in this week's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The story of insulin, it turns out, starts back in the late 1800s. That's when scientists discovered a link between diabetes and damaged cells in the pancreas — cells that produce insulin. In the early 1920s, researchers in Toronto extracted insulin from cattle pancreases and gave it to people who had diabetes, as part of a clinical trial. The first patient was a 14-year-old boy, who made a dramatic recovery. Most others recovered as well. Soon, insulin from pigs and cattle was being produced and sold on a massive scale around the world. But for some, the early forms of the medicine weren't ideal. Many people required multiple injections every day, and some developed minor allergic reactions. Over the next few decades, scientists figured out how to produce higher-quality insulin, Greene says. They made the drug purer, so recipients had fewer bad reaction Continue reading >>

Co-pay Calculator

Co-pay Calculator

Do not share your NovoLog® FlexPen®, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® cartridge or PenFill® cartridge compatible insulin delivery device with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take NovoLog®? Do not take NovoLog® if: your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. How should I take NovoLog®? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. NovoLog® is fast-acting. Eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes after taking it. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Do not share your NovoLog® FlexPen®, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® cartridge or PenFill® cartridge compatible insulin delivery device with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take NovoLog®? Do not take NovoLog® if: your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Before taking NovoLog®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blood sugar. How should I take NovoLog®? Read the Instructions for Use and ta Continue reading >>

Why Walmart Insulins Aren’t The Answer To High Insulin Prices

Why Walmart Insulins Aren’t The Answer To High Insulin Prices

A diabetes advocate contrasts the performance of generic insulins versus the more popular brands. Commentary Some people don’t understand why people with diabetes get upset at the price of insulin. They see insulin for sale at a relatively reasonable price in Walmart and don’t see the problem. What they don’t know is that these Walmart insulins just don’t perform nearly as well as the more expensive insulins, and that gap in performance can have a very negative effect on the health of people with diabetes. There are three insulins available at Walmart for the price of $25 – NPH, Regular, and 70/30 (a mix of the two). NPH was first approved by the FDA in 1950, Regular was approved in 1982, 70/30 in 1989. That means NPH has been around for 66 years, Regular for 33 years, 70/30 for 27 years. Take a moment and think about what healthcare was like in 1950. Now, I’m sure someone is saying, “Well, they must still work if they are still being sold.” And they do, but they don’t work in the same way. These insulins are not interchangeable. If a person with Type 1 diabetes were to switch from a Humalog/Lantus insulin regimen to Regular and NPH, it would drastically alter their lifestyle, making blood sugar control more irregular and raising A1C scores. The biggest issue is that whereas Lantus is steady, NPH peaks. A person using NPH must keep a very set dietary schedule, making sure to eat meals and snacks at certain times to correspond with peak times of an insulin dose. The strict schedule is difficult for everyone, but especially for children. They are unable to alter their daily schedules and must always be sure to eat at specific times. Even if they’re not hungry, they must eat to avoid low blood sugar. And if they are hungry, they often cannot have more t Continue reading >>

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

Insulin can be expensive. If you’re one of the 6 million Americans with diabetes relying on this main-stay treatment, you could be paying out-of-pocket costs anywhere from $120 to $400 per month, according to a 2015 New England Journal of Medicine commentary. Drugs such as Lantus (insulin glargine) and Levemir (insulin detemir) have seen significant cost increases, according to a recent trend report by pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts. One reason for the high prices is the lack of generic options for insulin. So for now, you’re stuck having to search around to find affordable options. Where do you shop for more affordable insulin? For some people though, high drug costs can mean making difficult financial choices. Our national polls show people might cut back on groceries and paying bills to pay for their medications. To minimize your costs, consider these options: Prescription Assistance Programs If you don’t have health insurance or are without drug coverage, look into applying for a patient assistance program (PAP). Through the nonprofit NeedyMeds, you can find some programs that offer free or low-cost insulin as long as you meet the eligibility requirements. Those are usually based on your insurance status, income, and diagnosis. You might also qualify for a diagnosis-specific program that can help you save on syringes, pumps, and other diabetes supplies. Pharmacists are also a great resource and can help you find a PAP that meets your financial needs. Switch Drugs Another way to save is by asking your doctor whether there’s a lower-priced insulin that’s right for you. While “long-acting” is a more popular type of insulin, it's also more expensive, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it works better. “It’s mostly a marketing ploy,” says M Continue reading >>

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