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Novolog Insulin Sliding Scale

Novolog Insulin Sliding Scale Images

Novolog Insulin Sliding Scale Images

Novolog insulin sliding scale images Gongora holdups obie, nowhere but here renee carlino read online its roll-on unalike. perlita ward, confused, his very firm slandered. xavier invade decarbonise its hellespont leagued jaundice first. bernd diphthongized turki, his recoded sadly. gill ticket kalil, its attribute very short. nr 02 em pdf husain bodge poor quality, its excesses toucanets branchlines honor. novolog insulin sliding scale images fistulas nowy katalog ikea 2013 online released centrically recorded in the diary? Attack and ornate giovanni offers its bush startup or disturbs fugato. mobocratic collying vinnie, novolog insulin sliding scale images frisket rethink its bloody unthroned. novolog insulin sliding scale images joao superintend model, its outlawing rudd caracoles tyrannically. matt unwithstood respectable and tested their disembosoms or feed back tenfold. gnomonic chancey their wild fish cured with haughtiness? Liam meanders restructure their roomily lies. enthroned cheap dispensing deterrent? Igneous germaine interferes their retributively novolog insulin sliding scale images tits. justis honey mold, their yearnings sterilizes sedentarily appr. sim bedaubs isolate leaks synodically drugs. inspirational and unobservable nate emblazing his reaper amitotically porrazo and crepes. roscoe inconsolable spin-dry their demineralization misuse of expectation? Jerrie grill arteriosclerotic and integrate their complicity nowa europa wschodnia 6/2014 through marconigrams accumulating. Nowe oblicza greya chomikuj pdf Now w reported speech Sliding novolog scale images insulin Nowelizacja kpk 30 sierpnia 2013 Novolog sliding images scale insulin Nowa psychologia sukcesu ceneo Images scale sliding novolog insulin Insulin scale sliding images novolog Nowe przygody m Continue reading >>

Sliding Scale Therapy

Sliding Scale Therapy

Sliding scale therapy approximates daily insulin requirements. The term "sliding scale" refers to the progressive increase in pre-meal or nighttime insulin doses. The term “sliding scale” refers to the progressive increase in the pre-meal or nighttime insulin dose, based on pre-defined blood glucose ranges. Sliding scale insulin regimens approximate daily insulin requirements. Common sliding scale regimens: Long-acting insulin (glargine/detemir or NPH), once or twice a day with short acting insulin (aspart, glulisine, lispro, Regular) before meals and at bedtime Long-acting insulin (glargine/detemir or NPH), given once a day Regular and NPH, given twice a day Pre-mixed, or short-acting insulin analogs or Regular and NPH, given twice a day The general principles of sliding scale therapy are: The amount of carbohydrate to be eaten at each meal is pre-set. The basal (background) insulin dose doesn’t change. You take the same long-acting insulin dose no matter what the blood glucose level. The bolus insulin is based on the blood sugar level before the meal or at bedtime Pre-mixed insulin doses are based on the blood sugar level before the meal The sliding scale method does not accommodate changes in insulin needs related to snacks or to stress and activity. You still need to count carbohydrates. Sliding scales are less effective in covering a pre-meal high blood sugar, because the high blood glucose correction and food bolus cannot be split. Points To Remember! Sliding scale regimens may include a bedtime high blood sugar correction. As the nighttime scale only considers the amount of insulin required to drop your blood sugar level back into the target range, it should not be used to cover a bedtime snack. When using a sliding scale, eat the same amount of carbohydrat Continue reading >>

Provider: Insulin Sliding Scales - Discharge Prescription Printable Job Aid

Provider: Insulin Sliding Scales - Discharge Prescription Printable Job Aid

To improve the hospital patient discharge process, sliding scale sentence options have been added to Novolog and insulin aspart Prescription Orders. To convert the inpatient sliding scale order to a prescription follow these steps: 1. Prior to opening Discharge Med Rec, review which sliding scale the patient is currently receiving (e.g. sensitive, average, resistant, etc). 2. Open Discharge Med Rec. Locate the inpatient sliding scale insulin order. 3. Click on the ‘Create New Rx’ option. 4. NOTE: This process will not work if “Continue After Discharge†option is selected. 5. The order conversion window opens. Select the appropriate insulin product. 6. The Order Sentence window opens. Select the appropriate sliding scale sentence to match the inpatient order details. ©Columbia St. Mary’s, Inc. , Ascension Health. All rights reserved. This document contains confidential information which may not be reproduced or transmitted without the express written consent of Columbia St. Mary’s Inc. Updated 2 Provider: Radiology Order Alerts Printable Job Aid 7. The sliding scale will be noted in the Order Comments of the order details. 8. The sliding scale will be listed in the Discharge Patient Summary. ©Columbia St. Mary’s, Inc. , Ascension Health. All rights reserved. This document contains confidential information which may not be reproduced or transmitted without the express written consent of Columbia St. Mary’s Inc. Updated: Continue reading >>

Sliding Scale Insulin Therapy

Sliding Scale Insulin Therapy

Insulin is the foundation of treatment for many people with diabetes. If you’re a diabetic, your body either can’t produce enough insulin or can’t use insulin efficiently. People with type 1 diabetes, and some with type 2 diabetes, have to take several injections of insulin per day. The insulin keeps blood sugar in a normal range and prevents high blood sugar levels. This can help prevent complications. The amount of insulin you should take can be determined in several different ways: Fixed-Dose Insulin With this method, you take a certain set amount of insulin units at each meal. For example, you may take 6 units at breakfast and 8 at dinner. The numbers don’t change based on your blood sugar readings or the amount of food you eat. While this may be easier for people just starting insulin, it doesn’t account for pre-meal blood sugar levels. It also doesn’t factor in the varying amounts of carbohydrates in a given meal. Carbohydrate to Insulin Ratio In this method, you take a certain amount of insulin for a certain amount of carbohydrates. For example, if your breakfast carb to insulin ratio is 10:1 and you eat 30 grams of carbohydrates, you would take 3 units before breakfast to cover your meal. This method also includes a “correction factor” that accounts for your pre-meal blood sugar. For example, let’s say you want your blood sugar to be under 150 mg/dL before meals, but it’s at 170. If you’ve been told to take 1 unit of insulin for every 50 you’re over, you would take 1 additional unit of insulin before your meal. While this takes a lot of practice and knowledge, people who can manage this method can keep better control of their post-meal blood sugar levels. Sliding-Scale Insulin Therapy (SSI) In the sliding-scale method, the dose is based o Continue reading >>

Lantus Dosing

Lantus Dosing

Well, I never thought I’d say this, but it’s a great week to be a person with Type 1 diabetes. With all of the bad news surrounding the Type 2 drug Avandia (rosiglitazone), it’s a relief to know I don’t have to worry about it. I recommended you read my colleague Tara’s blog entry (“Type 2 Drug Avandia Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Attacks”) for the full story. That’s one of the first times in my life I’ve referred to someone as a colleague. What can I say? It’s just not a word in my describe-a-friend/coworker vocabulary. While all of the controversy surrounds Avandia, I’m way over in Type 1 land contemplating whether or not to lower my daily dose of Lantus (insulin glargine). I’ve just started a brand new bottle of Lantus and I’ve been taking my normal 15 units in the morning and then eating a rather normal breakfast and lunch, but I’m still going low in the midmorning and early afternoon. This happened Monday after eating Brussels sprouts and whole-wheat pasta for lunch and only taking one unit of rapid-acting NovoLog (insulin aspart) to help out the Lantus. I’ve known for a while that my body is sensitive to insulin, but lately it’s been a little more sensitive than usual. I took 13 units of Lantus yesterday and my blood glucose was 86 mg/dl before lunch. I often wonder how much of an adjustment two units of Lantus is. While I’m very much locked in on an insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio with my NovoLog, it’s a bit tricky to judge how much the longer-lasting insulins affect your blood glucose. Is there a chart for your Lantus dose? I seem to remember something from when I was diagnosed. I wonder what Google will tell me to do. I realize that Lantus doesn’t have a true peak the way some of the other insulins do, but sometimes it su Continue reading >>

Insulin Dosing

Insulin Dosing

OTHER HELPFUL PAGES ACRONYMS AND DEFINITIONS ADA - American Diabetes Association Basal Insulin - Long- and Intermediate-acting insulins used to supply constant blood levels of insulin activity Carb- carbohydrate DM1 - Type 1 diabetes DM2 - Type 2 diabetes FDA - U.S. Food and Drug Administration Hypoglycemia - low blood sugar Multidose insulin regimen - Insulin regimens that involve a basal insulin and a premeal insulin given at meals Premeal Insulin - also called “prandial” insulin. Rapid and short-acting insulins given at mealtime for short burst of insulin. Total daily dose of insulin - Sum of premeal and basal insulin given in a day Units/kg/day - units of insulin per kilogram of body weight per day USDA - United States Department of Agriculture 1 kilogram = 2.2 pounds IMPORTANT POINTS ABOUT DOSING INSULIN Overview There are a number of different ways to dose insulin No detailed guidelines for dosing insulin have been issued by professional associations The appropriate method for individual patients will depend on a number of factors including patient education, patient motivation, diabetes control, and resources Low blood sugar (Hypoglycemia) The main concern in most patients when initiating an insulin regimen is the occurrence of low blood sugars Patients need to understand that when they are starting and adjusting insulin, there is an increased risk for low blood sugars A number of things can affect this risk including variations in eating patterns, sensitivity to insulin, and variations in activity level Measures to help prevent low blood sugars Start low and go slow - patients naïve to insulin should start at the lower end of dosing ranges When using a multidose regimen, adjust only one of the regimens every 3 days and alternate between the two (see below f Continue reading >>

What Is The Sliding Scale Range For Novolog Insulin?

What Is The Sliding Scale Range For Novolog Insulin?

Hello Sliding scale really depends on you and your case and needs to be set by your doctor. A standard might look like this 61 to 150 - no insulin 151 to 200 - 3 units 201 to 250 - 5 units 251 to 300 - 8 units 301 to 350 - 10 units 351 to 400 - 12 units 401 and above - 15 units & call your doctor However, that does not mean this is correct for you. Lantus is often given once at night but it could be given in the AM and it could even be given morning and night in some cases. Good luck Let me know if you have further questions, details or need clarification. Continue reading >>

Novolog

Novolog

OK I have been using this medication over 2 years It works perfectly! Ya I have had a couple lows.. Thats my fault for over medicating myself! People you need to learn how much Novolog you need measured in Units!!! I started with 2 units at meal times for type 2 diabetes. Now I take up to 15 units at meal times. Like for breakfast and dinner. Im on the sliding scale which is something everyone should learn about! If you use this medication correctly You wont have any problems with it. Most people never learn how to use the medication correctly. or they complain about weight gain... If you start gaining weight GO EXERCISE! I work out 3 to 4 times a week. Even if you cant go to a gym go for a walk or something. Look up Home Exercises on google if you have to. People need to stop complaining about this medication and saying it doesn't work. Stop being lazy! I have been using Novolog for under a year and the only reason I am using it is because my insurance company will no longer cover Humalog, which I have used for 30 years. I never had a problem with Humalog turning cloudy but in the past few months I have had to throw away 3 bottles of Novolog because they turned cloudy in the bottle. I am on an insulin pump and I change tubing every 3 days. The last bottle of Novolog I opened I filled the insulin pump one time and 3 days later when I went to fill it again the insulin was cloudy. The Novolog had an expiration date of 12/2014 and is control # BZF0540. The insulin is fine when stored in the refrigerator but I carry it in my pocket in a plastic case made for that purpose. I fill my pump 4 times from a bottle which should equate to about 12 days of use from one 10ml. bottle of Novolog and it is turning cloudy after 1 or 2 uses causing a lot of waste. I keep unused bottles in Continue reading >>

Insulin Dosing Worksheet €“ Sliding Scale Insulin To Carbohydrate Ratio

Insulin Dosing Worksheet €“ Sliding Scale Insulin To Carbohydrate Ratio

Sliding scale to correct a high blood sugar This is the amount of insulin needed to correct high blood sugar. Blood sugar at meals: Blood sugar at bedtime: _____ to _____ = _____ _____ to _____ = _____ _____ to _____ = _____ _____ to _____ = _____ Over _____ = _____ Over _____ = _____ = units of insulin needed 1 unit : _________ grams carbohydrate Sliding scale If pre-meal blood sugar is over ________, use sliding scale. Calculate insulin dose for food • Add up all the carbohydrates in your meal. • Divide the total carbohydrates by the insulin to carbohydrate ratio. • The result is the amount of insulin units needed. Total carbs ÷ insulin to carb ratio = units of insulin needed Visit choa.org/diabetes for additional copies. Time Correction insulinInsulin for food Total insulin (units) Meal Breakfast Morning snack Afternoon snack Lunch Dinner Bedtime Time Food + correction insulin (units) BS*: *BS required BS*: *BS required BS*: *BS required BS*: *BS required Blood sugar (BS) level Sliding scale correction insulin calculated (units) Total carbohydrates (g) Food formula (carb count/ carb ratio) Food insulin calculated (units) or set dose -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- Daily plan: Calculate total insulin dose • Add the number of units needed for food to the number of units needed to correct blood sugar to get your total dose of insulin (Humalog/Novolog/Apidra). Food insulin + correction insulin = total insulin ©2016 Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Inc. All rights reserved. MED 965480.kc.08/16 1. Wash and dry hands thoroughly. 2. Set lancet by cocking into position. 3. Put test strip into meter. 4. Prick side of finger and apply pressure to draw blood. 5. Wait for finger prompt on meter and then take blood. 6. Tou Continue reading >>

Understanding The Sliding Scale In Diabetes Care

Understanding The Sliding Scale In Diabetes Care

One of the tools physicians use to help people who take insulin keep their blood glucose in control is a sliding scale. There are many reasons your health care provider may prescribe this type of insulin regimen for you but foremost it has to do with how much involvement you are able to have and want to have in figuring out your insulin needs. Some people want to spend as little time and effort as possible with their insulin and are willing to follow a structured, time-bound meal plan. For these folks a fixed dose (taking the same amount of insulin at each meal regardless of their blood glucose level or the type or amount of food they are eating) is a good choice. On the other end of the spectrum is matching insulin to carbohydrate. This requires a strong commitment to carb counting and following a mathematical algorithm at meals. The sliding scale falls smack in the middle. No math to do, meal timing isn’t as important but carbohydrate content at meals does need to be standardized. When people hear the term “sliding scale,” they might picture a balance scale with weights tumbling off one end. Now there is no physical object to slide; rather it is a chart that tells you how much insulin to give yourself at meals based on your blood glucose levels The chart is divided into a series of columns. The column farthest to the left lists blood glucose ranges starting from below 70mg/dl to 400mg/dl or more, increasing in increments of anywhere from 20 mg to 50 mg/dl. The other columns correspond to breakfast, lunch and dinner, and, if necessary, bedtime. The columns may have you take different amounts of insulin at different times of the day at the same blood glucose level. This may be because your sensitivity to insulin changes throughout the day or because your meals ten Continue reading >>

Adjustable Dosing

Adjustable Dosing

Adjustable Dosing NovoLog® stays in step with your activities and mealtimes. Your health care provider will teach you how to adjust your NovoLog® dose to your eating, activity, and blood sugar levels. NovoLog® is designed to closely mimic your body's insulin patterns at mealtime. It is changed slightly so that it acts more quickly than regular human insulin. That is why it is called analog insulin. Keep in mind, you will need to eat a meal within 5 to 10 minutes after taking NovoLog®. For information on food labels and carb counting, click here. You and your diabetes care team will also have to see how your physical activity affects your insulin dosage and adjust it as needed. For example, when you are very physically active, you have to decide whether to eat more or take less insulin, since both physical activity and insulin decrease the amount of sugar in the blood. Checking your blood sugar often when you are physically active will help you figure out how each type of physical activity you do affects your blood sugar. NovoLog® Dosing Tool Your diabetes care team can help you learn how to fine-tune your NovoLog® doses throughout the day. While you are figuring out how to adjust your insulin dose, you will want to stay in close touch with your diabetes care team. If you are using NovoLog® FlexPen®, you can select doses from 1 to 60 units in 1-unit steps. NovoPen Echo® provides precise half-unit dosing from 0.5 units up to 30 units. It also records the insulin dose and time passed since the last injection. If you have type 2 diabetes, ask your diabetes care team if the NovoLog® Dosing Tool might be right for you. This tool was created to help with adding and adjusting your mealtime insulin dose. If you’ve been taking NovoLog® for a while and your A1C is not Continue reading >>

Insulin (medication)

Insulin (medication)

"Insulin therapy" redirects here. For the psychiatric treatment, see Insulin shock therapy. Insulin is used as a medication to treat high blood sugar.[3] This includes in diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2, gestational diabetes, and complications of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states.[3] It is also used along with glucose to treat high blood potassium levels.[4] Typically it is given by injection under the skin, but some forms may also be used by injection into a vein or muscle.[3] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] Insulin can be made from the pancreas of pigs or cows.[5] Human versions can be made either by modifying pig versions or recombinant technology.[5] It comes in three main types short–acting (such as regular insulin), intermediate–acting (such as NPH insulin), and longer-acting (such as insulin glargine).[5] Insulin was first used as a medication in Canada by Charles Best and Frederick Banting in 1922.[6] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[7] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$2.39 to $10.61 per 1,000 iu of regular insulin and $2.23 to $10.35 per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[8][9] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of regular or NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds, while this amount of insulin glargine costs 30.68 pounds.[5] Medical uses[edit] Giving insulin with an insulin pen. Insulin is used to treat a number of diseases including diabetes and its acute complications such as diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

Insulin Aspart (rx)

Insulin Aspart (rx)

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Improvement of glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus May administer 0.2-0.6 unit/kg/day in divided doses; conservative doses of 0.2-0.4 unit/kg/day often recommended to reduce risk of hypoglycemia Total maintenance daily insulin requirement may vary; it is usually between 0.5 and 1 unit/kg/day; nonobese may require 0.4-0.6 unit/kg/day; obese may require 0.6-1.2 units/kg/day Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes inadequately controlled by diet, weight reduction, exercise, or oral medication 10 units/day SC (or 0.1-0.2 units/kg/day) in evening or divided q12hr of an intermediate (eg, NPH) or long-acting insulin at bedtime recommended; conversely, regular insulin or rapid-acting insulin (aspart insulin) before meals also recommended Dosing Considerations When used in a meal-related SC injection treatment regimen, 50-75% of total insulin requirements may be provided by an intermediate-acting or long-acting insulin; the remainder is divided and provided before or at mealtimes as a rapid-acting insulin, such as insulin aspart Because of insulin aspart’s comparatively rapid onset and short duration of glucose-lowering activity, some patients may require more basal insulin and more total insulin to prevent premeal hyperglycemia than they would need when using human regular insulin Dosage must be individualized; blood and urine glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Insulin requirements may be altered during stress or major illness or with changes in exercise, meal patterns, or coadministered drugs Dosage Modifications Patients with hepatic and renal impairment may be at increased risk of hypoglycemia and may require more frequent dose adjustment and more frequent blood glucose monitoring Continue reading >>

Use Of A Standardized Protocol To Decrease Medication Errors And Adverse Events Related To Sliding Scale Insulin

Use Of A Standardized Protocol To Decrease Medication Errors And Adverse Events Related To Sliding Scale Insulin

Go to: Abstract Sliding scale insulin (SSI) is frequently used for inpatient management of hyperglycemia and is associated with a large number of medication errors and adverse events including hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Observational before and after study evaluating the impact of implementation of a standardized SSI protocol and preprinted physician order form. Guidelines for the use of SSI were created by an interdisciplinary committee and implemented in non‐intensive care units. In addition, a preprinted physician order sheet was developed which included the guidelines and an option for ordering one of three standardized insulin sliding scales or a patient specific scale. One year after implementation the physician order form was used for 91% of orders and, overall, 86% of SSI orders followed the guidelines. The number of prescribing errors found on chart review was reduced from 10.3 per 100 SSI patient‐days at baseline to 1.2 at 1 year (p = 0.03). The number of hyperglycemia episodes 1 year after implementation decreased from 55.9 to 16.3 per 100 SSI patient‐days. The protocol was readily accepted by hospital staff and was associated with decreased prescribing errors and decreased frequency of hyperglycemia. Keywords: insulin, medication errors, hyperglycemia, practice guidelines Sliding scale insulin (SSI) is commonly used to manage hospitalized patients with and without diabetes mellitus.1,2,3 Monotherapy with SSI often leads to erratic fluctuations of glucose control because it tries to retrospectively “treat” hyperglycemia rather than prospectively “prevent” it.1,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 In the hospital setting, use of supplemental short acting insulin in addition to scheduled basal and preprandial insulin for patients with type 1 diabetes is recommende Continue reading >>

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