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Normal Insulin Level Range

C-peptide

C-peptide

A C-peptide test measures the level of this peptide in the blood. It is generally found in amounts equal to insulin because insulin and C-peptide are linked when first made by the pancreas. Insulin helps the body use and control the amount of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Insulin allows glucose to enter body cells where it is used for energy. The level of C-peptide in the blood can show how much insulin is being made by the pancreas . C-peptide does not affect the blood sugar level in the body. A C-peptide test can be done when diabetes has just been found and it is not clear whether type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes is present. A person whose pancreas does not make any insulin (type 1 diabetes) has a low level of insulin and C-peptide. A person with type 2 diabetes can have a normal or high level of C-peptide. A C-peptide test can also help find the cause of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), such as excessive use of medicine to treat diabetes or a noncancerous growth (tumor) in the pancreas (insulinoma). Because man-made (synthetic) insulin does not have C-peptide, a person with a low blood sugar level from taking too much insulin will have a low C-peptide level but a high level of insulin. An insulinoma causes the pancreas to release too much insulin, which causes blood sugar levels to drop (hypoglycemia). A person with an insulinoma will have a high level of C-peptide in the blood when they have a high level of insulin. A C-peptide test is done to: Help tell the difference between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Find the cause of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Check to see whether a tumor of the pancreas (insulinoma) was completely removed. You may be asked to stop eating and drinking for 8 hours before having this blood test. Insulin and some oral medicines use Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

Insulin is an anabolic hormone that promotes glucose uptake, glycogenesis, lipogenesis, and protein synthesis of skeletal muscle and fat tissue through the tyrosine kinase receptor pathway. In addition, insulin is the most important factor in the regulation of plasma glucose homeostasis, as it counteracts glucagon and other catabolic hormones—epinephrine, glucocorticoid, and growth hormone. Table 1. Reference Range of Insulin Levels [1] (Open Table in a new window) Insulin Level Insulin Level (SI Units*) Fasting < 25 mIU/L < 174 pmol/L 30 minutes after glucose administration 30-230 mIU/L 208-1597 pmol/L 1 hour after glucose administration 18-276 mIU/L 125-1917 pmol/L 2 hour after glucose administration 16-166 mIU/L 111-1153 pmol/L ≥3 hours after glucose administration < 25 mIU/L < 174 pmol/L *SI unit: conversional units x 6.945 Continue reading >>

Blood Levels Of Insulin And Hemoglobin A1c In Foundation Members

Blood Levels Of Insulin And Hemoglobin A1c In Foundation Members

Life Extension® has an advantage in identifying modern causes of premature aging and death. That’s because we have direct access to tens of thousands of our members’ blood test results. Our review of this real-world data enables us to uncover disease risk factors that are overlooked by the mainstream media. We then alert members about simple steps they can take to mitigate these hazards. Earlier this year, we analyzed fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c blood levels in over 10,000 members. A startling 66% had higher than desired fasting insulin. Twenty-two percent had hemoglobin A1c levels that placed them in a pre-diabetic state. Hemoglobin A1c measures the percentage of glycated hemoglobin in one’s blood. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be below 5.6%,1 yet more than one in five people we tested had a reading over 6%. Gaining early access to this kind of data can spare aging humans the ravages of degenerative illness. Armed with this knowledge, Foundation members can slash their risk of cancer, vascular occlusion, and other complications before frank diabetes is diagnosed. This article will describe the dangers of elevated fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c, our recent analysis of member blood tests, and a novel way to protect against glycemic overload. What Is Insulin Supposed to Do? Insulin is a hormone that regulates carbohydrate and fat metabolism.2 Insulin enables liver and muscle cells to take up blood sugar (glucose) for energy production or storage.2 Insulin also facilitates the packing of glucose into fat cells as triglycerides.2 A burst of insulin is released in response to food ingestion. Once glucose has been safely shuttled into energy producing cells or stored, insulin levels should drop below 5 µIU/mL.3 Only a tiny amount of residual insulin should b Continue reading >>

What Tests Should I Get For Insulin Resistance And Pcos?

What Tests Should I Get For Insulin Resistance And Pcos?

Is Insulin Resistance Causing Your PCOS? Insulin resistance and PCOS commonly occur together. Have you got PCOS, but never been tested for insulin resistance? Or maybe you have been tested, but your doctor has told you that your blood sugar is normal? If so, you may have been left wondering what’s causing your PCOS. During my second year at university we did an experiment where were measured our blood glucose levels after eating different foods. We’d just been learning about how blood glucose could be lower in athletes due to higher muscle mass and increased insulin sensitivity. At the time, I was training for 20 hours a week. You can imagine my shock when I found that my results were close to the top end of the normal range. However, when I queried my doctor about this she assured me that it was still within the normal range. She told me that I needn’t be worried. I’m going to explain to you why this is incorrect and why even slight changes in blood glucose can be a sign of insulin resistance. Studies have shown that up to 70% of women with PCOS have insulin resistance. I’m always amazed at the number of women I talk to who have been diagnosed with PCOS, but not tested for insulin resistance. You were not born with PCOS. PCOS is a condition that develops due to your environment interacting with your genes. Your ‘environment’ includes what you eat, how much you exercise, stress levels, environmental toxins, etc. It’s therefore easy to see that there is always something in your environment causing your PCOS. If you can find out what this is then you can remove it, then reverse your PCOS symptoms. I’ve written about the main causes of PCOS and how insulin resistance is the main one. Now I want to further explore insulin resistance: – What is it? – Ho Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance (IR) is a pathological condition in which cells fail to respond normally to the hormone insulin. The body produces insulin when glucose starts to be released into the bloodstream from the digestion of carbohydrates in the diet. Normally this insulin response triggers glucose being taken into body cells, to be used for energy, and inhibits the body from using fat for energy. The concentration of glucose in the blood decreases as a result, staying within the normal range even when a large amount of carbohydrates is consumed. When the body produces insulin under conditions of insulin resistance, the cells are resistant to the insulin and are unable to use it as effectively, leading to high blood sugar. Beta cells in the pancreas subsequently increase their production of insulin, further contributing to a high blood insulin level. This often remains undetected and can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes or latent autoimmune diabetes of adults.[1] Although this type of chronic insulin resistance is harmful, during acute illness it is actually a well-evolved protective mechanism. Recent investigations have revealed that insulin resistance helps to conserve the brain's glucose supply by preventing muscles from taking up excessive glucose.[2] In theory, insulin resistance should even be strengthened under harsh metabolic conditions such as pregnancy, during which the expanding fetal brain demands more glucose. People who develop type 2 diabetes usually pass through earlier stages of insulin resistance and prediabetes, although those often go undiagnosed. Insulin resistance is a syndrome (a set of signs and symptoms) resulting from reduced insulin activity; it is also part of a larger constellation of symptoms called the metabolic syndrome. Insuli Continue reading >>

What's The Ideal Fasting Insulin Level?

What's The Ideal Fasting Insulin Level?

[2013 update. I'm leaving this post up for informational purposes, but I think it's difficult to determine the "ideal" insulin level because it depends on a variety of factors including diet composition. Also, insulin assays are not always comparable to one another, particularly the older assays, so it's difficult to compare between studies] Insulin is an important hormone. Its canonical function is to signal cells to absorb glucose from the bloodstream, but it has many other effects. Chronically elevated insulin is a marker of metabolic dysfunction, and typically accompanies high fat mass, poor glucose tolerance (prediabetes) and blood lipid abnormalities. Measuring insulin first thing in the morning, before eating a meal, reflects fasting insulin. High fasting insulin is a marker of metabolic problems and may contribute to some of them as well. Elevated fasting insulin is a hallmark of the metabolic syndrome, the quintessential modern metabolic disorder that affects 24% of Americans (NHANES III). The average insulin level in the U.S., according to the NHANES III survey, is 8.8 uIU/mL for men and 8.4 for women (2). Given the degree of metabolic dysfunction in this country, I think it's safe to say that the ideal level of fasting insulin is probably below 8.4 uIU/mL. Let's dig deeper. What we really need is a healthy, non-industrial "negative control" group. Fortunately, Dr. Staffan Lindeberg and his team made detailed measurements of fasting insulin while they were visiting the isolated Melanesian island of Kitava (3). He compared his measurements to age-matched Swedish volunteers. In male and female Swedes, the average fasting insulin ranges from 4-11 uIU/mL, and increases with age. From age 60-74, the average insulin level is 7.3 uIU/mL. In contrast, the range on Kit Continue reading >>

Do You Know Your Insulin Level?

Do You Know Your Insulin Level?

People often keep close watch on their glucose numbers. But how many of us know our insulin level? Dr. Joseph Mercola says fasting insulin is “the number that may best predict your sudden death.” Sounds important. But what does it mean? Our bodies need some circulating insulin at all times, even when we don’t eat. Otherwise, our livers keep making glucose and dumping it into the blood. Livers do this to prevent blood glucose from going too low. So a fasting insulin level should never be 0, which it might be in a person with untreated Type 1. It shouldn’t go below 3. But a high insulin level is just as problematic. A high insulin level is a sign of insulin resistance or prediabetes. It can also signify early-stage Type 2. According to Dr. Mercola, too much insulin promotes weight gain by storing fat. It promotes insulin resistance, lowers magnesium levels, and increases inflammation. It also tends to lower HDL (“good”) cholesterol and raise levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. All of these increase the risk of diabetes and heart disease. It may be that high insulin levels come before insulin resistance and help cause it. If you already have diabetes, why should you know your insulin level? Mainly, it helps diagnose what is happening with you. Your blood glucose may be high, but how much of the problem is too little insulin? How much is insulin resistance? A fasting insulin level test is valuable in several situations: • Diagnosing prediabetes and metabolic syndrome. “Prediabetes” is one result of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance causes high cholesterol, high glucose, and high blood pressure. A high level of fasting insulin indicates insulin resistance and can encourage a person to make changes to lower it. • Separating Type 2 from LADA (latent Continue reading >>

Essential Notes On Blood Sugar And Insulin

Essential Notes On Blood Sugar And Insulin

You have approximately 5 liters (about 21 cups) of blood traveling around in your blood vessels and heart at any given moment. In these 5 liters of blood, you need only about one teaspoon of sugar for all of your regular activities. If you regularly have more than a teaspoon of sugar floating through your blood vessels, the excess sugar can slow down your circulation, which, over time, can cause all of the problems you would expect to have if you had thick maple syrup clogging up your blood vessels. This is essentially what happens when a person becomes diabetic. In order to keep the amount of sugar floating through your blood vessels at around a teaspoon, your body releases insulin whenever you eat foods that release sugar into your bloodstream. Eating sugary foods, most sweeteners, grains, cookies, pastries, cakes, pasta, and starchy vegetables like potatoes all lead to a release of sugar into your bloodstream. Insulin works by stimulating your cells to sponge up this excess sugar out of your bloodstream. Once inside your cells, sugar is used for energy, with any excess amount being converted to fat tissue. If you regularly eat sugary foods and highly processed carbohydrates, your body will have released so much insulin that it will begin to lose its sensitivity to insulin, which means that your cells won’t receive as strong a signal to sponge up excess sugar out of your blood. This will lead to excess sugar floating around your blood vessels and all the health problems that come with this scenario. Just a few years ago, 110 - 120 mg/dL (6.1 - 6.7 mmol/L) was widely considered the upper range for a normal fasting blood sugar level. Today, a fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is considered normal, while anything within 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to Continue reading >>

How To Test For Insulin Resistance: Your Comprehensive Guide

How To Test For Insulin Resistance: Your Comprehensive Guide

This guide is dedicated to Dr.Joseph Kraft MD, a pioneer in the development of laboratory assays to accurately test for insulin resistance before the development of diabetes. The amazing Dr. Kraft just recently passed away in 2017 at the age of 95. His contributions to the field of metabolic and cardiovascular health were under-appreciated during his time but have vast implications today! I’ve been told that my Blood Sugar is Normal! So I’m Not Insulin Resistant, Right? In most medical practices, it is typical to test patients for blood markers of diabetes. Unfortunately, this type of thinking is rather dangerous as the vast majority of people who exhibit signs and symptoms of insulin resistance test negative for diabetes! Signs and Symptoms of Insulin Resistance Increased abdominal circumference Easy weight gain Difficult weight loss Acanthosis nigricans (dark velvety skin behind the neck or under the arms) Skin tags Fatty liver Why are so many patients with these clear signs and symptoms of insulin resistance testing negative for the most common assays for diabetes? The answer is simple! The wrong tests are being recommended. What’s the Difference Between Diabetes and Insulin Resistance? Rather than a condition that develops overnight, the onset of type two diabetes is a lengthy process that takes many, many years to manifest. It begins with insulin resistance, often starting decades before the high blood sugar levels characteristic of a diabetic emerge. Insulin resistance is characterized by hyperinsulinemia – the secretion of higher than normal amounts of insulin either after eating, or continuously even when fasting. Insulin is an important hormone – without which we would quickly die. It is released after we eat, and tells our bodies what to do with the Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

Diatest Insulin resistance is often referred to as pre-diabetes, because it precedes the development of type ii diabetes. What is insulin resistance? Insulin is a polypeptide hormone secreted by the beta cells of the pancreas. One of the major functions of insulin is to stimulate glucose uptake into tissues for utilization. transport of glucose into tissue keeps blood glucose levels within a specific range of ”normal‘ values. with insulin resistance, tissues become resistant to the effects of insulin, which means the pancreas must produce more insulin to maintain normal blood glucose levels. over time, the pancreas no longer produces sufficient amounts of insulin, which results in high blood glucose levels and a probable diagnosis of type ii diabetes. in fact, several prospective studies have concluded that insulin resistance is the best predictor of whether a person will go on to develop diabetes. How does the Diatest breath test for insulin resistance work? Insulin stimulates the uptake of glucose into tissues. approximately 50% of ingested glucose is metabolized to carbon dioxide (CO2) and water. the Diatest breath test measures expired CO2 before and after ingestion of stable c universally labeled glucose (non-radioactive). patients with normal insulin function exhale a greater percentage of CO2 because moreC13 labeled glucose is transported to tissue by insulin. the glucose in tissue is eventually metabolized to CO2 and water and exhaled. insulin resistant patients exhale less CO2 because resistance to the effects of insulin reduces the transport of c labeled glucose into tissues, and therefore Less CO2 is produced. In other words, the Diatest breath test is a functional test for insulin resistance: it measures how well insulin functions at delivering glucose t Continue reading >>

Elevated Insulin, Not Cholesterol Is The Single Greatest Marker Of Cvd Risk

Elevated Insulin, Not Cholesterol Is The Single Greatest Marker Of Cvd Risk

Elevated levels of fasting insulin is the single greatest marker to assess a person's cardiovascular and diabetic risk factors. This has been consistently demonstrated in the medical literature going back more than 20 years. Elevated levels of insulin are found among those with heart disease, congestive heart failure, insulin resistance, diabetes, high blood pressure, and obesity. Why then are insulin levels not routinely tested on standard blood chemistry tests? Answer: there are no drugs to lower insulin. It is controlled specifically through dietary intervention and exercise. There are no drugs to sell to a patient. No profit to be made despite the insulin reality. To make matters worse, laboratory reference ranges for what constitutes "healthy" or "normal" insulin values are totally absurd. Laboratory reference ranges for what constitutes a normal, fasting insulin level are so ludicrous that they will have you believe an insulin level in double digits (10 or greater) is normal. I have never seen one person with a fasting insulin level of 10 or greater who did not have multiple health issues. Insulin levels of 20 or more (considered to be within normal range by most labs) indicate a person is already a type II diabetic!Show me someone with a fasting insulin level of 10 or greater and I'll show you a person with multiple health issues. Ideally one's fasting insulin should be as low to zero as possible! The reference range that I recommend for fasting insulin instead is 0-5. A one point movement in insulin is significant. What Happens When High Amounts of Insulin Are Released? Insulin resistance is the primary cause of type 2 diabetes, an epidemic that now affects tens of millions of Americans alone. Because the cells of your body must maintain a high level of sensitiv Continue reading >>

What Is The Normal Insulin Level In Dogs?

What Is The Normal Insulin Level In Dogs?

Welcome to JustAnswer! Are you referring to the normal amount of insulin to give a diabetic dog? The insulin level will fluctuate over the course of the day in response to the blood sugar. What your veterinarian is referring to is the insulin to glucose RATIO. What this means is that if the glucose is LOW, the insulin should be low (as insulin drops the glucose level). If the glucose is high, insulin should be high. If this glucose is LOW and the insulin level is normal to HIGH, this is an inappropriate body response and is consistent with an insulin producing tumor of the pancreas, called an insulinoma. We do NOT look at one single value. In people and dogs, the insulin level changes every minute. Your veterinarian is not correct. It is NOT the individual value, but the RATIO of the value in relation to the glucose. This is the reason an insulin:glucose RATIO is required for this diagnosis. You can NOT evaluate the insulin level alone, isolated, without the combination of the glucose value at the EXACT time the bloodwork was performed. The normal range is 70 to 100 mg/dL (or 5 to 20 uL), but again - I am trying to be very complete for you and letting you know that the number itself means very little without comparison to the glucose. Continue reading >>

Perth Diet Clinic : Consultant Dietitians And Nutritional Counsellors

Perth Diet Clinic : Consultant Dietitians And Nutritional Counsellors

Higher levels of blood fats including cholesterol and triglycerides It is not clear but it can be a combination of environmental and genetic. It is felt that part of the gene that regulates insulin secretion may function abnormally. This leads to a condition called insulin resistance. This can affect the way cells handle glucose and in the way ovarian cells respond to the hormone that stimulates testosterone production. In some people, the body cells do not respond to the insulin. This is called insulin resistance. As the glucose does not move freely into the cell, our blood concentration of glucose increases. When body cells become resistant to insulin, the pancreas over produces insulin to try to compensate. The resulting hyperinsulinaemia is the major factor behind insulin resistance syndrome. It is thought that around one in four people show signs of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance can be determined with a simple fasting blood test. 10-14 mU/L mild to moderate insulin resistance >14 mU/L moderate to severe insulin resistance Insulin levels may also be checked during a Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT). Levels of 100 or more at 1 or 2 hours show severe insulin resistance. Obesity is strongly linked with insulin resistance. This is mostly due to insulins effect of promoting the production of fat (lipogenesis) and the development of adipose tissue. Alternatively, obesity is also a major factor in the development of insulin resistance. There is an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This is usually accounted for by obesity, hypertension and changes to the lipid profile. Often the insulin tends to increase blood triglyceride levels and decrease HDL (good cholesterol) levels. The hyperinsulinaemia also affects other hormones. In particular there is an increase in Continue reading >>

How To Determine The Impact Of Your Diet On Blood Glucose?

How To Determine The Impact Of Your Diet On Blood Glucose?

When should we suspect low or high blood sugar? Have you experienced any of the following symptoms from the list below? Tests to determine insulin levels are most frequently ordered in response to low glucose and/or when someone has acute or chronic symptoms of low blood glucose (hypoglycemia). Symptoms of hypoglycemia may include (1): Sweating Palpitations Hunger Confusion Blurred vision Dizziness Fainting In serious cases, seizures and loss of consciousness These symptoms may indicate low blood glucose but may also be seen with other conditions. Symptoms of high blood sugar include (2): severe thirst tingling of your hands or feet How can an accurate, long range average of blood glucose be obtained? HbA1c is an accurate measure of blood glucose. “The term HbA1c refers to glycated hemoglobin.” Hemoglobin (Hb) is a protein within red blood cells (RBCs) that carries oxygen throughout your body. When Hb joins with glucose in the blood, it is ‘glycated’ (1). Because red blood cells are being generated continuously, every blood sample represents an average of the starting points of the population of cells in the sample. There are about 1 billion red blood cells in 2-3 drops of blood (2). These red blood cells all started at different times (about 2 million are generated per second). Therefore, the billion cells represent the full spectrum of starting points within that 8 to 12 weeks. In other words, essentially every possible starting point in the 8 to 12 weeks regeneration time is represented by those billion RBCs. HbA1c is like taking a blood glucose reading every microsecond during that 8 to 12 weeks and computing the average. Conversely, direct measurement of blood glucose from a single time point after fasting 12 hours represents the results of what you ate wit Continue reading >>

International Committee Advises: Don’t Measure Fasting Insulin In Children

International Committee Advises: Don’t Measure Fasting Insulin In Children

There is no reason to test overweight or obese children for insulin resistance, according to an international committee of experts in pediatric endocrinology and diabetes. The panel’s conclusions were summarized by five of its members at a joint meeting of the Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society and the European Society for Pediatric Endocrinology. The evidence-based document, to be submitted for publication in October, will address the definition, measurement, risk assessment, treatment, and prevention of insulin resistance in children. It has been endorsed by seven specialty societies and is financially supported by the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) and an unrestricted educational grant from the French pharmaceutical company Ipsen. Although the document is subject to revision, it is expected to recommend against the use of fasting insulin levels — or any laboratory test — to screen for insulin resistance in children, and against the use of medication to treat children with insulin resistance in the absence of specific diagnoses such as Type 2 diabetes or polycystic ovarian syndrome. In adults, insulin resistance has been strongly linked to obesity, Type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, and there is also some evidence linking it with a risk for those conditions among children, said Dr. Franco Chiarelli, panel cochair. “But unfortunately for us pediatricians, there is a lack of clarity as to what insulin resistance means in childhood, how it is best assessed, what clinical disorders occur, and its consequences. And, there is debate on how to treat and possibly prevent insulin resistance in children,” said Chiarelli, professor and head of pediatrics at the University of Chieti (Italy). Dr. Claire Levy-Marchal Continue reading >>

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