diabetestalk.net

Non-diabetic Using Insulin To Lose Weight

What Are The Risks Of Using Insulin To Lose Weight?

What Are The Risks Of Using Insulin To Lose Weight?

Sympler , Your Health Buddy says, Excess insulin in the bloodstream causes cells in your body to absorb too much glucose (sugar) from your blood. It also causes the liver to release less glucose. These two effects together create dangerously low glucose levels in your blood. This condition is called hypoglycemia. Your blood needs the right amount of glucose for your body to operate properly. Glucose is the body’s fuel. Without it, your body is like a car running out of gas. The severity of the situation depends on how low the blood sugar level goes. It also depends on the person, because everyone reacts differently. Mild hypoglycemia Symptoms of low blood sugar may include: sweating and clamminess chills lightheaded or dizziness mild confusion anxiety or nervousness shakiness rapid heartbeat hunger irritability double vision or blurred vision tingling in the lips or around the mouth These signs indicate a mild or moderate case of hypoglycemia. However, they still require immediate attention so they don’t lead to dangerously low blood sugar. People who have low blood sugar levels should eat 15 grams of a fast digesting carbohydrate, such as glucose tablets or a high-sugar food. High-glucose foods include: raisins soda fruit juice honey candy Your symptoms should improve within 15 minutes of eating. If they don’t, or if a test shows your levels are still low, repeat the steps above until your blood sugar level is above 70 mg/dL. If your symptoms still don’t improve after three treatments, seek medical help immediately. Also, be sure to eat a meal after treating a low blood sugar reaction. Severe hypoglycemia More severe symptoms of hypoglycemia, sometimes referred to as diabetic shock or insulin shock, include: concentration problems seizures unconsciousness death Continue reading >>

Other Non-diabetic Uses Of Insulin

Other Non-diabetic Uses Of Insulin

Insulin potentiation therapy (IPT) is unique in the world. But it is not alone. Insulin does many things in the body, and over the past 79 years people have come up with many ways to use it. Of course, treatment of diabetes is the only one that is generally known to the public. However, the many non-diabetic uses of insulin help support the credibility of the positive reports of the IPT doctors. The diversity of these approaches is amazing. I am sure that a comprehensive review of the literature will uncover many more that are little known or forgotten. I also believe that by looking at many of these other approaches, we can spin new ideas for ways to improve IPT and extend it. Here are the non-diabetic uses of insulin that I have run into during my years of involvement with IPT: Intravenous feeding solutions (for total parenteral nutrition). One of the ingredients used in IV solutions for feeding the body is often a small amount of insulin. This is known to improve the absorption of nutrients. And insulin combined with growth hormone or insulin-like growth hormone (which insulin cross-reacts with) reverses negative protein balance. Intravenous GIK solution (glucose, insulin, and potassium) has been used for 40 years to decrease mortality rates in cases of acute myocardial infarction (heart attack) and postoperative cardiac failure. Articles. In very high doses, it is sometimes used to cause cardiac arrest for purposes of heart surgery or transplantation. Apparently GIK infusion is a way to quickly infuse potassium into all the cells of the heart, even where circulation is impaired. My question: would K infusion work even better if the insulin were given first, with the glucose and potassium delayed a few minutes? Weight regulation. I have read that in the early years o Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Pharmacotherapy Of Obese Non-diabetic And Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Weight Loss Pharmacotherapy Of Obese Non-diabetic And Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Abstract The first line in the treatment of obesity is a combination of a low calorie diet, increased physical activity and behavioural therapy. Unless these options fail, should be considered an effective and safe pharmacotherapy. The market situation in anti-obesity treatment will change in a relatively short time; the combination anti-obesity therapy is entering into clinical practice. Currently in Europe we have three drugs approved for long-term chronic treatment of obesity. In addition to the orlistat EMA approved a combination of naltrexon SR/bupropion SR and liraglutide 3.0 mg. A specific feature management of obese diabetic patients is the selection of weight neutral or weight-reducing anti-diabetic treatment (oral anti-diabetics, insulin), but also weight neutral treatment associated with co-morbidities. Keywords Orlistat; Naltrexon SR/bupropion SR; Liraglutide 3.0 mg; Metformin; Inhibitors DPP-4; GLP-1 RA; Inhibitors SGLT2 Introduction The epidemic of obesity is now recognized as one of the most important public health problems facing the world today. According to World Obesity Federation (WOF) there are around 475 million obese adults with over twice that number overweight - that means around 1.5 billion adults are too fat. Globally over 200 million school-age children are overweight. The situation in Slovakia is not different from the other world. 61.8% of Slovak adult population is overweight and obese (based on data from 2012). 23.4% has BMI (body mass index) >30 kg/m2, 18.3% from all adults (with predominance of males) has BMI 30-35 kg/m2, about 4% of the adult Slovak population (predominance of women) has BMI of 35-40 kg/m2, and in the range of morbid obesity BMI > 40 kg/m2) is more than 1% of the adult population (predominate women) [1]. Obesity increa Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Weight Loss With Metformin

Non-diabetic Weight Loss With Metformin

Metformin is a medication that normally is used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. This medication is in the antihyperglyemic drug class, meaning that it counteracts glucose in the blood. While the Food and Drug Administration has not approved metformin for weight loss in the United States, some physicians are starting to utilize this medication in an off-label manner to decrease weight in overweight or obese patients. Several studies are underway analyzing the use of metformin for weight-loss, and more studies are needed before FDA approval. Video of the Day Decreased Hepatic Glucose Production Metformin decreases the amount of sugar that is created by the liver, according to findings from the Glaser Obesity Study, conducted by the Glaser Pediatric Research Network. If you haven't eaten in some period of time and your blood sugar becomes too low, your liver can compensate by creating and releasing sugar into the blood. Insulin is then secreted to compensate, and stores this sugar as fat in adipose tissue. When metformin decreases the amount of sugar released by the liver, the pancreas does not have to release extra insulin, thus reducing fat production and storage. Metformin may cause mild gastrointestinal side effects including diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, according to Drugs.com. It is proposed that one possible mechanism of action for the weight-reducing benefit of metformin is simply that because of these mild gastrointestinal side effects people do not feel like eating, notes the Glaser research. If you have excessive or prolonged gastrointestinal upsets while taking metformin, contact your physician as he may need to change your medication. Metformin creates increased insulin sensitivity by assisting the body in using the blood sugar already present. Continue reading >>

The Drug Virtually Everyone Should Ask Their Doctor About

The Drug Virtually Everyone Should Ask Their Doctor About

With each passing year, fresh scientific evidence emerges to vindicate Life Extension®’s contention that aging humans can derive enormous benefit from an antidiabetic drug called metformin. In 2010 alone, scientists at top-ranked institutions made landmark discoveries that broaden its use to combat degenerative disease. The ability of metformin to help facilitate weight loss has long been known. What few doctors understand are the unique mechanisms by which metformin can prevent and even help treat certain cancers. In a remarkable finding, a team of Swiss researchers found that diabetic women on a long-term metformin regimen (5 years or more) experienced a 56% reduction in breast cancer risk!1 It also slashed pancreatic cancer rates by 62% in diabetics and may cut lung cancer rates in smokers.2,3 In this article, a novel link between impaired glucose control and cancer is detailed. You will discover the growing list of cancers metformin may effectively combat, including those of the colon, uterus, and prostate. You will also learn of a striking connection between the anti-cancer mechanisms of metformin and calorie restriction! Why Metformin Should Be Viewed Differently than Other Drugs Many Life Extension members like to brag that they do not need to take any prescription drugs. Given the lethal side effects posed by so many FDA-approved medications, avoiding them whenever possible makes sense. Metformin is an exception! Its broad-spectrum anti-aging properties make it a drug that most longevity enthusiasts should seriously consider asking their doctors about. Since it long ago came off patent, metformin is a super-low cost generic that everyone can afford. Metformin Was Originally a Botanical Compound Although it is sold as a prescription drug today, metformin has a Continue reading >>

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

People with diabetes receive mixed messages about weight loss from magazines, newspapers, friends, family, and, yes, even health professionals. Few subjects have accumulated as much misleading and potentially dangerous folklore as the subject of obesity. A common message is that losing weight is just a matter of willpower, and if you have been losing weight and reach a plateau, it's because you've lost your willpower and are no longer following your diet. Furthermore, for people with type 2 diabetes, the message often is that weight loss is the answer to improving glucose control: “If you just lose 20 lb, you won't need insulin.” What does research tell us about these issues, and what should our messages as health professionals be to people with diabetes? Obesity is a serious worldwide problem and is associated with the risk of developing diabetes. Today, more than 1.1 billion adults worldwide are overweight, and 312 million of them are obese.1 In the past 20 years, the rates of obesity have tripled in developing countries that have adopted a Western lifestyle, with the Middle East, Pacific Islands, Southeast Asia, India, and China facing the greatest increase. Consequently, the number of people with diabetes in these countries is expected to increase from 84 million in 2000 to 228 million by 2030. Thus, preventing obesity is a high priority for the prevention of diabetes and other chronic diseases. According to some obesity researchers, it may not be possible to decrease the current numbers of overweight and obese people in the United States, but we need to try to slow or prevent the increase that has been occurring at an alarming rate.2 The hope is that slowing the rising prevalence of obesity will also slow the diabetes epidemic. Can this be accomplished? Thus fa Continue reading >>

Effectiveness Of Metformin On Weight Loss In Non-diabetic Individuals With Obesity.

Effectiveness Of Metformin On Weight Loss In Non-diabetic Individuals With Obesity.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of metformin for the treatment of obesity has been evaluated in few clinical trials with inconclusive results. Moreover, the effectiveness in a real-life outpatient setting has not been tested until today. In this study we aimed to examine the effectiveness of metformin as a weight reducing drug in obese and overweight patients with regard to their degree of insulin resistance. DESIGN AND PATIENTS: We treated 154 consecutive patients with a body mass index ≥27 kg/m(2) in an outpatient setting over 6 months with metformin up to a dosage of 2,500 mg per day. Additionally, we included 45 untreated patients as controls. Patients were monitored for weight changes over 6 months. Before metformin treatment was started insulin sensitivity was determined in all patients by calculating HOMA index and Matsuda index after a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. RESULTS: The mean weight loss in the metformin treated group was 5.8±7.0 kg (5.6±6.5%). Untreated controls gained 0.8±3.5 kg (0.8±3.7%) on average. Patients with severe insulin resistance lost significantly more weight as compared to insulin sensitive patients. The percentage of weight loss was independent of age, sex or BMI. CONCLUSION: Metformin is an effective drug to reduce weight in a naturalistic outpatient setting in insulin sensitive and insulin resistant overweight and obese patients. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York. Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) For Weight Loss

Metformin (glucophage) For Weight Loss

After you eat, sugar goes from your intestines into your bloodstream, and then immediately into your liver. Then your liver releases sugar back into your bloodstream to cause your blood sugar level to rise. To keep blood sugar levels from rising too high, your pancreas release insulin into your bloodstream. Insulin makes you hungry all the time and causes your liver to convert extra calories to fat and it constricts arteries to cause heart attacks. You need insulin to keep blood sugar levels from rising too high to cause diabetes, nerve damage, heart attacks, strokes and kidney damage. Glucophage reduces sugar release from your liver to prevents blood sugar levels from rising too high, so your body doesn't need to produce as much insulin that makes you hungry and causes your liver to make fat (3,13,14). Glucophage lowers insulin levels (4), prevents many of the side effects of diabetes and can be used by people who want to lose weight. However, Glucophage is not effective when your blood is acidic from excess lactic acid and recent research shows that exercise, which raises lactic acid, does not cause blood acid levels to rise enough to reduce Glucophage's benefits (5). Glucophage, itself, does not raise blood lactate levels and is therefore considerably safer than doctors originally thought. Since Glucophage lowers insulin, diabetics should be placed on Glucophage to lower their requirements for all other medications used to treat diabetes (6). A common cause of obesity in women is called polycystic ovary syndrome, which is caused by having high blood levels of insulin. Glucophage helps these women to lose weight (7-12). See the report on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) in the Women's Health section. Glucophage is a safe medication that prevents blood sugar levels fro Continue reading >>

Metformin For Weight Loss In Non Diabetics

Metformin For Weight Loss In Non Diabetics

Most patients who have type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. This is because most of the drugs used to control diabetes lead to increase of weight. However, this is not the case with Metformin also known as Glucophage. Metformin is an oral diabetes medication that has been used for decades to control the levels of blood sugar in the body. It is a general safe medication; however, there are some patients that may experience some minor side effects like dizziness, stomach pain, weakness, difficulty breathing, slow or uneven heart rate and lactic acidosis. If you have diabetes and looking to shed off some weight, Metformin can be an effective remedy. Read on to find out more on how it works. Decrease Sugar Production by the Liver According to research, Metformin decreases the amount of sugar that the liver creates. After you eat, sugar goes into the blood stream from the intestine and then immediately goes into the liver. Then the liver releases sugar right back into the blood stream resulting in the rise of blood sugar levels. So as to regulate the sugar levels and keep them from been too high, the pancreas acts by releasing insulin into the blood stream. Insulin causes the liver to convert extra calories to fat and also makes you feel hungry all the time. As a person with diabetes, you need insulin to regulate the amount of sugar in your blood stream. Metformin prevents the liver from releasing too much sugar into the blood stream, so the pancreas will not have to release too much insulin that causes the liver to make fat and makes you hungry all the time. Gastrointestinal Side Effects Metformin may have some gastrointestinal side effects that make a patient to diarrhea, vomit and feel nausea. It is proposed that because of this side effects people who have diabetes d Continue reading >>

A Grand Dame With Hidden Aces: The Non-diabetic Uses Of Insulin

A Grand Dame With Hidden Aces: The Non-diabetic Uses Of Insulin

Go to: Abstract This brief communication reviews the non-diabetic uses and utility of insulin. It highlights the lesser known uses in medicine, psychiatry, suregery and diagnostics that this versatile peptide has. Keywords: Applied pharmacology, insulin, non-traditional uses Go to: The discovery of insulin is thought to be one of the most dramatic turns in the medical history. Insulin is the most important anabolic hormone in the body.[1] Over the past century, researchers have discovered multiple pleiotropic effects and actions of this molecule. While extensive work has been published, on a regular basis, about advances in biochemistry, physiology, and pharmacology of insulin, no review has targeted the spectrum of non-diabetic uses of this hormone. Some of the many non-diabetic uses of insulin are presented here [Table 1]. Go to: Several hormones including insulin are used as an essential component of synthetic growth media for cell culture.[2] They promote growth of mammalian cells by increasing the permeability of cell membranes to glucose and making nutrients available to the cells. Although invariably every mammalian cell will require insulin for survival, the degree of requirement varies with different cell lines. Insulin is also used for similar reasons in organ preserving solutions. Organs extracted for transplant purposes are preserved in insulin containing solutions. Insulin tolerance test is the most reliable provocative test for growth hormone deficiency.[3] An insulin tolerance test is age independent and reproducible. Insulin is administered into the patient and blood samples are taken after every 15 minutes over the next hour to determine whether the growth hormone levels have risen in response to insulin. Since growth hormone is a counter-regulatory hor Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug May Spur Weight Loss In Obese People

Diabetes Drug May Spur Weight Loss In Obese People

HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, May 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A higher dose of the diabetes drug liraglutide (Victoza) may help obese people without the disease lose weight, a new study suggests. In this test of its effectiveness as a diet aid, people taking liraglutide for over a year lost an average of 8 percent of their body weight, compared with 2.6 percent shed by those taking a placebo (dummy drug), researchers found. Victoza/liraglutide is typically given in 1.2 milligram and 1.8 milligram doses as a diabetes treatment. In the new study, aimed at seeing if the medicine might help curb obesity, the drug's dose was upped to 3 milligrams. "Liraglutide, an injection treatment already approved for diabetes treatment, can help reduce body weight in people with obesity when used at a higher dose than is usually used in diabetes," said lead researcher Dr. John Wilding, head of the department of obesity and endocrinology at the University of Liverpool in England. "These results suggest liraglutide is effective and overall well-tolerated for obesity treatment," he said. Although this study didn't compare Victoza with other weight loss drugs, Wilding said that a previous study showed Victoza could produce about twice as much weight loss as another drug, orlistat (Xenical). Xenical works by reducing the amount of fat the intestines can absorb. People taking Xenical lose an average of five to seven pounds, studies have shown. Victoza works by lowering blood sugar. The results of the study were scheduled for presentation Thursday at the European Congress on Obesity in Sofia, Bulgaria. Data and conclusions presented at meetings are usually considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal. Dr. David Katz, director of the Yale University Prevention Resear Continue reading >>

More in insulin