diabetestalk.net

Non Diabetic Insulin Overdose

Insulin Overdose: Dosage, Symptoms, And Treatment

Insulin Overdose: Dosage, Symptoms, And Treatment

Insulin is an important hormone used in medical treatments for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It helps the body's cells to properly absorb sugar. Insulin is a lifesaving medication when taken correctly, but an insulin overdose can have some serious side effects. This article explores signs of insulin overdose to look out for, as well as steps to take to avoid insulin overdoses. Contents of this article: Safe vs. unsafe insulin doses There are a few things to consider to ensure a correct insulin dose. Insulin doses can vary greatly from person to person. The normal dose for one person may be considered an overdose for another. Basal insulin The insulin needed to keep the blood sugar steady throughout the day is called basal insulin. The amount of insulin needed changes from person to person based on what time of day they take it, and whether their body is resistant to insulin or not. It is best to consult a doctor to figure out the appropriate basal insulin dosage. Mealtime insulin Mealtime insulin is insulin that is taken after a meal. Glucose (sugar) is released into the bloodstream as the body breaks down food, which raises the blood sugar levels. In people with diabetes, this extra sugar must be met with extra insulin so the body can use it properly. There are a few different factors to be considered in terms of the mealtime insulin levels. People with diabetes have to consider: their pre-meal blood sugar how many carbs are in the food they are eating if they plan to do anything active after the meal Then they must factor in their own level of insulin sensitivity and the blood sugar target they want to hit after the insulin is taken. The process can be complicated and, as such, there is room for error. Other variables There are also a few different types of Continue reading >>

Teenage Girl Died Of Insulin Overdose After Injecting Herself With Diabetic Boyfriend's Pen 'in Cry For Attention'

Teenage Girl Died Of Insulin Overdose After Injecting Herself With Diabetic Boyfriend's Pen 'in Cry For Attention'

A teenage girl who died after injecting herself with insulin may have taken it to try to lose weight. Charlie Dunne, 19, used an insulin pen belonging to her diabetic boyfriend while he was out at a hospital appointment. An inquest heard the trainee hairdresser may have taken the hormone previously after hearing that it could help slimmers. But the teenager, who was fit and healthy, would have been unaware of the ‘catastrophic’ danger the drug posed to non-diabetics, a coroner said. Miss Dunne was discovered collapsed at the home in Atherton, Greater Manchester, she shared with boyfriend Terence Rhoden, 28, when he returned hours later. She suffered brain damage caused by a dramatic drop in blood sugar and died in hospital six days later. Police later investigated claims by Miss Dunne’s family that Mr Rhoden had confessed to injecting her with insulin in the past to help her lose weight. But he denied doing so and officers found no evidence that he was involved in his girlfriend’s death. Bolton Coroner’s Court was told that ‘bubbly’ Miss Dunne was a regular at her local Methodist church, where she was given the community title of ‘rose queen’ for her charity fundraising. However, the inquest was told she suffered mood swings and had tried to overdose on tablets during a previous relationship. She also claimed to have suffered a miscarriage and was worried she could not have children, despite a lack of medical evidence to support her fears. The court heard that Mr Rhoden was woken when Miss Dunne returned from her local pub in an ‘agitated’ state on December 17 last year and threatened to take painkillers. She told him to leave, saying he was ‘too good for her’. After talking, she calmed down and fell asleep on the sofa. Mr Rhoden left for his a Continue reading >>

Suicide By Insulin?

Suicide By Insulin?

HealthDay Reporter typically saves the lives of those with diabetes, but it can also be a way for some people to kill themselves, a new review warns. People with the blood sugar disease tend to suffer higher rates of depression, the researchers explained. And suicide or suicide attempts using insulin or other diabetes medications that lower blood sugar levels may not always be an easy-to-spot attempt at self-harm, they added. "Some suicides with insulin are likely missed in people with diabetes, just as [suicide may be missed] in people without diabetes using other medications or after a car accident. Could a suicide using insulin be missed? Absolutely," said Alicia McAuliffe-Fogarty, vice president of lifestyle management at the American Diabetes Association. Insulin is a natural hormone produced by the body. Its job is to help usher the sugar from foods into the body's cells to provide fuel for those cells. But insulin is also a complex medication. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make enough insulin and must give themselves insulin to stay alive. People with type 2 diabetes don't use insulin efficiently -- this is called insulin resistance -- and eventually don't make enough insulin to keep up with the body's demands. At this point, people with type 2 diabetes also need to take insulin. Insulin can be given by multiple injections every day or via an insulin pump. Insulin pumps deliver insulin through a small tube that's inserted under the skin. The site of the insulin pump must be changed every few days. But once the tube is in, someone who uses an insulin pump only needs to push a few buttons to deliver a dose of insulin. However, getting the right amount of insulin is no easy task. Many factors affect the body's need for insulin. Exercise decreases the need. F Continue reading >>

Intentional Overdose With Insulin: Prognostic Factors And Toxicokinetic/toxicodynamic Profiles

Intentional Overdose With Insulin: Prognostic Factors And Toxicokinetic/toxicodynamic Profiles

Abstract Prognostic factors in intentional insulin self-poisoning and the significance of plasma insulin levels are unclear. We therefore conducted this study to investigate prognostic factors in insulin poisoning, in relation to the value of plasma insulin concentration. We conducted a prospective study, and used logistic regression to explore prognostic factors and modelling to investigate toxicokinetic/toxicodynamic relationships. Twenty-five patients (14 female and 11 male; median [25th to 75th percentiles] age 46 [36 to 58] years) were included. On presentation, the Glasgow Coma Scale score was 9 (4 to 14) and the capillary glucose concentration was 1.4 (1.1 to 2.3) mmol/l. The plasma insulin concentration was 197 (161 to 1,566) mIU/l and the cumulative amount of glucose infused was 301 (184 to 1,056) g. Four patients developed sequelae resulting in two deaths. Delay to therapy in excess of 6 hours (odds ratio 60.0, 95% confidence interval 2.9 to 1,236.7) and ventilation for longer than 48 hours (odds ratio 28.5, 95% confidence interval 1.9 to 420.6) were identified as independent prognostic factors. Toxicokinetic/toxicodynamic relationships between glucose infusion rates and insulin concentrations fit the maximum measured glucose infusion rate (Emax) model (Emax 29.5 [17.5 to 41.1] g/hour, concentration associated with the half-maximum glucose infusion rate [EC50] 46 [35 to 161] mIU/l, and R2 range 0.70 to 0.98; n = 6). Intentional insulin overdose is rare. Assessment of prognosis relies on clinical findings. The observed plasma insulin EC50 is 46 mIU/l. Introduction Contrasting with the common occurrence of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes patients, deliberate overdose with insulin are rarely reported [1]. In the 2005 Annual Report of the American Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Taking Insulin When You Don't Need It

Side Effects Of Taking Insulin When You Don't Need It

Insulin-dependent diabetics take insulin injections because their pancreas no longer produces insulin. Insulin helps cells absorb glucose, the body’s main energy source, from the blood. All Type 1 diabetics, formerly called juvenile diabetics, and some Type 2 diabetics, formerly called adult-onset diabetics, need insulin because their bodies no longer produce enough of the hormone. Without insulin to remove glucose from the blood, blood glucose levels rise, a condition called hyperglycemia. Taking too much insulin or taking insulin when your body already makes enough removes too much glucose from the blood, a condition called hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Video of the Day All cells require glucose to function. When you eat, carbohydrates in the food break down in the intestines into glucose. The blood absorbs the glucose. When this happens, your blood glucose levels rise. In response to the increase in blood sugar, the pancreas releases insulin. Insulin facilitates a cell’s ability to remove glucose from the blood and utilize it for energy. If your body has already released enough insulin and you take more, too much glucose is removed from your blood and you become hypoglycemic. Taking an overdose of short-acting or intermediate-acting insulin is more dangerous than taking too much long-acting insulin, eMedTV explains. Taking insulin when you don’t need it causes symptoms such as sweating, shaking, headache, irritability, nervousness, anxiety, weakness, dizziness, hunger, tremors, nausea, and difficulty concentrating or thinking. For diabetics, the treatment for hypoglycemia is to eat something containing quickly absorbed glucose, such as candy or special glucose tablets. If you have a hypoglycemic reaction and take glucose, follow up with a snack containing b Continue reading >>

Octreotide For The Treatment Of Intentional Insulin Aspart Overdose In A Non-diabetic Patient

Octreotide For The Treatment Of Intentional Insulin Aspart Overdose In A Non-diabetic Patient

Abstract Intentional insulin overdose may lead to severe and refractory hypoglycemia. Exogenous dextrose administration is the mainstay of therapy for these patients and is effective in most cases. However, in patients with a functional pancreas, exogenous dextrose administration may precipitate endogenous insulin release leading to rebound hypoglycemia. We describe a case report of a 41-year-old woman who injected 300 units of insulin aspart with suicidal intent. Her initial blood glucose was 2.3 mmol/L (41 mg/dL). Over the next 12 hours, she experienced recurrent hypoglycemic episodes despite 10% dextrose infusions and 14 ampoules of 50% dextrose. Our patient experienced complications, including peripheral edema, related to the large volumes of intravenous dextrose required to attempt to maintain euglycemia. Octreotide, a somatostatin analogue, may help prevent dextrose-induced hypoglycemia and improve the management in select insulin overdose patients; large infusion volumes resulted in significant peripheral edema. Treatment with octreotide was initiated 12.5 hours post-injection and was followed by a stabilization of blood glucose concentration in this non-diabetic patient. Une surdose intentionnelle d’insuline peut entraîner une hypoglycémie très grave, réfractaire au traitement. Celui-ci consiste principalement en l’administration de dextrose exogène, et il se montre efficace dans la plupart des cas. Toutefois, chez les personnes chez qui le pancréas est en état de fonctionnement, l’administration de dextrose exogène peut provoquer la libération endogène d’insuline, ce qui peut provoquer à son tour une hypoglycémie rebond. Sera exposé ici le cas d’une femme de 41 ans, aux idées suicidaires, qui s’est injectée 300 unités d’insuline as Continue reading >>

Can An Insulin Overdose Kill A Non-diabetic?

Can An Insulin Overdose Kill A Non-diabetic?

Can an insulin overdose kill a non-diabetic? Of course, it can! Why insulin, even water can kill you if you take it in excess intravenously due to volume overload. Anything is enough to kill, it all depends upon how and by which route you take it. Insulin causes hypoglycemia irrespective of diabetes status. It is hormone naturally secreted in our body by beta cells of pancreas. Venous glucose level less than 40 mg/dl is lethal. So, yes it can kill non diabetics too. 227 Views View Upvoters Answer requested by Nikhil Chaudhary , studied Bachelor of Technology Degrees & Biotechnology at SRM University, Kattankulathur Answered 10w ago Author has 826 answers and 460.5k answer views High blood sugar takes a long time to kill an individual. It slowly affects the organs to make them dysfunctional over a period of time. But very low blood sugar can cut the supply to the brain and the heart and a person can collapse immediately. It can kill instantly. High dose of insulin will reduce the blood sugar drastically and increase the chances of a person collapsing. Don't not take such risk or have any such ideas in your head please. Diabetics on insulin are always recommended to keep something sweet with them in their pockets all the time for the very same reason. Interestingly, diet and lifestyle changes can get a diabetic off insulin in a matter of just a few weeks. I have done for many myself so can say it with confidence. If you wish to get a personal consultation, you can contact me. Continue reading >>

Woman Kills Herself By Insulin Overdose

Woman Kills Herself By Insulin Overdose

I LOVE you were the last words a diabetic woman wrote in a suicide note to her step-daughter before killing herself with an insulin overdose. Could not subscribe, try again laterInvalid Email I LOVE you were the last words a diabetic woman wrote in a suicide note to her step-daughter before killing herself with an insulin overdose. Andrea Smith had already tried to kill herself once with an insulin overdose in the months leading up to her death, aged 45, on August 8 last year, Aberdare Coroners Court was told. She had attempted to take her own life in May 2008 with insulin and tablets, which had led to her month-long admission to Royal Glamorgan Hospitals psychiatric ward. In a statement read to the court, step-daughter Susan Davies said that on that occasion she had found her step-mother sitting grey-faced on the bed with eight empty insulin pens by her side. She said that I had caught her in time but that next time I would not be so lucky, said Susan. She had called into her step-mothers home at Cae Glas, Penrhiwfer, Tonypandy, after concerned neighbours contacted her to say the cat was crying outside and had been there for some time, which was unusual. Andrea, a cashier at a local petrol station, was discharged in June and was under the care of a crisis team who made several visits a week. The court heard she had a history of depression for which she was receiving medication, and stomach problems and was receiving treatment for a hernia. She had become depressed following her mothers death in 2005 and was also upset because her dog had died and she had taken it badly. Susan said she was in regular touch with Andrea. She said that her step-mother and father had not been getting on well and on the Tuesday before the death he had taken his wife to work for the night sh Continue reading >>

Intentional Insulin Overdose Associated With Minimal Hypoglycemic Symptoms In A Non-diabetic Patient

Intentional Insulin Overdose Associated With Minimal Hypoglycemic Symptoms In A Non-diabetic Patient

Go to: CASE REPORT A young medical professional is brought to the emergency department (ED) by ambulance, following insulin overdose 3.5 hours previously. There was a history of chronic alcohol abuse, physical self-harm and substance misuse (paracetamol/codeine); no regular medications or allergies. After drinking approx. 300 mls of vodka, the person impulsively decides to commit suicide by injecting in the abdomen (4 times over 90 minutes) a total of 10 mls (1000 units) of Actrapid® insulin (100 units/ml) from a vial procured for this purpose 3 months before. On the onset of the hypoglycaemic symptoms, the person became scared, however, and informed family members. The family called the emergency services who attended the patient approx. 2.75 hours after the overdose. On initial assessment, the GCS was 15/15 and the capillary glucose 1.4 mmol/L. Oral glucose gel (20 g) was administered; after 15 minutes the capillary glucose was still 1.4 mmol/L. After 1 mg of glucagon, the capillary glucose rose to 2.9 mmol/L. An 18 G IV access was established and a bolus of 250 mls of dextrose 10% was given. This increased the capillary glucose to 13.3 mmol/L; the remaining 250 mls was given over 90 minutes. On arrival, the patient was alert and oriented; GCS 15/15, capillary glucose 9.3, blood pressure 127/79 mmHg, pulse 109 bpm, temperature 35.1°C, respiratory rate 16, SaO2 100% on room air. Clinical examination was unremarkable. A second 18 G IV access was established and blood drawn for a full blood count, urea and electrolytes, liver function tests, plasma glucose, creatinekinase, amylase, CRP, salicylates/paracetamol levels. Initial ECG: sinus tachycardia with a normal axis and a QTc of 492 msec. The ECG was repeated after 5 minutes and the QTc was 477 msec. Also multiple ven Continue reading >>

Insulin Poisoning With Suicidal Intent

Insulin Poisoning With Suicidal Intent

Go to: A 27-year-old paramedical personnel without any comorbidities, working as an assistant in the operation theater, was found to be drowsy and drenched in sweat with bradycardia (34 beats/min) and hypotension (80/50 mm of Hg). She was immediately shifted to ICU. She was pale and there was no cyanosis, icterus, clubbing, lymphadenopathy, or any evidence of external injury. Temperature was 99.0°F, with a respiratory rate of 20/min and cold peripheries. Pupils were bilateral 3 mm, reactive to light, and oculocephalic reflex was preserved. Deep tendon reflexes were brisk and plantars were flexor. Meningeal signs were absent. Her systemic examination was unremarkable. An electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia. Atropine was given intravenously and normal saline infusion started. Blood pressure remained low which prompted initiation of norepinephrine drip. Capillary blood glucose (CBG) was 35 mg/dL, hence 50 mL of 50% dextrose bolus was given and 5% dextrose infusion started. Her neurological status started deteriorating and she rapidly lapsed into coma, 90 minutes from her initial presentation. At this stage, pupils were bilateral 2 mm and nonreactive, with loss of occulocephalic reflex and dysconjugate deviation of eye. She continued to have bradycardia and hypotension. Repeat CBG was 32 mg/dL and bolus of 50 mL 50% dextrose was repeated. No history could be gathered regarding the preceding events. At this stage, in addition to malaria, encephalitis, cerebrovascular accident, exogenous insulin administration was considered as another staff detected one empty vial of insulin. Blood samples were drawn for glucose, insulin, and c-peptide. Patient had an episode of generalized tonic clonic seizure which was treated with intravenous lorazepam 4 mg. Again a bolus of 50 mL Continue reading >>

Insulin Overdose: Signs And Risks

Insulin Overdose: Signs And Risks

Before the discovery of insulin, diabetes was a death sentence. People couldn’t use the nutrients in their food and would become thin and malnourished. Managing the condition required a strict diets and reduced carbohydrate intake. Still, these measures weren’t enough to reduce mortality. In the early 1920s, Canadian surgeon Dr. Frederick Banting and medical student Charles Best discovered that insulin could help normalize blood sugar levels. Their discovery garnered them the Nobel Prize and allowed people with diabetes to live a much longer and healthier life. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 12 percent of adults with diabetes take insulin only, and 14 percent take both insulin and an oral medication. Taken as prescribed, insulin is a lifesaver. However, too much of it can cause significant side effects and sometimes death. While some people may use excessive amounts of insulin intentionally, many others take too much insulin by accident. No matter the reason for the overdose, an insulin overdose needs to be treated immediately. Even with proper treatment, it can become a medical emergency. Like all medications, you need to take insulin in the right amounts. The right dosage will provide benefit without harm. Basal insulin is the insulin that keeps your blood sugar steady all day. The correct dosage for it depends on many things, such the time of day and if you are insulin resistant. For mealtime insulin, the correct dosage depends on factors such as: your fasting or premeal blood sugar level the carbohydrate content of the meal any activity planned after your meal your insulin sensitivity your target postmeal blood sugar goals Insulin medications also come in different types. Some are fast-acting and will work within about 15 minutes. S Continue reading >>

Injected Insulin In Non-diabetic: What Happens? [archive] - Straight Dope Message Board

Injected Insulin In Non-diabetic: What Happens? [archive] - Straight Dope Message Board

Their blood sugar drops. It's one of the many drugs that bodybuilders use to get big. Depends on the dose. Prior to electro-convulsive therapy for the mentally ill the approved method was insulin shock therapy were sufficient insulin was injected to create convulsions and insulin coma. Well if they get 3 or 4 shots, they die. Not a good way to have a Final Exam. ((Bonus Point for the first person to get the reference.)) If a person without any diabetes-related issues is injected with insulin, what occurs? Does his/her blood sugar level drop or does the body naturally compensate for the added insulin? The person will develop low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and then, over about a fifteen interval, will normalize his/her sugar level. The mechanism for recovery from hypoglycemia is really just an exaggerated form of the body's normal response to periods of starvation. In other words, during starvation, or even during an overnight sleep (when no food is being ingested), there is a tendency for the blood sugar level to fall. Should it fall too much, there will be an inadequate amount of sugar to "fuel" the brain. Unchecked, that will be fatal. To prevent the blood sugar level from falling significantly during starvation or other periods of minimal food intake, the body employs a number of overlapping, redundant, and synergistic responses. After all, periods of starvation were/are frequent and the potential consequences lethal. Hence the evolutionary need to defend against hypoglycemia. As a person's blood sugar level drops, the main short term response involves the release of adrenalin (a.k.a. eipnephrine) from the adrenal glands, and the simultaneous release of glucagon from the pancreas. Both act to oppose the actions of insulin as well as to directly stimulate the liver to Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

Link to 2.1.7.1.1 Insulin Teaching Resources Link to Problems for Discussion DRUGS INCLUDED Insulin Aspart Protamine, Recombinant/Insulin Aspart, Recombinant Insulin Aspart, Recombinant Insulin Degludec1 Insulin Degludec/Insulin Aspart, Recombinant Insulin Detemir Insulin Glargine, Recombinant Insulin Glulisine Insulin Human Isophane (NPH) Insulin Human Isophane (NPH)/Insulin Human Regular Insulin Human Regular2 Insulin Lispro Protamine, Recombinant/Insulin Lispro, Recombinant Insulin Lispro, Recombinant 1Also available in a 200 Unit/mL concentration (rather than the usual 100 U/mL) 2Also available in a 500 Unit/mL concentration (rather than the usual 100 U/mL) OVERVIEW As expected, the toxicity of insulin in overdose is primarily due to hypoglycaemia, although hypokalaemia may also cause problems. The duration of the hypoglycaemic effect depends on the type of insulin injected (duration of action), the amount and age, diabetes (insulin resistance) and other factors that may increase or decrease the patient`s sensitivity to insulin. Mortality in attempted suicidal overdose with insulin is 25%. Death has occurred after as little as 20 units but doses of 400 to 900 units or more are more common in fatal cases. Irreversible neurological injury occurs when glycogen stores are depleted since the brain is totally dependent on glucose metabolism. It is the duration of hypoglycaemia in the presence of signs or symptoms of neurological compromise that determines post hypoglycaemic encephalopathy, rather than the quantity of insulin injected. The period from injection of an overdose of insulin to irreversible brain damage is frequently about 7 hours (about the time glycogen stores are completely). Treatment is with 50% glucose IV, food (and lots of it) and close observation. MECH Continue reading >>

Death By Insulin: How Sweet It Isn't!!

Death By Insulin: How Sweet It Isn't!!

Case Study S. P. was a nurse who had a long history of depression. She had stopped her medication several months ago since her life had stabilized. However, with the discovery of her husband having an affair, a setback at work, and the terminal illness of her mother, she soon began to have feelings of unworthiness and hopelessness. She was working for a home health agency and was involved in the care of an elderly woman who had a heart condition brought on by her long history of insulin dependent diabetes. Her patient had just received her three month supply of quick-acting insulin. S.P. decided to take one of the bottles and in the privacy of her home she injected herself with the entire contents. Within several minutes she began to feel hungry, nervous, sweaty, shaky, and very weak. This rapidly progressed to her feeling dizzy, disoriented and confused, ultimately resulting in drowsiness, unconsciousness, coma, and finally death. Why did she die? Cause of Death? If your answer to this question is that S.P died from an overdose of insulin, I suppose you are right. After all that’s what I would put on the death certificate. But what I’m really looking for here is the mechanism underlying the cause of death. Only by understanding the pathophysiology of disease, dysfunction, and death, can one begin to appreciate the complexity of life and how easy it is for us to die and fall off the radar screen for the survival of the fittest. The strength of a chain is only as good as its weakest link. In the case here of S.P, most people who are familiar with diabetes and insulin realize that since insulin is a hormone that is needed to keep the blood sugar (glucose) from going too high, then taking too much of it can cause a person’s blood sugar to drop too low. That’s exact Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: A Killing Dose Of Insulin

Ask D'mine: A Killing Dose Of Insulin

Hey, All: if you've got questions about life with diabetes, then you've come to the right place! That would be our weekly diabetes advice column, Ask D'Mine, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and clinical specialist Wil Dubois. Today, Wil tackles a very serious question that we hope is just one of genuine curiosity. It's about suicide, a sensitive topic to be approached with the utmost caution. Read on to see how Wil responds... {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Anonymous, type 1 from California, asks: How much insulin would you need to take to kill yourself? [email protected] D’Mine answers: First off, don’t kill yourself. Second off, if you are determined to do it, don’t use insulin. It’s slow and unreliable, with a distinct risk that the attempt will leave you permanently damaged, rather than dead. More on that in a bit. But first, let’s start the day by talking about the different ways to end your day. The Wikipedia entry on suicide methods lists the following ways to usher yourself out of this world: Bleeding, drowning, suffocation, hypothermia, electrocution, jumping from height, using a firearm, hanging, ligature compression, vehicular impact from trains or cars, taking poison, not treating a disease, immolation (including throwing oneself into a volcano), starvation, dehydration, and suicide attack—sometimes called Suicide by Cop. The entry even includes a discussion on the use of homemade guillotines as a way of suicide. But no mention of insulin. That’s odd. Or maybe not, because, as I mentioned, insulin is a crappy tool to try to use to kill yourself. Not surprisingly, studies of insulin suicides are somewhat scarce, but one looked at 160 insulin suicide attempts and found that 94.7% of the PWDs fully recovered, 2.7% Continue reading >>

More in insulin