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New Diabetic Insulin

Insulin

Insulin

What are Insulin Insulin is a hormone that occurs naturally in the body and can also be given by injection as a treatment for diabetes. Naturally-occurring insulin is made by the beta cells of the Islets of Langerhans located in the pancreas. It helps the cells of the body to uptake glucose (sugar) found in the carbohydrates we eat so that it can be used as energy or stored for later use. Insulin also controls glucose release from the liver. One of the main roles of insulin is to keep blood glucose levels from going too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia). People with type 1 diabetes do not make enough insulin to satisfy their body's needs or make none at all. Insulin given by injection acts similarly to naturally occurring insulin. There are more than 20 different types of insulin available for diabetes treatment in the United States. The various types of insulin differ in several ways: such as source (animal, human or genetically engineered), the time for insulin to take effect and the length of time the insulin remains working (ie, rapid acting, short acting, intermediate acting, long acting or very long acting). Insulin is used to treat Type 1 diabetes and it may be used together with oral medications in the later stages of Type 2 diabetes. List of Insulin: Filter by: -- all conditions -- Drug Name View by: Brand | Generic Reviews Avg. Ratings Humulin R (Pro, More...) generic name: insulin regular 0 reviews 10 NovoLog Mix 70 / 30 FlexPen (More...) generic name: insulin aspart/insulin aspart protamine 0 reviews 10 Humalog Mix 75 / 25 (More...) generic name: insulin lispro/insulin lispro protamine 2 reviews 9.5 NovoLog Mix 70 / 30 (More...) generic name: insulin aspart/insulin aspart protamine 3 reviews 9.5 ReliOn / Novolin 70 / 30 (More...) generic name: i Continue reading >>

Can Synthetic Biology Finally Cure The Autoimmune Disease?

Can Synthetic Biology Finally Cure The Autoimmune Disease?

Lev Dolgachov/Thinkstock Type 1 diabetes is a discouraging disease. Despite the availability of synthetic insulin and increasingly sophisticated monitoring technology, it’s still a condition that requires incessant vigilance: Diabetics must constantly track their blood sugar levels and carefully use that information to calibrate drug doses. Even if you manage to do all of that well, bad days remain almost inevitable. Take too much insulin, and you can spiral into a hypoglycemic delirium. Take too little, and your glucose levels will rise, filling the body with dangerous levels of ketones. Less immediately frustrating—but no less familiar for diabetics—is the state of diabetes research. Possible cures routinely pop up only to fade from view, their benefits never quite surpassing the simple efficacy of an insulin injection. More recently, though, the field of synthetic biology—a hybrid discipline that aims to construct or redesign biological components and systems—has shown the potential to produce a novel set of treatments. The solutions remain speculative, but they do offer cautious reasons for hope. “Type 1 diabetes, in theory, should be relatively easy to solve. That has been the mantra of researchers for the last 30 years. And I still take insulin every day.” John Glass, a researcher working on one such new effort, knows how maddening false hope can be, having lived with the disease for decades. “Type 1 diabetes, in theory, should be relatively easy to solve,” he told me over the phone. “That has been the mantra of type 1 diabetes researchers for the last 30 years. And I still take insulin every day.” I had originally called Glass, a synthetic biologist with the J. Craig Venter Institute, in the hopes of better understanding how his burgeoning f Continue reading >>

Eli Lilly’s New Ultra-rapid Insulin In The Works

Eli Lilly’s New Ultra-rapid Insulin In The Works

While Fiasp is now the only ultra fast insulin on the market, it won’t be the new kid for long. At least two other companies are hard at work bringing their own version of ultra fast acting insulin to a pharmacy near you. Pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly and Company says they are starting the late phases of clinical studies on an ultra fast insulin to go up against Novo Nordisk’s Fiasp, which is on the market in parts of Europe and in Canada. Lilly’s insulin will be for use in syringes, pens, and pumps and they plan to submit in 2019 for regulatory approval to multiple agencies in a global rollout that will include the United States. French biotechnology company Adocia is also in late stage development of an ultra rapid insulin but how and whether their drug might come to market is unknown since a collaboration between Adocia and Lilly was dissolved in January 2017. “Development of an ultra rapid insulin has been a priority for Lilly for years,” says Deirdre Ibsen, Platform Leader in the effort to develop and market the company’s ultra-rapid formulation. “We’ve had three efforts in development, including two internal efforts. Obviously we feel strongly that there is a role for ultra-rapid insulin in helping people better manage their diabetes.” Dr. Thomas Hardy, an endocrinologist and Senior Medical Director at Lilly, says the company has been working for more than six years on ultra rapid insulin formulations. He says Phase III clinical trials are about to begin, which is the last step before results of the trials are submitted to the Food and Drug Administration, the European Medicines Agency, and other regulatory agencies for approval. Hardy says the new insulin was formulated with two new excipients to speed up its action. One of those includes an Continue reading >>

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

For diabetic patients who need financial assistance with supplies and related health care items and services, the following programs may be of help. Please note that applications must be submitted to the programs and not to PPA® . Categories Insulin Access Programs Blink Health is working with Eli Lilly and Company to offer a 40 percent discount on Lilly insulins. The Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program delivers the 40 percent discount directly to patients and will be honored at over 67,000 local pharmacies nationwide. Anyone can participate in the Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program via the Blink Health mobile app (available for iOS & Android) or website, www.blinkhealth.com, which has no membership fees or monthly premiums. Patients enter the form, dosage and quantity of the Lilly insulin that matches their prescription. The discount will be automatically applied. Payments are made online and the prescriptions can be picked up at virtually any U.S. pharmacy, including: Walgreens, CVS/pharmacy, Target, RiteAid, Safeway and Kroger. People using federal government programs are not eligible. Purchases are fully refundable. Assistance: Insulin Free Glucose Meters Abbott Diabetes Care provides free blood glucose monitoring system kits to those with diabetes. Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc. 1360 South Loop Road Alameda, CA 94502 USA Tel: 888-522-5226 Fax: 202-337-8314 Email: [email protected] Assistance: Free Glucose Meters Test Strips Roche Diagnostics, the maker of ACCU-CHEK® Products provides a limited supply of ACCU-CHEK Aviva test strips to a network of community clinics and health centers throughout the U.S. to distribute to their low-income and uninsured patients with diabetes. Roache Diagnostics Corporation 9115 Hague Road Indianapolis, IN 46250 Phone: 800 Continue reading >>

Smartphone-controlled Cells Could Pump Insulin For Diabetics

Smartphone-controlled Cells Could Pump Insulin For Diabetics

Scientists in China have used a smartphone and a technique called optogenetics to precisely control cells to deliver insulin to diabetic mice. The approach could be used to continuously monitor blood glucose levels in human diabetics and automatically produce necessary insulin, a hormone that converts sugar from food into energy the body can use. The researchers engineered human cells with a light-sensitive gene that is found in plants and produces insulin on cue when activated by wirelessly powered red LED lights. They inserted those lights and the designer cells onto small, flexible discs that were then grafted onto the backs of mice. Neural probes that combine optics, electronics, and drugs could help unlock the secrets of the brain. A customized Android-based phone app turns on the LED lights and adjusts the intensity of the light. The researchers exposed the diabetic mice to about four hours of light each day and were able to stabilize normal insulin production in the bloodstream for 15 days. Optogenetics is an emerging field that uses light-sensitive proteins to regulate biological activities in the body. The technique has been envisioned as a way to treat a range of diseases, including Parkinson’s and schizophrenia. The first human test of optogenetics is under way to restore vision to patients with retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative eye condition that leads to blindness. The researchers, who describe the insulin delivery approach in Science Translational Medicine, say the system was inspired by the “smart home” concept, which involves lighting, heating, and electronic devices that communicate with one another and can all be controlled remotely with phone or computer apps. They say the remote-controlled cells could “pave the way for a new era of persona Continue reading >>

Get Around-the-clock Blood Sugar Control With Powerful A1c Reduction

Get Around-the-clock Blood Sugar Control With Powerful A1c Reduction

Do not take Tresiba® if you: are having an episode of low blood sugar are allergic to Tresiba® or any of the ingredients in Tresiba® Before taking Tresiba®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions, including if you are: pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements Talk to your health care provider about low blood sugar and how to manage it. Read the Instructions for Use and take Tresiba® exactly as your health care provider tells you to Do not do any conversion of your dose. The dose counter always shows the selected dose in units Know the type and strength of insulin you take. Do not change the type of insulin you take unless your health care provider tells you to Prescription Tresiba® is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children who are 1 year of age and older with diabetes Tresiba® is not for people with diabetic ketoacidosis Tresiba® is not for children who need less than 5 units of Tresiba® each day It is not known if Tresiba® is safe and effective in children under 1 year of age Tresiba® is available in 2 concentrations: 200 units/mL and 100 units/mL Do not take Tresiba® if you: are having an episode of low blood sugar are allergic to Tresiba® or any of the ingredients in Tresiba® Before taking Tresiba®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions, including if you are: pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements Talk to your health care provider about low blood sugar and how to manage it. Read the Instructions for Use and take Tresiba® exactly as your health care pr Continue reading >>

#51: Diabetes Treatment In 2017: New Meds, Insulin, And Cardiac Risk Reduction

#51: Diabetes Treatment In 2017: New Meds, Insulin, And Cardiac Risk Reduction

Get cozy with these new drugs for diabetes treatment. Don’t be scared, they won’t bite. On this episode, we interview Endocrinologist and current president of AACE, Dr. Jonathan D. Leffert, MD, FACP, FACE, ECNU about how to utilize the myriad of new diabetes drugs on the marketplace including SGLT2 inhibitors, DPP4 inhibitors, GLP1 agonists, and new ultra long acting insulins. Plus, we’ll teach you how to choose between agents, common side effects, A1C goals, and the cardiovascular benefits of these newer agents. Help patients afford their meds with this resource from AACE Full show notes available at Join our newsletter mailing list. Rate us on iTunes, recommend a guest or topic and give feedback at [email protected] Case: Case from Kashlak Memorial Hospital: 49 yo M with HTN, BMI 29, hyperlipidemia, family history of premature CAD (dad age 45yo), and type 2 diabetes with A1C increase from 6.4% to 9% while on metformin monotherapy. Clinical Pearls: Latent autoimmune diabetes of aging (LADA): Autoimmune disease similar to type 1 diabetes (DM1). Suspect if older adult presents w/new insulin dependence. Check glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies, which are most sensitive and specific. Often positive in LADA/DM1. Can also check islet cell Ab or insulin autoantibodies. A1C and anemia: Based on red cell (RBC) survival. Falsely high a1c if RBC turnover is low → Older RBCs that accumulate more glucose e.g. Iron, vitamin B12, or folate deficiency anemia. Falsely low a1c if rapid RBC turnover e.g. hemolysis, or on treatment for iron, B12, or folate deficiency, or erythropoietin injections (Source: UptoDate) Fructosamine and A1C: Fructosamine is bound to albumin in blood. Turnover of albumin is about 28 days vs 120 days for hemoglobin. Thus, fructosamine pr Continue reading >>

Revere Health The First In Utah To Offer New, Automatic Insulin Pump To Diabetic Patients

Revere Health The First In Utah To Offer New, Automatic Insulin Pump To Diabetic Patients

A new insulin pump available at Revere Health Provo Campus aims to give patients with diabetes peace of mind. Revere Health in Provo is the first in Utah to offer the MiniMed 670G system, the first Food and Drug Administration-approved hybrid closed loop insulin pump, according to Revere Health. “This will take off a lot of the mental and physical burden of the person,” said Souhbi Nizam, an endocrinologist with Revere Health. The MiniMed 670G system will automatically deliver a personalized amount of basal insulin to a patient’s body throughout the day and will learn how much insulin a patient needs in order to give that personalized amount every five minutes to keep glucose levels in a healthy range. Nizam said the system is the first of its kind for diabetes and has been anxiously awaited by health professionals. The device was approved last year. Some Revere Health patients will be switched to the closed loop system in the next few months. Nizam said the automatic system will help patients relax as the pump automatically adjusts the basal rate throughout the right. It also works to prevent highs and lows, and will short the amount of time spent toward diabetes management. The pump is for patients with Type 1 diabetes who are at least 14 years old. About 1.25 million people in the United States have Type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile diabetes, and less than a third of them are achieving target blood glucose control levels, according to the JDRF (formerly known as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation). Continue reading >>

Woman With Type 1 Diabetes Still Off Insulin One Year After Cell Transplant

Woman With Type 1 Diabetes Still Off Insulin One Year After Cell Transplant

Scientists report a step forward in the plan to create a truly artificial pancreas, offering new hope to people with type 1 diabetes. A 43-year-old single mother with dangerously difficult-to-control diabetes had insulin-producing islet cells transplanted into her omentum -- a fatty membrane in the belly. The cells began producing insulin faster than expected, and after one year she is doing well and doesn't need insulin injections, the University of Miami researchers said. "We're exploring a way to optimize islet cell therapy to a larger population. This study gives us hope for a different transplant approach," said the study's lead author, Dr. David Baidal. He's an assistant professor in the university's Diabetes Research Institute. Others voiced optimism as well. "This study was a good start at evaluating a novel site for transplant," said Julia Greenstein, vice president of discovery research for JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation). Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. That means the body's immune system mistakenly damages healthy cells -- in this case, the islet cells found in the pancreas. This leaves people with type 1 diabetes without enough insulin to convert sugars from foods into energy for the body. As a result, they must take multiple daily insulin injections, or use a pump that delivers insulin via a tube inserted under the skin that must be changed every few days. Currently, islet cells from deceased donors are transplanted into the liver, but that's not an ideal option. This new research was a proof-of-concept study expected to be the first step on a path toward developing a mini-organ called the BioHub. In its final stages, the BioHub would mimic a pancreas and act as a home for transplanted islet cells, providing them with ox Continue reading >>

2018 New Insulin Pump Comparisons And Reviews

2018 New Insulin Pump Comparisons And Reviews

Insulin pumps are NOT commodities. There are differences between systems (some subtle, some obvious) that make certain pumps better options for certain individuals. It is astounding that so many people are given little to no choice when it comes to selecting an insulin pump. Given that pump warranties last longer than the average marriage, it makes sense to invest some time in comparing the various devices before making a selection. Every member of our clinical team has personal and professional experience with every make and model of insulin pump. We are not employed by any pump company, and we are not easily pressured (although really good chocolate has been known to sway our opinion a bit), so we can offer you fair and impartial information/insight. Please use our pump comparisons to help make an educated decision. We have listed the positive and negative features that are unique to each pump. Features that are common to all pumps, such as allowing for multiple basal patterns, are not included. At the end of the day, the choice is yours. If you would like some expert input, feel free to contact our office and schedule some time to meet or speak with one of our clinicians. And for assistance applying your pump to achieve the best possible glucose management, please reach out. Continue reading >>

New Smart Insulin Patch Could Be A Game Changer

New Smart Insulin Patch Could Be A Game Changer

New Smart Insulin Patch Could Be a Game Changer The smart insulin patch. The lab of Zhen Gu, Ph.D. For many who suffer from diabetes, insulin injections can be a painful and imprecise process of keeping their blood sugar levels under control. A new smart insulin patch could do away with these painful injections and revolutionize the way diabetics keep their blood sugar levels in check. The patch, created by researchers from the University of North Carolina and NC State, is a thin square covered with more than 100 tiny needles.According to researchers, the patch works fast, is simple to use and is made from biocompatible materials.The patchs tiny, painless needles are packed with insulin and glucose-sensing enzymes in microscopic storage units. The patch is able to release these enzymes when blood sugar levels get too high. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , showed promising results in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. Researchers hope to see similar success in subsequent clinical trials in humans. Around 387 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes. These patients keep their blood sugar in check by monitoring their levels with regular finger pricks and repeated insulin shots. If the wrong amount of medication is injected, patients could suffer from severe complications. "The whole system can be personalized to account for a diabetic's weight and sensitivity to insulin," said co-senior author Zhen Guin a statement, "so we could make the smart patch even smarter." The study found that the patch lowered blood glucose in mice for up to nine hours. As mice are less sensitive to insulin than humans, researchers suggest the patch can have a longer-lasting effect in diabetic patients. The patch emulates beta cells, which generate and Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

Insulin Prices Skyrocketing

Insulin Prices Skyrocketing

America’s getting plenty angry about the rising cost of insulin—and no wonder. Between 2002 and 2013, the average price for this life-saving, injectable drug used by nearly 10 million Americans with diabetes has tripled, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). “No one who relies on insulin should have to wonder if they’ll be able to afford it,” the ADA asserts in an online petition for its Stand Up for Affordable Insulin campaign.1 The ADA’s action doesn’t stand alone. In November, Vermont senator and former contender for the Democratic presidential nomination Bernie Sanders fired off a letter calling on the U.S. Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission asking for an investigation of pharmaceutical makers Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk and Sanofi for possibly colluding on insulin price increases.2 “Not only have these pharmaceutical companies raised insulin prices significantly—sometimes by double digits overnight—in many instances the prices have apparently increased in tandem,” noted the letter, co-signed by Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD). “We have…heard from our constituents that the life-saving insulin they need is increasingly unaffordable,” And in early January 2017, the New York law firm Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann sued Novo Nordisk on behalf of the Lehigh County (PA) Employees' Retirement System alleging the company “reported materially false and misleading earnings and forecasts” that were “inflated” by price fixing. That’s not all. In a rapidly-changing insulin market, the recent introduction in the U.S. of the generic “biosimilar insulin” called Basaglar, which won FDA approval in December 2015, has put a lower-priced type on the market. This development reportedly prompted two major manufactu Continue reading >>

New Type 2 Diabetes Pill Could Replace Insulin Needle

New Type 2 Diabetes Pill Could Replace Insulin Needle

Living A pill taken once a day may significantly improve the health and waistlines of people with type 2 diabetes, researchers in England have found. Scientists from the Leicester Diabetes Centre at the University of Leicester have reported that a semaglutide pill has been shown to lower blood glucose levels by almost two percent and help patients to lose weight. The pill will enable patients to better control their condition and reduce the need for insulin injections. Unlike many of the current treatments, semaglutide doesn’t carry the risk of causing low blood sugar or weight gain. Semaglutide works by stimulating insulin production while suppressing both glucagon (the hormone that raises glucose levels) and appetite. Of the 632 participants in the 26-week study, 90 percent of those receiving the drug were able to lower their blood sugar levels to a target level of less than seven percent, reducing the need for insulin. Weight loss also occurred in 71 percent of patients taking the pill. The results of the phase II trial were published in the medical journal JAMA. Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, develops as the body becomes resistant to the effects of insulin and/or the pancreas becomes less effective at producing insulin. According to Diabetes Australia, 280 Aussies develop diabetes every day. Currently about 1.7 million Australian have diabetes (this includes all types, both diagnosed and undiagnosed.) Study leader Professor Melanie Davies said the results will help type 2 diabetes sufferers better manage their condition. “Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition with potentially devastating complications which is posing a major challenge to health services across the world because of the increasing numbers of people developing it,” she said. Continue reading >>

A New Clinical Trial Just Made Diabetes Patients Insulin Independent

A New Clinical Trial Just Made Diabetes Patients Insulin Independent

New research involving pancreatic islet cell implants show promise in treating Type 1 Diabetes, a potentially debilitating form of the disease that affects more than a million people in the U.S. This new treatment might just spell the end for T1D. With Promising Potential No matter how modern the world has become, there are certain ailments that continue to persist. One of these is diabetes, and according to the World Health Organization (WHO), there are now over 422 million people in the world suffering from it. Generally characterized as a problem in blood sugar levels, diabetes has two variants — an insulin-dependent one, known as type 1 diabetes (T1D), and type 2 diabetes that’s non-insulin-dependent. In the United States, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation reports that about 1.25 million people have T1D. The cause of this particular diabetes variant still remains unknown, and treatments generally involve pumping insulin daily into the patient’s body. As such, there’s still no known cure for T1D. However, researchers from the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine in Florida may have just made it possible to develop one. In a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the researchers described how clinical trials involving pancreatic islet cell implants to the omentum — the tissue covering organs in the abdomen — shows promise in treating T1D. “Islet transplantation can restore euglycemia and eliminate severe hypoglycemia in patients with [T1D],” the researchers wrote. “The omentum has a dense vascularized surface for islet implantation, drains into the portal system, and is easily accessible.” Insulin Independence Pancreatic islets are endocrine cell clusters found throughout the organ, which is normally inv Continue reading >>

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