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Natural Remedies For Insulin Resistance

Natural Remedies For Insulin Resistance Work

Natural Remedies For Insulin Resistance Work

Natural Remedies For Insulin Resistance Work An Oasis of Healing has natural remedies for insulin resistance that help reverse that condition. We have solutions for people who would rather explore natural remedies for insulin resistance versus going the route of synthetic prescription drugs which cause a lot of damage internally. Doing things involving natural solutions is always best so your body can focus on healing and not be distracted by adverse side effects. We take the time to educate people and teach them how the body works. We show people what the body needs and why it needs it. Our center has a passion for helping teach people how to eat so health is maintained. Our diet for people consists of a raw plant-based vegan diet that is organic and uncooked. Our results have shown that adopting this way of eating can help restore health on its own. However, we dont stop there. Studies also show that exercise is a key piece in maintaining health. When you leave our center and return home, you bring this knowledge home with you for your benefit as well as your families. Exercise is crucial for good health. Now, dont worry, we arent talking about turning you into an Olympic athlete having you exercise 8 hours a day. That is not needed. We simply want to increase your cardiopulmonary fitness level. What we are talking about is doing things like walking, maybe a little running, riding a bicycle, and so on. We help integrate these things into your lifestyle for maximum benefit. Not exercising on a regular basis prevents the cleansing of the waste that builds up around your cells. Eliminating the waste around the cells through physical activity is a must and cant be ignored. Natural Remedies for Insulin Resistance Start with What Youre Putting in Your Mouth People who beco Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance—a Lethal Link Between Metabolic Disease And Heart Attack

Insulin Resistance—a Lethal Link Between Metabolic Disease And Heart Attack

Due to multimillion dollar advertising and marketing campaigns by the pharmaceutical industry, patients and physicians alike seem to associate heart attack and stroke risk only with cholesterol. Drugs that lower cholesterol (statins), have created a windfall of profit for pharmaceutical companies, with a single company’s statin drug often exceeding several billion dollars in annual sales. However, cardiovascular risk entails far more than just elevated cholesterol levels. In fact, the phenomenon known as insulin resistance offers a direct link between metabolic disease and cardiovascular risk, and is an often overlooked culprit underlying diabetes and heart disease. Learn how and why these two common diseases are intimately related and how to untangle them from your life. How are Blood Sugar and Plaque Related? Diabetes and heart disease are intertwined from the start, sharing a complex panel of hidden phenomena that lay the foundation for both conditions. If diabetes is present, heart disease is much more likely to develop. If heart disease develops, it is far more likely that diabetes will also. The shared misfortune of diabetes and heart disease emerged with Dr. Steven Haffner’s 1998 report from the University of Texas that people with diabetes who do not have heart disease have the same risk for heart attack as people with established heart disease—the risk is one and the same.1 In 1999, the American Heart Association went on to label diabetes “a cardiovascular disease.” Since then, more studies have established this link. A 2001 study of people with stable heart disease but no previous history of diabetes found that approximately 50% of subjects had newly diagnosed disturbances of glucose metabolism (16% had full-blown diabetes and 36% had impaired glucos Continue reading >>

How To Treat Insulin Resistance Naturally

How To Treat Insulin Resistance Naturally

Insulin is the pancreatic hormone that escorts glucose into the body's cells to provide them with energy. When cells are regularly exposed to too much glucose because of excessive simple sugar consumption or when far fewer calories are used than are consumed, insulin resistance may result. Video of the Day Untreated, insulin resistance leads to fatigue, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It is critical to implement lifestyle changes but although these are simple to learn most people find them challenging to implement consistently. Lose seven percent of your body weight to reduce the risk of your insulin resistance progressing to diabetes by 60 percent, according to the National Institutes of Health. To avoid the dangerous practice of having your weight yo-yo up and down, George Blackburn, M.D., of the Center for the Study of Nutrition Medicine at Harvard University, recommends that you stop after losing 10 percent of your body weight and remain for six months at this new weight before resuming weight loss efforts. To lose one pound a week establish your Basal Metabolic Rate, or BMR, on an online BMR calculator. This is the number of calories you need to survive. Then multiply this number by 1.2 if you are not walking an hour a day or 1.35 if you have this level of exercise. Finally, subtract 500 from this result to find the number of calories you need to eat daily to lose one pound a week. Take as long as you need to reach a body mass index of 18.5 to 24.9. Calculate body mass index by diving your weight in kilograms by your height in meters squared. Plan three meals and two snacks a day within your target daily calorie count. To optimize nutrition and reduce the level of glucose your body has to contend with at one time, select foods from the Mediterranean Diet Plan. Continue reading >>

For Good Health, Resist Insulin Resistance!

For Good Health, Resist Insulin Resistance!

Cinnamon Extract Gets in Your Blood Cinnamon extract is a safe, natural way to maintain healthy blood sugar levels By Dr. Edward R. Rosick ne of my greatest joys as a physician and as a writer is being able to educate people on the ways in which they can maximize their health and, therefore, their lives. On the other hand, one of my greatest frustrations is seeing a health or behavioral problem that a patient (or society as a whole) just doesn’t want to deal with, generally because they don’t see it as being that much of a threat to their health. Helping patients to change their behaviors in order to effect an improvement in their health can be difficult at best, but when the health problem in question is silent and stealthy, taking years or even decades to manifest its ugly consequences, it makes the job—for me and the patients—that much harder. “Benefits in insulin sensitivity are also likely to lead to a decreased incidence of cardiovascular diseases, which are more than double in people with diabetes.” When patients come to my office with fears about cancer or heart disease, it’s relatively easy to educate them on the lifestyle changes they should make and the dietary supplements they should take. But there are other chronic health problems, such as insulin resistance, that don’t get nearly the respect (so to speak) they deserve, even though they affect tens of millions of people. Insulin Resistance—A Silent, Deadly Epidemic In simple terms, insulin resistance is the decreased ability of insulin (a hormone secreted by the pancreas) to do its primary job of moving glucose (blood sugar) from our bloodstream into our cells. Since all of our cells use glucose as their primary fuel for maintaining the metabolic processes of life, an impairment of insuli Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

How To Help Your Body Reverse Diabetes

How To Help Your Body Reverse Diabetes

Diabetes rates are rising, in fact it is now considered an “epidemic” in the medical community. The American Diabetes Association reports that: 23.6 million Americans have diabetes 57 million Americans are pre-diabetic 1.6 new cases of diabetes are reported each year For those over age 60, almost 1 in 4 have diabetes Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death Diabetes increases heart attack risk and 68% of diabetes related death certificates report heart related problems 75% of adults with diabetes will develop high blood pressure Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness, kidney failure and nervous system disorders Diabetes costs $174 billion annually Diabetes is a well-established problem and a multi-billion dollar industry. It is medically characterized by Fasting Blood Glucose higher than 126 mg/dL , which ranges between 100-125 mg/dL are considered pre-diabetic and ranges below 99 mg/dL are considered normal. Studies are finding that a fasting blood glucose below 83 mg/dL is actually a better benchmark, as risk of heart disease begins to increase at anything above that. IMPORTANT: There is a difference between Type 1 diabetes (an autoimmune condition) and Type 2 diabetes (lifestyle related). This article refers specifically to Type 2 diabetes. Some medical professionals use an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) to test for diabetes. If you’ve ever been pregnant and had to drink the sickeningly sweet sugar cocktail and then have blood drawn, you are familiar with this one. Basically, a patient is given 50-75 grams of glucose in concentrated solution and his blood sugar response is measured. I’m not a fan of this test because no one should be ingesting that much concentrated glucose, and the test is not a completely accurate measure. (Just a side note: if yo Continue reading >>

Stop Fighting Blood Sugar, Start Fixing Insulin Resistance

Stop Fighting Blood Sugar, Start Fixing Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance is the underlying condition that is present in all forms of diabetes. Most people believe that insulin resistance is only present in prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, however ample research shows that insulin resistance is also present in type 1 diabetes (1-3). It is a common misconception that people with type 1 diabetes do not experience insulin resistance. Even many doctors believe that insulin resistance only affects people with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, and that by nature of being “skinny” or “normoweight,” people with type 1 diabetes are insulin sensitive. This information cannot be farther from the truth. In my practice, more than 95% of my clients with type 1 diabetes are insulin resistant, and 100% of my clients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes are insulin resistant. If you’ve been reading this blog for any length of time, you probably have picked up on the fact that I’m a huge fan of maximizing insulin effectiveness over managing blood glucose. The reason for this is actually quite simple: Trying to control blood glucose without addressing insulin resistance is akin to frequently washing your car and never fixing problems under the hood. Addressing the root cause of blood glucose variability – insulin resistance – is the most successful method of controlling blood glucose. Period. The Blood Sugar Rollercoaster Perhaps you’ve been in this situation before: you wake up in the morning, your blood glucose is 50 points over the normal range. You don’t know why. You eat a standard breakfast, bolus the same amount of insulin that you always give yourself for breakfast, and then continue on with your day. Two hours later, when you check your blood glucose, and it is still high. This time it is 150 points above the norma Continue reading >>

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

Understanding the cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance helps us choose more effective therapeutic interventions for the treatment and prevention of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is present in individuals who are obese and those with diabetes mellitus. Several studies have found that an insulin resistance diet protocol and exercise can alter insulin signaling pathways and delay the onset of insulin resistance. It’s estimated that the number of diabetes sufferers in the world will double from about 190 million to 325 million during the next 25 years. (1) It’s obvious that we need to pay more attention to our lifestyle habits and make some changes. An insulin resistance diet, similar to a diabetic diet plan, helps you lose excess weight and regulate your insulin and blood glucose levels in order to reduce your risk of developing prediabetes and diabetes. Insulin Resistance Diet Research suggests that the primary cause of insulin resistance is excess weight, especially excess fat around the waist. Fortunately, weight loss can help the body respond better to insulin. The Diabetes Prevention Program and other large studies indicate that people with insulin resistance and prediabetes can often prevent or delay developing diabetes by changing their diets to follow an insulin resistance diet, along with losing weight. Here are seven ways to start eating an insulin resistance diet. 1. Limit Carbohydrates Research published in Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity suggests that monitoring carbohydrate intake, whether by carbohydrate counting or experience-based estimation, remains a key strategy in achieving glycemic control. Although all carbohydrates can be incorporated into carbohydrate counting, for good health, carbohydrates from vegetables, Continue reading >>

A Few Simple Changes Can Help Reverse Insulin Resistance Naturally

A Few Simple Changes Can Help Reverse Insulin Resistance Naturally

Reset Scientists have known that calorie restriction, when accompanied by optimum nutrition (also known as C.R.O.N.) can extend lifespan of animals 30 to 230 %, depending on the species. Primate studies are in process. It will be another 10 years before we known the final results, and no doubt, results will then lead to even more questions. What we do know, from major studies of centenarians already underway, is that the demographics have nothing much in common. Many centenarians are smokers, for example. They come from all over the world without favoring any geographic location in particular. However, there are 3 consistent blood metabolic indicators of all centenarians that are relatively consistent: low sugar, low triglyceride, and low insulin. All three are relatively low for age. Among these three variables insulin is the common denominator. The level of insulin sensitivity of the cell is one of the most important markers of lifespan. Many lifestyle factors can contribute to a resistance to insulin, so in this article, we will go into what exactly this means, what it affects, and how to reverse insulin resistance naturally. Insulin When we eat, the food we consume turns into sugar once inside the body. This is particularly true of carbohydrates such as potatoes or rice. This sugar circulates within us, and under the influence of insulin, is absorbed into the surrounding cells and tissue where it is metabolized into energy, or in the case of excessive sugar, stored for future use. Insulin is commonly known as a hormone secreted by the beta cells of the pancreas that lowers the blood sugar by promoting their transport from the blood stream to the cell. Cells, in turn, use sugar as fuel to generate ATP, the energy currency of the body. Insulin’s real purpose in our Continue reading >>

Reverse Insulin Resistance With These 8 Foods

Reverse Insulin Resistance With These 8 Foods

Research indicates that you don't need drugs to control blood sugar. Food, herbs, and spices are the future of medicine. Over 80 million Americans have insulin resistance that can lead to diabetes. And you could be on the road to diabetes for 10 years or more and never even know it. Here's what happens. The hormone insulin directs your cells to open up and take in glucose from the blood. With insulin resistance, your cells become desensitized to insulin. They ignore the instructions to open up and take in glucose. Your body keeps producing more insulin to try to get the message heard. But it doesn't work. And your insulin levels rise higher and higher. Those chronically high insulin levels cause rapid weight gain, premature aging, high blood pressure, heart disease, and higher cancer risks. Eventually they lead to type 2 diabetes. Herbs, spices and foods are your first line of defense. Here are eight that can help restore and maintain your cells' sensitivity to insulin. 1. Turmeric: 100% Effective In Preventing Diabetes A 2009 study found curcumin, an active compound found in turmeric, was 500 to 100,000 times more effective than the prescription drug Metformin at activating glucose uptake.[i] In another study of 240 pre-diabetic adults, patients were given either 250 milligrams of curcumin or a placebo every day. After nine months, NONE of those taking curcumin developed diabetes but 16.4% of the placebo group did. In other words, the curcumin was 100% effective at preventing Type 2 diabetes. 2. Ginger: Lowers Fasting Blood Glucose by 10.5% In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial 88 diabetics were divided into two groups. Every day one group received a placebo while the other received 3 one-gram capsules of ginger powder. After eight weeks, the ginger g Continue reading >>

14 Natural Ways To Improve Your Insulin Sensitivity

14 Natural Ways To Improve Your Insulin Sensitivity

Insulin is an essential hormone that controls your blood sugar levels. It's made in your pancreas and helps move sugar from your blood into your cells for storage. When cells are insulin resistant, they can't use insulin effectively, leaving your blood sugar high. When your pancreas senses high blood sugar, it makes more insulin to overcome the resistance and reduce your blood sugar. Over time, this can deplete the pancreas of insulin-producing cells, which is common in type 2 diabetes. Also, prolonged high blood sugar can damage nerves and organs. You're most at risk of insulin resistance if you have prediabetes or a family history of type 2 diabetes, as well as if you are overweight or obese. Insulin sensitivity refers to how responsive your cells are to insulin. Improving it can help you reduce insulin resistance and the risk of many diseases, including diabetes. Here are 14 natural, science-backed ways to boost your insulin sensitivity. A good night's sleep is important for your health. In contrast, a lack of sleep can be harmful and increase your risk of infections, heart disease and type 2 diabetes (1, 2). Several studies have also linked poor sleep to reduced insulin sensitivity (3, 4). For example, one study in nine healthy volunteers found that getting just four hours of sleep in one night reduced insulin sensitivity and the ability to regulate blood sugar, compared to getting eight and a half hours of sleep (4). Fortunately, catching up on lost sleep can reverse the effects of poor sleep on insulin resistance (5). A lack of sleep can harm your health and may increase insulin resistance. Making up for lost sleep may help reverse its effects. Regular exercise is one of the best ways to increase insulin sensitivity. It helps move sugar into the muscles for storag Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

What is insulin resistance? Insulin is a hormone that facilitates the transport of blood sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream into cells throughout the body for use as fuel. In response to the normal increase in blood sugar after a meal, the pancreas secretes insulin into the bloodstream. With insulin resistance, the normal amount of insulin secreted is not sufficient to move glucose into the cells – thus the cells are said to be “resistant” to the action of insulin. To compensate, the pancreas secretes insulin in ever-increasing amounts to maintain fairly adequate blood-sugar movement into cells and a normal blood-sugar level. What are some insulin resistance symptoms? There are usually no obvious, outward signs of insulin resistance. However, when you are severely insulin resistant, dark patches of skin called acanthosis nigricans can develop on the back of the neck. Sometimes a dark ring forms around the neck. These dark patches can also occur on the elbows, knees, knuckles and armpits. More importantly, insulin has less visible effects on metabolic reactions throughout the body, including converting calories into fat. Insulin resistance influences the liver enzymes that produce cholesterol and acts on the kidneys (which can contribute to high blood pressure). High insulin levels also have a role in the process that regulates inflammation. In time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes, itself a risk factor for heart disease. Insulin resistance can be diagnosed with blood tests that show low levels of HDL cholesterol (the “good” cholesterol), a high triglyceride level, a high fasting insulin level or a high uric acid level. What are the causes of insulin resistance? There are genetic factors that can contribute to the development of insulin resista Continue reading >>

Natural Treatments For Insulin Resistance

Natural Treatments For Insulin Resistance

Some natural treatments may help fight insulin resistance, a health condition known to raise your risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease. In people with insulin resistance, the body fails to respond properly to insulin (a hormone that plays a key role in using blood sugar for energy). The body produces more and more insulin to help blood sugar (or "glucose") enter cells, but excess glucose builds up in the bloodstream and, in turn, promotes the onset of diabetes. But by pairing certain natural treatments with essential lifestyle changes, you may be able to protect against insulin resistance. Using Natural Remedies for Insulin Resistance While the presence of specific genes appears to increase your odds of developing insulin resistance, some lifestyle factors (such as being overweight and not exercising regularly) could also raise your risk for this condition. Many people with insulin resistance also show signs of metabolic syndrome (a cluster of health problems known to increase your risk of diabetes and heart disease, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and excess weight around your waist). Working with your doctor to manage any major health issues should be your first step in addressing insulin resistance. In fact, by working out regularly, following a healthy diet, and maintaining a healthy weight, you may be able to reverse insulin resistance and reduce your risk of diabetes and other chronic illnesses. There's also some evidence that getting sufficient sleep may help improve your insulin response. In addition, preliminary research suggests that the following natural treatments may offer some benefit when it comes to combating insulin resistance: 1) Omega-3 Fatty Acids Following a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids (a type of healthy fat found naturall Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance: An Actionable Guide

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance: An Actionable Guide

If you’ve been in the space of alternative health and wellness for a while, then you’ve likely heard the term ‘insulin resistance’ floating around. But if not, I’m going to do that right now so your brain can stop screeching to a halt every time it reads that word. What Does Insulin Do? Insulin is a hormone. To put it quite simply, you can think of hormones as “body messengers” that communicate and respond to everything from hunger signals to reproduction, to emotions and a heck of a lot more. Because we are an intelligent and integrated feedback loop, some hormones have more than one, and/or, overlapping functions. Insulin is produced in the pancreas (which is part of the endocrine system). Its major responsibility (which is uber important) is to help regulate blood sugar. When you eat foods that contain any form of sugar, that sugar gets broken down into glucose. By the way, when I say that foods containing sugar I’m not just talking about sweet foods. I’m also talking about any carbohydrate (both simple and complex) containing foods. In this case, flavor is secondary to chemical make-up because that’s what ultimately determines how it’s going to be digested. Let me give some examples of foods that will get broken down into glucose: Desserts: ice cream, cookies, cakes, pies, candy, dried fruit… Sweet drinks: gatorade, creamers, soda, koolaid, juices… Simple carbs: bread, pasta, crackers, cereals… Complex carbs: quinoa, oats, brown & wild rice, corn, sprouted wheats, plantains, cassava, turnips, squashes… Fiber-rich: most fruits, most vegetables, peas, beans, legumes Those foods, the ones above and the others I didn’t have space to include, once simplified into glucose molecules (this is what we mean when we say blood sugar) are then esc Continue reading >>

Q And A: Type Ii Diabetes (insulin Resistant Diabetes)

Q And A: Type Ii Diabetes (insulin Resistant Diabetes)

Q: Dear Dr. Foster, I am a 33 year old male who has recently been diagnosed with Type II Diabetes. I am currently on 10 mg. of Glucotrol and 80 mg of Lipitor per day. I am trying to research the benefits of juicing or another holistic approach to help my condition and get off of these medications. Can you help? Signed, Bittersweet A: Dear Bittersweet, Before I get started on a very long answer, let's define the difference between Type I Diabetes Mellitus (also called juvenile onset or Insulin Dependent Diabetes) and Type II Diabetes (also called adult onset or insulin resistant Diabetes.) The onset of Type I is usually sudden and severe. It occurs most frequently in children, which is why it is called juvenile onset diabetes. In this type of diabetes, it is thought that a virus attacks the pancreas so that it can no longer produce insulin. Insulin is the only hormone in the body which can lower blood sugar, so if it is not produced, then blood sugar rises because it cannot get into the cells without insulin. Some doctors have found research that suggests other less well-known causes: the drinking of cow's milk in infancy and receiving regular vaccinations. For more information on the hazards of immunizations, please visit the web site: www.909shot.com. Of course, now that the vaccines have already been given, there's nothing to do about this except don't take any more, and go to the healing recommendations at the end. The onset of Type II Diabetes is usually gradual. Symptoms include weight loss, excessive thirst and hunger, weakness, and excessive urination. According to medical doctors, it can usually be controlled by diet and exercise and/or oral hypoglycemic medications (also called sulfonylureas). It occurs most frequently in middle-aged adults. Coincidentally, the Continue reading >>

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