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Mixing Metformin And Insulin

Can You Take Metformin And Januvia Together

Can You Take Metformin And Januvia Together

What type of drug is Metformin Metformin is a Generic name for a drug with antihyperglycemic properties that is used for treating non – insulin – dependent diabetes mellitus. This drug can improve glucose levels in blood by decreasing the production of glucose in liver, decreasing intestinal absorption of glucose and increasing insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Therapy with metformin may also decrease the risk of having a stroke, heart attack, or other diabetes-related complications. Metformin can induce weight loss and that’s why it is the drug of choice for obese patients with diabetes type two. When it is used alone, this drug doesn’t cause hypoglycemia as side effect; but, it may potentiate the hypoglycemic effects of sulfonylureas drugs and insulin if they are used together. Metformin is available in the form of tablet in following dosage forms: 500, 750, 850 and 1000 mg. It is usually taken during meals. Common Brand names on the market containing metformin as an active ingredient are: Glucophage, Glumetza, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, Metformin Sandoz, Diabex, Diaformin, Siofor, Metfogamma and Riomet. What is Januvia Januvia is a Brand name for a drug containing sitagliptin as an active ingredient. It is an oral diabetes drug that is used to control sugar levels in blood. Januvia works by regulating insulin levels that body produces after eating. This drug is used for the treatment of patints with type 2 diabetes. Januvia can be used in combination with other diabetes medicines, but is not used for treating type 1- diabetes. Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis should not use Januvia. Januvia is available in tablet and film-coated tablet form in following strenghts: 25, 50 and 100 mg. Common Brand names on the market containing sitagliptin as an active ingredie Continue reading >>

Can You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin?

Can You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin?

Metformin is a medication that helps manage type 2 diabetes and occasionally prediabetes. In general, drinking alcohol while taking metformin is not helpful and not recommended by doctors. The side effects of metformin can be life-threatening with excessive alcohol consumption. Metformin and alcohol both put stress on the liver, so intensifying the harmful effects and increasing the risk of liver complications. How does metformin and alcohol affect the body? Metformin is a popular, effective, and inexpensive management medication, prescribed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In 2014, some 14.4 million people in the United States were prescribed metformin. Metformin is also being used more and more frequently in prediabetes cases. Metformin use in overweight people with type 1 diabetes may also reduce insulin requirements and increase metabolic control. The drug works by improving insulin sensitivity, promoting the uptake of glucose into tissues and lowering sugar levels in the bloodstream. By increasing how effectively the existing glucose is used, metformin reduces the amount of glucose the liver produces and the intestines absorb. Alcohol also affects blood sugars significantly. Alcohol digestion puts stress on the liver, an organ dedicated to the removal of poisons from the body. When the liver is forced to process high amounts of alcohol, it becomes overworked and releases less glucose. Long-term alcohol use can also make cells less sensitive to insulin. This means that less glucose is absorbed from the blood and levels in the bloodstream increase. Over time, alcohol consumption damages the liver, especially when it is consumed in excess. It reduces the liver's ability to produce and regulate glucose. Conditions like alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis of the live Continue reading >>

Insulin And Metformin

Insulin And Metformin

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My son has been insulin dependent for the past 14 years. At his last clinic appointment he was prescribed Metformin to take long term as well as insulin, has anyone had experience of this? The side effects look nasty so we are very hesitant to start on the tablets. I know that some Type1s use metformin so hope they will come forward. Being put on metformin 2 weeks ago was the best thing since the pump! I haven't had any side effects and they are only listed on there as they have to be that doesn't mean he will have any! Since being on metformin my bloods have rarely been above a 10!! If it doesn't work out for him then you can always stop taking them but tbh I wish they had put me on metformin years ago instead of messing about just talking about it! Sorry to show my ignorance/thickness but what's Metaformin?? Sorry to show my ignorance/thickness but what's Metaformin?? How thick am I?? Just googled it so now I know..... sorry!! How thick am I?? Just googled it so now I know..... sorry!! I've been on Metformin and insulin for about 18 months now I think, and it seems to be helping my insulin resistance. The one thing I had a problem with at the beginning was being prescribed bog-standard Metformin (the cheaper kind, apparently), which had pretty horrible side-effects. Very uncomfortable, to put it mildly! But my prescription was amended to the slow-release form and that's been absolutely fine - I'm on 2000mg (2 tablets twice a day). I've been on Metformin for 4 months and not had the problems you hear others are having. I only have to take one tablet a day at breakfast which I do mid breakfast and wash it down with 200ml of water which seems to do the Continue reading >>

Drug Interactions Between Lantus And Metformin

Drug Interactions Between Lantus And Metformin

Interactions between your drugs Moderate metformin ↔ insulin glargine Applies to:metformin and Lantus (insulin glargine) Using metFORMIN together with insulin glargine may increase the risk of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include headache, dizziness, drowsiness, nervousness, confusion, tremor, nausea, hunger, weakness, perspiration, palpitation, and rapid heartbeat. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. You may need a dose adjustment or more frequent monitoring of your blood sugar to safely use both medications. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor. The classifications below are a guideline only. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific patient is difficult to determine using this tool alone given the large number of variables that may apply. Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit. Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances. Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan. Unknown No information available. Compare Pharmacy Prices Compare Local Prescription Prices. Get a Free Coupon & Save up to 80% goodrx.com Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource be Continue reading >>

Increased Mortality With Combining Sulfonylurea And Insulin

Increased Mortality With Combining Sulfonylurea And Insulin

About 11,000 patients using both insulin and sulfonylurea were evaluated… Ulrik M. Mogensen, MD, of the department of cardiology at University Hospital Rigshospitalet in Denmark, and colleagues evaluated patients receiving sulfonylurea with insulin and 16,910 patients receiving metformin with insulin to determine the differences in outcomes of treatment combinations. Outcome endpoints measured included all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, hypoglycemia and a composite endpoint of myocardial infarction, stroke and CV death. The metformin plus insulin group was younger, had experienced less comorbidity and a longer duration of monotherapy treatment, and used metformin more often before insulin therapy vs. the sulfonylurea plus insulin group. There was a two to five times greater risk for mortality among the sulfonylurea group compared with the metformin group. Glibenclamide, tolbutamide and glipizide plus insulin led to the greatest odds of all outcome endpoints compared with metformin plus insulin. Compared with metformin plus insulin, there was an increased risk for mortality among all sulfonylurea plus insulin combinations. When using glimepiride plus insulin as a reference, researchers found no significant differences of mortality for combinations of insulin plus glibenclamide, gliclazide, glipizide and tolbutamide. Increased mortality (RR=1.7; 95% CI, 1.48-1.95), CV death (RR=1.35; 95% CI, 1.07-1.7) and the combined endpoint (RR=1.25; 95% CI, 1.05-1.49) were all associated with the use of sulfonylurea plus insulin. One percent of patients had been hospitalized with hypoglycemia at baseline. During follow-up, 3.5% were hospitalized with hypoglycemia; 85% once, 10.6% twice, 3.4% three times and 3% more than three times. Compared with the sulfonylurea plus insuli Continue reading >>

Combined Metformin And Insulin Therapy For Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Combined Metformin And Insulin Therapy For Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Combined metformin and insulin therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Sint Franciscus Gasthuis, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. This study was undertaken to assess the effects of combined treatment with insulin and metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in whom dietary measures, weight control, and oral antihyperglycemic therapy had failed. Insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, increased hepatic gluconeogenesis, and impaired insulin secretion are the underlying factors in the development of type 2 diabetes. Metformin is a biguanide antihyperglycemic agent that increases peripheral insulin sensitivity, reduces hepatic gluconeogenesis, and decreases intestinal glucose absorption. Thirty-one patients (24 women, 7 men; mean age, 61.8 years; mean body mass index [BMI], 28.0 kg/m2) were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, 2-way, crossover, placebo-controlled study. Patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated previously with insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents and who had a glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level >9% or a fasting blood glucose level >8 mmol/L were included. Patients who were being treated with oral agents were switched to insulin therapy and required to maintain stable blood glucose control for 2 months prior to randomization. Patients received insulin plus either metformin 1,700 mg/d or placebo for 5 months, followed by a 2-month washout period, and were then crossed over to the other treatment arm for 5 months of additional treatment (total treatment period: 12 months). Thirty patients completed the study; 1 patient withdrew early because of hypoglycemia. Compared with placebo, metformin produced significant reductions from overall baseline in mean daily insulin dose requirement (-8.69 units (17.2%], P < 0.001), HbA1c level Continue reading >>

Can I Take Metformin With Insulin For My Type 2 Diabetes?

Can I Take Metformin With Insulin For My Type 2 Diabetes?

Metformin (Glucophage, Fortamet) is a prescription medication that helps to control blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have this condition and are 17 or older and take insulin, your doctor may decide to add metformin to your therapy. You'll probably start on a low dose of metformin while continuing your regular dose of insulin. Your doctor may increase your dose of metformin if necessary until your blood sugar levels are under control. He or your pharmacist can tell you more about how metformin and insulin work together. Continue reading >>

Insulin-metformin Combo Tied To Poorer Survival

Insulin-metformin Combo Tied To Poorer Survival

HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, June 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The combination of metformin and insulin for people with type 2 diabetes may slightly increase death rates among patients, according to researchers from Vanderbilt University. However, other experts question the study's conclusions and claim it is at odds with other better-designed studies that show the combination of metformin and insulin is both safe and effective. "Insulin remains a reasonable option for patients who have very high glucose [blood sugar] or who desire flexible and fast blood sugar control, but most patients taking metformin prefer to delay starting insulin," said lead researcher Dr. Christianne Roumie, an associate professor of internal medicine and pediatrics at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. "The current study suggests that adding a sulfonylurea to metformin should be preferred to adding insulin for most patients who need a second diabetes drug," she said. Sulfonylureas include glibenclamide (Micronase), glimepiride (Amaryl), glipizide (Glucotrol) and others. They work by stimulating the body to make more insulin. Roumie's team found that, compared with those who added a sulfonylurea, those who added insulin to metformin had 30 percent higher odds of heart attack, stroke and death from any cause during the study period. "Although new heart attacks and strokes occurred at similar rates in both groups, mortality was higher in patients who added insulin," she said. Roumie said she doesn't know why the rate of deaths was higher among study patients taking insulin. "We have a number of studies planned to examine possible mechanisms. We are investigating type 2 diabetes outcomes associated with blood sugar swings and with episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) tied to insulin," s Continue reading >>

Combination Therapy With Insulin And Metformin.

Combination Therapy With Insulin And Metformin.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: To review the clinical usefulness of combination therapy with insulin and metformin. METHODS: Basic considerations about the use of insulin in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and the interaction of metformin with insulin are outlined. The clinical documentation of this therapeutic strategy is reviewed, with emphasis on controlled studies. In addition, the use of this drug combination in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is briefly addressed. RESULTS: Insulin is used in patients with NIDDM when adequate plasma glucose control can no longer be maintained by orally administered agents. Metformin ameliorates insulin resistance, reduces hyperinsulinemia, and counteracts weight gain. It exerts an insulin-sparing and antihyperglycemic effect and may improve cardiovascular risk factors. Although these effects have been demonstrated consistently in several controlled studies, relatively few patients have been treated with insulin + metformin (with or without sulfonylurea). The combination is well tolerated, commonly used, and approved in several countries. No specific guidelines have been established for selection of patients, but obese patients with NIDDM who are receiving high doses of insulin are likely to benefit. Patients whose diabetes is poorly controlled by sulfonylurea or by combination oral therapy, not previously treated with insulin, may also be suitable candidates. Insulin administered at bedtime is a feasible approach, and a daily dose of 1.5 to 2.5 g of metformin seems adequate. Although the application may be questionable, metformin can also be added to insulin in the treatment of selected patients with IDDM. CONCLUSION: Metformin is effective in conjunction with insulin in NIDDM. Because of its action on insulin resis Continue reading >>

What Is The Effect Of A Glass Of Wine After Taking Metformin?

What Is The Effect Of A Glass Of Wine After Taking Metformin?

It is generally acceptable to drink a glass of wine while taking metformin; however, it's best to be careful because of the risk of lactic acidosis. Additionally, there is a risk of hypoglycemia when a diabetes patient drinks alcohol, whether or not the patient takes metformin. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include hunger, shakiness, nervousness, sweating, dizziness, sleepiness, confusion, difficulty speaking, anxiety and weakness. Symptoms of lactic acidosis include nausea, vomiting, hyperventilation, abdominal pain, lethargy, anxiety, hypotension, rapid or irregular heart rate and metal status changes. If you take metformin or are diabetic, ask your doctor if it's safe to drink alcoholic beverages. Video of the Day Metformin is a biguanide, a type of oral medication used to treat Type 2 diabetes by helping control the amount of glucose in the blood. It primarily works to reduce gluconeogenesis, glucose production by the liver, but also aids in blood glucose control by increasing insulin sensitivity and decreasing glucose absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. The most common side effects of metformin are gastrointestinal related, but rarely, lactic acidosis can occur. Hypoglycemia is an unlikely side effect of metformin when it is used alone. The liver is largely responsible for clearing lactate from the body, and when a patient takes metformin, the rate of clearance by the liver is reduced. This is part of the reason for the correlation between taking metformin and the risk of lactic acidosis. Dr. Thomas Higgins, an endocrinologist at Boulder Medical Center, cautions against prescribing metformin to patients with conditions that predispose them to lactic acid accumulation. For example, use of metformin, which is not metabolized but cleared via tubular secretion into th Continue reading >>

Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection) Indications And Usage

Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection) Indications And Usage

Levemir® is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to Levemir® or any of its excipients. Never Share a Levemir® FlexTouch® Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Dosage adjustment and monitoring: Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Insulin regimens should be modified cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment of concomitant anti-diabetic treatment. Administration: Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin or solution. Do not administer subcutaneously via an insulin pump, intramuscularly, or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. WARNING: RISK OF THYROID C-CELL TUMORS Liraglutide causes dose-dependent and treatment-duration-dependent thyroid C-cell tumors at clinically relevant exposures in both genders of rats and mice. It is unknown whether Victoza® causes thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans, as the human relevance of liraglutide-induced rodent thyroid C-cell tumors has not been determined. Victoza® is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of MTC and in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Counsel patients regarding the potential risk for MTC with the use of Victoza® and inform them of symptoms of thyroid tumors (eg, a mass in the neck, dysphagia, dyspnea, persistent hoarseness). Routine monitoring of serum calcitonin or using thyroid ultrasound is of uncertain value for early detection of MTC in patients treated with Victoza®. Levemir® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) Indications and U Continue reading >>

Does Cinnamon Conflict With Metformin?

Does Cinnamon Conflict With Metformin?

I've heard that cinnamon helps control blood sugar. How much truth is there to this, and would it in any way conflict with me taking metformin? Continue reading >>

Description And Brand Names

Description And Brand Names

Drug information provided by: Micromedex US Brand Name Metaglip Descriptions Glipizide and Metformin combination is used to treat high blood sugar levels that are caused by a type of diabetes mellitus or sugar diabetes called type 2 diabetes. Normally, after you eat, your pancreas releases insulin to help your body store excess sugar for later use. This process occurs during normal digestion of food. In type 2 diabetes, your body does not work properly to store the excess sugar and the sugar remains in your bloodstream. Chronic high blood sugar can lead to serious health problems in the future. Proper diet is the first step in managing type 2 diabetes but often medicines are needed to help your body. With two actions, the combination of glipizide and metformin helps your body cope with high blood sugar. Glipizide stimulates the release of insulin from the pancreas, directing your body to store blood sugar. Metformin has three different actions: it slows the absorption of sugar in your small intestine; it also stops your liver from converting stored sugar into blood sugar; and it helps your body use your natural insulin more efficiently. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription. This product is available in the following dosage forms: Tablet Copyright © 2018 Truven Health Analytics Inc. All rights reserved. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. Continue reading >>

Metformin And Insulin Combo Cuts Mortality In Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin And Insulin Combo Cuts Mortality In Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin and Insulin Combo Cuts Mortality in Type 2 Diabetes A new retrospective study indicates that, in type 2 diabetes, treatment with insulin is safer when it is used together with metformin. In the research, recently published in PLoS One, a team from Cardiff University, Wales, showed that patients on insulin and metformin were at a significant 40% reduced risk for death and a significant 25% reduced risk for major adverse cardiac events (MACE) compared with those treated with only insulin. However, the combination was not significant in reducing cancer. "If at all possible, patients with type 2 diabetes initiated on insulin should also be given metformin," senior author Craig Currie, PhD, professor of applied pharmacoepidemiology, Cardiff University, Wales, told Medscape Medical News. Asked to comment, Jason Baker, MD, assistant professor in clinical medicine and attending endocrinologist at Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, told Medscape Medical News: "These results from a retrospective analysis are not surprising and support what we already know. It is reassuring and a reminder that insulin alone may not be appropriate for some of our patients." Dr Baker has been in endocrinology practice for 15 years, has type 1 diabetes himself, and treats patients with type 1 as well as type 2 diabetes. The Cardiff researchers used the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, which collects longitudinal data from 660 participating primary-care practices in the United Kingdom. Intensive management of patients with type 2 diabetes often involves using insulin alone or in combination with other glycemic medications. Data were collected from January 2000 to January 2013 for patients with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, those with prescriptions written for at least two classes of gl Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Mix Metformin And Alcohol?

Is It Safe To Mix Metformin And Alcohol?

If you’re taking metformin to treat your diabetes, you may be wondering how this drug affects your ability to drink safely. Drinking alcohol can affect your diabetes symptoms directly, but there are additional risks if you drink alcohol with metformin. This article gives you information on how alcohol interacts with metformin and also how drinking alcohol can affect your diabetes. With any medicine you take, you should be aware of interactions that can happen if you use other substances. Metformin and alcohol can interact to increase your risk of harmful effects. You are at much greater risk of these effects if you frequently drink a lot of alcohol or you binge drink (drink a lot in short periods). These effects include an extremely low blood sugar level, called hypoglycemia, and a condition called lactic acidosis. Hypoglycemia Drinking alcohol while you’re taking metformin may cause extremely low blood sugar levels. Some symptoms of low blood sugar levels can be similar to symptoms of having too much alcohol. These include: drowsiness dizziness confusion Tell the people who are with you while you drink that you have diabetes. They can help you watch for these symptoms. If you or the people around you notice these symptoms, stop drinking and eat something right away to help increase your blood sugar level. If your symptoms of hypoglycemia are severe, such as losing consciousness, and you do not have a glucagon hypoglycemia rescue kit, someone with you should call 9-1-1. A glucagon hypoglycemia rescue kit includes human glucagon (a natural substance that helps balance your blood sugar level), a syringe to inject it, and instructions. You can use this kit for severe hypoglycemia when eating food will not help. If you are not familiar with this kit, talk to your doctor Continue reading >>

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