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Mix Insulin

How Do I Prepare A Mixed Insulin Injection?

How Do I Prepare A Mixed Insulin Injection?

How do I prepare a mixed insulin injection? To prepare a mixed insulin injection, follow these steps: Be clear on the amounts of each insulin and the totalunits you want. To find the total units, add the units ofrapid- or short-acting insulin to the units of intermediate-or long-acting insulin. For cloudy insulin, gently roll the bottle of insulin slowlybetween your palms to mix. Make sure it is mixed thoroughly.Do not use if it has clumps or particles in it.Shaking the bottle can cause air bubbles. Draw air into the syringe equal to the intermediate- orlong-acting dose. Hold the bottle steady on the table and put the needlethrough the rubber stopper. Inject the air into that bottle.Take out the needle without drawing up any insulin. Draw air into the syringe equal to the dose of rapid- orshort-acting insulin and inject the air into the bottle ofrapid- or short-acting insulin. With the needle still in the rapid- or short-acting insulinbottle, turn it upside down so that insulin covers the tipof the needle. Pull the correct amount of insulin into the syringe bypulling back on the plunger. Check for air bubbles in the syringe. If you see air bubbles, keep the bottle upsidedown and push the plunger up so the insulin goes backinto the bottle. If necessary, empty and refill until all airbubbles in the syringe are gone. Remove the syringe. Insert the syringe into the bottle of intermediate- or long-actinginsulin. (You have already injected the rightamount of air into this bottle.) Slowly pull the plunger down to draw in the right dosageof intermediate- or long-acting insulin. This will be thetotal units of the short- and intermediate- or long-actinginsulins. Do not return any extra insulin back to this bottle. Itsnow a mixture. Double check for the correct totalamount of ins Continue reading >>

My Doctor Says I Need To Mix Insulins...

My Doctor Says I Need To Mix Insulins...

Mixing Insulins BD Getting Started ™ My Doctor Says I Need to Mix Insulins... How Do I Begin? When your doctor tells you to use two types of insulin for an injection, they can be mixed in the same insulin syringe so that you will need only one injection. Using two types of insulin can help you keep your blood sugar levels in your target range. When you mix two insulins in one syringe, one type of insulin is always clear and short or rapid-acting, while the other type is cloudy and long-acting. Check that you have the right syringe size. Match your dose to the syringe size that is just right for you. It is an easy way to assure the accuracy of your dosage. Two types of Insulin BD™ Insulin Syringe BD™ Alcohol Swabs To mix your insulins, you will need:To mix your insulins, you will need: Also check that you have the right brand and type of insulin. Make sure that the expiration date on the insulin bottle has not passed. Between 30 and 50 units Between 50 and 100 units Use a 3/10 cc BD INSULIN SYRINGE Use a 1/2 cc BD INSULIN SYRINGE Use a 1 cc BD INSULIN SYRINGE Less than 30 units at one time - - - 1 2 3 if you inject:if you inject: ml ml ml 1 2 3 •Roll the bottle between your hands. •Never shake a bottle of insulin. •Wipe the top of both the insulin bottles with a BD™ ALCOHOL SWAB. step one...step one... step two...step two... step three...step three... •Wash your hands. 4 •Pull the plunger down to let _____ units of air in your syringe. •You need air in the syringe equal to the amount of cloudy insulin you will take. step four...step four... 5 6 7 8 •Push the air into the cloudy insulin bottle. •Pull the needle out of the cloudy insulin bottle. •You are not going to draw out any of the cloudy in Continue reading >>

Pre-mixed Insulin

Pre-mixed Insulin

Pre-mixed insulin requires only one injection. Pre-mixed insulin may be right for you if you're older, have vision trouble, or are just starting insulin therapy. Pre-mixed insulins are usually prescribed for patients needing a simple insulin treatment plan, and sliding scale therapy. You may be in this category if you: Have diminished vision or trouble with dexterity Are just starting insulin therapy NPH insulin may be mixed with both rapid-acting insulin analogs and fast-acting human Regular insulin. These mixtures include various combinations: In the United States, rapid-acting insulin, Lyspro (humalog) is mixed with NPH in a 50:50 (50% NPH and 50% insulin Lyspro) and 75:25 (75% NPH and 25% insulin Lyspro) ratio. Insulin/Aspart (Novolog) combinations also are available as 70:30 mixtures (70% NPH, 30% insulin aspart). The traditional NPH ratio of Regular pre-mixed insulin 70:30 (70% NPH, 30% Regular) is still available. These insulins are available as vials, and as insulin pens. The disadvantage is that NPH, which has a relatively unpredictable action, is the only long-acting insulin that can be used. Also, when the doses in a mixture is increased or decreased, the amount both of the short acting insulin and long-acting insulin changes, which increases the risk of both high and low blood sugars. Mixtures also don’t allow a separate correction to be made for high blood sugars. (You may wonder why there are NO pre-mixed insulins using Lantus and detemir. This is because insulin glargine (Lantus®) and detemir (Levemir®) cannot be mixed in the same syringe with other insulins!) Pre-mixed insulins are usually prescribed for patients needing a simple insulin treatment plan, and sliding scale therapy. You may be in this category if you: Are older, with regular meal and ac Continue reading >>

What Is Premixed Insulin?

What Is Premixed Insulin?

Insulin that comes in pre-mixed formulations combines insulins that have different onsets (how quickly they begin to work) and durations (how long the effects last) to best manage the blood glucose levels of the individual. Rapid-acting insulins work well for the increase in blood glucose that occurs right after meals, while longer-acting insulins help maintain blood glucose levels between meals and overnight. Many patients like pre-mixed insulins as they help reduce the number of injections needed per day, however they are not convenient for intensive insulin regimens. A person with diabetes may need to change their insulin regimen if they experience changes in their physical activity, weight gain or loss, increased stress, illness, or a change in diet. Changes like these should be discussed with a healthcare professional. Always check with your healthcare professional about any potential drug interactions before starting treatment and report any side effects you experience. Some of the long-acting insulins available in the US include: Humalog Mix 50/50 is a mix of 50% of a rapid-acting insulin (insulin lispro) and an intermediate-acting insulin (insulin lispro protamine suspension) used to treat adults with diabetes for the control of blood sugar. The rapid-acting insulin goes to work quickly in about 15 to 30 minutes, stimulating the cells to absorb glucose for their energy needs, while the intermediate acting insulin reaches its peak effect 2 to 4 hours after injection and continues working for up to 22 hours.* In addition to stimulating the absorption of glucose, insulin promotes the storage of glucose in the form of glycogen in the liver, stops the liver from producing more glucose, and promotes the conversion of excess glucose into fat. Humalog Mix 50/50 is avail Continue reading >>

Novolog Mix 70-30

Novolog Mix 70-30

NovoLog® Mix 70/30 (70% insulin aspart protamine suspension and 30% insulin aspart) Injection, [rDNA origin]) Suspension for Subcutaneous Injection DESCRIPTION NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart rdna origin) (70% insulin aspart protamine suspension and 30% insulin aspart injection, [rDNA origin]) is a human insulin analog suspension containing 70% insulin aspart protamine crystals and 30% soluble insulin aspart. NovoLog Mix 70/30 is a blood glucoselowering agent with an earlier onset and an intermediate duration of action. Insulin aspart is homologous with regular human insulin with the exception of a single substitution of the amino acid proline by aspartic acid in position B28, and is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's part (NovoLog) has the empirical formula C256H381N65O79S6 and a molecular weight of 5825.8 Da. Figure 1: Structural formula of insulin aspart NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart rdna origin) is a uniform, white, sterile suspension that contains insulin aspart 100 Units/mL. Inactive ingredients for the 10 mL vial are mannitol 36.4 mg/mL, phenol 1.50 mg/mL, metacresol 1.72 mg/mL, zinc 19.6 μg/mL, disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate 1.25 mg/mL, sodium chloride 0.58 mg/mL, and protamine sulfate 0.32 mg/mL. Inactive ingredients for the NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart rdna origin) FlexPen are glycerol 16.0 mg/mL, phenol 1.50 mg/mL, metacresol 1.72 mg/mL, zinc 19.6 μg/mL, disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate 1.25 mg/mL, sodium chloride 0.877 mg/mL, and protamine sulfate 0.32 mg/mL. NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart rdna origin) has a pH of 7.20 - 7.44. Hydrochloric acid or sodium hydroxide may Continue reading >>

Mixing Insulin Glargine With Rapid-acting Insulin: A Review Of The Literature

Mixing Insulin Glargine With Rapid-acting Insulin: A Review Of The Literature

Purpose. To review the literature examining the mixing of insulin glargine with rapid-acting insulin (RAI). Methods. A literature search was conducted via PubMed and Medline (from 1948 to August 2012) using the search terms “diabetes,” “insulin glargine,” “short acting insulin,” “rapid acting insulin,” and “mixing.” Literature was limited to English-language articles reporting on human studies. Studies with data describing mixing glargine with any short-acting insulin or RAI were included. Four studies met inclusion criteria. Results. Of the four studies assessing mixing glargine, one was a pharmacokinetic study. The other three assessed clinical outcomes in “real-world” settings. All of these studies were conducted in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes. Two of the clinical outcomes studies did not report significant differences in A1C levels or preprandial, postprandial, or nocturnal blood glucose levels from mixing glargine and RAI. One of the clinical outcome studies reported improved blood glucose control (A1C and fasting blood glucose) with RAI mixed with glargine compared to RAI mixed with NPH insulin. There were no significant differences in hypoglycemia in any of the clinical outcome trials at any time measured. Conclusion. Initial small clinical trials indicate that there are no significant changes in clinical outcomes (blood glucose levels, A1C levels, and hypoglycemia) when mixing glargine with RAI. Additional studies with larger patient populations and longer trial durations are needed before mixing glargine with RAI can be recommended on a routine basis in clinical practice. Methodology A literature search was conducted via PubMed and Medline (articles published from 1948 to January 2012) using the search terms “diabetes,” Continue reading >>

Steps For Preparing A Mixed Dose Of Insulin

Steps For Preparing A Mixed Dose Of Insulin

Steps for Preparing a Mixed Dose of Insulin slide 1 of 9, Rolling the bottles gently, Step 1. Roll the insulin bottles (vials) gently between your hands. Roll the cloudy insulin bottle until all the white powder has dissolved. Rolling the bottle warms the insulin if you have been keeping the bottle in the refrigerator. The order in which you mix the clear (rapid- or short-acting) and cloudy (long-acting) insulin is important. slide 2 of 9, Cleaning the lids of the bottles, Step 2. Wipe the rubber lid of both insulin bottles with an alcohol wipe or a cotton ball dipped in alcohol. Let the alcohol dry. Note: If you are using a bottle for the first time, remove the protective cover from the rubber lid before cleaning. Drawing air into the syringe for the cloudy insulin dose slide 3 of 9, Drawing air into the syringe for the cloudy insulin dose, Step 3. Remove the plastic cap that covers the needle on your insulin syringe. Step 4. Pull the plunger back on your insulin syringe and draw air into the syringe equal to the number of units of cloudy insulin to be given. Forcing air into the cloudy insulin bottle slide 4 of 9, Forcing air into the cloudy insulin bottle, Step 5. Push the needle of the syringe into the rubber lid of the cloudy insulin bottle. Step 6. Push the plunger of the syringe to force the air into the bottle. This equalizes the pressure in the bottle when you later remove the dose of insulin. Step 7. Remove the needle from the bottle. Drawing air into the syringe for the clear insulin dose slide 5 of 9, Drawing air into the syringe for the clear insulin dose, Step 8. Pull the plunger of the syringe back and draw air into the syringe equal to the number of units of clear insulin to be given. Forcing air into the clear insulin bottle slide 6 of 9, Forcing air i Continue reading >>

Insulin Types

Insulin Types

What Are the Different Insulin Types? Insulin Types are hormones normally made in the pancreas that stimulates the flow of sugar – glucose – from the blood into the cells of the body. Glucose provides the cells with the energy they need to function. There are two main groups of insulins used in the treatment of diabetes: human insulins and analog insulins, made by recombinant DNA technology. The concentration of most insulins available in the United States is 100 units per milliliter. A milliliter is equal to a cubic centimeter. All insulin syringes are graduated to match this insulin concentration. There are four categories of insulins depending on how quickly they start to work in the body after injection: Very rapid acting insulin, Regular, or Rapid acting insulins, Intermediate acting insulins, Long acting insulin. In addition, some insulins are marketed mixed together in different proportions to provide both rapid and long acting effects. Certain insulins can also be mixed together in the same syringe immediately prior to injection. Rapid Acting Insulins A very rapid acting form of insulin called Lispro insulin is marketed under the trade name of Humalog. A second form of very rapid acting insulin is called Aspart and is marketed under the trade name Novolog. Humalog and Novolog are clear liquids that begin to work 10 minutes after injection and peak at 1 hour after injection, lasting for 3-4 hours in the body. However, most patients also need a longer-acting insulin to maintain good control of their blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog can be mixed with NPH insulin and are used as “bolus” insulins to be given 15 minutes before a meal. Note: Check blood sugar level before giving Humalog or Novalog. Your doctor or diabetes educator will instruct you in determini Continue reading >>

Mixing Insulin

Mixing Insulin

License Here How Do You Mix Insulin? Your doctor or diabetes educator may ask you to mix a short-acting or clear insulin with an intermediate or long acting cloudy insulin in the same syringe so that both can be given at the same time. Keep in mind: The only insulin that cannot be mixed is insulin Glargine. Mixing Insulin In this example, the doctor has asked you to mix 10 units of regular, clear, insulin with 15 units of NPH cloudy insulin, to a total combined dose of 25 units. Always, draw “clear before cloudy” insulin into the syringe. This is to prevent cloudy insulin from entering the clear insulin bottle. Always do this procedure in the correct order, as shown in the following sequence. Roll the bottle of the cloudy insulin between your hands to mix it. Clean both bottle tops with an alcohol wipe. Pull back the plunger of the syringe to the dose of the long-acting (cloudy) insulin in this example 15 units. You now have 15 units of air in the syringe. Check the insulin bottle to ensure you have the correct cloudy type of insulin. With the insulin bottle held firmly on a counter or tabletop, insert the needle through the rubber cap into the bottle. Push the plunger down so that the air goes from the syringe into the bottle. Remove the needle and syringe. This primes the bottle for when you withdraw the insulin later. Pull back the plunger of the syringe to the dose of the shorter acting clear insulin in this example 10 units. You now have 10 units of air in the syringe. Check the insulin bottle to ensure you have the correct clear type of insulin. With the insulin bottle held firmly on a counter or tabletop, insert the needle through the rubber cap into the bottle. Push the plunger down so that the air goes from the syringe into the bottle. Turn the bottle upsid Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex Make sure you have the type (beef and pork, pork, or human) and the strength of insulin that your doctor ordered for you. You may find that keeping an insulin label with you is helpful when buying insulin supplies. The concentration (strength) of insulin is measured in USP Insulin Units and USP Insulin Human Units and is usually expressed in terms such as U-100 insulin. Insulin doses are measured and injected with specially marked insulin syringes. The appropriate syringe is chosen based on your insulin dose to make measuring the dose easy to read. This helps you measure your dose accurately. These syringes come in three sizes: 3/10 cubic centimeters (cc) measuring up to 30 USP Units of insulin, ½ cc measuring up to 50 USP Units of insulin, and 1 cc measuring up to 100 USP Units of insulin. It is important to follow any instructions from your doctor about the careful selection and rotation of injection sites on your body. There are several important steps that will help you successfully prepare your insulin injection. To draw the insulin up into the syringe correctly, you need to follow these steps: Wash your hands with soap and water. If your insulin contains zinc or isophane (normally cloudy), be sure that it is completely mixed. Mix the insulin by slowly rolling the bottle between your hands or gently tipping the bottle over a few times. Never shake the bottle vigorously (hard). Do not use the insulin if it looks lumpy or grainy, seems unusually thick, sticks to the bottle, or seems to be even a little discolored. Do not use the insulin if it contains crystals or if the bottle looks frosted. Regular insulin (short-acting) should be used only if it is clear and colorless. Remove the colored protective cap on the bottle. Do not Continue reading >>

How To Mix Insulin Clear To Cloudy

How To Mix Insulin Clear To Cloudy

Learn how to mix insulin clear to cloudy. Drawing up and mixing insulin is a skill that nurses will utilize on the job. Insulin is administered to patients who have diabetes . These type of patientsdepend on insulin so their body can use glucose. Therefore, nurses must be familiar with how to mix insulin. The goal of this article is to teach you how to mix insulin. Below are a video demonstration and step-by-step instructions on how to do this. Purpose of mixing insulin: To prevent having to give the patient two separate injections (hence better for the patient). Most commonly ordered insulin that are mixed: NPH (intermediate-acting) and Regular insulin (short-acting). Never mix Insulin Glargine Lantus with any other type of insulin. Administer the dose within 5 to 10 minutes after drawing up because the regular insulin binds to the NPH and this decreases its action. Check the patients blood sugar and for signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia to ensure they arent hypoglycemic if patient is hypoglycemic hold the dose and notify md for further orders. Key Concept for Mixing Insulin: Draw up CLEAR TO CLOUDY Remember the mnemonic: RN (Regular to Nph) Why? It prevents contaminating the vial of clear insulin with the cloudy insulin because if contaminated it can affect the action of the insulin. Why does this matter because they will be mixed in the syringe? You have 5 to 10 minutes to give the insulin mixed in the syringe before the action of the insulins are affected Demonstration on Drawing Up Clear to Cloudy Insulin 1. Check the doctors order and that you have the correct medication: Doctors order says: 10 units of Humulin R and 12 units of Humulin N subcutaneous before breakfast daily Youre giving a total of 22 units (10 Regular & 12 NPH) As the nurse, it is important to k Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection: Two Bottle Injection Instructions

Insulin Injection: Two Bottle Injection Instructions

Wash your hands. Pick up the CLOUDY bottle and turn it upside down. Roll the bottle gently between your hands to mix the insulin. Wipe the top of both (clear and cloudy) bottles with alcohol. Remove the caps from the top and bottom of the syringe. Pull the plunger down to the correct unit mark for your CLOUDY insulin dose as ordered. Insert the needle into the CLOUDY bottle. Push the plunger down to inject air into the CLOUDY bottle. Withdraw the empty syringe from the bottle. Set the bottle aside. Pull the plunger down to the correct unit mark for the CLEAR insulin dose as ordered. Insert the needle into the CLEAR bottle. Push the plunger down to inject air into the CLEAR bottle. Leave the needle in the bottle. Turn the bottle upside down with the needle in it. Pull the plunger down to the correct unit mark for the CLEAR insulin dose. Look for air bubbles in the syringe. If you see air bubbles in the syringe, push the insulin back into the bottle, and repeat steps 17 and 18. Pull the bottle away from the needle, and set aside the CLEAR bottle. Pick up the CLOUDY bottle of insulin. Turn the CLOUDY bottle upside down and push the needle into the bottle. Be very careful not to move the plunger. Pull the plunger down and withdraw the correct number of units for the CLOUDY insulin. The plunger should now be on the unit mark showing the total units of both the CLEAR and CLOUDY types of insulin. For example, 6 units of CLEAR insulin are already in the syringe. Add 14 units of CLOUDY insulin for a total of 20 units in the syringe. Pull the bottle away from the needle. Set both bottles on the table. Look for air bubbles in the syringe. If you see air bubbles, discard the dose and begin again. Set the syringe down. Do not let the needle touch anything. Pinch or spread the skin a Continue reading >>

Humalog 50-50

Humalog 50-50

HUMALOG® Mix50/50™ 50% Insulin Lispro Protamine Suspension and 50% Insulin Lispro Injection (Rdna Origin) 100 Units Per Ml (U-100) DESCRIPTION Humalog® Mix50/50™ [50% insulin lispro protamine suspension and 50% insulin lispro injection, (rDNA origin)] is a mixture of insulin lispro solution, a rapid-acting blood glucose-lowering agent and insulin lispro protamine suspension, an intermediate-acting blood glucose-lowering agent. Chemically, insulin lispro is Lys(B28), Pro(B29) human insulin analog, created when the amino acids at positions 28 and 29 on the insulin B-chain are reversed. Insulin lispro is synthesized in a special non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli bacteria that has been genetically altered to produce insulin lispro. Insulin lispro protamine suspension (NPL component) is a suspension of crystals produced from combining insulin lispro and protamine sulfate under appropriate conditions for crystal formation. Insulin lispro has the following primary structure: Insulin lispro has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 and a molecular weight of 5808, both identical to that of human insulin. Humalog Mix50/50 vials and Pens contain a sterile suspension of insulin lispro protamine suspension mixed with soluble insulin lispro for use as an injection. Each milliliter of Humalog Mix50/50 injection contains insulin lispro 100 units, 0.19 mg protamine sulfate, 16 mg glycerin, 3.78 mg dibasic sodium phosphate, 2.20 mg Metacresol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.0305 mg zinc ion, 0.89 mg phenol, and Water for Injection. Humalog Mix50/50 has a pH of 7.0 to 7.8. Hydrochloric acid 10% and/or sodium hydroxide 10% may have been added to adjust pH. Continue reading >>

​insulin Syringe Preparation: How To Mix Short- And Intermediate-acting Insulin

​insulin Syringe Preparation: How To Mix Short- And Intermediate-acting Insulin

​Nurses from the Department of Specialty Nursing, Singapore General Hospital, a member of the SingHealth group, share the right way of mixing short-acting (clear) and intermediate-acting (cloudy) insulin for injection. How to mix short-acting (clear) insulin and intermediate-acting (cloudy) insulin Step 1: Roll and clean ​ Wash and dry your hands. Roll the cloudy (intermediate-acting) bottle of insulin between your palms 10 times gently. Do not shake vigorously. Clean the top of vial with an alcohol swab. Step 2: Add air to cloudy (intermediate-acting) insulin ​ Draw the required amount of air (equal to the dosage of cloudy insulin) into the insulin syringe. Inject air into the cloudy insulin vial. Do not draw out any insulin, and remove the syringe and needle. Step 3: Add air to clear (short-acting) insulin ​ Using the same syringe and needle, draw the required amount of air (equal to the dosage for clear insulin) into the insulin syringe. Inject air into the clear insulin vial. Step 4: Withdraw clear (short-acting) insulin first, then cloudy (intermediate-acting) insulin ​ With the insulin syringe and needle attached, turn the clear insulin bottle upside down, with the needle bevel within the insulin, withdraw the required amount of clear insulin into the syringe. Then do the same with the cloudy insulin. Always withdraw clear insulin first before withdrawing cloudy insulin. Ensure the total dose of clear and cloudy insulin is correct. If overdrawn, discard and repeat. "Not all types of insulin are suitable to be mixed. If in doubt, please check with your pharmacist or diabetes nurse educator," say nurses from the Department of Specialty Nursing, Singapore General Hospital (SGH), a member of the SingHealth group. Reminders: Look out for the expiry date on th Continue reading >>

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides For Consumers [internet].

Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides For Consumers [internet].

Go to: Fast Facts When people have type 2 diabetes, their body either does not make enough insulin or does not use insulin as well as it should. Many people with type 2 diabetes need to take insulin shots. Premixed insulin combines two kinds of insulin. The first kind helps the body control blood sugar (blood glucose) all through the day. The second kind helps the body control blood sugar at meal times. There are different types of premixed insulin. The different types of premixed insulin work equally well to lower your A1c. The A1c is a blood test that shows your average blood sugar over the past 2 to 3 months. The chance of your blood sugar dropping too low is the same with the different types of premixed insulin. Go to: What Does This Guide Cover? The information in this guide comes from a government-funded review of research about premixed insulin. This guide compares the benefits, side effects, and costs of a newer type of premixed insulin with other kinds of insulin and pills for diabetes. Has your doctor or nurse told you that you need insulin for your type 2 diabetes? There are many kinds of insulin and many different ways to take insulin. This guide can help you learn about them. It can help you talk with your doctor or nurse about whether premixed insulin may be a good choice. Go to: What Is Not Covered in This Guide? This guide does not cover all the possible ways to treat type 2 diabetes. It does not include information on diet and exercise. It does not cover using insulin in pumps or non-insulin shots like exenatide (Byetta®) or pramlintide (Symlin®). It does not cover the use of insulin by children, pregnant women, or people with type 1 diabetes. If your doctor has recommended pills for your type 2 diabetes, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Continue reading >>

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