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Metformin Gas And Bloating

Metformin Gas - Medhelp

Metformin Gas - Medhelp

Common Questions and Answers about Metformin gas My mother takes it and says that she has an amazing amount of gas pain in her back and has been taking it for about a year now. Working on day 74 of this cycle, lol. I hate my PCOS. Still taking the metformin even though it gives me gas and makes me dizzy sometimes. No spotting since starting it though so I guess that's good. Thinking of discontinuing it. This is supposed to help me get regular periods, not none at all. Oh well. Hubby wants me to call the doctor and tell him my side effects. I'll do it in time. There are some symptoms that will come with Metformin though. One of the big ones is gastrointestinal side effects including diarreah, gas , and bloating. I have experiences all three in the last couple days, but it hasn't been too painful, so I can make it through this. I am on 850 mg taken once daily for now and then on Saturday 12/18/2010, I will start on 850 mg twice daily. I heare the symptoms get much better as time goes on, so we will see. Anyone here on Metformin and have a success story? I have been on Metformin for only a month and a half for my PCOS to help regulate me and help me get pregnant. Last week (about 8 days ago) I had some very very light bleeding that only showed when I wiped and it wasn't every time. Hi Ladies I just have as question about metformin whats the side effects some of you may have had? I start to take metformin today so maybe this will bring on my period. I had a natural m.c in nov 2008 and no AF as of yet. I have been on metformin for 2 months now & this last month have been taking 1500mg per MD...I am usually nauseous throughout the day there after...it gets to the point where i'm vomitting at nite or when I wake up in the mornings (usually 2 a.m.)...I don't have any other pro Continue reading >>

How Diabetics Can Stop The Bloating And Gas Caused By Metformin

How Diabetics Can Stop The Bloating And Gas Caused By Metformin

If you have diabetes, you probably know all about the health challenges you face. It's not just about your blood sugar. You're also at higher risk of heart disease, cancer, and Alzheimer's. What you don't need is for your diabetes drugs to cause even more health challenges. But new research says that's exactly what they're doing. In this new study, the researchers wanted to find out if diabetes drugs changed the patients' gut bacteria. They looked at 784 people. Some of them were healthy; some of them had type-2 diabetes. What was interesting about this study was what the researchers found out about metformin. Metformin is the most frequently used drug to treat high blood sugar. The first thing they found out was that the metformin caused favorable changes in the gut bacteria of type-2 diabetics. But it didn't stop there. Other studies have shown that metformin causes adverse effects on the gastrointestinal tract. Many people who take this drug suffer from bloating and increased flatulence. These are not comfortable problems. And they're also not signs of improved bacterial function. So what gives? How can metformin cause favorable changes in the bacteria, but still cause GI problems? Continued Below... They use a 5,000-year-old formula that works even when conventional remedies fail. Modern studies show it works! The study provided the researchers with a possible explanation. First, the changes the metformin made in the gut bacteria made the bugs better at sugar metabolism. So that's good. However, patients treated with metformin have more coliform bacteria in their intestines. While most medical professionals don't consider coliform bacteria dangerous, it can cause bloating and gas. So it's not completely benign. The reality is diabetics who take metformin have differ Continue reading >>

Dapagliflozin/metformin - Oral

Dapagliflozin/metformin - Oral

This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs. Rarely, too much metformin can build up in the body and cause a serious (sometimes fatal) condition called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is more likely to happen in certain medical conditions such as kidney or liver disease, recent surgery, a serious infection, worsening heart failure, heavy alcohol use, a severe loss of body fluids (dehydration), or X-ray or scanning procedures that use iodinated contrast. Tell your doctor right away if any of these conditions occur or if you notice a big change in your overall health. You may need to stop taking this medication for a short time. Older adults are also at higher risk. (See also Side Effects and Precautions sections.) Stop taking this medication and get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as unusual tiredness, dizziness, severe drowsiness, chills, blue/cold skin, muscle pain, fast/difficult breathing, slow/irregular heartbeat, stomach pain with nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. This medication is a combination of 2 drugs: dapagliflozin and metformin. It is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. This me Continue reading >>

Is Metformin An Effective Treatment For Type 2 Diabetes?

Is Metformin An Effective Treatment For Type 2 Diabetes?

If your doctor has prescribed Metformin for diabetes or another use, what exactly is this medication and how does it work? What is the best way to take it to reduce side effects? What adverse effects might you experience and why is it important to be aware of these? Overview According to the American Diabetes Association Standards of Care, Metformin, if tolerated, is the preferred initial oral diabetes medication for Type 2 diabetes because it is the most effective. . The problem is that they are either not making enough insulin or the insulin they do make isn't being used efficiently. Metformin is a weight neutral medication that helps the body use insulin. Weight neutral means that it is not associated with weight gain (or loss) as are many other diabetes medications. Like all medicines, however, Metformin can produce some side effects, some of which it is important to know. How It Works , which are derived from the French lilac. Metformin helps to lower blood sugar by utilizing insulin and reducing insulin resistance (making your body more sensitive to insulin.) Many people with Type 2 diabetes carry excess weight—fat cells prevent insulin from doing its job, ultimately causing the cells to become resistant to insulin. When cells become resistant to insulin, insulin is unable to direct sugar from the bloodstream to the cells to use for energy, and instead, the sugar remains in the blood. As a result, the liver responds by making more sugar because it thinks the body needs it for fuel and the pancreas responds by making more insulin. You wind up with chaos—high blood sugars and high insulin levels. Metformin helps to restore normalcy by increasing insulin sensitivity and reducing the production of sugar made by the liver. Other Uses In addition to being used for d Continue reading >>

Wind, Gas And Bloating

Wind, Gas And Bloating

Everyone has a certain amount of gas in the gut. Some people, however, are sensitive to normal amounts. They experience pain, burp excessively or pass large amounts of wind as the gas passes through the gut. Occasionally, greater than normal amounts of gas are produced. There are several situations in which this may occur, including air swallowing, dietary factors and, less commonly, bowel diseases. Changes to the diet, various medicines and products which deodorise gas may be helpful. See also separate leaflet calledAbdominal Pain . There is always a certain amount of gas in the bowel. Most of this comes from air swallowed whilst you are eating or drinking. It can also happen during smoking or when swallowing saliva. Larger amounts can be swallowed when you eat quickly, gulp down a drink or chew gum. The swallowed air goes down into the gullet (oesophagus). If you are sitting up, the air tends to go back up the oesophagus and escapes again through the mouth in the process of belching. If you are lying flat, the air tends to pass down into the stomach, enter the small bowel (small intestine) and eventually escapes through the back passage (anus). People often refer to this as 'farting' or, more politely, 'passing wind'. Gas can also be produced due to germs (bacteria) acting on partially digested food in the gut. This is more likely to happen with some foods than others. Broccoli, baked beans and brussels sprouts are well-known culprits. The gas produced may contain traces of a chemical called sulphur. This is responsible for the unpleasant smell experienced when you pass wind through the back passage. Bloating is the term used when the tummy feels blown out, tight or full of gas. It may look larger than normal and the waistband of a skirt or pair of trousers may feel Continue reading >>

Alkaplex For Diabetes-metformin Acidity

Alkaplex For Diabetes-metformin Acidity

Description of Diabetes-Metformin Acidity Commonly reported side effects of metformin include: lactic acidosis, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and flatulence. Other side effects include: Acid or sour stomach Belching Bloate Excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines Full feeling Heartburn Indigestion passing of gas stomachache stomach upset or pain vomiting Source: In a very small number of cases metformin may cause a dangerous buildup of lactic acid in the blood, called lactic acidosis. Source: Common Treatments Include Nausea. Eat regular meals, munch on salty crackers between meals, chew ginger gum, and sip on ginger tea. If these measures don’t work, talk to your doctor. He or she may recommend a prescription or an over-the-counter (OTC) medication. Diarrhea. Limit caffeine and spicy, acidic, and high-fiber foods from your diet. If tweaking your diet doesn’t work, ask your doctor if any OTC drugs can help. Source: Recommended RCR Product Forms Important Notice: We are not proposing- nor do we support in any way - the notion of replacing the use of Metformin (Glucophage), or any other prescription drug, with any RCR product. We only recommend supplementing their use with our products to help your body manage the increased acidic load that they typically create. (Standard-speed shipping is FREE within the continental US. And all products are guaranteed to delight you or you can receive a full refund.**) A Daily Regimen for Whole Body Wellness & Prevention Use our caplets as a daily regimen to maintain a slightly-alkaline state (which all diseases hate) in cells throughout your body. Extinguish the Fire of Stomach Acid Once you have a heartburn/indigestion flare-up, the AlkaPlex ingredient in our Digestion capsules acts as an “extinguisher Continue reading >>

Saying Bye-bye To Bloating

Saying Bye-bye To Bloating

If you’re like many people, you’ve probably experienced the dreaded “belly bloat” at one time or another. Belly bloating is a result of excess air in your digestive tract. You know the feeling: Your stomach is puffed out and hard, your waistband is digging into you, and maybe you have those uncomfortable gas pains. You might also have symptoms of gas (flatulence), burping, or a rumbling stomach, as your body tries to get rid of excess air. Causes of belly bloating There are a lot of reasons for being bloated. Certain medical conditions may be the cause. These include: • Irritable bowel syndrome • Inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis) • Gastroparesis • Heartburn • Fluid retention due to cancer, liver disease, or kidney failure • Celiac disease • Pancreatic insufficiency • Perforation of the digestive tract • Food intolerance • Parasite infection • Certain medications • Stress or anxiety Some of these causes are, of course, very serious and require medical attention. On the other hand, belly bloating (as bothersome as it is) may be due to overindulging (think second or third helpings of Thanksgiving dinner, for example). And, in many instances, belly bloating is caused by consuming certain foods and beverages. Let’s take a look at some of the common culprits. Sugar-free foods. Foods labeled as being “sugar-free” have a certain appeal to people who have diabetes, as well as to people who are cutting back on calories. Sugar-free foods, by definition, are foods or drinks that contain less than 0.5 grams of sugar per serving. Artificial sweeteners (such as aspartame, sucralose, and stevia) and/or sugar alcohols (such as sorbitol, xylitol, and mannitol) are usually added to replace sugar and provide sweetness. Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) For Pcos

Metformin (glucophage) For Pcos

Metformin (or Glucophage) for polycystic ovararian symdrome (PCOS) by Kelly Why would you be taking metformin or glucophage (metformin is the generic for glucophage) Metformin is a diabetes medicine used for lowering insulin and blood sugar levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This helps regulate menstrual cycles, start ovulation, and lower the risk of miscarriage in women with PCOS. It is generally used in conjuction with clomid. The most common side effects of metformin Nausea. Loss of appetite. Diarrhea. Increased abdominal gas. A metallic taste. Tiredness. Problems that might arise and ways to troubleshoot I have always had pretty strong side effects (lots of nausea and always very tired) while taking metformin. It does get better as time goes on but working myself up to the maximum dosage has always been hard. I’ve been to a number of different doctors who have all suggested different ways to work up to my maximum dosage (1500 mg). It is generally suggested that you start with the lowest dose and keep increasing it as you get used to it (or as the side effects start to go away). The first time I took it, I took 500 mg for about three weeks (1 pill in the morning). Then added a second pill at lunch time (so I took 1000 mg for 3 weeks). And, then I added a third pill at dinner time. The second time that I took metformin, I increased the dosage from 500 mg to 1500 mg over the course of three weeks. I was sick a lot but I feel like I got the worst part over with faster. My personal experience has been that it usually takes me about 1 month for the side effects to start to lessen. I will still have bouts of nausea, but after about 2 months that starts to happen less often. My personal tips Always take with food or a glass of milk – I always take my Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia and the similar drug Janumet are two medications made by Merck to treat type 2 diabetes along with diet and exercise changes. Merck got these two drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2006 and 2007 and since then has made a huge amount of money. Drugs like these have been so popular because more and more people in the U.S. are struggling with Type 2 diabetes. Medications may be helpful for lowering blood sugar in patients with this chronic condition, but they come with risks. Januvia side effects range from infections to acute pancreatitis and even pancreatic cancer. As the risks and how serious they are become clearer, more people are blaming Merck for not warning them of the side effects that were possible with their drugs. These people are also suing the company seeking compensation for the damage they have suffered to their health. How Januvia and Janumet Work Januvia is the generic drug sitagliptin, while Janumet is a combination of sitagliptin and metformin. Merck developed sitagliptin to control high blood sugar in people with Type 2 diabetes. This is a chronic condition, typically caused by a poor diet and obesity. It is characterized by chronically high blood sugar levels. This happens when the body becomes less sensitive to insulin, the hormone that is supposed to lower blood sugar levels. Someone with Type 2 diabetes may also be producing less insulin from the pancreas. Having blood sugar levels that are too high for a long period of time leads to serious health consequences, and ultimately to death. This is why it is so crucial for people with Type 2 diabetes to get their blood sugar under control. Drug companies have produced a number of drugs to do this in recent years as cases of the condition rise in the population. Lik Continue reading >>

Gastroparesis: A Complication Of Diabetes

Gastroparesis: A Complication Of Diabetes

"Gastro" means stomach and "paresis" means impairment or paralysis. Diabetic gastropathy is a term for the spectrum of neuromuscular abnormalities of the stomach caused by diabetes. The abnormalities include gastric-dysrhythmias, antral hypomotility, incoordination of antroduodenal contractions and gastroparesis. Quick Stomach Anatomy Lesson The stomach is a neuromusclar organ that receives the food we ingest, mixes the food with acid and pepsin, and empties the nutriment suspension into the small intestine for absorption. The proximal stomach or fundus relaxes in order to receive the swallowed food (that's called receptive relaxation). The body and antrum mix and empty the food via recurrent gastric peristalic waves. The peristaltic contractions are paced by neoelectrical events called pacesetter potentials or slow waves. When gastric motility is normal, the postprandial (after eating) period is associated with pleasant epigastric sensations. Gastric motility disorders or gastroparesis presents with unpleasant, but non-specific postprandial symptoms: upper abdominal bloating, distention, discomfort, early satiety, nausea, and vomiting. If the vomitus contains undigested food, then gastroparesis is very likely to be present. Fluctuating, difficult-to-predict glucose levels may also reflect the presence of gastroparesis. Diabetes and the GI Tract The motility of your GI tract, which we were just speaking of, is controlled by an outer sleeve of muscles that surrounds your GI tract. They are controlled by a complex nervous system. Diabetes can damage these nerves, and it is this neurological long-term complication of diabetes that can lead to gastrointestinal disorders. How do we know this is the case? First, many of the people with gastroparesis have long-standing diabete Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Cause Severe Diarrhea?

Can Metformin Cause Severe Diarrhea?

Question Originally asked by Community Member Tracey Can Metformin Cause Severe Diarrhea? My mother has Type 2 diabetes and is suffering with severe diarrhea. This is now making her avoid going out because she’s afraid of needing a bathroom all the time. Can anything be done about this? Answer Yes, metformin can cause severe diarrhea, which is needless, because we can easily avoid it. The problem is that our doctors far too often start us with a dose that is far too high and/or increase the dosage far to soon. Metformin is one of the safest drugs that we have for type 2 diabetes as well as having few side effects. It is one of our most powerful drugs and is one of the least expensive too. Please see my article about it and about how to increase the dosage at Metformin Forever. You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Continue reading >>

Choosing A Type 2 Diabetes Drug

Choosing A Type 2 Diabetes Drug

Diabetes makes your blood sugar get too high. Type 2 diabetes is the most common kind of diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes, you may think that you need drugs to control it. But not everyone needs a drug. Eating less, exercising more, and losing weight may lower your blood sugar enough. See the blue section on the right for more information. If you need a drug, metformin is usually best. For most patients, the best choice for managing type 2 diabetes is metformin. It has been used for almost 20 years and is often better than the newer drugs you see advertised. Metformin is the generic name. The brand-name is Glucophage. Generic metformin works better for most people compared to the newer brand-name drugs Actos, Avandia, Glyset, Januvia, and Onglyza. Metformin is also the better drug compared to Precose and Starlix, which come as generic acarbose and nateglinide. Why metformin works better than newer drugs. Metformin lowers blood sugar more than the newer drugs. Metformin can lower bad cholesterol. High cholesterol can clog your arteries and lead to heart disease. The newer drugs do not help lower cholesterol. Metformin does not cause weight gain like some newer drugs do. And it may even help some people lose weight. Metformin is generally safer than the newer drugs. Metformin can cause minor side-effects, such as bloating, gas, nausea, and diarrhea. Some of the newer drugs can make your blood sugar drop too low. This can cause sweating, shaking, dizziness, hunger, and, in rare cases, death. Some of the newer drugs are linked to other serious problems. Avandia and Actos may cause heart failure. Avandia may also increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Metformin costs less than the newer drugs. You can buy generic metformin through discount generic-drug programs. Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

Pms Metformin - Medicine Shoppe

Pms Metformin - Medicine Shoppe

This medication is typically used to control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. It may also have other uses. Even though you may not feel its effects, this medication takes effect within a few hours. This medication is typically used 3 times a day. However, your doctor or pharmacist may have suggested a different schedule that is more appropriate for you. It must be used regularly and continuously to maintain its beneficial effects. Be sure to keep an adequate supply on hand. If this medication is used to treat diabetes, you should monitor your blood sugar levels regularly using the appropriate device. If you forget a dose, take it as soon as you remember -- unless it is almost time for your next dose. In that case, skip the missed dose. Do not double the next dose to catch up. This medication may irritate the stomach, and should be taken with food. Avoid excessive alcohol consumption during treatment. In addition to its desired action, this medication may cause some side effects, notably: Each person may react differently to a treatment. If you think this medication may be causing side effects (including those described here, or others), talk to your doctor or pharmacist. He or she can help you to determine whether or not the medication is the source of the problem. As with most medications, this product should be stored at room temperature. Store it in a secure location where it will not be exposed to excessive heat, moisture or direct sunlight. Keep it out of reach of young children. Make sure that any leftover portion is disposed of safely. Wear a Medic-Alert TM bracelet stating that you are taking this product. A treatment with this medication requires regular monitoring by a doctor. Be sure to see your doctor for all regularly scheduled appointments. It Continue reading >>

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin is a type of medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes. Because there is a strong link between diabetes and PCOS, metformin is now commonly proscribed to treat PCOS. But should it be? What is the real relationship between metformin and PCOS? Can Metformin used for PCOS help lessen PCOS symptoms? Metformin used for PCOS: The Science PCOS is an infertility condition that often causes acne, facial hair growth, balding, low sex drive, weight gain, difficulty with weight loss, and mental health disturbances such as depression and anxiety in approximately 15% of women. It is also associated with a myriad of health conditions, spanning from diabetes to hypothyroidism and to heart disease. PCOS is, in short, not a condition to sneeze at. PCOS is a condition of hormone imbalance. With PCOS, male sex hormones such as testosterone and DHEA-S rise relative to the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone. (…Roughly speaking – it’s complicated. For a full-blown account of the science of PCOS and how it affects you, see here.) Elevated testosterone is very often the primary culprit in causing PCOS. (But not always! For one of my most thorough accounts of other things that can cause PCOS, see here.) Insulin causes testosterone levels to rise because insulin tells the ovaries to produce testosterone. Basically, elevated insulin causes elevated testosterone, which causes PCOS. This is where metformin comes into play. Metformin lowers blood sugar levels below what they would otherwise be after a meal. This is because it intervenes with the liver’s interaction with and production of glucose. Insulin is the body’s way of dealing with blood sugar. If blood sugar is lower, then insulin will be lower, and thus testosterone will be lower. Metformin decreases blood sugar, Continue reading >>

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