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Metformin Food Interactions

Can I Have Grapefruit While Taking Metformin?

Can I Have Grapefruit While Taking Metformin?

Many medications, such as statins and some antihistamines, have a negative interaction with grapefruit. Metformin is used in treatment of type 2 diabetes. Does having grapefruit while taking metformin lead to adverse side effects? There’s limited research, but here’s what you need to know. Metformin is a drug that’s prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can’t use insulin normally. This means they can’t control the amount of sugar in their blood. Metformin helps people with type 2 diabetes control the level of sugar in their blood in several ways, including: decreasing the amount of sugar your body absorbs from food decreasing the amount of sugar produced by your liver increasing your body’s response to the insulin that it makes naturally Metformin can rarely cause a very serious and life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. People with liver, kidney, or heart problems should avoid taking metformin. There are more than 85 drugs that are known to interact with grapefruit. Of these drugs, 43 of them can lead to serious adverse effects. All forms of grapefruit — including freshly squeezed juice, frozen concentrate, and the whole fruit — can lead to drug interaction. Some of the chemicals found in grapefruit can bind to and inactivate an enzyme in your body that’s found in your intestines and liver. This enzyme helps break down the medication you take. Normally when you take a drug orally, it’s broken down slightly by enzymes before it reaches your bloodstream. This means that you receive a little less of the drug in your bloodstream than the amount you initially consumed. But when the enzyme is inhibited — as it is when it interacts with the chemicals in grapefruit — there’s a dramatically larger amount of the dr Continue reading >>

Ran-metformin - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Medbroadcast.com

Ran-metformin - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Medbroadcast.com

have type 1 diabetes (people with type 1 diabetes should always be using insulin) have very poor blood glucose control (these people should not take this medication as the only antidiabetic agent) What side effects are possible with this medication? Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent. The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor. The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time. Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects. unusual stomach ache (after the initial stomach ache that can occur at the start of therapy) Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication. Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication? Before you begin taking a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should take this medication. \ Alcohol intake: Anyone taking metformin should avoid excessive alcohol intake. Blood sugar control: If you have fever, trauma, infection, or surgery, you may have a temporary loss Continue reading >>

Metformin Food Interactions

Metformin Food Interactions

by admin Diabetes , Metformin , Metformin HCl How Does Metformin And Other Anti Diabetic Drugs Interact With Food? When you are taking any medication, its important to know what other life factors can affect that medications absorption and functioning in your body. Food is one of the most important factors to take into consideration. Consumption of alcohol is another. Many types of foods, especially those that originate from plants, have various chemical compounds that interact with the enzymes present in the liver. These enzymes are also used by the liver to destroy and detoxify active chemicals that are present in the medications you take to control diabetes. It is important to know how the type of food you consume will affect your livers ability to recycle the active ingredients present in diabetes medications, as well as which type of foods can slow this process down as these will affect the rise and the dip of blood sugar levels. How foods affect diabetic drug processing How the food you eat will affect the diabetes medication you take will depend on what enzyme is used by your liver to break down those medications. This is an overview of how several known diabetic drugs are processed in the liver and how they are affected by the foods you eat. Also known as Glucophage, metformin is one medication that does not get processed by the liver. This means the use of Metformin cannot be affected by the food you eat. However, consumption of alcohol does affect metformin metabolism. Excessive alcohol in your system will lead to metformin breaking down too much lactate which can cause one of the metformin side effects known as lactic acidosis. Lactic Acidosis a serious condition that is characterised by an increased amount of lactate in the body and can cause multiple negat Continue reading >>

Metformin & Sitagliptin Overview

Metformin & Sitagliptin Overview

Sitagliptin/metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. Sitagliptin/metformin is a single tablet containing 2 prescription drugs. Sitagliptin belongs to a group of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, which help lower blood sugar levels. Metformin belongs to a group of drugs called biguanides, which decrease the amount of sugar made by the liver and help cells to respond to insulin. This medication comes in tablet form and is taken twice a day, with meals. Sitagliptin/metformin is also available as an extended release tablet and is taken once a day with a meal preferably in the evening. Take sitagliptin/metformin extended release tablets whole. Do not break, cut, crush, dissolve, or chew sitagliptin/metformin extended release tablets before swallowing. If you cannot swallow Janumet XR tablets whole, tell your doctor. Common side effects include stuffy nose, headache, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Continue reading >>

Metformin | Michigan Medicine

Metformin | Michigan Medicine

Metformin is a drug used to lower blood sugar levels in people with non-insulin-dependent (type 2) diabetes . Types of interactions: Beneficial Adverse Check Metformin therapy has been shown to deplete vitamin B12, and sometimes, but not always, folic acid as well. This depletion occurs through the interruption of a calcium-dependent mechanism. People taking metformin should supplement vitamin B12 and folic acid or ask their doctor to monitor folic acid and vitamin B12 levels. Metformin therapy has been shown to deplete vitamin B12, and sometimes, but not always, folic acid as well. People taking metformin should supplement vitamin B12 and folic acid or ask their doctor to monitor folic acid and vitamin B12 levels. The interaction is supported by preliminary,weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence. In a small, controlled study, guar gum plus metformin slowed the rate of metformin absorption. In people with diabetes this interaction could reduce the blood sugar-lowering effectiveness of metformin. Until more is known, metformin should be taken two hours before or two hours after guar gum-containing supplements. It remains unclear whether the small amounts of guar gum found in many processed foods is enough to significantly affect metformin absorption. The interaction is supported by preliminary,weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence. In a preliminary trial, administration of Ginkgo biloba extract (120 mg per day) for three months to patients with type 2 diabetes who were taking oral anti-diabetes medication resulted in a significant worsening of glucose tolerance. Ginkgo did not impair glucose tolerance in individuals whose diabetes was controlled by diet. Individuals taking oral anti-diabetes medication should consult a doctor b Continue reading >>

Effect Of Food On The Pharmacokinetics Of A Vildagliptin/metformin (50/1000 Mg)fixed-dose Combination Tablet In Healthy Volunteers.

Effect Of Food On The Pharmacokinetics Of A Vildagliptin/metformin (50/1000 Mg)fixed-dose Combination Tablet In Healthy Volunteers.

1. Curr Med Res Opin. 2008 Jun;24(6):1703-9. doi: 10.1185/03007990802114070. Epub2008 May 7. Effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of a vildagliptin/metformin (50/1000 mg)fixed-dose combination tablet in healthy volunteers. He YL(1), Flannery B, Campestrini J, Leon S, Zinny MA, Ligueros-Saylan M,Jarugula V. (1)Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA, USA. OBJECTIVE: Vildagliptin is an orally active, potent and selective DPP-4 inhibitorthat improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes by increasingalpha- and beta-cell responsiveness to glucose.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This open-label, single-center, randomized,two-period crossover study in healthy subjects (n=23) ages 18-45 yearsinvestigated the effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of vildagliptin andmetformin following administration of a vildagliptin/metformin (50/1000 mg)fixed-dose combination tablet.RESULTS: Administration of the fixed-dose combination tablet following a high-fatmeal had no effect on vildagliptin AUC(0-infinity) (ratio of geometric mean forfed:fasted state, 1.10 [90% CI 1.03, 1.18]), C(max) (ratio of means 0.98 [90% CI 0.85, 1.13]) or median t(max) (2.5 h in fed and fasted states). The rate ofabsorption of metformin was decreased when given with food, as reflected by theprolonged t(max) (2-4 h) and reduction in C(max) (by 26%), but the extent ofabsorption was not changed. The food effect on the metformin component of thefixed-dose combination tablets was consistent with, but of a lesser magnitudecompared with data stated.CONCLUSIONS: The vildagliptin/metformin (50/1000 mg) fixed-dose combinationtablet can be administered in the same manner as metformin, and can berecommended to be taken with meals to reduce the gastrointestinal symptomsassociated with metformi Continue reading >>

Repaglinide And Metformin

Repaglinide And Metformin

Repaglinide/metformin treats Type 2 Diabetes. May cause nausea. Take with food to help with nausea. Repaglinide/metformin is a prescription medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes . It is a single product containing 2 medications: repaglinide and metformin . Repaglinide belongs to a group of drugs called meglitinides, or simply glinides. It works by stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin which will help lower blood sugars. Metformin belongs to a group of drugs called biguanides. It works by reducing the amount of sugar that the liver produces. This medication comes in a tablet form and is usually given 2 to 3 times a day with meals. Common side effects of repaglinide/metformin include headaches, low blood sugars, nausea, and diarrhea. What tips would you provide a friend before taking ? Did you experience many side effects while taking this drug? How likely would you be to recommend to a friend? Repaglinide/metformin is a prescription medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes . This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Serious side effects have been reported with repaglinide/metformin. See the Drug Precautions section. Common side effects of repaglinide/metformin include the following: This is not a complete list of side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you take: Monoamine oxidase inhibitors such as tranylc Continue reading >>

How Does Metformin Interact With Other Medications Or Foods?

How Does Metformin Interact With Other Medications Or Foods?

Medications that interact with metformin include digoxin, cimetidine, furosemide, nifedipine, amiloride, ranitidine, triamterene, morphine, quinidine, vancomycin, trimethoprim and procainamide. Taking metformin with other drugs that lower blood sugar can raise your risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). This includes probenid, beta-blockers, sulfa drugs, salicylates, monoamine oxidase inhibitors and certain nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Alcohol can also lower your blood sugar and increase the chances of developing lactic acidosis. Your risk of hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may be increased if you take metformin with other medications that increase blood sugar levels. Medications that raise your blood sugar are thyroid medications, steroids, isoniazid, diet pills, seizure medications, birth control pills, diuretics and phenothiazines. There may be other drugs, supplements or food that interact with metformin. People with diabetes should follow a diet and exercise plan. Because diabetes affects your blood sugar, diet is extremely important and you should discuss this with your doctor. Continue reading >>

Metformin And Alcohol / Food Interactions

Metformin And Alcohol / Food Interactions

There is 1 alcohol/food/lifestyle interaction with metformin: metformin drug Interactions There are 703 drug interactions with metformin metformin disease Interactions There are 4 disease interactions with metformin which include: The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables. Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit. Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances. Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan. Unknown No information available. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright Continue reading >>

Interactions Between Antidiabetic Drugs And Herbs: An Overview Of Mechanisms Of Action And Clinical Implications

Interactions Between Antidiabetic Drugs And Herbs: An Overview Of Mechanisms Of Action And Clinical Implications

Interactions between antidiabetic drugs and herbs: an overview of mechanisms of action and clinical implications 1NICM, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 1797 Australia 2Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, School of Agricultural Sciences and Rural Development, Nagaland University, Medziphema, 797 106 India 1NICM, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 1797 Australia 3School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 1797 Australia 1NICM, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 1797 Australia 3School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 1797 Australia 1NICM, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 1797 Australia 4Discipline of Pharmacology, School of Medical Sciences, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia 1NICM, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 1797 Australia 2Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, School of Agricultural Sciences and Rural Development, Nagaland University, Medziphema, 797 106 India 3School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 1797 Australia 4Discipline of Pharmacology, School of Medical Sciences, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia Ramesh C. Gupta, Email: [email protected] . Received 2017 May 12; Accepted 2017 Jul 12. Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Crea Continue reading >>

Drug Interactions Of Medications Commonly Used In Diabetes

Drug Interactions Of Medications Commonly Used In Diabetes

When patients are diagnosed with diabetes, a large number of medications become appropriate therapy. These include medications for dyslipidemia, hypertension, antiplatelet therapy, and glycemic control. So many medications can be overwhelming, and it is imperative that patients are thoroughly educated about their drug regimen. Patients have many concerns when multiple medications are started, including prescribing errors, the cost of medications, and possible adverse effects. Significantly, 58% of patients worry that they will be given medications that have drug interactions that will adversely affect their health.1 These worries are not unfounded given that several highly publicized drugs have been withdrawn from the U.S. market in the past several years because of adverse effects from drug interactions. Terfenadine, mibefradil, and cisapride have all been withdrawn from the market specifically because of drug-drug interactions. When terfenadine or cisapride were given with a strong inhibitor of their metabolism, torsades de pointes, a life-threatening drug-induced ventricular arrhythmia associated with QT prolongation, could occur.2 Cisapride, for gastroparesis or gastrointestinal reflux disease, and mibefradil, for hypertension, were prescribed for many patients with diabetes. An adverse drug interaction is defined as an interaction between one or more coadministered medications that results in the alteration of the effectiveness or toxicity of any of the coadministered medications. Drug interactions can be caused by prescription and over-the-counter medications, herbal products or vitamins, foods, diseases, and genetics (family history). The true incidence of drug interactions is unknown because many are not reported, do not result in significant harm to patients, o Continue reading >>

Fortamet

Fortamet

FORTAMET® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets DESCRIPTION FORTAMET® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets contain an oral antihyperglycemic drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N, Ndimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is a member of the biguanide class of oral antihyperglycemics and is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other class of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The empirical formula of metformin hydrochloride is C4H11N5•HCl and its molecular weight is 165.63. Its structural formula is: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline powder that is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. FORTAMET® Extended-Release Tablets are designed for once-a-day oral administration and deliver 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin hydrochloride. In addition to the active ingredient metformin hydrochloride, each tablet contains the following inactive ingredients: candellila wax, cellulose acetate, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycols (PEG 400, PEG 8000), polysorbate 80, povidone, sodium lauryl sulfate, synthetic black iron oxides, titanium dioxide, and triacetin. FORTAMET® meets USP Dissolution Test 5. System Components And Performance FORTAMET® was developed as an extended-release formulation of metformin hydrochloride and designed for once-a-day oral administration using the patented single-composition osmotic technology (SCOT™). The tablet is similar in appearance to other film-coated oral administered tablets but it consists of an osmotically active core formulation that is surrounded by a semipermeable membra Continue reading >>

Before Using

Before Using

Drug information provided by: Micromedex In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered: Allergies Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully. Pediatric Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of metformin oral solution and tablets in children 10 to 16 years of age. However, safety and efficacy of metformin extended-release tablets in the pediatric population have not been established. Geriatric Although appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of metformin have not been performed in the geriatric population, geriatric-specific problems are not expected to limit the usefulness of metformin in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related kidney problems, which may require caution in patients receiving metformin. This medicine is not recommended in patients 80 years of age and older who have kidney problems. Pregnancy Information about this metformin-oral-route Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus. Breastfeeding Studies in women suggest that thi Continue reading >>

Ecl-metformin - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Canoe.com

Ecl-metformin - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Canoe.com

have type 1 diabetes (people with type 1 diabetes should always be using insulin) have very poor blood glucose control (these people should not take this medication as the only antidiabetic agent) What side effects are possible with this medication? Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent. The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor. The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time. Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects. unusual stomach ache (after the initial stomach ache that can occur at the start of therapy) Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication. Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication? Before you begin taking a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should take this medication. \ Alcohol intake: Anyone taking metformin should avoid excessive alcohol intake. Blood sugar control: If you have fever, trauma, infection, or surgery, you may have a temporary loss Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid When On Metformin

Foods To Avoid When On Metformin

Metformin is often one of the first medications prescribed to people with diabetes, according to the Canadian Diabetes Association (see reference 2 under Highlights of Revisions). It helps lower your blood sugar levels by decreasing the amount of glucose, or sugar, produced by your liver. It also helps your insulin, the hormone that gets the sugar out of your blood and into your cell, work better. (see reference 1 pg 1 under Clinical Pharmacology under Mechanism of Action para 1). While you do not need to avoid any foods when taking metformin, you may need to limit or avoid alcohol (see reference 1 pg 8 under alcohol intake.). Metformin and Alcohol If your doctor has prescribed metformin to help you get better control over your blood sugar, you should not drink an excessive amount of alcohol, including beer, wine or hard liquor (see reference 1 pg 8 under Alcohol Intake). Too much alcohol causes metformin to breakdown too much lactate, which is a by-product of glucose and amino acids, and may lead to lactic acidosis (see reference 1 pg 8 under Alcohol Intake). If you drink alcohol, it's OK to have moderate amounts while on metformin, which means up to 1 drink a day for women and 2 drinks a day for men (see reference 3 pg x). But everyone is different, so be sure to talk to your doctor first to a safe amount of alcohol for you. Lactic acidosis is actually not very common when taking metformin, but it can be dangerous, and even deadly, according to the Food and Drug Administration (see reference 1 pg 15). Symptoms that warrant an immediate call to your doctor include difficulty breathing, stomach pain, diarrhea, muscle cramps, unusual sleepiness or weakness or an all-around achiness. Continue reading >>

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