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Metformin Food Interactions

Ecl-metformin - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Canoe.com

Ecl-metformin - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Canoe.com

have type 1 diabetes (people with type 1 diabetes should always be using insulin) have very poor blood glucose control (these people should not take this medication as the only antidiabetic agent) What side effects are possible with this medication? Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent. The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor. The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time. Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects. unusual stomach ache (after the initial stomach ache that can occur at the start of therapy) Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication. Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication? Before you begin taking a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should take this medication. \ Alcohol intake: Anyone taking metformin should avoid excessive alcohol intake. Blood sugar control: If you have fever, trauma, infection, or surgery, you may have a temporary loss Continue reading >>

Repaglinide And Metformin

Repaglinide And Metformin

Repaglinide/metformin treats Type 2 Diabetes. May cause nausea. Take with food to help with nausea. Repaglinide/metformin is a prescription medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes . It is a single product containing 2 medications: repaglinide and metformin . Repaglinide belongs to a group of drugs called meglitinides, or simply glinides. It works by stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin which will help lower blood sugars. Metformin belongs to a group of drugs called biguanides. It works by reducing the amount of sugar that the liver produces. This medication comes in a tablet form and is usually given 2 to 3 times a day with meals. Common side effects of repaglinide/metformin include headaches, low blood sugars, nausea, and diarrhea. What tips would you provide a friend before taking ? Did you experience many side effects while taking this drug? How likely would you be to recommend to a friend? Repaglinide/metformin is a prescription medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes . This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Serious side effects have been reported with repaglinide/metformin. See the Drug Precautions section. Common side effects of repaglinide/metformin include the following: This is not a complete list of side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you take: Monoamine oxidase inhibitors such as tranylc Continue reading >>

Metformin Food Interactions

Metformin Food Interactions

by admin Diabetes , Metformin , Metformin HCl How Does Metformin And Other Anti Diabetic Drugs Interact With Food? When you are taking any medication, its important to know what other life factors can affect that medications absorption and functioning in your body. Food is one of the most important factors to take into consideration. Consumption of alcohol is another. Many types of foods, especially those that originate from plants, have various chemical compounds that interact with the enzymes present in the liver. These enzymes are also used by the liver to destroy and detoxify active chemicals that are present in the medications you take to control diabetes. It is important to know how the type of food you consume will affect your livers ability to recycle the active ingredients present in diabetes medications, as well as which type of foods can slow this process down as these will affect the rise and the dip of blood sugar levels. How foods affect diabetic drug processing How the food you eat will affect the diabetes medication you take will depend on what enzyme is used by your liver to break down those medications. This is an overview of how several known diabetic drugs are processed in the liver and how they are affected by the foods you eat. Also known as Glucophage, metformin is one medication that does not get processed by the liver. This means the use of Metformin cannot be affected by the food you eat. However, consumption of alcohol does affect metformin metabolism. Excessive alcohol in your system will lead to metformin breaking down too much lactate which can cause one of the metformin side effects known as lactic acidosis. Lactic Acidosis a serious condition that is characterised by an increased amount of lactate in the body and can cause multiple negat Continue reading >>

Interactions Between Antidiabetic Drugs And Herbs: An Overview Of Mechanisms Of Action And Clinical Implications

Interactions Between Antidiabetic Drugs And Herbs: An Overview Of Mechanisms Of Action And Clinical Implications

Interactions between antidiabetic drugs and herbs: an overview of mechanisms of action and clinical implications 1NICM, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 1797 Australia 2Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, School of Agricultural Sciences and Rural Development, Nagaland University, Medziphema, 797 106 India 1NICM, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 1797 Australia 3School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 1797 Australia 1NICM, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 1797 Australia 3School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 1797 Australia 1NICM, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 1797 Australia 4Discipline of Pharmacology, School of Medical Sciences, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia 1NICM, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 1797 Australia 2Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, School of Agricultural Sciences and Rural Development, Nagaland University, Medziphema, 797 106 India 3School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 1797 Australia 4Discipline of Pharmacology, School of Medical Sciences, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia Ramesh C. Gupta, Email: [email protected] . Received 2017 May 12; Accepted 2017 Jul 12. Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Crea Continue reading >>

Rosiglitazone & Metformin

Rosiglitazone & Metformin

Combines 2 drugs to help lower blood sugar in type 2 diabetes. Works in part by increasing the body's response to insulin and decreasing the amount of sugar produced by the liver. Metformin/rosiglitazone is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. It is a single tablet containing two different prescription medications, metformin and rosiglitazone. Metformin belongs to a group of drugs called biguanides, which cause the liver to make less glucose. Rosiglitazone belongs to a group of drugs called thiazolidinediones, which increase the body's sensitivity to insulin to help control blood glucose levels. Metformin/rosiglitazone is available in 4 tablet strengths. It is taken by mouth, with meals, as directed by your doctor. Common side effects of metformin/rosiglitazone include diarrhea, nausea, upset stomach, cold-like symptoms. Do not drink alcohol while taking this medication. Metformin/rosiglitazone is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent diabetes). Metformin/rosiglitazone may be used alone or with other diabetes medicines. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Metformin/rosiglitazone may cause serious side effects. See "Drug Precautions". Some serious side effects include: new or worse heart failure heart attack swelling (edema) weight gain liver problems. Call your doctor right away if you have unexplained symptoms such as: nausea or vomiting stomach pain unusual or unexplained tiredness loss of appetite dark urine yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes. macular edema (a diabetic eye disease with swelling in the back of the eye) fractures (broken bones), usually in the hand, upper arm or foot low red blood cell count (anemia) lo Continue reading >>

Ran-metformin - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Medbroadcast.com

Ran-metformin - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Medbroadcast.com

have type 1 diabetes (people with type 1 diabetes should always be using insulin) have very poor blood glucose control (these people should not take this medication as the only antidiabetic agent) What side effects are possible with this medication? Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent. The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor. The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time. Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects. unusual stomach ache (after the initial stomach ache that can occur at the start of therapy) Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication. Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication? Before you begin taking a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should take this medication. \ Alcohol intake: Anyone taking metformin should avoid excessive alcohol intake. Blood sugar control: If you have fever, trauma, infection, or surgery, you may have a temporary loss Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid When On Metformin

Foods To Avoid When On Metformin

Metformin is often one of the first medications prescribed to people with diabetes, according to the Canadian Diabetes Association (see reference 2 under Highlights of Revisions). It helps lower your blood sugar levels by decreasing the amount of glucose, or sugar, produced by your liver. It also helps your insulin, the hormone that gets the sugar out of your blood and into your cell, work better. (see reference 1 pg 1 under Clinical Pharmacology under Mechanism of Action para 1). While you do not need to avoid any foods when taking metformin, you may need to limit or avoid alcohol (see reference 1 pg 8 under alcohol intake.). Metformin and Alcohol If your doctor has prescribed metformin to help you get better control over your blood sugar, you should not drink an excessive amount of alcohol, including beer, wine or hard liquor (see reference 1 pg 8 under Alcohol Intake). Too much alcohol causes metformin to breakdown too much lactate, which is a by-product of glucose and amino acids, and may lead to lactic acidosis (see reference 1 pg 8 under Alcohol Intake). If you drink alcohol, it's OK to have moderate amounts while on metformin, which means up to 1 drink a day for women and 2 drinks a day for men (see reference 3 pg x). But everyone is different, so be sure to talk to your doctor first to a safe amount of alcohol for you. Lactic acidosis is actually not very common when taking metformin, but it can be dangerous, and even deadly, according to the Food and Drug Administration (see reference 1 pg 15). Symptoms that warrant an immediate call to your doctor include difficulty breathing, stomach pain, diarrhea, muscle cramps, unusual sleepiness or weakness or an all-around achiness. Continue reading >>

Drug Interactions Of Medications Commonly Used In Diabetes

Drug Interactions Of Medications Commonly Used In Diabetes

When patients are diagnosed with diabetes, a large number of medications become appropriate therapy. These include medications for dyslipidemia, hypertension, antiplatelet therapy, and glycemic control. So many medications can be overwhelming, and it is imperative that patients are thoroughly educated about their drug regimen. Patients have many concerns when multiple medications are started, including prescribing errors, the cost of medications, and possible adverse effects. Significantly, 58% of patients worry that they will be given medications that have drug interactions that will adversely affect their health.1 These worries are not unfounded given that several highly publicized drugs have been withdrawn from the U.S. market in the past several years because of adverse effects from drug interactions. Terfenadine, mibefradil, and cisapride have all been withdrawn from the market specifically because of drug-drug interactions. When terfenadine or cisapride were given with a strong inhibitor of their metabolism, torsades de pointes, a life-threatening drug-induced ventricular arrhythmia associated with QT prolongation, could occur.2 Cisapride, for gastroparesis or gastrointestinal reflux disease, and mibefradil, for hypertension, were prescribed for many patients with diabetes. An adverse drug interaction is defined as an interaction between one or more coadministered medications that results in the alteration of the effectiveness or toxicity of any of the coadministered medications. Drug interactions can be caused by prescription and over-the-counter medications, herbal products or vitamins, foods, diseases, and genetics (family history). The true incidence of drug interactions is unknown because many are not reported, do not result in significant harm to patients, o Continue reading >>

Metformin Overview

Metformin Overview

Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. Metformin belongs to a group of drugs called biguanides, which work by helping your body respond better to the insulin it makes naturally, decreasing the amount of sugar your liver makes, and decreasing the amount of sugar your intestines absorb. This medication comes in tablet, extended-release tablet, and liquid forms. It is taken up to 3 times daily, depending on which form you are taking. Swallow extended-release tablets whole. Common side effects of metformin include diarrhea, nausea, and upset stomach. Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Metformin may be found in some form under the following brand names: Serious side effects have been reported including: Lactic Acidosis. In rare cases, metformin can cause a serious side effect called lactic acidosis. This is caused by a buildup of lactic acid in your blood. This build-up can cause serious damage. Lactic acidosis caused by metformin is rare and has occurred mostly in people whose kidneys were not working normally. Lactic acidosis has been reported in about one in 33,000 patients taking metformin over the course of a year. Although rare, if lactic acidosis does occur, it can be fatal in up to half the people who develop it. It is also important for your liver to be working normally when you take metformin. Your liver helps remove lactic acid from your blood. Make sure you tell your doctor before you use metformin if you have kidney or liver problems. You should also stop using metformin and call your doctor right away if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treate Continue reading >>

Glipizide And Metformin Overview

Glipizide And Metformin Overview

Glipizide/metformin is a prescription medication used in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is a single tablet containing 2 medications: glipizide and metformin. Glipizide belongs to a group of drugs called sulfonylureas. These work by stimulating the release of insulin from the pancreas. Metformin belongs to a group of drugs called biguanides. These work by decreasing the amount of glucose absorbed from food and decreasing the amount of glucose that is produced by the liver. This medication comes in tablet form and is taken once or twice daily with meals. Common side effects of glipizide/metformin include stomach pain, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea, and dizziness. Glipizide/metformin can also cause dizziness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how glipizide/metformin affects you. Glipizide/metformin is a prescription medication used in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It helps to lower the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Continue reading >>

Before Using

Before Using

Drug information provided by: Micromedex In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered: Allergies Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully. Pediatric Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of metformin oral solution and tablets in children 10 to 16 years of age. However, safety and efficacy of metformin extended-release tablets in the pediatric population have not been established. Geriatric Although appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of metformin have not been performed in the geriatric population, geriatric-specific problems are not expected to limit the usefulness of metformin in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related kidney problems, which may require caution in patients receiving metformin. This medicine is not recommended in patients 80 years of age and older who have kidney problems. Pregnancy Information about this metformin-oral-route Pregnancy Category Explanation All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus. Breastfeeding Studies in women suggest that thi Continue reading >>

Glimepiride Side Effects

Glimepiride Side Effects

What Is Glimepiride (Amaryl)? Glimepiride is the generic name of the prescription drug Amaryl, used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes. Glimepiride belongs to a class of drugs known as sulfonylureas. It stimulates the pancreas to produce insulin and helps the body use insulin more efficiently. The drug can also decrease the chances that someone will develop life-threatening complications of type 2 diabetes. The drug was approved by the FDA in 1995 and is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. Glimepiride comes in tablet form and is usually taken once a day. It may be used alone, or in combination with insulin or another oral medication such as metformin. Your doctor will probably start you on a low dose of the medication and gradually increase your dose if needed. If you've taken glimepiride for a long period of time, the drug may not control blood sugar as well as it did when you first started the treatment. Your doctor will adjust the dosage as needed. Glimepiride Warnings Glimepiride helps control blood sugar, but it will not cure your diabetes. You should continue to take glimepiride even if you feel well. This medication should not be used to treat patients with type 1 diabetes, a disease in which the body does not produce insulin. Glimepiride will only help lower blood sugar if your body produces insulin naturally. In one study, patients who took a medication similar to glimepiride to treat diabetes were more likely to die of heart problems than those who were treated with diet changes and insulin. Talk to your doctor about the risks of this treatment. While taking glimepiride, you should tell your doctor if you: Are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding Are having surgery, including dental surgery Have ever had G6PD deficiency (a genetic blood diso Continue reading >>

In Vitro And In Silico Drug-food Interaction: An Evaluation Of Metformin And Green Tea Interactions | Jacob A. Kolawole | University Of Jos., Nigeria | Babe 2018 | Meetings International

In Vitro And In Silico Drug-food Interaction: An Evaluation Of Metformin And Green Tea Interactions | Jacob A. Kolawole | University Of Jos., Nigeria | Babe 2018 | Meetings International

In vitro and in silico drug-food interaction: an evaluation of metformin and green tea interactions Jacob Adegboyega KOLAWOLE, PhD, FPSN, FPCPharm. FIPAN, completed his PhD at the age of 38 years from the Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria and The Robert Gordon, University, Aberdeen, UK (1996). He is the Dean, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Jos and Consultant to West African Health Organization, on development of guidelines and training manuals for, Pharmaceutical Finished products; Pharmaceutical Raw Materials; Standard Operating Procedures for Laboratories; Bioavalability /Bioequivalent. He has more than 40 publications in international journals. Food-drug interaction is a consequence of physical, chemical or physiological relationship between a drug and food. Failure to identify and properly manage food-drug interaction can lead to serious consequences such as reduction in absorption of certain orally administered drugs thereby leading to failure of treatments. This study sort to explore the effect of green tea on Metformin uses both in-vitro dissolution test and in-silico docking interactions models. Dissolution test was carried out on Metformin alone and Metformin in the presence of green tea using the official dissolution medium, phosphate buffer pH 6.8 and sampling done at USP timing intervals. Docking studies was carried out by using 10 phenolic compounds and metformin in the active site of the AMPK crystal structure, 4ZHX.pdb. Metformin alone complied with the USP requirement of 70% drug release while Metformin release in the presence of green tea was less than 70% at 45minutes. Phenolic constituents of green tea; (-)-epigallocatechine, epicatechine, theanine and theophylline were seen to form complexes with metformin through covalent bonding in Continue reading >>

Canagliflozin And Metformin

Canagliflozin And Metformin

Canagliflozin/metformin treats Type 2 Diabetes. Can cause nausea. Take with food to help with nausea. Canagliflozin/metformin is a prescription medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes. It is a single product containing 2 different medications: canagliflozin and metformin . Canagliflozin belongs to a group of drugs calledsodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. SGLT2 inhibitors work by allowing the kidneys to get rid of more sugar by dumping it in the urine. Metformin belongs to a group of drugs called biguanides. Biguanides work by reducing the amount of sugar produced by the liver. Together, these medications work to lower blood sugars. This medication comes in a tablet form and is usually taken twice a day with food. Canagliflozin/metformin is also available as an extended-release tablet and is taken once daily in the morning, with a meal. Do notsplit, crush, dissolve, or chew the extended-release tablets. Swallow them whole. Common side effects of canagliflozin/metformin include diarrhea, bloating, frequent urination, and thirst. What tips would you provide a friend before taking ? Did you experience many side effects while taking this drug? How likely would you be to recommend to a friend? Canagliflozin/metformin is a prescription medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Serious side effects have been reported with canagliflozin/metformin. See the Drug Precautions section. Common side effects of canagliflozin/metformin include the following: Genital fungal infections (yeast infections) This is not a complete list of side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that do Continue reading >>

Can I Have Grapefruit While Taking Metformin?

Can I Have Grapefruit While Taking Metformin?

Many medications, such as statins and some antihistamines, have a negative interaction with grapefruit. Metformin is used in treatment of type 2 diabetes. Does having grapefruit while taking metformin lead to adverse side effects? There’s limited research, but here’s what you need to know. Metformin is a drug that’s prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can’t use insulin normally. This means they can’t control the amount of sugar in their blood. Metformin helps people with type 2 diabetes control the level of sugar in their blood in several ways, including: decreasing the amount of sugar your body absorbs from food decreasing the amount of sugar produced by your liver increasing your body’s response to the insulin that it makes naturally Metformin can rarely cause a very serious and life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. People with liver, kidney, or heart problems should avoid taking metformin. There are more than 85 drugs that are known to interact with grapefruit. Of these drugs, 43 of them can lead to serious adverse effects. All forms of grapefruit — including freshly squeezed juice, frozen concentrate, and the whole fruit — can lead to drug interaction. Some of the chemicals found in grapefruit can bind to and inactivate an enzyme in your body that’s found in your intestines and liver. This enzyme helps break down the medication you take. Normally when you take a drug orally, it’s broken down slightly by enzymes before it reaches your bloodstream. This means that you receive a little less of the drug in your bloodstream than the amount you initially consumed. But when the enzyme is inhibited — as it is when it interacts with the chemicals in grapefruit — there’s a dramatically larger amount of the dr Continue reading >>

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