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Menopause Blood Sugar Fluctuations

Menopause And Diabetes

Menopause And Diabetes

Tweet Managing diabetes whilst going through menopause can feel like a twin challenge for most women due to the combined effects that each condition can have on the body. The best way to remain in control is by knowing what to expect so that you can prepare yourself for the unique challenges that may lie ahead. What is menopause? Menopause is the general term that describes the end of a woman's menstrual cycle - in other words, the cessation of monthly periods - that usually occurs around the age of 50. Periods usually come to a gradual halt, becoming less frequent and with longer intervals between each one before stopping altogether. But for some women, the end of menstruation can be sudden. It is this period that is referred to when a woman is said to be 'going through menopause'. For many women, the end of menstruation can lead to a number of physical and emotional symptoms, which can be detrimental to health. Levels of the female sex hormone oestrogen decrease, causing the ovaries to stop producing an egg each month (ovulation). Reduced oestrogen can result in women experiencing hot flushes, night sweats, mood swings and vaginal dryness. However, changing hormone levels can also trigger spikes and falls in blood sugar levels, which for women with diabetes can lead to a number of problems and may pose a number of health risks. I have both diabetes and menopause - what should I expect? Menopause will not affect every woman in the same way, however, there are a number of common effects. Fluctuating blood sugar levels As mentioned above, changes in the levels of oestrogen and progesterone - hormones that affect how your cells respond to insulin - can lead to unexpected fluctuations in your blood sugars, making it harder to keep diabetes well controlled. Weight gain Putt Continue reading >>

Sugar Sensitivity & Menopause

Sugar Sensitivity & Menopause

Menopause, a time of hormonal upheaval for many women, may include a range of symptoms and health effects aside from hot flashes, night sweats and mood swings. Hormonal ups and downs during menopause can affect your blood sugar levels and may be a contributing factor to your hot flashes and irritability and other menopausal complaints. Blood sugar imbalances can also make you more susceptible to developing certain health conditions. Video of the Day The effects of menopause on sugar sensitivity have not been well studied and have produced contradictory results, according to Rogerio A. Lobo, editor of the book "Menopause: Biology and Pathobiology." Insulin levels have been seen to decrease in some studies, increase in others and stay the same in yet others. Some experts believe that insulin secretion and elimination both decrease after menopause, resulting in no effect on glucose tolerance or insulin levels. Insulin secretion has been shown to be the same in women on hormone replacement as for those not undergoing hormone replacement therapy. However, diabetic menopausal women manage blood sugar better on estrogen replacement. Estrogen contributes to insulin sensitivity by encouraging muscle cells to absorb glucose. Declining estrogen levels during menopause make you more susceptible to insulin resistance, according to naturopath Joseph Collins, author of the book "Discover Your Menopause Type." Your risk for developing diseases related to insulin resistance, such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and certain forms of cancer, also increase. Insulin resistance occurs in up to 44 percent of healthy postmenopausal women and is not always associated with obesity. Metabolic stress caused by excessive oxidation and inflammation are associated with increased risk for d Continue reading >>

Don’t Sugar Coat It…diabetes Effects Menopause Symptoms

Don’t Sugar Coat It…diabetes Effects Menopause Symptoms

The Effects of Menopause and Diabetes Hormonal changes The menopause, and the years leading up to it, is when women’s bodies gradually produce less estrogen and progesterone. These hormonal changes can affect blood sugar levels differently for each individual. Many women notice their blood sugar levels fluctuate more,. The hormonal changes as well as swings in blood sugar levels can contribute to mood changes, fatigue and hot flushes. Weight gain often occurs at menopause. Any weight gain will increase insulin resistance which may cause the development of diabetes. And, in women who have diabetes, menopause itself, can wreak havoc on their diabetes control and they may have to adjust their diabetes medication. Menopause means end of menstruation. It is defined as not having a menstrual period for 12 consecutive months in a row. The menopause may be natural or it may occur after a hysterectomy, the surgical removal of the uterus, with the removal of the ovaries (oophorectomy). The usual age for women to stop menstruating naturally is between 45 -55 years. Signs and Symptoms of Menopause include: Mood changes Disturbed sleep Depression and headaches Irregular periods Hot flashes Night sweats Other symptoms includes: vaginal dryness, loss of sex drive and bladder problems. These problems will be made worse by high blood sugar levels. Does Menopause Increase Diabetes? This question is difficult to answer, but it does look like estrogen and progesterone may have something to do with it. Also, of course, our age, weight and lifestyle plays an important part. As women start to go into menopause, changes in hormone levels can lead to swings in blood glucose levels. That is why it is so important for women to have their blood sugar checked regularly. It’s important for women Continue reading >>

How Menopause Affects Your Blood Sugar Levels

How Menopause Affects Your Blood Sugar Levels

Read the full video transcript below Today's topic Hello, and welcome to my weekly video blog. And today on A.Vogel Talks Menopause, I'm going to be discussing your blood sugar levels. Now, for those of you, especially, that have been watching for a while, you'll know that I often talk about controlling blood sugar levels and how important it is in the menopause. So I'm going to look at this in a little bit more detail. What is blood sugar control? Well, your brain needs glucose as a fuel, so levels must stay constant in the blood all the time. And sometimes your blood sugar levels get a bit low. Now, if you imagine you're going on a car journey and you're starting to run out of petrol, you'll get a little warning bleep, you might get a little light flashing on the dashboard. If you ignore that and the car goes on for a bit longer, you'll get a bigger bleep and you'll get more flashes until eventually the bleep is absolutely continuous. And at that point, you go, "Oh, I better do something about this now or we're going to run out of petrol." And it's the same with our blood glucose levels. If it starts to get too low, the body has then got to give you some kind of warning signal that it's time to eat something. What happens when it gets low Now, when it gets too low, that could be to do with the fact that you're not eating enough. And, you know, especially at this time of the year, how many of us think about going on diets for the summer? It can be that we're missing meals, it could be that we're eating the wrong foods, or it could be the fact that we're waiting too long between meals before we're actually eating. So the body has to give us some kind of reminder to eat something. Normally, it can just be hunger pangs, and very often that's something we will then address Continue reading >>

Menopause Low Blood Sugar: Four Habits To Avoid

Menopause Low Blood Sugar: Four Habits To Avoid

Four Habits that can Lower Blood Sugar Levels and Worsen Other Menopausal Symptoms Menopause brings its own set of symptoms. They are, generally speaking, ones you have never had to contend with before. Mood swings are difficult and, if you have never really had them before, you may be asking yourself Who is this person thats acting in this way? Its certainly not the me Im used to! The insomnia may begin to take a toll on your life, making you accident-prone and skewing your decision-making abilities. Hot flashes may leave you amazed that you have to change clothes so often during the day, and leave you wondering when the next one will occur. All these symptoms do make life difficult, and since bad habits will aggravate the symptoms of menopause, it will be very important to make sure your daily habits are as good as they can be. Here are four habits to avoid during the trying times of menopause: Mood swings from hormone fluctuations during menopause are aggravated by low blood sugar, so do everything in your power to eat regular meals. Low blood sugar will cause a whole host of negative symptoms including headaches, mood swings, mental fog, weariness, anxiety, aggressiveness, hunger that leads to overeating, depression, shakiness, sweating, trembling, and can potentially mimic every known mental disorder! The only way to overcome low blood sugar during menopause is to eat regular meals. Your body was engineered to accept three meals a day, one meal every four hours. Its the ideal way to get in your nutrients for the day.The best way to insure that meals are eaten is to simply prepare the protein for the week ahead of time. With a cooked chicken, beef roast, and ham sitting in the refrigerator already cooked, theres no reason why you cant slice your choice of meat whil Continue reading >>

Menopause And Diabetes: Does Menopause Cause Diabetes?

Menopause And Diabetes: Does Menopause Cause Diabetes?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the United States has the highest rate of diabetes cases in the developing world and it is still increasing in an alarm rate. In 2016, it is estimated that 1 in 10 US individuals have type 2 diabetes (the increase rate of type 1 diabetes is much smaller). By 2050, it is estimated that 1 in 3 individuals will suffer from type 2 diabetes. From the statistics, overweight individuals who are age 40 or older are in the highest risk percentile. How does this information important for women? In the United States, diabetes is ranked as the number 6 most common cause of death for females between 45 to 54 years old and the number 4 common cause of death for females who are between 55 to 64 years old. It seems that as women grow older and reach their menopause stage, they become much more susceptible to develop diabetes. The question is whether menopause can drastically increase the risk of developing diabetes? This article will answer this question along with covering various topics that concerns menopause and its effect on diabetes: Can Menopause Can Trigger Diabetes? We would like to give you a straightforward answer for this question. However, sadly, health research scientists are still struggling to find the answer because it is difficult to separate the correlation and effects of menopause from the correlation and effects of age and weight. In 2011, a scientific correlation study suggests that after taking the age factor out from the correlation study, there is “no association between natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy and diabetes risk” (Kim, 2011). Yet there have been studies suggesting that progesterone is correlated with the development diabetes. Although we cannot give you a straight yes or Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Menopause – What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Menopause – What You Need To Know

Women with diabetes may at first have a hard time telling the difference between a bout of low blood sugar and menopause. If you are a woman with diabetes approaching a certain age, there may come a point when it can feel as though you hit a wall with your diabetes self-care. Your blood sugar levels may become erratic, you might find you’ve gained a bit of weight, and you sleep restlessly. What you may be experiencing is menopause. Menopause typically starts around age 50, but perimenopause, the beginning stages of menopause, can start as early as 40. At this time, the hormones estrogen and progesterone start fluctuating, causing hot flashes, moodiness, short-term memory loss, and fatigue. For a woman with diabetes, fluctuating blood sugars can also be common with menopause. The tricky thing is that the symptoms of menopause are so similar to low blood sugar that it can be hard to distinguish between the two. More frequent blood sugar monitoring is essential to identify whether the symptoms you experience are caused by diabetes, menopause, or a combination of both. Weight gain, although not inevitable, is common during menopause for women with and without diabetes. You also are prone to lose muscle mass and replace it with fat, usually in the abdomen, hips, and thighs. Without any changes in diet, you may find the scale creeping up. Diabetes and menopause share several other symptoms, including vaginal dryness, vaginal infections and urinary tract infections. These are caused by reduced estrogen levels in menopause, and elevated glucose levels and nerve damage with diabetes. Treating the symptoms of vaginal dryness is important for comfort and avoiding vaginal infection. There are ways to make yourself feel better during menopause, and regain stability with your blood Continue reading >>

3 Blood Sugar Problems During Menopause

3 Blood Sugar Problems During Menopause

Controlling your blood sugar level is vital… even more so during menopause. Menopause is tough to deal with at best of times. It can be a real pain with uncomfortable symptoms like hot flashes, night sweats, weight gain, and sleeplessness. But what does blood sugar have to do with menopause? Now, to top it all off, women going through menopause are more sensitive to sugar. This means that they are more likely to develop blood sugar related problems like diabetes, oxidation and insulin resistance. Insulin Resistance – Estrogen levels in the body decrease when a woman enters menopause. This can make a woman more vulnerable to insulin resistance. This happens because the lower estrogen levels make the cells store more sugar, which can also lead to other health issues like diabetes, heart disease, and even certain types of cancer. Could you be insulin resistance? Here are 5 Tell-Tale Signs of Insulin Resistance and How to Stop It… Oxidation – The increased numbers of free radicals and the decreased number of antioxidants in the body during menopause can lead to insulin resistance and other blood sugar related problems. Weight Gain – Weight gain during menopause seems to be a huge problem – No pun intended. Most women tend to pick up some weight during menopause. This may lead to increased fat deposits and decreased muscle mass in the body. What can I do to prevent these blood sugar problems? As a drop of estrogen levels are the main reason for menopause, we recommend taking a natural supplement. The Manna Menopause Support helps increase estrogen levels the natural way without any side effects. If you struggle to lose weight, we also recommend taking the Manna Blood Sugar Support. It helps control blood glucose levels, decrease insulin levels, curb cravings and Continue reading >>

Going Into Menopause Can Increase Your Blood Sugar Levels

Going Into Menopause Can Increase Your Blood Sugar Levels

Going into Menopause can Increase Your Blood Sugar Levels Did you know that if you are going through menopause it could be impacting your diabetes blood sugar levels? Yes, it's true! Your female hormones, estrogens and progesterone affect your cells' sensitivity to insulin. So if you thought as your menopausal symptoms have gotten worse your blood sugar levels have also become less predictable, you are not crazy, it is true. Why does one of your health conditions affect another? It is happening because our hormones impact one another. There are three different estrogens which are produced mainly in the ovaries each month that we have our menstrual cycle. As we move into menopause the levels of estrogen being produced in the ovaries begin to decline. Once in the blood stream, insulin travels to cells to help remove glucose from the blood so it can enter all of our cells easily. Estrogen has a protective effect on pancreas cells and prevents them from premature cell death. It also works on the cells of the pancreas to increase the production of insulin when required by certain conditions, such as diabetes. The decline in estrogen seems to cause our cells to become more insulin resistant, exacerbating blood glucose levels circulating in the body. Insulin resistance causes cells to not absorb glucose from the bloodstream as readily so blood glucose levels get higher. This causes a higher probability of exacerbating high blood sugars and diabetic complications over time. So what is the solution to this seemingly-complicated situation where menopause and diabetes co-exist in your body? If you are taking medications to control your blood sugars, whether orally or by injection, be diligent about taking them daily. It is important to monitor your blood sugar levels consistently Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Menopause: A Twin Challenge

Diabetes And Menopause: A Twin Challenge

Diabetes and menopause may team up for varied effects on your body. Here's what to expect — and how to stay in control. Menopause — and the years leading up to it — may present unique challenges if you have diabetes. But it's not necessarily a one-two punch. First, learn what to expect. Then consider what to do about it. Diabetes and menopause: What to expect Menopause is the phase of life after your periods have stopped and your estrogen levels decline. In some women, menopause can occur as a result of surgery, when the ovaries are removed for other medical reasons. Diabetes and menopause may team up for varied effects on your body, including: Changes in blood sugar level. The hormones estrogen and progesterone affect how your cells respond to insulin. After menopause, changes in your hormone levels can trigger fluctuations in your blood sugar level. You may notice that your blood sugar level is more variable and less predictable than before. If your blood sugar gets out of control, you have a higher risk of diabetes complications. Weight gain. Some women gain weight during the menopausal transition and after menopause. This can increase the need for insulin or oral diabetes medication. Infections. Even before menopause, high blood sugar levels can contribute to urinary tract and vaginal infections. After menopause — when a drop in estrogen makes it easier for bacteria and yeast to thrive in the urinary tract and vagina — the risk is even higher. Sleep problems. After menopause, hot flashes and night sweats may keep you up at night. In turn, the sleep deprivation can make it tougher to manage your blood sugar level. Sexual problems. Diabetes can damage the nerves of the cells that line the vagina. This can interfere with arousal and orgasm. Vaginal dryness, a Continue reading >>

Menopause And Blood Sugar Fluctuations

Menopause And Blood Sugar Fluctuations

The carbohydrates you eat provide your body with fuel in the form of glucose. Blood sugar refers to the amount of glucose in your body. A normal blood sugar is about 80 mg/dl after fasting or before a meal. However, typical blood sugar levels may fluctuate between 80 mg/dl and 120 mg/dl. Abnormal blood sugar fluctuations can occur for a number of reasons and leave you feeling tired, hungry, irritable and unable to concentrate. You may also feel dizzy or experience blurred vision. Poor eating habits and skipping meals can contribute to low blood sugar levels, or hypoglycemia. High blood sugar levels are generally linked to diabetes, a condition in which the pancreas produces too little insulin or fails to make insulin at all. Menopause can increase the incidence of blood sugar fluctuations. Your metabolism can shift and change dramatically during menopause. One study discovered that estrogen levels during menopause can increase fat storage and increases the risk of imbalanced blood sugars. As progesterone levels fall, women’s bodies are less able to use fat for energy and may experience higher insulin levels and abnormal blood sugar levels. If you are struggling with blood sugar fluctuations, you may reach for a menopause treatment to help ease the discomfort. You can also try making lifestyle changes. Carbohydrate cravings can be intense during a hypoglycemic episode, but before grabbing a candy bar or bag of chips, reach instead for healthier complex carbs. Whole grains, fresh vegetables and fiber-rich fruits can all be good choices. Try not to skip meals, and focus on getting regular exercise, which can help prevent weight gain. High blood sugars may indicate a visit to your health care practitioner is in order. Menopause natural relief can be used to even out the h Continue reading >>

Menopause And Diabetes

Menopause And Diabetes

Menopause presents unique challenges for women that have diabetes. The hormones progesterone and estrogen will impact how the cells of your body respond to insulin. After you go through menopause, hormone level changes can result in blood sugar level fluctuation. For people with diabetes, this may result in blood sugar levels that are unpredictable and difficult to control. Menopause can make it harder to control your diabetes, but there are several things that women can do to better manage the condition. A healthy lifestyle involving regular exercise and a diet rich in healthy foods is a necessity in a diabetes treatment plan. Women should also check their blood sugar frequently, keeping track of symptoms and readings. Medical treatment can also help women to better regulate both their menopause and diabetes. If your blood sugar levels have increased, you may need to alter your diabetes medication dosage or try a new one. Your risk of cardiovascular disease will also be higher when you are dealing with both menopause and diabetes, so your doctor may also consider putting you on a medication that will help to lower your cholesterol. Hypoglycemia Hormone levels are important in preventing the body from experiencing hypoglycemia, which is a condition that occurs when blood glucose or sugar levels are too low. Levels usually fall to less than 70 mg/dl, and symptoms of hypoglycemia include shakiness, nervousness, anxiety, irritability, confusion, rapid heartbeat, dizziness, or nausea. While a lack of blood sugar can cause hypoglycemia, a lack of certain hormones like epinephrine, cortisol, and insulin may be the reason that your blood sugar levels decreased to begin with. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia can also be experienced by people who don’t have diabetes. There are two ty Continue reading >>

Menopause

Menopause

What to Expect, How to Cope For most women, menopause—the cessation of menstrual periods—is a normal, natural occurrence. The average age at menopause is 51, although any time after 40 is considered normal. The years leading up to the menopausal transition—a time known as the perimenopause—may be characterized by changes in the menstrual period, hot flashes (a sudden feeling of warmth, sometimes accompanied by sweating), emotional ups and downs, sleep disturbances, and vaginal dryness. Some of these symptoms may continue after menopause. The severity of symptoms varies dramatically from person to person, ranging from barely noticeable menstrual changes to an experience described as debilitating. Women who experience menopause abruptly because of the surgical removal of their ovaries (called surgical menopause) typically have much more severe symptoms than women who experience a natural menopause. Both the perimenopausal and postmenopausal periods may present additional challenges for women who have diabetes. For one thing, the hormonal fluctuations that are common to perimenopause can affect blood glucose levels. For another, some symptoms of menopause are the same as or easily confused with the symptoms of high or low blood glucose levels, so the cause must be determined before corrective action can be taken. In addition, both diabetes and menopause raise a woman’s risk of osteoporosis, so women with diabetes must be proactive about taking steps to keep their bones strong. Lack of sleep, whether related to menopause, stress, or something else, can disrupt diabetes control. And menopause is often associated with weight gain, which can make blood glucose control more difficult. The menopausal process A woman is said to be postmenopausal one year after her final Continue reading >>

Menopause And Blood Sugar: Is There Any Connection?

Menopause And Blood Sugar: Is There Any Connection?

Menopause and Blood Sugar Menopause is the time of life when a woman’s menstrual cycle comes to an end, and as a result, she experiences various symptoms linked to this. Because her female reproductive hormones, namely progesterone and estrogen, significantly decrease*, a number of changes occur in her body. These changes can also affect the amount and control of blood sugar in her body. Although there has not been extensive research linking menopause and the levels of blood sugar, doctors believe that there is a link between the two. Just like each woman experiences different menopause symptoms at varying levels, so blood sugar levels during menopause vary significantly. Some women experience lower levels, while others experience much higher levels. With some women, however, the blood sugar levels do not change during menopause. Symptom of Blood Sugar The symptoms of low and high blood sugar vary. If a woman has high blood sugar, then her body does not have enough insulin to regulate the amount of blood sugar in her body. She is likely to experience nausea, blurred vision, extreme thirst, extreme hunger, drowsiness and the need to urinate frequently. If a woman has low blood sugar, then the opposite is true – she has too much insulin for the blood sugar in her body. The symptoms she may experience include sweating, weakness, extreme hunger, tiredness, anxiety, fast heartbeat, dizziness and irritability. What Causes Height Blood Sugar at Menopause? During menopause, estrogen and progesterone levels decrease* significantly, affecting a number of regular bodily functions. One of the effects that these lower hormonal levels have on the body’s cells is that they change the way cells respond to insulin. In most women, this will result in higher levels of blood sugar. I Continue reading >>

Menopause

Menopause

Menopause marks the completion of a natural process that women go through as the child-bearing years come to an end and the ovaries cease to release eggs every month. The hormones estrogen and progesterone, which prepare the uterus for pregnancy, decrease considerably, although small amounts of estrogen may still be produced. Prior to menopause, the hormonal changes that a woman experiences during her monthly cycles often follow her own individual pattern: One woman will have a period every 26 days which may last four to five days while another woman's may occur every 31 days and last six to seven days. This pattern often changes dramatically as a woman approaches menopause. Some women begin to experience hormonal fluctuations in their mid-to-late thirties but the majority of women notice changes starting in their early forties. Menopause takes place when you have not menstruated for 12 months. For most women in North America, this occurs around 51 years of age. Women with type 1 diabetes may experience menopause earlier than average. Women with type 2 diabetes may reach menopause later than average if they are above a healthy weight, as estrogen levels do not decrease as rapidly in women who are overweight. During peri-menopause, the years leading up to menopause, surges and reductions in estrogen and progesterone can affect women in various ways: Mood changes, increased PMS signs, menstrual periods that are more or less frequent, heavier or lighter blood flow during menstruation. These hormonal changes can affect women with diabetes by causing blood glucose to fluctuate. For some women this is scarcely noticeable as estrogen and progesterone production is reduced gradually over the years. However, for many women, fluctuations in blood glucose can mean that they need t Continue reading >>

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