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Medtronic Waterproof Insulin Pump Cases

T1d Exchange Data Shows Patients Want Choice In Devices And Therapies

T1d Exchange Data Shows Patients Want Choice In Devices And Therapies

The recent news that UnitedHealthcare has chosen Medtronic as its preferred insulin pump provider has elicited a strong reaction from type 1 diabetes stakeholders, including patients, advocates, businesses and organizations. We applaud these efforts to collectively demonstrate how this business decision will impact diabetes patients and the overall health care system, and offer our perspective using evidence from T1D Exchange research, including clinic registry data and community feedback collected online at Glu (Myglu.org) – a community of nearly 17,000 people touched by type 1 diabetes (T1D). As a mission-driven research organization focused on improving T1D outcomes , we at T1D Exchange urge UnitedHealthcare to reconsider this decision to limit patient choice and reduce access to insulin pumps. Details of this Preferred Relationship There is no immediate change if a UnitedHealthcare member is using a different pump until that pump is out of warranty (typically within 4 years). Members 18 years and younger, members with Medicare Advantage plans, Sierra Health and Life commercial plans are not part of this preferred relationship with Medtronic. Additionally, for patients who would be covered by the preferred relationship, there may be exceptions if clinical indications support use of an insulin pump other than Medtronic Minimed. These cases will be determined one-on-one with the prescribing physician and, if approved, would be covered at the in-network benefit level. This announcement comes at a time when there is both: a need for greater adoption of today’s pump technologies to help improve care and outcomes for people with type 1 diabetes; and great excitement and hope for next-generation insulin pumps which might include closed loop systems, integrations with sm Continue reading >>

Technology Helps People With Diabetes Worry Less About Lows

Technology Helps People With Diabetes Worry Less About Lows

(BPT) - Diabetes is a complex disease to manage, and it can be extremely challenging for people with diabetes to keep their blood sugar levels within an ideal target range. While reducing high blood sugar – or hyperglycemia – is important since high�blood�sugar can lead to long-term complications like cardiovascular disease and nerve damage, reducing low blood sugar – or hypoglycemia – can be a matter of life or death. Low blood sugar is a condition that can cause confusion, disorientation and loss of consciousness; in the worst cases it can result in coma or death. The average person with type 1 diabetes has two lows a week that they’re aware of – and untold ones they’re not – with more than half experiencing lows at least once a night.[1] Phyllis Kaplan of Boston has had type 1 diabetes for most of her life and has first-hand experience with hypoglycemia. “I have a history of severe lows at night, when it’s most challenging to manage my glucose levels,” Kaplan says. “It was very scary thinking that I was lucky to wake up.” “Low blood sugar at night is of particular concern, as that is when up to 75 percent of severe hypoglycemia occurs and patients are unlikely to be aware of symptoms while they are asleep,” says Dr. Satish Garg of the University of Colorado Denver, Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes. SmartGuard™ technology, the latest advancement developed by Medtronic, is helping to combat this problem and reduce lows*. Available in the Medtronic MiniMed insulin pump systems with continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), SmartGuard technology is the only feature available in the U.S. that takes action against lows*. �Continued delivery of insulin, which is designed to lower blood sugar levels, when the person with diabetes i Continue reading >>

Newsflash: Medtronic Launches New Minimed 630g System

Newsflash: Medtronic Launches New Minimed 630g System

A new Medtronic insulin pump is now available in the United States, introducing a new des ign and color-screen as part of a complete makeover to these diabetes devices that have fundamentally looked the same for 30 years! Say hello to the Minimed 630G, which Medtronic announced on Thursday after receiving the FDA's Pre-Market Approval on Aug. 10. This news caught many by surprise, as the California pump-CGM company hadn't previewed this product in advance as they typically do before launches. Instead, they've focused on their forthcoming 670G hybrid closed loop system, expected to be the first-gen commercial Artficial Pancreas system to hit market in 2017. A number of users are actually upset that they weren't warned of this interim product launch, because they've recently purchased new products or upgrades. Others were holding out for the future closed loop system. So we're all wondering: Just what is this 630G that we've heard nothing about before? Remember, Medtronic got FDA approval in September 2013 for its 530G that automatically stops insulin delivery once a user crosses a certain low glucose level. That was step one in moving toward closed loop technology. Next up is their Predictive Low Glucose Suspend (PLGS) features that can anticipate oncoming hypos in advance and shut off insulin to prevent them from happening. That's built into the Minimed 640G system that hit the market outside the U.S. in early 2015. Medtronic ultimately decided it would not pursue bringing that device to the U.S., opting instead to leapfrog that model and focus on getting the first hybrid closed loop 670G to market in 2017. So now, it seems we're getting this 630G as a sort of stop-gap device in between the two D-tech generations. Here's a quick glance at the Minimed 630G: Fresh Design: Continue reading >>

Medtronic - Minimed 640g

Medtronic - Minimed 640g

Tweet Medtronic’s MiniMed 640G marks another step forward for insulin pump technology as it features the SmartGuard algorithm which uses CGM data to predict and prevent hypos. The MiniMed 640G also marks the first of Medtronic’s insulin pumps to feature a colour screen. As with other Medtronic pumps, the 640G is available as two different models, the MMT-1512, which has a smaller 180 unit reservoir and the MMT-1712, which is about 1 cm taller but allows for a 300 unit reservoir. Features SmartGuard - can predict and prevent most hypos Integration with Enlite II CGM sensors Integrated with Contour NEXT Link 2.4 blood glucose meter 8 basal patterns 180 unit and 300 unit reservoirs available Colour screen –with light adjusting display Designed for easy use by both left-handed and right-handed people In addition to its colour screen, the 640G also makes navigating around menus easier than on Medtronic’s previous pumps, meaning less button presses needed to operate certain functions and change settings. Disadvantages The 640G has integration with the Bayer Contour NEXT Link 2.4 blood glucose meter, which allows you to send bolus dose instructions to the pump. However, the 640G does not provide the same level of control by remote provided by other manufacturers. The 640G is a little larger than Medtronic’s Paradigm Veo pump. SmartGuard The main technology leap made by the 640G is its SmartGuard feature. Medtronic’s previous insulin pump, the Paradigm Veo, had a low glucose suspend feature which meant, that when used with an Enlite CGM sensor, the pump would cease delivering insulin if blood sugar levels became low and therefore helped to reduce the chances of a severe hypo occurring. SmartGuard takes this a step further as the software is able to predict when hypo Continue reading >>

Your Health

Your Health

ABOUT DIABETES Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. The exact cause of diabetes is unknown, although both genetic and environmental factors, as well as lifestyle issues (for example, obesity and lack of exercise) appear to play roles. There are two major types of diabetes, known as Type 1 and Type 2. ABOUT TYPE 1 DIABETES Type 1 diabetes is often diagnosed in children and teenagers, and for this reason was once called “juvenile onset diabetes.” However, people of all ages can be diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. The cause is unknown, though there seems to be a strong family link that can be triggered by environmental factors such as viruses. Type 1 diabetes does not appear to be related to lifestyle or obesity. Type 1 diabetes occurs most often in children and young adults and accounts for 10-15% of diabetes cases in Australia.1 ABOUT TYPE 2 DIABETES Type 2 diabetes affects over 1 million people in Australia, making it the most common form of diabetes.2 While it was once called “adult onset diabetes”, children and teenagers can develop Type 2 diabetes as well. Continue reading >>

Three Months With The Medtronic 640g – Time For A Review And Comparison With The Spirit Combo That I Used Previously

Three Months With The Medtronic 640g – Time For A Review And Comparison With The Spirit Combo That I Used Previously

To summarise it, as a pump, it does little differently, aside from a less functional remote control, however it has a few bells and whistles, that, for me at least, make it an amazing option. But if you want to know more, then read on. The 640G – Form and Function as a pump In May, I got my hands (finally) on one of these, being funded by the NHS: On a basic level, if I was to make a comparison, in terms of “On-Pump” functionality, I think the combo and the 640G both do very similar things. They have the same range of pump functionality, in that they both offer multiple basal rates, have normal, square and dual/multiwave bolusing, and do what pumps do. Both also offer a form of bolus wizard that allows you to enter a load of data and then have the system calculate what your bolus should be. Whilst the functionality is the same, the “how” the functionality is delivered is very different. Why? The remote control. As everybody knows by now, the Spirit Combo includes a linked Aviva “Expert” meter (which for many is a killer feature of the pump), on to which all the Bolus Wizard data is entered. Then when you blood test, the bolus amount is sent to the pump to deliver. In the case of the 640G, whilst you do the blood test on the Ascensia Contour Next-Link 2.4 (bit of a mouthful that), and the test result is sent to the pump, you enter all the data on the pump, which is where it does the calculations. The other thing that the meter has is a full emulator of the pump functionality, so that, if you wish, you can hide the pump away and run it all remotely. This is not something that you can do with the 640G. The only option there is to offer a remote bolus, which is similar functionality to the old “bolus button” you could get for the Veo pumps. For many, this Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Cases – All Boys’ Models With Belt – Save 25%

Insulin Pump Cases – All Boys’ Models With Belt – Save 25%

Retail Price $41 SALE: Visit the store to see the current price Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Comment You may use these HTML tags and attributes: Continue reading >>

Waterproof Insulin Pumps

Waterproof Insulin Pumps

Tweet Insulin pumps are designed to be able to comfortably withstand temporary exposure to water. This means that if you get splashed or your insulin pump drops into the sink when washing, it shouldn’t malfunction if it’s soon dried with a towel. Some pumps have been designed specifically with greater waterproof protection in mind and have been tested to confirm their waterproof capabilities. Image text: Some insulin pumps have been specifically designed to be waterproof Which insulin pumps are waterproof? Insulin pumps need to be waterproof to some degree but some have been shown to be more waterproof than others. The following list shows to which depths and which durations different insulin pumps have been shown to be waterproof: Lifescan Animas Vibe: 3.6m depth for up to 24 hours (IPX-8) DANA Diabecare R: 3m depth for 24 hours (IPX-8) Ypsomed mylife OmniPod: 7.6m depth for up to 1 hour (IPX-8) Accu-Chek Spirit Combo: 2.4m depth for up to 1 hour (IPX-8) Medtronic MiniMed Paradigm Veo: This pump is not waterproof - slightest moisture may damage the pump Note that handheld remote devices for these insulin pumps are not waterproof and should not be exposed to water. Can these pumps be used in the bath, shower or swimming pool? Yes, waterproof pumps can be used for bathing, showering or spending time in a swimming pool as long as you keep within the depths and times specified by the pump. Are there any limitations to using waterproof insulin pumps? Aside from time and depth considerations given above, there are also some other limitations which need to be taken into consideration. Waterproof insulin pumps should not be exposed to high temperatures for extended periods of time as this could affect the quality of the insulin inside. It is therefore recommended to discon Continue reading >>

A Look Into Medtronic’s Pump Game Plan

A Look Into Medtronic’s Pump Game Plan

Medtronic’s reasoning for releasing the 630G, and why the company may be looking past it to the artificial pancreas. Last week, I wrote about the curious move by Medtronic to release an unpredictive insulin pump in the shell of a pump that had predictive technology. The 630G pump looks like the 640G, a predictive pump not available in the U.S.; the pump can decipher blood sugar level trends and suspend insulin delivery before a pump user goes too low. However, the 630G has capabilities closer to the 530G, a pump that can only suspend insulin delivery if low blood sugar levels are detected. The release of the 630G has been met with some skepticism from other pump geeks in the Type 1 community. Our Facebook post about this story drew the following negative comments toward Medtronic: “I have been saying this for months! They are putting fancy buttons on the same crap!” “Pretty obvious that Medtronic is phoning it in even more so than before.” “And Medtronic wonders why we leave. It’s games like this.” After the story was published, I was contacted by Janet Kim, a spokesperson with Medtronic, who asked to provide more information about the company’s thinking with the 630G. Kim said the 630G was designed primarily to give pump users a more user-friendly experience. She pointed out that the pump design had new features that customers wanted, including a waterproof shell and a color screen. “A lot of those user-friendly features are features that patients have been asking us for for a number of years,” she said in a telephone interview. Kim pushed back against the notion that the pump was created from a collection of spare parts from production of the 640G. “It’s not that we had leftover cases that we decided to bring to market,” she said. “It’s Continue reading >>

Medtronic Insulin Pump Accessories Waterproof

Medtronic Insulin Pump Accessories Waterproof

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My Boobs Are Costing Me $7000 (a.k.a. Time For A New Insulin Pump)

My Boobs Are Costing Me $7000 (a.k.a. Time For A New Insulin Pump)

Opening Note: If the title of this post seems like a shameless grab for attention, that’s because it is. I’m really interested in some opinions/feedback from other pumpers on this post. However, being largely absent from the blogosphere since having Baby B (I’m spending lots of time with the kids instead of at the keyboard, and also dealing with some wicked carpal tunnel) makes me feel the need to put a little extra effort into getting this post noticed. So if you’re here just to read about boobs, you’ll likely be disappointed. If you’re here as a pumper – please read on and leave a comment! Back in April, I had a baby. You may already know this. You may also already know that I had a c-section. Normally I wear my pump (a Medtronic Paradigm) clipped to the waist of my pants/shorts/skirt/pyjamas, but after my c-section I found it a bit uncomfortable to wear it near my belly while sleeping, so I decided to keep it between my boobs at night. It’s probably also no surprise to anyone that boobs tend to expand significantly when you’re breastfeeding a baby. So that pump was in there nice and snug. What may be news to some, though, is that hormones take a while to settle down after having a baby, and these wacky hormones can cause night sweats. I don’t mean seems-a bit-warm-in-here sweating. No, I mean doing-cardio-outside-in-summer sweating. Does anyone see yet where this story is headed? It is important to note that Medtronic pumps are not advertised as being waterproof. I was quite well versed in the dangers of exposing a Medtronic Pump to water after I accidentally took my pump swimming with me last year. But I’ve always sort of assumed that they would be somewhat water resistant. And definitely sweat resistant. I mean, athletes wear them, right? I re Continue reading >>

Onetouch Ping® Insulin Pump And Meter Remote

Onetouch Ping® Insulin Pump And Meter Remote

Say hello to the OneTouch Ping® Glucose Management System The OneTouch Ping® is the two-part system with one thing on its mind: helping you perform at your best. When used together with the OneTouch Ping® Insulin Pump, the Meter Remote communicates wirelessly to deliver insulin from the pump. Start the process to get your OneTouch Ping® System Our inside sales department will help you every step of the way. GET STARTED The OneTouch Ping® Meter Remote controls pump functions from up to 10 feet away, which means you can keep your OneTouch Ping® Insulin Pump under cover. With the OneTouch Ping®, you get great clinical performance* and features designed with your lifestyle in mind. Basal insulin keeps your blood sugar steady between meals. OneTouch Ping® System gives you a wide range of dosing options with a low basal insulin increment of 0.025 U/hr. Because how much you need is unique to you, OneTouch Ping® System precision is key. Superior post-meal control1‡ The bolus calculator designed by Animas delivers superior post-meal control compared to the Medtronic Paradigm® Bolus Wizard®. The bolus calculator in the OneTouch Ping® System automatically determines how much bolus insulin you may need to cover carbs eaten and/or correct a high BG. Pumpers using the automated bolus calculator in the OneTouch Ping® pump stayed in control longer—and closer to target range—than those using Medtronic Paradigm® Bolus Wizard® in a clinical study.1‡ Give yourself an insulin dose—and never touch your pump. The pump and Meter Remote can share information wirelessly, the Meter Remote can do more than just check your blood sugar. It is also able to control pump functions. Use it to calculate how much bolus insulin you need and tell your pump to deliver the dose, all w Continue reading >>

I’m Not Getting A T:slim

I’m Not Getting A T:slim

Update 1/11/2013: If you are reading this for the first time, please also read my January 11, 2013 post, in which I express a change-of-heart on many of the sentiments expressed here. * * * Have you heard? There’s a slick new gadget in town — an insulin pump called the t:slim. It’s all the rage these days, and it seems all the cool kids are getting one. But my thirty-eight-year old bald-headed, glasses-wearing self is anything but cool. (Actually, glasses and insulin pumps really are cool, just not on me). I don’t plan on getting one. In case you’ve been living under a rock lately, let me explain what the t:slim is. It’s the newest addition to the insulin pump market. They’ve shattered the mold when it comes to insulin pumps, and re-cast it into something sleek and shiny,resembling a touch-screen cell phone. It’s flat and has a large, vibrant color touch-screen. One look, and anybody would instantly be WOW’ed by it. I sure was. (Worth noting: I’ve never actually held, or even seen it. I’ve read about it and looked at pictures and videos of it, but that’s all. Allison put together a great video recap on DiabetesMine of the new pump, which was quite influential in what you’re about to read here. So while you may think this makes my review meaningless, I like to think it is objective – and not seduced by the t:slim’s irrefutable sexiness.) As you probably know, I’ve been using Medtronic pumps for years. The MedT is the complete opposite of sexy. It’s boxy, has five ginormous buttons, and a tiny lo-res black-and-white LCD display. It resembles a pager. Pagers were sexy in 1984, but not today. Sadly, many sexy people also lose that appeal after twenty-eight years, but at the same time, we learn to value compatibility, intuition, and it’s-n Continue reading >>

Important Safety Information About Minimed Veo

Important Safety Information About Minimed Veo

Customer support At Medtronic, we are committed to continually evaluating and improving the quality and reliability of our products and services. Through our monitoring system, we have learned about potential issues and we would like to inform you about these and provide recommendations regarding the usage of our pumps. Sensor Graph Timeout (Only VEO) LOOSE DRIVE SUPPORT CAP (ONLY VEO) What do I need to do if I drop my insulin pump or I have a young child on pump therapy and she/he drops the insulin pump all the time. Should I be concerned? WATER DAMAGE (ONLY VEO) I wear my insulin pump when I play sports and work out. I wear my insulin pump in my sports bra but it has a great exposure to sweat. Should I be concerned with the repeated exposure and if so, what are the suggestions to this scenario? Your MiniMed Veo insulin pump has an IPX7 rating, why are you recommending customers to disconnect from the insulin pump during any water activity? Continue reading >>

2016 Insulin Pump Comparisons

2016 Insulin Pump Comparisons

Click to go to comparison page: Tandem t-Slim/t-Flex/t-slim G4Roche Accu-Chek Combo Insulet Insulet OmniPod Medtronic 530G With Enlite Animas Vibe Pump System Features in Common: 24-hour toll-free helpline Internal safety checks Child button lock-out Full Training Included Simplified programming Extended bolus options Temporary basal rate options Programmable reminders Downloadable Low battery warning Low insulin warning User-set active insulin time Tandem t:slim, t:slim G4 & t:flex Unique Advantages Potential Drawbacks Bright, full-color touch screen Modern, high-tech appearance Compact, thin dimensions Rapid numeric entry, fastest bolus entry Cartridges hold 300u (t:slim); 480u (t:flex) Can calculate boluses up to 50 units (60 on t:flex) Site-change reminder w/customizable day & time Graphic on-screen history display Carb counting calculator Temp basal up to 250%, 72 hrs Can set duration of insulin action in 1-minute increments IOB & time remaining displayed on home screen Missed bolus reminders customizable by day of week Alert for high temperatures which may spoil insulin Secondary basal programs linked with secondary bolus calculation parameters Web-based download software Compatible w/leur-lock infusion sets Minimal insulin movement with changes in altitude Small buttons can be difficult to activate; screen goes blank if buttons missed 3x Unlock procedure required to perform any programming No integrated clip (must put in a case that has a clip) Tubing connector looks “medical,” can snag on clothing Basal & bolus settings in same time slots; may take several steps to edit Extra confirmation steps with all programming Weak vibrate mechanism No meter link Manufacturer relatively new in pump industry Requires charging 1-2x/week No formal in-warranty upgrade polic Continue reading >>

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