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Medtronic Travel Loaner Pump

International Travel With A Pump

International Travel With A Pump

I switched to a pump from MDI about 2 yrs back and this April will be the first time I've done any air travel with it. I'll be traveling to Paris and returning here from England, duration of the trip 10 days. Suddenly I realize there are complications to traveling abroad with this system that I didn't have with MDI. There's a lot more diabetic paraphernalia to drag along, I'm not sure what the routine is for getting through airport security with this odd electronic/liquid device strapped to my body, how to keep insulin refrigerated, should I consider switching back to MDI for the trip...? and so forth. I'd love to hear from any other pump users as to what their experience of it has been like--any pitfalls or unanticipated problems you ran into. Anything you can tell me would be greatly appreciated! No pitfalls here, but keep in mind that in England especially they are very serious about airport security. They make us look a bit clownish. No liquids whatsoever in carryons. Theyll just take them away if you get stopped. This includes deoderant and toothpaste (fyi). I carry a card in many languages that simply says on insulin pump, type 1 diabetes. Friends and the Internet can assist you in finding translations. But truly, Ive not had many issues with my pump/CGMS. If I get stopped, I explain it and worst case scenario is that I get the pat down. Just allow extra time and ask your md for a letter of medical necessity just in case. I went to Mexico with my pump on, brought the cards in several languages like the other person mentioned. I also brought 2 extra bottles of insulin, needles and an extra week worth of pump supplies with me. Mexico is different than Europe however and I am sure there is a website as well that you can read about travelling/immigration. I also got Continue reading >>

2018 New Insulin Pump Comparisons And Reviews

2018 New Insulin Pump Comparisons And Reviews

Insulin pumps are NOT commodities. There are differences between systems (some subtle, some obvious) that make certain pumps better options for certain individuals. It is astounding that so many people are given little to no choice when it comes to selecting an insulin pump. Given that pump warranties last longer than the average marriage, it makes sense to invest some time in comparing the various devices before making a selection. Every member of our clinical team has personal and professional experience with every make and model of insulin pump. We are not employed by any pump company, and we are not easily pressured (although really good chocolate has been known to sway our opinion a bit), so we can offer you fair and impartial information/insight. Please use our pump comparisons to help make an educated decision. We have listed the positive and negative features that are unique to each pump. Features that are common to all pumps, such as allowing for multiple basal patterns, are not included. At the end of the day, the choice is yours. If you would like some expert input, feel free to contact our office and schedule some time to meet or speak with one of our clinicians. And for assistance applying your pump to achieve the best possible glucose management, please reach out. Continue reading >>

Travel Loaner Agreement

Travel Loaner Agreement

In order for Medtronic Diabetes to provide you with a loaner insulin pump, please complete the information below and then click on the "submit" button at least two weeks prior to your scheduled departure. In your shipment, you will receive instructions for returning the insulin pump. Please be aware that the travel loaner insulin pump remains the property of Medtronic Diabetes. To help cover the cost of our loaner program, we must charge you a US $50 fee for shipping and handling. If the loaner pump is lost, stolen, or damaged, we must ask you to be responsible for the replacement cost of US $3,600. Please understand that if we do not receive the loaner pump within two weeks of your estimated return date (not to exceed 90 days from the date of departure), we must apply the replacement cost charge of US $3,600 to your credit card (in either a lump sum or monthly installments, at our discretion). For our active military customers, Medtronic will extend the loan period beyond the 90 days to accommodate the length of deployment . To request this extension, we require you to fax (210-775-7821) or email ([email protected]) your military orders to us. If Medtronic is experiencing inventory constraints of travel loaner pumps there may be delays in receiving your order. As a result, Medtronic strongly suggests you contact your Doctor to prepare a back-up plan if a travel loaner pump is not available prior to your departure. Continue reading >>

Mitigating Airport Security With An Insulin Pump

Mitigating Airport Security With An Insulin Pump

Have you been through airport security with your insulin pump only to come into contact with an agent who has no idea what it is? I feel lucky anytime an agent recognizes what my insulin pump is, but even when they know it is related to diabetes, they still do not always understand how important it is, and that an error or malfunction of my pump could mean a medical emergency. I wear a Medtronic pump and the guidance says, “You need to remove your insulin pump and CGM (sensor and transmitter) while going through an airport body scanner. If you do not wish to remove your devices, you may request an alternative pat-down screening process.” To be honest, I have had so many arguments with airport agents that I have gone through the machine with my pump on, even though I know it’s dangerous. And I’ve heard stories from others, like Michael Aviad, whose Medtronic pump stopped working after airport security sent it through the scanner. That’s why diabetes mom Rachel Humphrey’s campaign around insulin pumps and airport security is so important. Twelve months ago Rachel Humphrey wrote an Open Letter to Dubai Airport after she was held in an airport police room for two hours because of her son’s insulin pump. Despite having all the correct documentation and information, the airport security insisted that the insulin pump, an Animas Vibe, go through the X-ray machine. A travel document on the Animas website states clearly, “Your pump should not go through the X-ray screening that is used for carry-on or checked luggage.” Only after several hours and a visit to the Airport Medical Center where a doctor confirmed that the pump couldn’t go through the machine, were they allowed to proceed. This experience and poor treatment led Rachel to launch a petition and camp Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everyone needs insulin to live. Insulin is a hormone that helps our bodies use and store the food we eat. People with Type 1 Diabetes no longer make insulin and have to give insulin in order to sustain life. People with Type 2 Diabetes don’t use their own insulin well, and over time can have trouble making enough. So, all people with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes need insulin. When people give insulin injections, they may take 1-2 injections of a long acting insulin every day and 3+ injections of rapid acting insulin for meals and snacks. The typical person with Type 1 Diabetes could take anywhere from 4-7+ injections a day. Many people currently give insulin through an insulin pen or a syringe. But, there is another option, an insulin pump. An insulin pump delivers rapid acting insulin in two ways. First, the pump is programmed to give you insulin every hour throughout the hour referred to basal insulin. Basal, think “base,” is the insulin your body needs even in the absence of food, it is also referred to as background insulin. This basal rate replaces the long acting injection that you take. Second, is bolus, this is the insulin you take for food or to correct a high blood sugar. If you get basal and bolus confused, think “bowl”, as in you eat out of a bowl, to help you remember bolus is for food. Once you are on a pump, all insulin is delivered through the pump and shots are no longer necessary. Components There are a few things necessary to make a pump work. When a pump is shipped to someone: they will also need to send infusion sets, reservoirs, and possibly batteries, depending on your pump. Let’s talk about each component. Infusion Sets An infusion set is the part that is actually inserted into the body and has tubing that conn Continue reading >>

Long-term Travel - General - Jdrf Typeonenation Community Forum

Long-term Travel - General - Jdrf Typeonenation Community Forum

How fun! I havent traveled for that long, but when I was in the UK for a few weeks, Minimed told me they could rent me a backup pump in case mine pooped out. I took twice as many supplies as a thought Id need, and came out more than fine. I would think your current insurance would still be covering you, as opposed to anything from an NHS. Minimed should be able to give you some advice, especially now that they are in so many countries. if you dont mind a stupid question how foreign of a country are you going? In my opinion, Europe is mostly okay, but spots in South America, India, Africa, and China scare the heck out of me. I once threatened to resign over an assignment that would have put me in an industrial area of India. The reason was that a T1d with raging dysentery in an area with no hospitals for 100 miles could easily die. along with the fine advice above, go over the latest TSA regulations, make sure you have a copy of your passport (the page with the number and picture) with someone, see if you need to check in with any embassy, get yourself an international SOS card with all your emergency numbers in one place, make sure you have a buddy either with you or a sponsor who will expect your arrival and be able to call someone in case you actually dont and use the heck out of google to find hospitals and other fallback facilities just in case. Hi! I just want to say, do not give up! I completely understand how it feels having T1 limit your dreams, but i promise if you do not give up and you keeptrying, youll be teaching english abroad in no time. I have been fighting to get medically cleared to serve in the Peace Corps for over a year now, and after many invitations, which were then taken away from me due to my T1 diabetes, i juat felt defeated. This has been my Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump: What To Know Before You Disconnect

Insulin Pump: What To Know Before You Disconnect

Many infusion sets have a “disconnect” feature that allows you to temporarily unhook the pump and tubing for situations such as bathing, sports, swimming, intimacy, and when undergoing medical tests (such as x-rays, computed tomography (CT scans), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)). Your diabetes care team will guide you on what to do when you need to disconnect from an insulin pump. You may need to check your blood sugar levels before, during, and after disconnection. When you use an insulin pump, there is only short acting insulin infused in the pump. Once you're disconnected from the pump, you need to be extra careful and monitor your blood sugars many times during that period of time. This is so that you can detect unusually high blood glucose and avoid diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA), which can happen if there is prolonged insulin infusion interruption. DKA is a serious condition caused by high levels of acids in the blood called ketones. When the body doesn’t have enough insulin, it breaks down fat to use as energy, which produces ketones. Instances when DKA can develop: you forget to reconnect the insulin pump after exercising or showering, or the catheter is pulled out without your realizing it, your pump reservoir ran out of insulin, or your pump stops working suddenly. If basal insulin delivery is interrupted for more than one hour, check your blood sugar level and if your blood glucose levels are elevated, check also ketones level (using a simple urine test strip). Also, you should check your urine ketone levels if you have one or more high glucose reading despite taking an insulin bolus to correct the high blood sugar. Call your health care provider immediately if your ketone level is high. If you are hospitalized, you may be able to continue on your ins Continue reading >>

Your Summer Travel Shouldnt Be A Battle...follow These 5 Tips!

Your Summer Travel Shouldnt Be A Battle...follow These 5 Tips!

With summer quickly approaching and warm weather upon us, we might all be getting the itch to take some time off and explore someplace new and exciting. Perhaps a long weekend trip to northern Michigan, or a visit to a bustling and bright city is on the horizon for you. For those individuals living with diabetes, however, it may feel difficult and restricting to take a long and relaxing break from their everyday routine. I am here to supply you with all of the necessary tools and tricks to manage your diabetes with as little stress as possible when visiting all those exciting summer vacation destinations. Following these few tips can help you worry less and manage better while away from home, exploring our beautiful world. The Top 5 Tips for Traveling with Diabetes This Summer (All tips and recommendations from the American Diabetes Association .) See your doctor before you head out and possibly have a medical exam to ensure your diabetes is in good control. This will give you some peace of mind while away from home. Wear a medical ID bracelet or necklace that shows that you live with diabetes. This will be helpful in case of an emergency and allows others to be aware of your medical needs. A medical ID can provide crucial information about your health condition and also list allergies in case of an emergency. The ADA recommends that you pack twice as much medication and supplies as you think you will need for the trip. Keeping your supplies in your carry-on bag is important because checked luggage can potentially be lost (if you are flying), and this ensures your medication and supplies are with you at all times. Allow for extra time at the airport because security might take additional time with your insulin pump. Worried about your insulin pump malfunctioning while Continue reading >>

Running On Carbs: Travel Loaner Pump

Running On Carbs: Travel Loaner Pump

So I contacted Medtronic the other day to ask about their Travel Loaner Pump program. I figured that it was probably a good idea to have a spare pump in my bag during my Israel trip. My pump has never failed me in the over four years that it's been hooked to my belt but I'd rather not risk a pump failure so far from home. They asked me a few questions and then emailed me a form to fill out. The instructions were to complete the form and fax back to the main office. I would get the loaner within two days. I filled out page one of the form and it was pretty easy stuff. Name, address, travel destination etc. Please provide your credit card information and sign the waiver. I read the waiver and it said that, if I do not return the pump or if is it lost, stolen or damaged, they will charge my credit card a total of $4,995 dollars. I know that pumps are expensive but isn't there a way to get a used loaner pump or something? The odds of someone stealing my bag in a tourist hot spot are higher than the odds of my perfectly functioning pump suddenly dying during the fourteen days that I am out of the country. I've checked and there is a Medtronic office in Israel. I personally met an Israeli during my Global Heroes weekend last October who uses a Medtronic pump so I know that I can get supplies and help there if needed. I'll bring back-up needles. Because this girl does NOT want a $5,000 dollar charge on her credit card because she accidentally dropped her bag off the side of Mount Masada and watched it bounce off a few camels before landing in the Dead Sea. Continue reading >>

Travel Easily With Tips From Kerri Sparling

Travel Easily With Tips From Kerri Sparling

⬅ Back to feed Heading out on vacation or away for work? Traveling with diabetes can be easy and streamlined if you’re willing to do a little prep work. A well-packed bag and proper planning can make your travel experiences fun-filled…despite being islet-free. What are my rights as a person with diabetes? You have the right to travel as a person with diabetes! And you have the right to bring what is necessary for you to travel safely. This includes your insulin pump, continuous glucose monitor, insulin, glucose meter, and any other necessary medications. If you have specific questions or concerns about air travel and diabetes, contact TSA Cares directly for assistance. What should I bring in my carry-on? It’s smart to keep any necessary medications and supplies out of your checked luggage, keeping them on-hand in your carry-on instead. That way, if your checked luggage takes longer to arrive to your final destination, you still have what you need. Keep your medications in their original packaging with the prescription label attached (not required, but can make things easier), and some people with diabetes prefer to also keep a letter from their doctor on hand stating why they need to carry these medications. In addition to keeping your insulin and glucose meter, it’s a good idea to have some fast-acting glucose sources at the ready for a low blood sugar. While many people with diabetes have been permitted to bring juice boxes and other liquid glucose treatments on board while they travel, many travelers prefer glucose tabs because they withstand air pressure changes and temperature fluctuations without issue. Can my insulin pump go through the x-ray machines, or through the full body scanner? It is not recommended that your insulin pump go through x-ray machin Continue reading >>

What To Do If Your Insulin Pump Malfunctions

What To Do If Your Insulin Pump Malfunctions

There's nothing quite like the horror of having an insulin pump suddenly go postal at eleven o'clock on a Saturday night. The buttons that don't respond to touch, the motor that spins wildly, the shrieking alarms. It's almost enough to induce a panic attack! Although insulin pumps are the treatment method of choice for both Amy and I, they are machines. Which means that sometimes they go kaputt. Unlike Amy who rocks an Omnipod, I don't have a box of back-ups at my disposal to switch to. When a tubed insulin pump (Medtronic, Animas, or the dearly departed Cozmo) fails, it's a pretty straightforward fix, but not without its share of anxiety. Of course, according to Murphy's Law, an insulin pump will usually die at the most inconvenient moment. The last time my insulin pump died was in 2005 (knock on wood), while on vacation at a cabin in rural Central Oregon. I was changing my reservoir and in the middle of priming, my pump's motor suddenly didn't recognize how much insulin was coming out. After rewinding a couple of times and having half a reservoir of insulin spew all over the kitchen counter, I admitted defeat. So what's a PWD to do? Luckily, it was a Tuesday afternoon, and I was able to get a prescription for Lantus and syringes faxed to the local pharmacy within a couple of hours. But what if it were the weekend or what if my vacation was somewhere overseas? Animas and Medtronic both have fairly cut-and-dry recommendations for what you should do if your insulin pump suddenly becomes a very expensive paper weight: - First, call the manufacturer right away. They can usually overnight a replacement pump, so chances are you won't be without your pump for longer than 24 hours. - Always keep a prescription or a bottle of long-acting insulin handy (and bring it with you whe Continue reading >>

Insurance For Lost Or Broke Pumps?

Insurance For Lost Or Broke Pumps?

Fayetteville, North Carolina, United States I am brand new to pumps and have read a few posts on here that mention lost or damaged pumps. Being completely new to pump and CGM's and traveling about 75% of the time I was wondering if anyone has ever tried to have their pump or CGM insured for those types of things? Kind of like cell phone insurance. I don't really mind having to keep an insulin pen and needles with me when I travel in case something happens to my pump and I need them but I am worried about what I can do when I get home and have to try to replace it for some reason. Friend type 2 on insulin, on the pump MM723 the only thing I can think of is to check to see if your home owners insurance policy covers it. Or they have special insurance you can buy for it. Mar 09 7.6:Sept 09 5.9:Jan 6 2010 5.5: Pumps are pretty tough, or mine seems to be. But I still have mine listed on my home policy. Doing this means its covered for almost anything. I have had pumps go bad. My pump's mfg has replaced the thing in within 24 hours. I think that's a pretty good turn around. Minimed also has some kind of pump loaner program where they'll give you a backup if you think your at risk. I don't know what this costs, but I've heard of people doing this. I think I'd just rather break my pump, shoot insulin every hour to control, and hope I can get a replacement the next day. Fayetteville, North Carolina, United States Thanks for the advice, I had never thought of connecting it to my home insurance. Sounds like it might be a good idea to know the exact language in the coverage too. I have had pump issues and have never had an issue with Medtronic replacing or fixing the pump. As for losing the darn thing, then I am sure you would have to come up with the funds to replace it. Doctor's Continue reading >>

Contact Us - Medtronic Diabetes Ireland

Contact Us - Medtronic Diabetes Ireland

Block G Ground Floor Cherrywood Business Park I am a healthcare professional~A diabetologist, a diabetes nurse I use a Medtronic Diabetes device~Such as an insulin pump or a continuous glucose monitoring device I DON'T use a Medtronic Diabetes device~But I am interested in learning more I prescribe Medtronic Diabetes products~I'm an existing Medtronic Diabetes customer I DON'T yet prescribe Medtronic Diabetes products~I'm not yet an existing Medtronic Diabetes customer By submitting this form, I agree to the terms of use. This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions. In case of an emergency please DO NOT use this contact form but call our 24/7 helpline immediately. This is our 24hr technical helpline for Emergency pump assistance. The content and all information provided on this website is for your informational use only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment in any manner. The patient stories provided are experiences specific to a particular patient. Responses to a treatment may vary from patient to patient. Always talk with your physician about diagnosis and treatment information and ensure that you understand and carefully follow that information. 2016 Medtronic International Trading Sarl. All Rights Reserved. No part of this website may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means without permission from Medtronic International Trading Sarl. MiniMed, Bolus Wizard, SMARTGUARD, Guardian, Enlite and CareLink are trademarks of Medtronic, Inc. and its subsidiaries. CONTOUR is a trademark of Bayer Healthcare LLC. Continue reading >>

Customer Support - Medtronic Diabetes Uk

Customer Support - Medtronic Diabetes Uk

Our customer support section aims to offer whatever you're looking for with regards to your diabetes management needs. Please click on one of the topics below where you will find answers to many frequently asked questions. CONTACT US ONLINE or call our 24/7 helpline. Youll never need to reschedule or wait in for deliveries again. The content and all information provided on this website is for your informational use only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment in any manner. The patient stories provided are experiences specific to a particular patient. Responses to a treatment may vary from patient to patient. Always talk with your physician about diagnosis and treatment information and ensure that you understand and carefully follow that information. 2016 Medtronic International Trading Sarl. All Rights Reserved. No part of this website may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means without permission from Medtronic International Trading Sarl. MiniMed, Bolus Wizard, SMARTGUARD, Guardian, Enlite and CareLink are trademarks of Medtronic, Inc. and its subsidiaries. CONTOUR is a trademark of Ascensia Diabetes Care. Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps Different People, Different Needs... Get The Pump Best For You

Insulin Pumps Different People, Different Needs... Get The Pump Best For You

You many be looking for greater flexibility in managing your diabetes. Consider the following scenarios. In each switching to insulin pump therapy could have an advantage. Mary is a 25-year-old elementary school teacher. She runs and swims to keep in shape. She has had type 1 diabetes for 20 years and injects insulin six times a day. Adam is an active three-year-old with type 1 diabetes. His parents are frustrated with his unpredictable appetite and eating habits. John is a 56-year-old carpet installer, with type 2 diabetes. His workload and schedule vary from day to day. On weekends, he is less active. He takes insulin four times a day. An insulin pump is a small, battery-powered microcomputer. It looks like a pager and is usually worn in a pocket, or clipped to a belt or waistband. The pump holds a syringe filled with rapid-acting insulin (Humalog™ or NovoRapid™). The syringe is attached to an infusion set, which is a thin plastic tubing with a small needle at the end. The needle is inserted into the fatty tissue below the skin, and then removed. This leaves a tiny, flexible plastic tube in place which must be changed every two to three days. The pump is programmed to deliver insulin continuously through this tube. A small dressing holds the infusion set in place. If you have discussed the option of an insulin pump with your diabetes specialist, you may be starting the search for the right pump. You, too, may be looking for greater flexibility in managing your diabetes. If so, you are likely asking yourself some questions. Which of the four pumps available in Canada should you buy? Which pump has the features you need and want? Do your research. An insulin pump is a major investment that you will use constantly for the next few years. Think about similarities and Continue reading >>

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