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Medtronic Insulin Pump For Sale

2018 New Insulin Pump Comparisons And Reviews

2018 New Insulin Pump Comparisons And Reviews

Insulin pumps are NOT commodities. There are differences between systems (some subtle, some obvious) that make certain pumps better options for certain individuals. It is astounding that so many people are given little to no choice when it comes to selecting an insulin pump. Given that pump warranties last longer than the average marriage, it makes sense to invest some time in comparing the various devices before making a selection. Every member of our clinical team has personal and professional experience with every make and model of insulin pump. We are not employed by any pump company, and we are not easily pressured (although really good chocolate has been known to sway our opinion a bit), so we can offer you fair and impartial information/insight. Please use our pump comparisons to help make an educated decision. We have listed the positive and negative features that are unique to each pump. Features that are common to all pumps, such as allowing for multiple basal patterns, are not included. At the end of the day, the choice is yours. If you would like some expert input, feel free to contact our office and schedule some time to meet or speak with one of our clinicians. And for assistance applying your pump to achieve the best possible glucose management, please reach out. Continue reading >>

Medtronic Minimed® 630g Insulin Pump System

Medtronic Minimed® 630g Insulin Pump System

The MiniMed® 630G Insulin Pump System is a complete solution designed for advanced diabetes control. Waterproof design with a user-friendly color screen and simple menu Built-in CGM allows for wireless transmittal of glucose information Remote insulin dosing with the Bolus Wizard®, which helps to calculate mealtime insulin and may avoid insulin stacking Continuously delivers insulin, with a tubing change needed only every two or three days Multiple insulin delivery settings to meet unique needs Enlite Sensor® sends readings to insulin pump every 5 minutes, helping to identify trends and make adjustments CGM tracks glucose levels throughout the day, including the effects of food or exercise Predictive alerts given up to 30 minutes ahead, if trending high or low CCS Medical offers Ascensia Diabetes Care strips for use with Medtronic pumps for many insurance plans. Continue reading >>

How Medtronic Is Dominating The Insulin Pump Market

How Medtronic Is Dominating The Insulin Pump Market

Medtronic appears to be throwing its weight around, though it may yet have to reckon with the diabetes patient community. Chris Newmarker Medtech giant Medtronic recently scored a major coup after UnitedHealthcare announced that the company will become the preferred, in-network durable medical equipment (DME) provider of insulin pumps. "Our goal is to provide the opportunity for a better care experience by providing our members with access to advanced diabetes technology and comprehensive support services while learning how advanced technology can be applied to improve outcomes and reduce costs," UnitedHealthcare said in its Network Bulletin for May. When the news got out on Tuesday that one of the largest health insurers in the United States was preferring Medtronic insulin pumps, it sent shares of insulin pump competitor Tandem Diabetes Care down about 20% in value. Another competitor, Insulet, saw shares drop about 10%. "Having diabetes isn't a choice. How people manage it should be," said Kim Blickenstaff, president and CEO of Tandem Diabetes Care. "Insulin pumps are not a one size fits all solution. Selecting which pump is the best fit for a person to manage their therapy needs should be a decision made between a person and their healthcare provider." Medtronic's win with UnitedHealthcare could be a good example of why medtech companies are increasingly merging. Medtronic itself become one of the largest medical device companies in the world through its roughly $50 billion merger with Covidien early last year. Says EP Vantage of UnitedHealthcare's decision: "One of the arguments underpinning the wave of consolidation in the medtech sphere--that increased size allows a company to offer its wares more cheaply while still turning a profit--seems to have worked nicely Continue reading >>

Medtronic's Insulin Pump Deal Shows Size Matters

Medtronic's Insulin Pump Deal Shows Size Matters

The apparently unstoppable push by Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) to dominate all the areas in which it is active as well as the medtech industry as a whole got another fillip yesterday as it became the preferred supplier of insulin pumps to the insurer UnitedHealthcare (NYSE:UNH). In so doing it has hobbled its smaller rivals Tandem Diabetes Care and Insulet, whose shares fell 20% and 10% respectively yesterday. One of the arguments underpinning the wave of consolidation in the medtech sphere – that increased size allows a company to offer its wares more cheaply while still turning a profit – seems to have worked nicely in in this case. Big but slow According to data compiled by EvaluateMedTech before the UnitedHealthcare deal, Medtronic was forecast to be the leading company in insulin pumps in 2022 with sales approaching three quarters of a billion dollars. But these sales are slow-growing – at an annual rate of just 3.7% they are increasing more slowly than the medtech sector as a whole, and looked very sluggish compared with the up-and-coming smaller companies. Insulin pump makers WW annual sales ($m) Company 2015 2022 CAGR Medtronic 569 734 +4% Insulet 227 544 +15% Ypsomed 67 233 +20% Tandem Diabetes Care 60 189 +18% Cellnovo 1 32 +81% Tandem in particular has just reported a storming quarter. Its first-quarter revenues were up 63% to $20.1m, markedly better than consensus expectations of $17.6m. It sold just over 4,000 pumps in the quarter, surprising analysts from Deutsche Bank who had forecast that it would shift 2,772. Roughly 60% of the pumps Tandem sold were its flagship t:slim G4 model, which incorporates, under an agreement struck in July, a G4 Platinum continuous glucose monitor (CGM) developed by DexCom – itself forecast to be the leading CGM company in 20 Continue reading >>

Animas Closes Operations And Exits Insulin Pump Market

Animas Closes Operations And Exits Insulin Pump Market

By Adam Brown and Kelly Close What are the options for approximately 90,000 Animas pumpers worldwide and for others considering a new pump? What does it mean for the pump market and patient choice? On October 5, Johnson & Johnson (J&J) announced in disappointing news that Animas is closing operations and exiting the insulin pump market, affecting approximately 90,000 Animas pumpers worldwide. Click to Jump to FAQs: My warranty hasn’t expired yet. What can I do? My Animas pump warranty expires after September 30, 2019 (i.e., pump is 0-2 years old). What can I do? What pumps are currently available in the US? What is coming soon, especially with automated insulin delivery? Effective immediately in the US and Canada, Animas will no longer manufacture and sell the Vibe and OneTouch Ping insulin pumps, and will continue to offer supplies, customer service, training, and warranty support through a transition period. “Partner-of-choice” Medtronic will take over Animas supply reordering and support in the “next few months.” The companies will send an email with more details soon. We’d assume Animas’ exit is also coming very soon in other countries besides the US and Canada. For now, Animas pumpers can stay on their Animas pumps and continue to access supplies, and will need to decide what pump to move to next – see below for the different options between Medtronic, Insulet, and Tandem in the US, depending on preferences and warranty timing. For those who acquired an Animas pump in the last two years, a free upgrade is only available to Medtronic's less advanced MiniMed 630G pump. Read an open letter from The diaTribe Foundation about this decision here. Although the closing of the business is not unexpected – J&J has been considering a sale or partnership of t Continue reading >>

Medtronic Puts Woes In Past With Soaring Sales In Diabetes Unit

Medtronic Puts Woes In Past With Soaring Sales In Diabetes Unit

Bloomberg the Company & Its Products Bloomberg Anywhere Remote LoginBloomberg Anywhere Login Bloomberg Terminal Demo Request Connecting decision makers to a dynamic network of information, people and ideas, Bloomberg quickly and accurately delivers business and financial information, news and insight around the world. Connecting decision makers to a dynamic network of information, people and ideas, Bloomberg quickly and accurately delivers business and financial information, news and insight around the world. Medtronic Puts Woes in Past With Soaring Sales in Diabetes Unit More than 20,000 patients using the 670G artificial pancreas Company to meet all demand for its sensors in current quarter The Medtronic MiniMed 670G Insulin Pump System. Photographer: Arnold Gold/New Haven Register via AP Photo Medtronic Plcs diabetes breakthrough is finally starting to pay off. The diabetes division led the medical-device companys sales growth last quarter, with a 17 percent increase. The gain followed more than a year of mishaps that had prevented Medtronic from meeting surging demand for its latest device -- an artificial pancreas that takes over much of the constant attention diabetics must devote to controlling their blood sugar levels. I do expect this to be a pivot point in many ways for diabetes, Chief Executive Officer Omar Ishrak said in a telephone interview following the companys quarterly earnings call. He expects the division to produce double-digit sales growth. approval from U.S. regulators for the worlds first artificial pancreas in September 2016, it became a victim of its own success: its manufacturing wasnt ready. A shortfall in the production of sensors used in the new product, called MiniMed 670G, and other Medtronic diabetes devices exacerbated the supply imbal Continue reading >>

Can I Buy Used Insulin Pumps?

Can I Buy Used Insulin Pumps?

Q: Last summer, through one of your links, I found a few used MiniMed pumps for sale—$1,500 or so—and now I can’t find the link. Do you have any information on where to pick up a used pump? Tiffany Flowers Internet A: This question is a bit probematic. An insulin pump is a regulated medical device that can only be dispensed with a prescription. Assuming that this matter could be taken care of, the second problem is knowing the condition of the pump and the warranty remaining—if any. The pump companies address this in that, for a nominal fee (about $50), the registration for a particular pump can be changed from one owner to another. This cannot be done, however, until it can be determined that the person in question has the training necessary to use the device and that the requisite medical-support team is in place and willing to sign off on the process. As far as I know, each of the pump companies has a refurbishment program where, for a fee of around $500, they will refurbish the pump, bring it up to its original specifications and warranty it for some period of time. There remain some legal questions that should be answered prior to purchasing a used pump: Who really owns it: the seller or their insurance company? Was it purchased outright or is it a leased pump? As far as where they can be bought, pumps appear from time to time on Ebay.com and on other auction sites. I would strongly suggest that you ask Animas, Disetronic and MiniMed about their specific policies on pump transfers and the availability of refurbished equipment. This question does not have one “right” answer, though it does have many wrong ones. I think that it’s safe to say that none of us were happy when we first found out that we had diabetes. The words “you’re a diabetic” or Continue reading >>

Medtronic Begins To Roll Out State-of-the-art Insulin Pump

Medtronic Begins To Roll Out State-of-the-art Insulin Pump

Two Minnesota teens with type 1 diabetes are some of the first patients in the nation to start using Medtronic's new insulin pump, a first-of-its-kind machine that can predict when a person will have a diabetic emergency and automatically adjust insulin levels to prevent it. Allison Scholl, 16, of Edina, and Eleanor Hedlund, 17, of Minneapolis, recently received their new Medtronic MiniMed 670G insulin pumps after using a similar but less-advanced Medtronic pump known as the 630G. Their new 670G units were officially activated on Wednesday in a manual mode, but both teens said they were eager to switch the devices into "auto mode" next week. "I'm a pretty avid endurance athlete. And it's obviously pretty hard to try and control blood sugar when you are constantly working out or being active," Hedlund said Wednesday after receiving training on how to use the device at Park Nicollet's International Diabetes Center in St. Louis Park. "I'm hoping that it will make me able to train more, or not have to drop out of practice. ... Hard workouts are hard to do when your blood sugar is out of whack." Scholl, meanwhile, was a longtime user of a different company's insulin pump. She said she switched brands last fall after Medtronic announced a "Priority Access" program that allowed people who purchase a 630G system to be "first in line" when the newer 670G is available commercially, which happened this week. Medtronic is hoping other type 1 diabetics will follow Scholl's lead and get in line for the 670G. Company CEO Omar Ishrak said in an earnings call with investors in February that Medtronic diabetes-device sales may slow during the quarter ending in April, as patients postponed purchases in anticipation of the 670G. But Ishrak also reiterated that Medtronic's diabetes business Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Medtronics New Automated Insulin Pump

Fda Approves Medtronics New Automated Insulin Pump

FDA Approves Medtronics New Automated Insulin Pump The device, known as the MiniMed 670G, is geared toward patients with Type 1 diabetes The Food and Drug Administration has approved an insulin pump by Medtronic that automatically manages glucose levels within a target range. Photo: Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg News The Food and Drug Administration approved for sale a significant advance toward a so-called artificial pancreas for Type 1 diabetes patients, a long-awaited insulin pump that aims to take some of the guesswork out of blood-sugar control. The product from Medtronic MDT -0.55% PLC, called the MiniMed 670G, combines two devices that attach to the outside of the bodya pump that delivers insulin through a tiny tube inserted under the skin, and a sensor that monitors blood glucose levels. The monitor tells the pump when to increase or decrease insulin flow to keep a persons blood sugar in a healthy range. The device isnt fully automatedusers must enter their planned carbohydrate intake at each mealtime, and adjust the sensor twice a day by carrying out finger-prick tests to measure blood sugar. But doctors and patients called the MiniMed an important breakthrough likely to improve glucose control, reduce complications and lessen the constant worry of controlling Type 1 diabetes. Existing diabetes pumps and monitors can automatically shut off insulin flow when a persons blood sugar levels veer toward being too low. But they cant automatically deliver insulin when a person has high blood sugar, doctors said. Weve been looking forward to a day like this for a long time, Derek Rapp, chief executive of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, or JDRF, said in an interview. Ultimately it means less concern, less burden, more freedom and less fear. Lori Laffel, a pediat Continue reading >>

Where To Find A Used Insulin Pump For Sale

Where To Find A Used Insulin Pump For Sale

If you’re looking for a used insulin pump for sale, there are various places you can find great working pumps at a great price. Knowing where to look and even the laws around buying and selling an insulin pump are very important. In many locations you must obtain a prescription for an insulin pump so there are certain legalities that would pertain to the transaction which you need to be aware of. Other than that there are some great used pumps that you can find online or local non profits which you can buy at a steep discount! When looking for insulin pumps you can start by contacting any local or national nonprofits, sometimes they will receive insulin pumps for diabetics that didn’t like them, got new insulin pumps through their insurance or in some cases the person has deceased and the family wants to donate their old supplies. Either way, these are great opportunities to get a used insulin pump for yourself or a family member. The benefits of finding one locally is that you can make sure the insulin pump works and test out the different functions before making the purchase. Insulin pumps are usually very rugged and durable so they can last a long time without looking worn or failing. There are many places online where you can find used insulin pumps and insulin pump accessories. But make sure you’re buying from a trusted seller and that you can contact them if you have any problems. Here are some quick tips before making the purchase. Before Buying a Used Insulin Pump You Should: Know how to use an insulin pump and the features safely, this is not something you can usually setup yourself Make sure you’re buying from a trusted seller Have the seller send you various high-res photos of the pump so you can inspect it for damage and abuse Research the different Continue reading >>

Keeping It Real On Medtronic's 530g

Keeping It Real On Medtronic's 530g

There's a lot of fuss and excitement about the newest diabetes device approved for people in the U.S.: Medtronic's long-awaited 530G system and Enlite sensor... But at the same time, there's a significant amount of frustration by PWDs (people with diabetes) and others in the know who feel they're being misled on a number of fronts about this new device. I'm one of them. Let me preface this by saying: Many are very excited about this being a huge step forward in eventually achieving the closed-loop dream. The 'Mine is on that boat, because we feel the 530G's ability to automatically shut off insulin between 60 and 90 mg/dL is a key step forward. However, we (all) have to be honest about what this product actually is and is not -- and the vendor's enthusiasm cannot fuel too-pushy sales pitches and marketing efforts. First off, this device is NOT an artificial pancreas, but rather just one piece of the puzzle required to eventually create one. Unfortunately, Medtronic's been sitting back and riding the PR wave of mainstream media jumping all over that exciting term, without correcting misconceptions. More on that in a moment. Perhaps more importantly for patients themselves, there are some questionable access issues underway: with the 530G systems being shipped starting Oct. 10, the company has decided it will start phasing out stand-alone pumps and no longer offer the older Paradigm Revels to most adult type 1s who have commercial insurance and could be covered for the new device. Huh? A Potential Customer: Me As noted the other day, I'm shopping around for my next insulin pump. Despite being a longtime Medtronic pumper, I got tired of waiting for the 530G and just recently bought the Dexcom G4. And "recently" means that my 30-day return window for the G4 passed just befo Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Rundown

Insulin Pump Rundown

Choosing an insulin pump doesn’t have to be an overwhelming process. Should you go with a more traditional pump where you can monitor your insulin levels directly? Are you looking for a model that works with a BGM monitor and allows you to administer insulin via a remote? Maybe you need a pump that offers integration with a CGM system. What about size? Color? To use tubes or not to use tubes? Presenting the options so you can find out what pump best fits your lifestyle is our goal. So, with several models on the market, let us help you sort through the choices by taking a look at what’s available and breaking down the various features of each. We’ve separated the pumps into four categories: pumps that incorporate or work with a Blood Glucose Monitor (BGM) and offer Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM), pumps with just CGM capability, pumps with just a BGM, and standalone pumps that don’t work with a BGM or offer CGM. Hybrid Closed-Loop System The 670 G system is the newest member to the Medtronic pump family and the first hybrid closed-loop system. In other ways, it is a like a “basal modulator” where you have to still bolus but it predicts your basal rate. Every 5 minutes, the auto-mode option (hybrid closed-loop) automatically adjusts basal insulin delivery based on your sugar levels to keep you range. It is excellent at catching lows because it stops your insulin dosage 30 minutes before you reach your pre-selected low limits, then it will automatically restart insulin when your levels recover. Possible concerns: excessive alerts and extended menu that needs clearing. Only approved for ages 14+ because it has a total daily dose requirement of at least 8 units a day. Feeling of loss of control of management with closed-loop system. Pumps with BGM and CGM ca Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump

Insulin Pump

There are a number of insulin pumps manufactured between 2006 – 2012 by Medtronic which are compatible. Compatibility has two requirements; (1) pump model and (2) firmware. The Loop-compatible pumps are as follows: Insulin Pump MM 515/715 MM 522/7222 MM 523/7233 MM 554/7544 CGM Dexcom G41 ✅ ✅ ✅ ✅ Dexcom G5 ✅ ✅ ✅ ✅ MM CGM ✅ ✅ ✅ ✅ 1. Offline access to glucose requires a Receiver with Share and the Share2 app to be running on the same iPhone as the Loop app is installed. Internet-dependent access via Share servers is also supported. 2. x22 model pumps were produced before firmware security patches were implemented, therefore these models are compatible because they will have firmware 2.4A or lower only. You can double check, but thus far all x22 pumps we have seen have compatible firmware. 3. Firmware 2.4A or lower is required for using Closed Loop and Bolus features. 4. Worldwide Veo (2.6A or lower) or Canadian/Australian Veo (2.7A or lower) is required for using Closed Loop and Bolus features. US version of this pump is not available. If you want to triple check compatibility, you can check for presence/absence of "PC connect" in the pump. If PC Connect is present, then the pump is NOT compatible. You can find PC connect in the Medtronic's Main Menu, Utilities, Connect Devices. PC Connect, if present, will be the first option showing in that menu, above the word "Meters". If you do NOT see PC Connect there...good! Pump Model To determine your pump model, look at the back side of your pump. There should be a sticker on the underside of the pump. On the right hand side of the sticker, it says REF MMT-XXXXXX MMT Pump Manufacturer Model (MiniMed Medtronic) 722 Pump Model Number NA Pump Region (NA=North America, CA=Canada/Australia, WW=Worldwide) S P Continue reading >>

Medtronic Minimed 508 Insulin Pump

Medtronic Minimed 508 Insulin Pump

All information products included in are provided"as is" for informational purposes only. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) does not provide any warranties of any kind regarding any information contained within. DHS does not endorse any commercial product or service, referenced in this product or otherwise. Further dissemination of this product is governed by the Traffic Light Protocol (TLP) marking in the header. For more information about TLP, see . Vulnerabilities: Cleartext Transmission of Sensitive Information, Authentication Bypass by Capture-replay Successful exploitation of these vulnerabilities may allow an attacker to replay captured wireless communications and cause an insulin (bolus) delivery. This is only possible when non-default options are configured. Additionally, the pump will annunciate this by providing a physical alert, and the user has the capability to suspend the bolus delivery. The following supported Medtronic products are affected: MMT - 522 / MMT - 722 Paradigm REAL-TIME, MMT - 523K / MMT - 723K Paradigm Revel, and 3.2.1 CLEARTEXT TRANSMISSION OF SENSITIVE INFORMATION CWE-319 Communications between the pump and wireless accessories are transmitted in cleartext. A sufficiently skilled attacker could capture these transmissions and extract sensitive information, such as device serial numbers. CVE-2018-10634 has been assigned to this vulnerability. A CVSS v3 base score of 4.8 has been assigned; the CVSS vector string is ( AV:A/AC:H/PR:N/UI:R/S:U/C:H/I:N/A:N ). 3.2.2 AUTHENTICATION BYPASS BY CAPTURE-REPLAY CWE-294 The models identified above, when paired with a remote controller and having the easy bolus and remote bolus options enabled (non-default), are vulnerable to a capture-replay attack. An attacker can capture the wireless transmi Continue reading >>

Medtronic 530g With Enlite

Medtronic 530g With Enlite

The FDA approved the Medtronic MiniMed 530G insulin pump with its display of the Enlite continuous glucose monitor in September, 2013. The 530G is the first system in the United States that can automatically stop insulin delivery if the CGM's glucose value falls to a preset level (60-90 mg/dl) AND the wearer doesn't respond to the Threshold Suspend Alarm. This functionality puts the device in the newly created OZO: Artificial Pancreas Device Classification created by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Although the 530G is an early step toward an artificial pancreas, some consumers have criticized Medtronic's marketing of the 530G using this classification, as discussed below. The 530G will be sold as an integrated system, paired with their CGM and its Enlite sensor. Those who want to use the Medtronic pump with a different CGM like the Dexcom G4 or Navigator would order the Revel 523 or 723 pumps that are identical to the 530G other than its display of the Enlite CGM. These pumps do not have threshold suspend. The Enlite sensor is said to be more comfortable, have slightly better accuracy than the older Guardian sensor, and can be worn up to 6 days rather than 3. Medtronic suggests that the sensor be worn on the abdomen only. It comes with a new Enlite Serter that puts the sensor in at a 90-degree angle while hiding the needle from the wearer. Like the Revel 523 and 723 pumps, the 530G uses the same 180-unit and 300-unit reservoirs and infusion sets. Threshold Suspend (TS) is the suspension of basal insulin delivery when a selected low blood glucose threshold is reached. The goal is to minimize time spent in hypoglycemia. The low threshold can be set between 60 and 90 mg/dL. An alarm is sounded when the TS begins to alert the wearer. The low alarm repeats every 20 Continue reading >>

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