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Magnesium Dosage For Insulin Resistance

Effect Of Magnesium Supplementation On Insulin Resistance In Humans: A Systematic Review - Sciencedirect

Effect Of Magnesium Supplementation On Insulin Resistance In Humans: A Systematic Review - Sciencedirect

Effect of magnesium supplementation on insulin resistance in humans: A systematic review Magnesium participates directly in glucose metabolism disorders in humans. In the present review, we evaluated evidence for the effectiveness of supplementation of magnesium in the control of the insulin resistance. This systematic review provided evidence of the benefits of magnesium supplementation on insulin resistance in patients with hypomagnesemia. Magnesium plays a potentially significant role in improving insulin sensitivity. However, larger-scale studies over a longer duration of treatment are needed to confirm this conclusion. Recent studies have demonstrated that minerals play a role in glucose metabolism disorders in humans. Magnesium, in particular, is an extensively studied mineral that has been shown to function in the management of hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance (IR) action. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of magnesium supplementation on IR in humans via systematic review of the available clinical trials. This review was conducted in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. A survey was conducted to select clinical trials related to the effects of this mineral in insulin sensitivity using the following databases: PubMed, SciVerse Scopus, ScienceDirect, and SciVerse Cochrane. After the selection process, 12 articles were identified as eligible, representing different clinical conditions and being free of restriction with regard to sex, age, ethnicity, and differential dosing/shape of magnesium. The results of eight clinical trials showed that supplementation with magnesium influences serum fasting glucose concentrations, and five trials determined an effec Continue reading >>

Magnesium Citrate: The Best Form Of Magnesium For Diabetes

Magnesium Citrate: The Best Form Of Magnesium For Diabetes

Magnesium is a mineral that the body needs in abundant quantities. Hypomagnesaemia (a deficiency of magnesium) is frequently seen in patients with diabetes, and magnesium supplementation can help them. However, there are different types of magnesium supplementation. Let’s find out why magnesium citrate is the best for diabetes. How Are Magnesium And Diabetes Related? Magnesium aids in the transport of glucose across the cell membrane, thereby helping to reduce insulin resistance. It is also an integral part of the insulin secretion and binding processes. Diabetics discard a lot more magnesium from their bodies, as opposed to healthy individuals. This is because high blood sugar levels make them urinate more frequently. How Do I Choose My Magnesium Supplement? Magnesium supplements have different properties based primarily on two things, namely, the substance used to stabilize the magnesium ions, and the size of the ions. The effect of each type of magnesium compound depends on how well it is absorbed by the body and its side effects. Small, pico-ionic sized particles are easily absorbed at cellular level. Some types of magnesium that are available as supplements are: Magnesium hydroxide – It is not absorbed easily, but is quite effective as a laxative. Magnesium sulphate – It is hard to ingest as it acts like a strong laxative, but is absorbed well by the skin. It is commonly known as Epsom salt. Magnesium malate – It is effective in treating the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Magnesium citrate – It is absorbed quickly by cells and is, sometimes, used as a laxative. Why is Magnesium Citrate So Popular? Magnesium citrate is a combination of magnesium and citric acid. It is available over-the-counter and is absorbed better than most of the other magnesium compounds. Continue reading >>

Reversing Insulin Resistance – The Insulin Magnesium Story

Reversing Insulin Resistance – The Insulin Magnesium Story

Magnesium is necessary for both the action of insulin and the manufacture of insulin. Reversing insulin resistanceis the most basic first step to reversing diabetes and heart disease.. Magnesium is a basic building block to life and is present in ionic form throughout the full landscape of human physiology. Without insulin though, magnesium doesn’t get transported from our blood into our cells where it is most needed. When Dr. Jerry Nadler of the Gonda Diabetes Center at the City of Hope Medical Center in Duarte, California, and his colleagues placed 16 healthy people on magnesium-deficient diets, their insulin became less effective at getting sugar from their blood into their cells, where it’s burned or stored as fuel. In other words, they became less insulin sensitive or what is called insulin resistant.. Insulin Defination Insulin is a common denominator, a central figure in life as is magnesium. The task of insulin is to store excess nutritional resources.This system is an evolutionary development used to save energy and other nutritional necessities in times (or hours) of abundance in order to survive in times of hunger. Little do we appreciate that insulin is not just responsible for regulating sugar entry into the cells but also magnesium, one of the most important substances for life. It is interesting to note here that the kidneys are working at the opposite end physiologically dumping from the blood excess nutrients that the body does not need or cannot process in the moment. Controlling the level of blood sugars is only one of the many functions of insulin. Insulin plays a central role in storing magnesium but if our cells become resistant to insulin, or if we do not produce enough insulin, then we have a difficult time storing magnesium in the cells wher Continue reading >>

Magnesium And Diabetes: Reduce Blood Sugar Now!

Magnesium And Diabetes: Reduce Blood Sugar Now!

Magnesium is the second most abundant mineral in our body. Considering we have so much, it’s obviously needed for a ton of stuff. It’s a vital nutrient that drives close to 300 different biochemical reactions in the body. One of these critical functions is ensuring that our blood sugar remains within the right range. The connection between having adequate magnesium and diabetes prevention is deep. Magnesium can help prevent diabetes if you don’t have it yet. If you are diabetic, it can help you control blood sugar better. We’re meant to get magnesium from a variety of foods, including dairy. And yet an astounding 80% of Americans are deficient in this mineral. Is it any wonder then that heart diseases, hypertension, and diabetes are on such a sharp rise in the United States? The relationship between magnesium and diabetes mellitus is crucial. Here’s why: Magnesium helps muscle cells relax, so insulin resistance goes down. Cells allow more sugar in. Blood sugar goes down. The heart is a muscle. Magnesium helps the heart relax and lowers risk of cardiac issues in diabetics. When magnesium is sufficient, it prevents calcium deposition in the inner walls of blood vessels. This helps prevent hardening of arteries. Magnesium is important for the production of energy. Diabetics often feel tired because proper energy production is an issue. Magnesium helps convert excess of glucose in the blood into glycogen. This gets stored in the liver. Excess sugar is removed from the blood. Magnesium helps antioxidants like Glutathione do their job in our body. Antioxidants help slow down aging. Diabetics face more oxidative stress than non-diabetics. This causes diabetic complications across the whole body. Diabetics often complain of feeling pins and needles or numbness in thei Continue reading >>

Oral Magnesium Supplementation Improves Insulin Sensitivity And Metabolic Control In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

Oral Magnesium Supplementation Improves Insulin Sensitivity And Metabolic Control In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

A randomized double-blind controlled trial Abstract OBJECTIVE—To determine whether oral magnesium supplementation (as magnesium chloride [MgCl2] solution) improves both insulin sensitivity and metabolic control in type 2 diabetic subjects with decreased serum magnesium levels. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—This study was a clinical randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. A total of 63 subjects with type 2 diabetes and decreased serum magnesium (serum magnesium levels ≤0.74 mmol/l) treated by glibenclamide received either 50 ml MgCl2 solution (containing 50 g MgCl2 per 1,000 ml solution) or placebo daily for 16 weeks. Chronic diarrhea, alcoholism, use of diuretic and/or calcium antagonist drugs, and reduced renal function were exclusion criteria. Homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used as the parameter of insulin sensitivity and glucose and HbA1c as parameters of metabolic control. RESULTS—At the end of the study, subjects who received magnesium supplementation showed significant higher serum magnesium concentration (0.74 ± 0.10 vs. 0.65 ± 0.07 mmol/l, P = 0.02) and lower HOMA-IR index (3.8 ± 1.1 vs. 5.0 ± 1.3, P = 0.005), fasting glucose levels (8.0 ± 2.4 vs. 10.3 ± 2.1 mmol/l, P = 0.01), and HbA1c (8.0 ± 2.4 vs. 10.1 ± 3.3%, P = 0.04) than control subjects. CONCLUSIONS—Oral supplementation with MgCl2 solution restores serum magnesium levels, improving insulin sensitivity and metabolic control in type 2 diabetic patients with decreased serum magnesium levels. Hypomagnesemia, a frequent condition in patients with diabetes (1,2), could be involved in the development of poor metabolic control and chronic complications (3,4). A large body of evidence that shows a link between hypomagnesemia and reduction of tyrosine-k Continue reading >>

Low Magnesium May Play Key Role In Insulin Resistance And Diabetes

Low Magnesium May Play Key Role In Insulin Resistance And Diabetes

Magnesium plays a key role in preventing insulin dysregulation and type 2 diabetes, according to several recent studies—yet 80 percent of Americans are likely magnesium deficient One study found those with the highest magnesium intake reduced their risk of metabolic problems by 71 percent Another study concluded magnesium is highly protective for those at high risk for type 2 diabetes Inadequate magnesium intake creates a vicious cycle of low magnesium levels in your body, elevated insulin and blood glucose levels, and excess loss of magnesium in your urine The best source of magnesium is whole, organic foods, especially dark green leafy vegetables; other good sources include seaweed, dried pumpkin seeds, unsweetened cocoa, flaxseed, almond butter, and whey Of the many forms of magnesium supplements available today, a newer form called magnesium threonate shows particular promise due to its ability to penetrate cell membranes, even those in your brain By Dr. Mercola Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in your body. If you don't have enough of it, your body simply cannot function at its best. Insufficient cellular magnesium levels set the stage for deterioration of proper metabolic function that typically snowballs into more significant health problems. As reported by GreenMedInfo,1 researchers have now detected 3,751 magnesium-binding sites on human proteins, reflecting how important this mineral is to a great many biological processes. For example, magnesium plays a role in your body's detoxification processes and therefore is important for minimizing damage from environmental chemicals, heavy metals, and other toxins. Even glutathione, considered by many to be your body's most powerful antioxidant, requires magnesium in order to be produced. Magnesium also Continue reading >>

Magnesium – A Great Help For Diabetics

Magnesium – A Great Help For Diabetics

Based on information from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), magnesium is practically a wonder drug. Yet few people know about it, and few doctors recommend it. It helps maintain muscles and nerves, regulates blood sugar levels, promotes normal blood pressure, and prevents heart attacks. A study published through the American Diabetes Association shows that oral magnesium supplementation with magnesium restores serum magnesium and improves insulin sensitivity in subjects with type 2 diabetes and decreased serum magnesium levels, thus contributing to metabolic control. In addition, a meat-analysis of 9 trials in 2014 shows that that those with higher magnesium intake are 10-47% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes. In the U.S., however, only about 50% of the population achieve the recommended dietary allowance of magnesium, which is 400-420 mg/day for men and 300-310 mg/day for women. Source: Hruby, A. et al. “Higher Magnesium Intake Reduces Risk of Impaired Glucose and Insulin Metabolism and Progression From Prediabetes to Diabetes in Middle-Aged Americans” Diabetes Care. 2014: 37(2): 419-427. This meta-analysis of 9 trials studying magnesium supplements in those with type 2 diabetes found that 360 mg/day resulted in lower fasting glucose levels, while another smaller and more recent trial studying obese, nondiabetic, insulin-resistant patients found that 365 mg/day for 6 months not only lowered fasting glucose values, but also lowered fasting insulin and insulin resistance, and improved insulin sensitivity. In patients with other risk factors, such as mild hypertension, 3-month supplementation with magnesium was found to improve insulin sensitivity and pancreatic β-cell function. Low magnesium diets, meanwhile, have been shown to impair insulin sensitivity Continue reading >>

Magnesium Deficiencies Contribute To Insulin Resistance And Diabetes

Magnesium Deficiencies Contribute To Insulin Resistance And Diabetes

Many people suffer from insulin resistance that impairs the cellular uptake of glucose from the bloodstream. Insulin resistance typically causes untimely hunger or a craving for stimulants accompanied by fatigue, mood swings, tension, overweight, and numerous other problems that arise as a result of the cells producing too little energy. The condition increases the risk of type-2 diabetes, even among children. But how does magnesium affect our blood sugar levels, and how do we make sure to get enough of this nutrient? Magnesium is one of the most abundant minerals in the human body. Magnesium, together with vitamin D and vitamin K, plays a vital role in bone health. Most of our magnesium is found inside the cells where it supports over 300 different enzymes that are important for the nervous system, muscles, digestion, and blood pressure. So far, science has identified 3,751 binding sites for magnesium in the body, which clearly suggests how many can wrong if we fail to get enough of the nutrient. There is a lot of focus on the need for calcium, yet the need for magnesium is overlooked. This has serious consequences for the risk of osteoporosis and lifestyle diseases such as insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes. Magnesium plays a vital role in the metabolism and insulin regulation Carbohydrate from what we eat and drink gets broken down into glucose and serves as blood sugar. When our blood sugar rises the pancreas produces insulin, which is the hormone that channels sugar (glucose) into the cells. Chromium supports insulin in this action. However, several studies also show that magnesium plays a role, as this mineral has a key function in preventing insulin dysfunctions and type-2 diabetes. A large Japanese study (the Hisayama study) that is published in Diabetic Med Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

What is insulin resistance? Insulin is a hormone that facilitates the transport of blood sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream into cells throughout the body for use as fuel. In response to the normal increase in blood sugar after a meal, the pancreas secretes insulin into the bloodstream. With insulin resistance, the normal amount of insulin secreted is not sufficient to move glucose into the cells – thus the cells are said to be “resistant” to the action of insulin. To compensate, the pancreas secretes insulin in ever-increasing amounts to maintain fairly adequate blood-sugar movement into cells and a normal blood-sugar level. What are some insulin resistance symptoms? There are usually no obvious, outward signs of insulin resistance. However, when you are severely insulin resistant, dark patches of skin called acanthosis nigricans can develop on the back of the neck. Sometimes a dark ring forms around the neck. These dark patches can also occur on the elbows, knees, knuckles and armpits. More importantly, insulin has less visible effects on metabolic reactions throughout the body, including converting calories into fat. Insulin resistance influences the liver enzymes that produce cholesterol and acts on the kidneys (which can contribute to high blood pressure). High insulin levels also have a role in the process that regulates inflammation. In time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes, itself a risk factor for heart disease. Insulin resistance can be diagnosed with blood tests that show low levels of HDL cholesterol (the “good” cholesterol), a high triglyceride level, a high fasting insulin level or a high uric acid level. What are the causes of insulin resistance? There are genetic factors that can contribute to the development of insulin resista Continue reading >>

High Dietary Magnesium Intake Is Associated With Low Insulin Resistance In The Newfoundland Population

High Dietary Magnesium Intake Is Associated With Low Insulin Resistance In The Newfoundland Population

Abstract Magnesium plays a role in glucose and insulin homeostasis and evidence suggests that magnesium intake is associated with insulin resistance (IR). However, data is inconsistent and most studies have not adequately controlled for critical confounding factors. The study investigated the association between magnesium intake and IR in normal-weight (NW), overweight (OW) and obese (OB) along with pre- and post- menopausal women. A total of 2295 subjects (590 men and 1705 women) were recruited from the CODING study. Dietary magnesium intake was computed from the Willett Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). Adiposity (NW, OW and OB) was classified by body fat percentage (%BF) measured by Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry according to the Bray criteria. Multiple regression analyses were used to test adiposity-specific associations of dietary magnesium intake on insulin resistance adjusting for caloric intake, physical activity, medication use and menopausal status. Subjects with the highest intakes of dietary magnesium had the lowest levels of circulating insulin, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-ß and subjects with the lowest intake of dietary magnesium had the highest levels of these measures, suggesting a dose effect. Multiple regression analysis revealed a strong inverse association between dietary magnesium with IR. In addition, adiposity and menopausal status were found to be critical factors revealing that the association between dietary magnesium and IR was stronger in OW and OB along with Pre-menopausal women. The results of this study indicate that higher dietary magnesium intake is strongly associated with the attenuation of insulin resistance and is more beneficial for overweight and obese individuals in the general population and pre-menopausal women. Moreover, the inverse Continue reading >>

Effect Of Magnesium Supplementation On Insulin Resistance In Humans: A Systematicreview.

Effect Of Magnesium Supplementation On Insulin Resistance In Humans: A Systematicreview.

1. Nutrition. 2017 Jun;38:54-60. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2017.01.009. Epub 2017 Feb 2. Effect of magnesium supplementation on insulin resistance in humans: A systematicreview. Morais JBS(1), Severo JS(1), de Alencar GRR(1), de Oliveira ARS(1), Cruz KJC(1), Marreiro DDN(1), Freitas BJESA(1), de Carvalho CMR(1), Martins MDCCE(2), FrotaKMG(3). (1)Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Piaui, Campus Minister Petrnio Portela, Ininga, Teresina, Piaui, Brazil. (2)Department of Biophysics and Physiology, Federal University of Piaui, Campus Minister Petrnio Portela, Ininga, Teresina, Piaui, Brazil. (3)Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Piaui, Campus Minister Petrnio Portela, Ininga, Teresina, Piaui, Brazil. Electronic address: [email protected] OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have demonstrated that minerals play a role in glucosemetabolism disorders in humans. Magnesium, in particular, is an extensivelystudied mineral that has been shown to function in the management ofhyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance (IR) action. The aim ofthis study was to investigate the effect of magnesium supplementation on IR inhumans via systematic review of the available clinical trials.METHODS: This review was conducted in accordance with Preferred Reporting Itemsfor Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. A survey wasconducted to select clinical trials related to the effects of this mineral ininsulin sensitivity using the following databases: PubMed, SciVerse Scopus,ScienceDirect, and SciVerse Cochrane.RESULTS: After the selection process, 12 articles were identified as eligible,representing different clinical conditions and being free of restriction withregard to sex, age, ethnicity, and differential dosing/shape of magnesium. Theresults o Continue reading >>

Reverse Insulin Resistance In 4 Easy Steps

Reverse Insulin Resistance In 4 Easy Steps

Reverse Insulin Resistance in 4 Easy Steps When it comes to metabolism and weight loss, it’s mostly about insulin. Insulin is also a major factor in many women’s health conditions such as  PCOS , acne , progesterone deficiency , and heavy periods . Healthy insulin sensitivity is how you keep inflammation down. It’s how you reduce your long-term risk of diabetes, cancer, osteoporosis , dementia, and heart disease. Do you have insulin resistance? It’s time to find out. Under normal conditions, your hormone insulin rises briefly after eating. It stimulates your liver and muscles to take up sugar from your blood and convert it to energy. This causes your blood sugar to fall, and then your insulin to fall. When you are insulin sensitive, both your sugar and insulin are low on a fasting blood test. When you have insulin resistance, your blood sugar may be normal but your insulin will be high. Why? Because your liver and muscles are not responding properly to insulin, so your pancreas makes more. Too much insulin then generates inflammation and pushes calories into fat storage. Too much insulin also impairs ovulation  and stimulates your ovaries to make testosterone, which is a major cause of PCOS . Insulin resistance is common and affects at least one in four adults. It is also called pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome. Blood test: The way to diagnose insulin resistance is to test insulin–not blood sugar. Ask your doctor to order “fasting insulin” or a “glucose tolerance test with insulin.” Look at your insulin reading (not just your blood sugar reading). Your fasting insulin should be less than 55 pmol/L (8 mIU/L ). One hour after the sugar challenge, your insulin should be less than 270 pmol/L (45 mIU/L). You can also use a blood test called Continue reading >>

Magnesium: The Forgotten Healer

Magnesium: The Forgotten Healer

Based on information from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), magnesium is practically a wonder drug. Yet few people know about it, and few doctors recommend it. It helps maintain muscles and nerves, regulates blood sugar levels, promotes normal blood pressure, and prevents heart attacks. I first learned about magnesium (chemical symbol Mg) when my legs started becoming stiff and jumpy. It was a multiple sclerosis symptom, but what to do about it? The prescribed medicines stopped the spasms, but had the side effect of completely knocking me out. My muscles wouldn’t function at all. Then someone at a support group suggested I take magnesium. In two days, the spasms and jumpy legs stopped. I’ve taken it ever since. I didn’t realize it had all these other benefits until a comment from Patricia on this blog entry alerted me. Patricia told us about a book called The Magnesium Miracle by Dr. Carolyn Dean, an MD and naturopath. According to Dr. Dean, nearly 80% of Americans are deficient in magnesium, and it is often the primary factor in heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and most muscular problems. The NIH says, “Magnesium is needed for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body… [It] is involved in energy metabolism and protein synthesis.” And according to our own Amy Campbell, “Results from three very large studies indicate that people who consume a diet rich in magnesium have a lower risk of getting Type 2 diabetes.” People with diabetes are more likely than those without to be low in magnesium. According to an article on About.com, “Elevated blood glucose levels increase the loss of magnesium in the urine, which in turn lowers blood levels of magnesium.” So getting enough magnesium is especially important in diabetes. In spite of Continue reading >>

Whole Health Source: Magnesium And Insulin Sensitivity

Whole Health Source: Magnesium And Insulin Sensitivity

From a paper based on US NHANES nutrition and health survey data ( 1 ): During 19992000, the diet of a large proportion of the U.S. population did not contain adequate magnesium... Furthermore, racial or ethnic differences in magnesium persist and may contribute to some health disparities.... Because magnesium intake is low among many people in the United States and inadequate magnesium status is associated with increased risk of acute and chronic conditions, an urgent need exists to perform a current survey to assess the physiologic status of magnesium in the U.S. population. Magnesium is an essential mineral that many people apparently don't get enough of. One of the many things it's necessary for in mammals is proper insulin sensitivity and glucose control. A loss of glucose control due to insulin resistance can eventually lead to diabetes and all its complications. Magnesium status is associated with insulin sensitivity ( 2 , 3 ), and a low magnesium intake predicts the development of type II diabetes in most studies ( 4 , 5 ) but not all ( 6 ). Magnesium supplements largely prevent diabetes in a rat model* ( 7 ). Interestingly, excess blood glucose and insulin themselves seem to reduce magnesium status, possibly creating a vicious cycle. In a 1993 trial, a low-magnesium diet reduced insulin sensitivity in healthy volunteers by 25% in just four weeks ( 8 ). It also increased urinary thromboxane concentration, a potential concern for cardiovascular health**. At least three trials have shown that magnesium supplementation increases insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant diabetics and non-diabetics ( 9 , 10 , 11 ). In some cases, the results were remarkable. In type II diabetics, 16 weeks of magnesium supplementation improved fasting glucose, calculated insulin sens Continue reading >>

Magnesium Deficiency Increases Insulin Resistance

Magnesium Deficiency Increases Insulin Resistance

Magnesium is a mineral involved in over 300 metabolic processes in the body. Most Americans do not obtain enough magnesium from dietary sources,1 which may contribute to a variety of chronic diseases.2-4 There is a lack of involvement from the medical community in recommending magnesium. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) concluded that: “…results of this study indicate that a significant number of patients with serum magnesium abnormalities are clinically unrecognized and demonstrate the efficacy of routine serum magnesium measurements.”5 A deficit of magnesium can lead to migraines,6-8 bone loss,9 stroke,10-12 heart disease,13,14 and many other illnesses. What has excited researchers is the role that magnesium can play to decrease the risk factors for type II diabetes. The Harm of Intensive Farming Practices The Green Revolution occurred between the 1940s and 1960s and marked one of the largest increases of food production in history.15,16 An American biologist named Norman Borlaug pioneered the farming technologies in this era. He received a Nobel Peace Prize in 1970 for saving over a billion people from starvation.17 While fertilization techniques developed as part of the green revolution have increased the production of food exponentially, one result has been a reduction in the amounts of minerals and vitamins in our food.18 The result? More food, less nutrients. Since the revolution, magnesium levels in grains have declined by an average of 19.6%. This is a concern in regions where up to 75% of the daily magnesium intake is from grains.18 Researchers see a correlation between nutrient shortages and the use of commercial fertilizers containing nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium.18 Plants require these elements to live Continue reading >>

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