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Low Cost Insulin Pump

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Development Of A Low-cost Insulin Infusion Pump: Lessons Learned From An Industry Case

Abstract In the last 30 years there have been great advances in technology for diabetes treatment, which facilitated the management of the disease and its complications. Among the advances we can mention the development of insulin infusion pump. However, diabetes treatment using the insulin pump still remains expansive in Brazil, especially because the device and its accessories are imported. The aim of this paper is to report a prototype development of a low-cost insulin infusion pump aimed to benefit Brazilian people suffering with Diabetes Mellitus type 1. The prototype development is a result from a cooperation between Brazilian academy and industry. We comment the development of such a prototype and the lessons learned obtained from it. Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. ChiGuy

    Insulin Pump Cost and ongoing expenses?

    My endo has been recommending I go on an insulin pump and I told him I would consider in the near future once I find better control first thru MDI. I started researching the different pump options and I am a shocked on the cost of a pump and ongoing expense of infusion sets. I realize everyone has different insurance coverage to offset these expenses, but it appears a lot more than I anticipated. I have BCBS Gold PPO plan that appears will require I first meet my deductible and then pay 20% for in network supplied pump. I am finding pumps range from $6,000-12,000. It also appears that the infusion sets will run another $120-170/month. Not sure what portion of infusion sets will be covered? My insurance co-pays on test strips and pen needles make coverage non-existent. It is much cheaper for me to use Relion meter and test strips purchased solely at my expense then it is to buy branded meter & test strips. Same thing with needles, cheaper online then what my co-pay is. Do most of you shop out infusion sets online and pay for this completely out of pocket or does insurance pick up big portion of this? I also seem a lot of the pumps work with specific meters which would also add to monthly expense.

  2. CalgaryDiabetic

    Can you move to Canada and become a resident for health care purposes ? Bring a warm parka. Yes capital and operating costs are staggering. Will be pumping soon instead of MDI. Read my post re lantus, this is why MDI not that practical for me lantus is useless or harmful in my case.

  3. PeterPumper

    I can only speak of my experience, but it may be typical.
    Yes, the initial pump was covered as a "durable medical device", and subject to deductible and then copay. But the year I first went on the pump I had already met my deductible. In fact, I'd also met my annual out-of-pocket max, so the pump cost me Zero.
    My insurer (and most) also cover infusion sets and reservoirs as DME rather than prescriptions (even though scripts are required), so again, annual deductibles, co-pays (in my case 20%), and annual out-of-pocket maxes apply.
    Does using a pump cost more than needles and vials? Yes. But I make an effort to make the most of the insurance plans and such.
    I've never sourced the infusion sets anywhere other than the manufacturer site, and I don't think there's the same 3rd party market for them as there is for test strips, since they are script-only DME.
    As far as meters, you can use any meter. Using one that "links" to your pump offers convenience, but is not mandatory. But also keep in mind that once you buy the pump and supplies, you've surely met your annual deductible, and in some cases your out-of-pocket max, and that sometimes means getting test strips through insurance ends up cheaper if not free.

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Ultra Low Cost Insulin Pump

The World Health Organization estimates that in 2013, 347 million people worldwide have diabetes. An insulin pump has been shown to greatly improve the control of blood sugars and the health of diabetics, yet the cost remains out of reach to nearly all. Currently, commercial insulin pumps cost between $5000 and $6000. This project explores how an individual could manufacture an insulin pump using approximately $50 (retail cost, quantity=1) of readily available materials. Manufacturers could be expected to lower this cost greatly through wholesale pricing and economies of scale. This project is intended to show proof of concept that an ultra-low-cost insulin pump is feasible, and it is not intended to design an “Insulin Pump Kit.” This will be accomplished by leveraging commercially available components, open source hardware, open source software, and creative commons (CC) stereolithography (STL) designs. The use of open-licensed components would make it available to any manufacturer or individual worldwide. Materials, software, and STL designs have been sourced by the author within the given budget, and a prototype is in development. All development will be made public under op Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. ChiGuy

    Insulin Pump Cost and ongoing expenses?

    My endo has been recommending I go on an insulin pump and I told him I would consider in the near future once I find better control first thru MDI. I started researching the different pump options and I am a shocked on the cost of a pump and ongoing expense of infusion sets. I realize everyone has different insurance coverage to offset these expenses, but it appears a lot more than I anticipated. I have BCBS Gold PPO plan that appears will require I first meet my deductible and then pay 20% for in network supplied pump. I am finding pumps range from $6,000-12,000. It also appears that the infusion sets will run another $120-170/month. Not sure what portion of infusion sets will be covered? My insurance co-pays on test strips and pen needles make coverage non-existent. It is much cheaper for me to use Relion meter and test strips purchased solely at my expense then it is to buy branded meter & test strips. Same thing with needles, cheaper online then what my co-pay is. Do most of you shop out infusion sets online and pay for this completely out of pocket or does insurance pick up big portion of this? I also seem a lot of the pumps work with specific meters which would also add to monthly expense.

  2. CalgaryDiabetic

    Can you move to Canada and become a resident for health care purposes ? Bring a warm parka. Yes capital and operating costs are staggering. Will be pumping soon instead of MDI. Read my post re lantus, this is why MDI not that practical for me lantus is useless or harmful in my case.

  3. PeterPumper

    I can only speak of my experience, but it may be typical.
    Yes, the initial pump was covered as a "durable medical device", and subject to deductible and then copay. But the year I first went on the pump I had already met my deductible. In fact, I'd also met my annual out-of-pocket max, so the pump cost me Zero.
    My insurer (and most) also cover infusion sets and reservoirs as DME rather than prescriptions (even though scripts are required), so again, annual deductibles, co-pays (in my case 20%), and annual out-of-pocket maxes apply.
    Does using a pump cost more than needles and vials? Yes. But I make an effort to make the most of the insurance plans and such.
    I've never sourced the infusion sets anywhere other than the manufacturer site, and I don't think there's the same 3rd party market for them as there is for test strips, since they are script-only DME.
    As far as meters, you can use any meter. Using one that "links" to your pump offers convenience, but is not mandatory. But also keep in mind that once you buy the pump and supplies, you've surely met your annual deductible, and in some cases your out-of-pocket max, and that sometimes means getting test strips through insurance ends up cheaper if not free.

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Low-cost Insulin Pump Designed By Israeli Team

Insulin pumps have helped many people with diabetes lead more active, healthier lives. The problem is that the cost of the pump and the supplies often makes pumping cost prohibitive to people in the developing world and those who do not have medical insurance. A father-son team from Israel, though, is trying to change that with an innovate and tiny pump that may make pumping affordable. Avi Keret of Touche Medical points out that their new patch pump is not innovative because it is a medical pump, but instead because it is affordable. “Our device gives the same amount of medication as any other pump; it just delivers the drug in a way that allows for a better quality of life,” Keret recently told ISRAEL21c. He also sees the pump he has developed with his son Amir as giving people who cannot afford to shell out thousands of dollars a new option to better manage their health. “We’ll offer them an alternative,” Keret said. “People who have or don’t have medical insurance will be able to afford it. Children all over the world will be able to use it.” The pump will also feature special designs for children and use technology that will help deliver a more precise dosage t Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. ChiGuy

    Insulin Pump Cost and ongoing expenses?

    My endo has been recommending I go on an insulin pump and I told him I would consider in the near future once I find better control first thru MDI. I started researching the different pump options and I am a shocked on the cost of a pump and ongoing expense of infusion sets. I realize everyone has different insurance coverage to offset these expenses, but it appears a lot more than I anticipated. I have BCBS Gold PPO plan that appears will require I first meet my deductible and then pay 20% for in network supplied pump. I am finding pumps range from $6,000-12,000. It also appears that the infusion sets will run another $120-170/month. Not sure what portion of infusion sets will be covered? My insurance co-pays on test strips and pen needles make coverage non-existent. It is much cheaper for me to use Relion meter and test strips purchased solely at my expense then it is to buy branded meter & test strips. Same thing with needles, cheaper online then what my co-pay is. Do most of you shop out infusion sets online and pay for this completely out of pocket or does insurance pick up big portion of this? I also seem a lot of the pumps work with specific meters which would also add to monthly expense.

  2. CalgaryDiabetic

    Can you move to Canada and become a resident for health care purposes ? Bring a warm parka. Yes capital and operating costs are staggering. Will be pumping soon instead of MDI. Read my post re lantus, this is why MDI not that practical for me lantus is useless or harmful in my case.

  3. PeterPumper

    I can only speak of my experience, but it may be typical.
    Yes, the initial pump was covered as a "durable medical device", and subject to deductible and then copay. But the year I first went on the pump I had already met my deductible. In fact, I'd also met my annual out-of-pocket max, so the pump cost me Zero.
    My insurer (and most) also cover infusion sets and reservoirs as DME rather than prescriptions (even though scripts are required), so again, annual deductibles, co-pays (in my case 20%), and annual out-of-pocket maxes apply.
    Does using a pump cost more than needles and vials? Yes. But I make an effort to make the most of the insurance plans and such.
    I've never sourced the infusion sets anywhere other than the manufacturer site, and I don't think there's the same 3rd party market for them as there is for test strips, since they are script-only DME.
    As far as meters, you can use any meter. Using one that "links" to your pump offers convenience, but is not mandatory. But also keep in mind that once you buy the pump and supplies, you've surely met your annual deductible, and in some cases your out-of-pocket max, and that sometimes means getting test strips through insurance ends up cheaper if not free.

  4. -> Continue reading
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