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Low Cost Insulin Pump

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

For diabetic patients who need financial assistance with supplies and related health care items and services, the following programs may be of help. Please note that applications must be submitted to the programs and not to PPA® . Categories Insulin Access Programs Blink Health is working with Eli Lilly and Company to offer a 40 percent discount on Lilly insulins. The Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program delivers the 40 percent discount directly to patients and will be honored at over 67,000 local pharmacies nationwide. Anyone can participate in the Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program via the Blink Health mobile app (available for iOS & Android) or website, www.blinkhealth.com, which has no membership fees or monthly premiums. Patients enter the form, dosage and quantity of the Lilly insulin that matches their prescription. The discount will be automatically applied. Payments are made online and the prescriptions can be picked up at virtually any U.S. pharmacy, including: Walgreens, CVS/pharmacy, Target, RiteAid, Safeway and Kroger. People using federal government programs are not eligible. Purchases are fully refundable. Assistance: Insulin Free Glucose Meters Abbott Diabetes Care provides free blood glucose monitoring system kits to those with diabetes. Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc. 1360 South Loop Road Alameda, CA 94502 USA Tel: 888-522-5226 Fax: 202-337-8314 Email: [email protected] Assistance: Free Glucose Meters Test Strips Roche Diagnostics, the maker of ACCU-CHEK® Products provides a limited supply of ACCU-CHEK Aviva test strips to a network of community clinics and health centers throughout the U.S. to distribute to their low-income and uninsured patients with diabetes. Roache Diagnostics Corporation 9115 Hague Road Indianapolis, IN 46250 Phone: 800 Continue reading >>

Development Of A Low-cost Insulin Infusion Pump: Lessons Learned From An Industry Case

Development Of A Low-cost Insulin Infusion Pump: Lessons Learned From An Industry Case

Abstract: In the last 30 years there have been great advances in technology for diabetes treatment, which facilitated the management of the disease and its complications. Among the advances we can mention the development of insulin infusion pump. However, diabetes treatment using the insulin pump still remains expansive in Brazil, especially because the device and its accessories are imported. The aim of this paper is to report a prototype development of a low-cost insulin infusion pump aimed to benefit Brazilian people suffering with Diabetes Mellitus type 1. The prototype development is a result from a cooperation between Brazilian academy and industry. We comment the development of such a prototype and the lessons learned obtained from it. Continue reading >>

Use Of Insulin Pumps In India: Suggested Guidelines Based On Experience And Cultural Differences

Use Of Insulin Pumps In India: Suggested Guidelines Based On Experience And Cultural Differences

Go to: What Is an Insulin Pump? The continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) pump (insulin pump for short) is a pager-sized device that can be connected to the body through an infusion set so as to deliver insulin continuously. It consists of a disposable reservoir for insulin and a disposable infusion set, including a cannula for subcutaneous insertion and a tubing system that connects the insulin reservoir to the cannula. Insulin pump therapy by itself is not a new therapy for diabetes mellitus. It is an alternative delivery mechanism for administration of insulin and is found to be superior to ordinary syringes and insulin pens. When insulin is administered subcutaneously via a properly programmed insulin pump, delivery of insulin is expected to mimic the insulin release pattern of a normal healthy pancreas better than other modalities of insulin delivery. Willingness on the part of the patient is absolutely essential before going on the pump. However, mere willingness to initiate pump therapy does not make a patient a candidate for the same. Other indications mentioned below need to be present if a patient is to be considered for pump therapy. Conversely, if a patient who fulfils one or more of the indications is not comfortable wearing the pump even after due explanation and counseling, he or she should not be put on the pump. In India at present, insulin pumps are usually not reimbursable or covered by insurance, and the patient needs to buy the pump and also the consumables, both of which are currently expensive. Cost of the pump is a one-time expense, but the cost of the consumables is a recurring expenditure. Hence, the family should be aware of the continuing expenditure when they decide to start with insulin pump therapy. If they cannot afford it in th Continue reading >>

Low-cost Insulin Pump Highlights Tech Transfer Gaps

Low-cost Insulin Pump Highlights Tech Transfer Gaps

The dean of the school of biotechnology at Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham in Kollam, Kerala has been in the science domain for at least 25 years. Now, he’s busy learning about technology transfer as he tries to take an insulin pump to the market. Nair is discovering that this isn’t easy. He has to reconcile research, business imperatives, and an institutional value system that insists that costs be kept low. Nair’s group at Amrita has developed an insulin pump, which could sell for one-tenth of the prices of existing devices that are currently imported in India and sold for between $4,000 (around Rs1.94 lakh) and $8,000. Inspired by the sweeping adoption of mobile phones, Nair’s team has designed the gadget to be more user friendly. “Most other pumps are only splash-resistant; we are close to being water-resistant,” says Nair, who returned to India in 2005 after a decade-long stint in the US, to set up a biotech institute that is also one of the core biomed technology centres of the department of science and technology, or DST. An insulin pump is a pager-like device that supplies a slow and steady insulin stream to the body of diabetics. The basic model doesn’t measure the sugar level but high-end models have in-built sensors that measure the glucose level and pump insulin accordingly. Even as Nair drives his team to develop the advanced micro-electro-mechanical system-based version of the pump, and even disposable ones, Nair is “struggling” to get a licensee who can keep the price low in bringing the device to the market. He thinks the prevailing price is high due to a monopolistic market. According to market research firm MindBranch, insulin pump makers Disetronic and MiniMed control 70% of the insulin pump market globally. Then, Nair also has to worry a Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Should I Get An Insulin Pump?

Diabetes: Should I Get An Insulin Pump?

You may want to have a say in this decision, or you may simply want to follow your doctor's recommendation. Either way, this information will help you understand what your choices are so that you can talk to your doctor about them. Get the facts Key points to remember An insulin pump can free you from a strict regimen of meals, sleep, and exercise, because you can program it to match your changing schedule. After you learn how to work with a pump, it can make living with diabetes easier. But it takes some time and effort to learn how to use the pump to keep it working properly and to control your diabetes. Using a pump includes checking your blood sugar many times a day and carefully counting the grams of carbohydrate that you eat. Using an insulin pump can keep your blood sugar at a more constant level so that you don't have as many big swings in your levels. People who use pumps have fewer problems with very low blood sugar. Many insurance companies cover the cost of insulin pumps, but they have strict guidelines that you will have to follow before they will pay. Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin pump therapy can give you the better control you want for your lifestyle.1, 2 Technology for Joy & Jake What Is Insulin Pump Therapy? An insulin pump is a small device about the size of a small cell phone that is worn externally and can be discreetly clipped to your belt, slipped into a pocket, or hidden under your clothes. It delivers precise doses of rapid-acting insulin to closely match your body’s needs: Basal Rate: Small amounts of insulin delivered continuously (24/7) for normal functions of the body (not including food). The programmed rate is determined by your healthcare professional. Bolus Dose: Additional insulin you can deliver “on demand” to match the food you are going to eat or to correct a high blood sugar. Insulin pumps have bolus calculators that help you calculate your bolus amount based on settings that are determined by your healthcare professional. Buttons to program your insulin LCD screen to show what you are programming Battery compartment to hold 1 AAA alkaline battery Reservoir compartment that holds insulin A plastic cartridge that holds the insulin that is locked into the insulin pump. It comes with a transfer guard (blue piece at the top that is removed before inserting the reservoir into the pump) that assists with pulling the insulin from a vial into the reservoir. A reservoir can hold up to 300 units of insulin and is changed every two to three days. An infusion set includes a thin tube that goes from the reservoir to the infusion site on your body. The cannula is inserted with a small needle that is removed after it is in place. It goes into sites (areas) on your body similar to where you give insulin injections. The infusion set is changed every two to three days. An infusion set is placed into the insertion device and wi Continue reading >>

Medtronic Minimed® 630g Insulin Pump System

Medtronic Minimed® 630g Insulin Pump System

The MiniMed® 630G Insulin Pump System is a complete solution designed for advanced diabetes control. Waterproof design with a user-friendly color screen and simple menu Built-in CGM allows for wireless transmittal of glucose information Remote insulin dosing with the Bolus Wizard®, which helps to calculate mealtime insulin and may avoid insulin stacking Continuously delivers insulin, with a tubing change needed only every two or three days Multiple insulin delivery settings to meet unique needs Enlite Sensor® sends readings to insulin pump every 5 minutes, helping to identify trends and make adjustments CGM tracks glucose levels throughout the day, including the effects of food or exercise Predictive alerts given up to 30 minutes ahead, if trending high or low CCS Medical offers Ascensia Diabetes Care strips for use with Medtronic pumps for many insurance plans. Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump

Insulin Pump

First things first – registering with the NDSS When a patient is diagnosed with diabetes, they should register with the Australian Government’s National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS), which is administered by Diabetes Australia. The NDSS provides subsidised insulin pump consumables, including reservoirs and infusion sets. Who is eligible for NDSS subsidies? To be eligible, the patient must be an Australian resident, hold a current Australian Medicare card or a Department of Veteran Affairs file number and should have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner. Several countries also have a reciprocal agreement with Australia. If the patient is visiting Australia, and comes from a country with a Reciprocal Health Care Agreement, they may be entitled to temporary NDSS registration. Please note, different rules apply for patients with Type 2 diabetes, and in most instances, these patients may not be able to access these subsidy programs. However, Medtronic is currently offering a grant on insulin pump consumables for patients with Type 2 insulin dependent diabetes, with the opportunity to save up to 90% on RRP30.This means that pump consumables will cost roughly the same as they do for people with Type 1 Diabetes who can access the NDSS consumable prices. See here for more information. Getting access to insulin The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) covers a considerable proportion of drug and medication costs through Medicare. Patients can get insulin from pharmacies with a prescription (from a GP or Endocrinologist) using the PBS; one prescription is generally 3-6 months’ supply, depending on the patient’s insulin needs. Other subsidy options for Type 1 patients Another option for subsidy assistance for Type 1 diabetes patients is the Type 1 Diabetes Insulin Pu Continue reading >>

Insulin Prices Skyrocketing

Insulin Prices Skyrocketing

America’s getting plenty angry about the rising cost of insulin—and no wonder. Between 2002 and 2013, the average price for this life-saving, injectable drug used by nearly 10 million Americans with diabetes has tripled, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). “No one who relies on insulin should have to wonder if they’ll be able to afford it,” the ADA asserts in an online petition for its Stand Up for Affordable Insulin campaign.1 The ADA’s action doesn’t stand alone. In November, Vermont senator and former contender for the Democratic presidential nomination Bernie Sanders fired off a letter calling on the U.S. Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission asking for an investigation of pharmaceutical makers Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk and Sanofi for possibly colluding on insulin price increases.2 “Not only have these pharmaceutical companies raised insulin prices significantly—sometimes by double digits overnight—in many instances the prices have apparently increased in tandem,” noted the letter, co-signed by Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD). “We have…heard from our constituents that the life-saving insulin they need is increasingly unaffordable,” And in early January 2017, the New York law firm Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann sued Novo Nordisk on behalf of the Lehigh County (PA) Employees' Retirement System alleging the company “reported materially false and misleading earnings and forecasts” that were “inflated” by price fixing. That’s not all. In a rapidly-changing insulin market, the recent introduction in the U.S. of the generic “biosimilar insulin” called Basaglar, which won FDA approval in December 2015, has put a lower-priced type on the market. This development reportedly prompted two major manufactu Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

Not Just for Type 1 An estimated 350,000 people in the United States use insulin pumps today, and about 30,000 of those are believed to have Type 2 diabetes. Surprised? Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease that causes many people who have it to eventually need to use insulin to control their blood glucose levels. Although many people still think insulin pumps are only for treatment of Type 1 diabetes, they can also be useful for some people with Type 2 diabetes. According to Charles H. Raine III, MD, a diabetologist in Orangeburg, South Carolina, who himself has Type 2 diabetes and uses an insulin pump, the criteria for a good pump candidate are the same, no matter what type of diabetes a person has. In general, a good pump candidate has uncontrolled blood glucose, but also has a desire to try for better control of his diabetes, is willing to measure and document food intake and blood glucose levels, and is physically, emotionally, and cognitively able to manage a pump (or has a caregiver who is). Another important characteristic is a willingness to keep appointments with members of his diabetes care team. Insulin pumps are cell-phone-size devices used to deliver preprogrammed and user-adjusted doses of insulin. Depending on the brand and model, they hold between 180 and 315 units of insulin. Most people use rapid-acting insulin — options include insulin lispro (brand name Humalog), insulin aspart (NovoLog), and insulin glulisine (Apidra) — in their pumps, with a few using Regular. Instead of using an intermediate- or long-acting insulin as a background — or basal — insulin, a user simulates the pancreas’s steady release of insulin by programming the pump to automatically give small amounts of the rapid-acting or Regular insulin around the clock, based on Continue reading >>

How Much Do Diabetes Supplies/medications Cost In The U.s.?

How Much Do Diabetes Supplies/medications Cost In The U.s.?

While everyone’s diabetes treatment plan, medications, and technology may be different, there is one thing we can all agree on: diabetes is expensive. In two previous posts at The Perfect D, I gave some sense of what the bare minimum of care for a U.S. adult with Type 1 diabetes would be and also financial resources and programs to help with the financial burden of living with diabetes. However, this post is about how much it could cost an adult with Type 1 diabetes if they used the technology and medications that are currently out on the market (and thought of as “the latest and greatest”) and paid out of pocket with no insurance. Research on this topic has shown me that: 1) prices can fluctuate wildly, so it pays to shop around and 2) there is a very big gap (financially, medically, and technologically) between the bare minimum and “surviving” and actually utilizing the tools and latest technology that is out there. So, the hypothetical person for this exercise is a Type 1 adult in the United States who weighs 60kg, just like the other calculation post I did. Ground Rules These prices are accurate on the websites I have referenced for December 1, 2014. They may change, they may add shipping, they may not offer the services, technology, or drugs on their website after this is posted. These prices are not a guarantee. They are to be used as a reference. The listing of prices/websites on this post does not mean that I endorse the company or product or service. I have not listed all the products available on the market for people with Type 1 diabetes. I have listed major ones to give you an idea of major manufacturers’ costs for the products that are available for general public viewing. I did not call any companies and ask for pricing. Why? Because I believe Continue reading >>

Amrita Insulin Pump And Low-cost, Automated Biomedical Devices

Amrita Insulin Pump And Low-cost, Automated Biomedical Devices

Diabetes is a chronic disorder characterized by abnormal blood glucose levels due to problems associated with insulin production and action. When glucose levels rise too high, diabetes becomes dangerous. Without medical care, it can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke and in late stages can cause blindness, kidney failure and loss of limbs. Worldwide, 285 million people are afflicted, but it is worse in developing countries where less than half the cases go undiagnosed. A staggering 50.8 million affected people live in India. The World Health Organization (WHO) projects that by the year 2030 there will be about 75 million Indians who are diabetic, giving India the dubious distinction of becoming the diabetic capital of the world. Responding to India’s high incidence of diabetes, researchers at Amrita have designed an automated insulin pump, which was recently awarded a patent by the USPTO Patent No: US8,034,019 B2. When the prototype is commercialized, it will be the first of its kind developed in India and one of about half a dozen available worldwide. Normally, insulin pumps are expensive and cost about $4500, making it unaffordable for the average Indian diabetic patient. Considering this, Amrita worked to develop a less expensive, but equally effective pump. The seamless integration of expertise from three Amrita campuses (Amritapuri, Coimbatore & Kochi) enabled the development of this user-friendly pump based on dual micro-controller technology, with features not found in other designs. Thanks to Amrita’s insulin pump inventors, India could be better equipped to treat the rising numbers of diabetic patients and manage the problems associated with this complex disease. Continue reading >>

2016 Insulin Pump Comparisons

2016 Insulin Pump Comparisons

Click to go to comparison page: Tandem t-Slim/t-Flex/t-slim G4Roche Accu-Chek Combo Insulet Insulet OmniPod Medtronic 530G With Enlite Animas Vibe Pump System Features in Common: 24-hour toll-free helpline Internal safety checks Child button lock-out Full Training Included Simplified programming Extended bolus options Temporary basal rate options Programmable reminders Downloadable Low battery warning Low insulin warning User-set active insulin time Tandem t:slim, t:slim G4 & t:flex Unique Advantages Potential Drawbacks Bright, full-color touch screen Modern, high-tech appearance Compact, thin dimensions Rapid numeric entry, fastest bolus entry Cartridges hold 300u (t:slim); 480u (t:flex) Can calculate boluses up to 50 units (60 on t:flex) Site-change reminder w/customizable day & time Graphic on-screen history display Carb counting calculator Temp basal up to 250%, 72 hrs Can set duration of insulin action in 1-minute increments IOB & time remaining displayed on home screen Missed bolus reminders customizable by day of week Alert for high temperatures which may spoil insulin Secondary basal programs linked with secondary bolus calculation parameters Web-based download software Compatible w/leur-lock infusion sets Minimal insulin movement with changes in altitude Small buttons can be difficult to activate; screen goes blank if buttons missed 3x Unlock procedure required to perform any programming No integrated clip (must put in a case that has a clip) Tubing connector looks “medical,” can snag on clothing Basal & bolus settings in same time slots; may take several steps to edit Extra confirmation steps with all programming Weak vibrate mechanism No meter link Manufacturer relatively new in pump industry Requires charging 1-2x/week No formal in-warranty upgrade polic Continue reading >>

Comparative Effectiveness And Costs Of Insulin Pump Therapy For Diabetes

Comparative Effectiveness And Costs Of Insulin Pump Therapy For Diabetes

Ronald T. Ackermann, MD, MPH; Amisha Wallia, MD, MS; Raymond Kang, MA; Andrew Cooper, MPH; Theodore A. Prospect, FSA, MAAA; Lewis G. Sandy, MD, MBA; and Deneen Vojta, MD Evaluation of healthcare utilization and costs over 3 years for adults with insulin-requiring diabetes who transition from multiple daily insulin injections to insulin infusion pumps. ABSTRACT Objectives: Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), or “insulin pump” therapy, is an alternative to multiple daily insulin injections (MDII) for management of diabetes. This study evaluates patterns of healthcare utilization, costs, and blood glucose control for patients with diabetes who initiate CSII. Study Design: Pre-post with propensity-matched comparison design involving commercially insured US adults (aged 18-64 years) with insulin-requiring diabetes who transitioned from MDII to CSII between July 1, 2009, and June 30, 2012 (“CSII initiators”; n = 2539), or who continued using MDI (n = 2539). Methods: Medical claims and laboratory results files obtained from a large US-wide health payer were used to construct direct medical expenditures, hospital use, healthcare encounters for hypoglycemia, and mean concentration of glycated hemoglobin (A1C). We fit difference-in-differences regression models to compare healthcare expenditures for 3 years following the switch to CSII. Stratified analyses were performed for prespecified patient subgroups. Results: Over 3 years, mean per-person total healthcare expenditures were $1714 (95% confidence interval [CI], $1184-$2244) higher per quarter for CSII initiators compared with matched MDII patients (total mean 3-year difference of $20,565). Compared with matched controls, mean A1C concentrations became lower for CSII initiators by 0.46% in year 2 (P = .000 Continue reading >>

Touchémedical’s Cheap Patch Insulin Pump (video)

Touchémedical’s Cheap Patch Insulin Pump (video)

Infusion pumps that deliver insulin and other drugs have been getting quite advanced thanks to wireless technology, new algorithms, and connectivity with other devices. Yet, while work toward an artificial pancreas that combines a continuous glucose meter with an insulin pump is producing promising results, many people around the world simply can’t afford even existing pumps. TouchéMedical, an Israeli firm, is developing a small, cheap, and accurate infusion pump that would be within the budgets of millions of diabetics and people with other diseases treated by drug pumps. The device has a disposable cartridge that is particularly cheap to manufacture, and a reusable core that contains the actual pump and the electronics to drive it. It includes Bluetooth connectivity to be able to interface it with a smartphone can even send out SMS messages to keep physicians and loved ones informed on how the drugs are being delivered. More at ISRAEL21c: World’s smallest, cheapest patch pump for diabetics… Continue reading >>

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