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Low Cost Insulin Pump

Low-cost Insulin Pump Highlights Tech Transfer Gaps

Low-cost Insulin Pump Highlights Tech Transfer Gaps

The dean of the school of biotechnology at Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham in Kollam, Kerala has been in the science domain for at least 25 years. Now, he’s busy learning about technology transfer as he tries to take an insulin pump to the market. Nair is discovering that this isn’t easy. He has to reconcile research, business imperatives, and an institutional value system that insists that costs be kept low. Nair’s group at Amrita has developed an insulin pump, which could sell for one-tenth of the prices of existing devices that are currently imported in India and sold for between $4,000 (around Rs1.94 lakh) and $8,000. Inspired by the sweeping adoption of mobile phones, Nair’s team has designed the gadget to be more user friendly. “Most other pumps are only splash-resistant; we are close to being water-resistant,” says Nair, who returned to India in 2005 after a decade-long stint in the US, to set up a biotech institute that is also one of the core biomed technology centres of the department of science and technology, or DST. An insulin pump is a pager-like device that supplies a slow and steady insulin stream to the body of diabetics. The basic model doesn’t measure the sugar level but high-end models have in-built sensors that measure the glucose level and pump insulin accordingly. Even as Nair drives his team to develop the advanced micro-electro-mechanical system-based version of the pump, and even disposable ones, Nair is “struggling” to get a licensee who can keep the price low in bringing the device to the market. He thinks the prevailing price is high due to a monopolistic market. According to market research firm MindBranch, insulin pump makers Disetronic and MiniMed control 70% of the insulin pump market globally. Then, Nair also has to worry a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

For diabetic patients who need financial assistance with supplies and related health care items and services, the following programs may be of help. Please note that applications must be submitted to the programs and not to PPA® . Categories Insulin Access Programs Blink Health is working with Eli Lilly and Company to offer a 40 percent discount on Lilly insulins. The Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program delivers the 40 percent discount directly to patients and will be honored at over 67,000 local pharmacies nationwide. Anyone can participate in the Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program via the Blink Health mobile app (available for iOS & Android) or website, www.blinkhealth.com, which has no membership fees or monthly premiums. Patients enter the form, dosage and quantity of the Lilly insulin that matches their prescription. The discount will be automatically applied. Payments are made online and the prescriptions can be picked up at virtually any U.S. pharmacy, including: Walgreens, CVS/pharmacy, Target, RiteAid, Safeway and Kroger. People using federal government programs are not eligible. Purchases are fully refundable. Assistance: Insulin Free Glucose Meters Abbott Diabetes Care provides free blood glucose monitoring system kits to those with diabetes. Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc. 1360 South Loop Road Alameda, CA 94502 USA Tel: 888-522-5226 Fax: 202-337-8314 Email: [email protected] Assistance: Free Glucose Meters Test Strips Roche Diagnostics, the maker of ACCU-CHEK® Products provides a limited supply of ACCU-CHEK Aviva test strips to a network of community clinics and health centers throughout the U.S. to distribute to their low-income and uninsured patients with diabetes. Roache Diagnostics Corporation 9115 Hague Road Indianapolis, IN 46250 Phone: 800 Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

Not Just for Type 1 An estimated 350,000 people in the United States use insulin pumps today, and about 30,000 of those are believed to have Type 2 diabetes. Surprised? Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease that causes many people who have it to eventually need to use insulin to control their blood glucose levels. Although many people still think insulin pumps are only for treatment of Type 1 diabetes, they can also be useful for some people with Type 2 diabetes. According to Charles H. Raine III, MD, a diabetologist in Orangeburg, South Carolina, who himself has Type 2 diabetes and uses an insulin pump, the criteria for a good pump candidate are the same, no matter what type of diabetes a person has. In general, a good pump candidate has uncontrolled blood glucose, but also has a desire to try for better control of his diabetes, is willing to measure and document food intake and blood glucose levels, and is physically, emotionally, and cognitively able to manage a pump (or has a caregiver who is). Another important characteristic is a willingness to keep appointments with members of his diabetes care team. Insulin pumps are cell-phone-size devices used to deliver preprogrammed and user-adjusted doses of insulin. Depending on the brand and model, they hold between 180 and 315 units of insulin. Most people use rapid-acting insulin — options include insulin lispro (brand name Humalog), insulin aspart (NovoLog), and insulin glulisine (Apidra) — in their pumps, with a few using Regular. Instead of using an intermediate- or long-acting insulin as a background — or basal — insulin, a user simulates the pancreas’s steady release of insulin by programming the pump to automatically give small amounts of the rapid-acting or Regular insulin around the clock, based on Continue reading >>

Is My Test, Item, Or Service Covered?

Is My Test, Item, Or Service Covered?

How often is it covered? Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) doesn’t cover insulin (unless use of an insulin pump is medically necessary), insulin pens, syringes, needles, alcohol swabs, or gauze. Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D) may cover insulin and certain medical supplies used to inject insulin, like syringes, gauze, and alcohol swabs. If you use an external insulin pump, insulin and the pump may be covered as durable medical equipment (DME). However, suppliers of insulin pumps may not necessarily provide insulin. For more information, see durable medical equipment. Your costs in Original Medicare You pay 100% for insulin (unless used with an insulin pump, then you pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount, and the Part B deductible applies). You pay 100% for syringes and needles, unless you have Part D. To find out how much your specific test, item, or service will cost, talk to your doctor or other health care provider. The specific amount you’ll owe may depend on several things, like: Other insurance you may have How much your doctor charges Whether your doctor accepts assignment The type of facility The location where you get your test, item, or service Continue reading >>

The Future For Insulin Pumps

The Future For Insulin Pumps

Guest Post by David Kliff, Diabetic Investor Newsletter. This morning I learned of yet another closed-loop insulin delivery system, i.e. artificial pancreas, under development. Per a post on the Drug Delivery web site: Cellnovo and Diabeloop said this week they are launching a CE Mark cross-over registration study for an artificial pancreas device Diabeloop is developing which uses Cellnovo’s insulin pump. Now keep in mind that Medtronic is currently launching the 670G, the artificial pancreas that really isn’t an artificial pancreas. Animas, Insulet, and Tandem all have closed-loop projects under way and the premise behind Bigfoot is a closed-loop system. Is it possible that this way-cool whiz-bang device could end up like every other whiz-bang way-cool diabetes device and become a commodity? Yep! Is it possible that when it becomes a commodity there will be a price war? Yep! Do we really need 5 or 6 of these suckers? Nope. Will that stop anyone from trying? Nope. The reality is we are still trying to figure out how anyone is going to make money in this market. Just looking at the 670G from Medtronic and all the additional expense this system demands, it does make one wonder. So far patient reaction to the 670G has been what I have anticipated, a love-hate affair. When it works, patients love it; when it doesn’t, it’s just another pump. Also, as I anticipated, the pump itself is nothing special and the love-hate scenario rests solely on sensor performance. Based on everything I have seen and read so far, the new Enlite sensor is better than the old one. That was a low bar to jump over. Is it as accurate and reliable as the Dexcom G5? That’s debatable. Yet, let’s look beyond which sensor is “better” or which pump has a more patient-friendly user interfac Continue reading >>

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap "old-school" Insulin

Note: BootCamp for Betics is not a medical center. Anything you read on this site should not be considered medical advice, and is for educational purposes only. Always consult with a physician or a diabetes nurse educator before starting or changing insulin doses. Did you know that all type 1 diabetics and some type 2 diabetics need injectable insulin in order to live? Put another way, if a diabetic needs insulin in order to live, and the diabetic does not get insulin, the diabetic will die. Diabetic death from Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a grisly process, during which acid starts running through your bloodstream, searing your vessels and organs while your body shrivels up in dehydration as it tries to push the acid out of your body through your urine and lungs, and, left untreated, the condition shuts down your organs one by one until you are dead. If you're lucky, your brain will be the first thing to swell itself into a coma and you'll be unconscious for the remainder of the organ failures. In some cases, this grisly diabetic death can take a few days or weeks to complete its process. Or, if you're one of the luckier less-resistant insulin-dependent type 2 diabetics, you may actually get away with staying alive for quite a few years and suffer only some heart disease, stroke, kidney damage/failure, neuropathy, limb amputations and blindness. (my intent in describing how lack of insulin leads to death is not to cause fear in people with diabetes or their loved ones; rather, my intent is to make clear the reality that injectable insulin is absolutely vital to diabetics who depend on injectable insulin to live) While I'd love to go off on a political rant about how insulin should be a basic human right for all insulin-dependent diabetics (and why the hell isn't it?), that' Continue reading >>

Low-cost Insulin Pump Designed By Israeli Team

Low-cost Insulin Pump Designed By Israeli Team

Insulin pumps have helped many people with diabetes lead more active, healthier lives. The problem is that the cost of the pump and the supplies often makes pumping cost prohibitive to people in the developing world and those who do not have medical insurance. A father-son team from Israel, though, is trying to change that with an innovate and tiny pump that may make pumping affordable. Avi Keret of Touche Medical points out that their new patch pump is not innovative because it is a medical pump, but instead because it is affordable. “Our device gives the same amount of medication as any other pump; it just delivers the drug in a way that allows for a better quality of life,” Keret recently told ISRAEL21c. He also sees the pump he has developed with his son Amir as giving people who cannot afford to shell out thousands of dollars a new option to better manage their health. “We’ll offer them an alternative,” Keret said. “People who have or don’t have medical insurance will be able to afford it. Children all over the world will be able to use it.” The pump will also feature special designs for children and use technology that will help deliver a more precise dosage than existing pumps. “The three advantages are that it is smaller, the price is cheaper and the accuracy is supposed to be better, so that it can achieve a better blood-sugar balance using a very small amount of the drug. That’s important especially for the pediatric population,” Dr. Orly Eshach Adiv deputy chief of pediatrics at the Meyer Children’s Hospital said. “It should also be more user-friendly than other patch pumps, giving the parents the ability to control the results easily for their kids.” An additional advantage of the new pump is that it is also more environmentally f Continue reading >>

Development Of A Low-cost Insulin Infusion Pump: Lessons Learned From An Industry Case

Development Of A Low-cost Insulin Infusion Pump: Lessons Learned From An Industry Case

Abstract In the last 30 years there have been great advances in technology for diabetes treatment, which facilitated the management of the disease and its complications. Among the advances we can mention the development of insulin infusion pump. However, diabetes treatment using the insulin pump still remains expansive in Brazil, especially because the device and its accessories are imported. The aim of this paper is to report a prototype development of a low-cost insulin infusion pump aimed to benefit Brazilian people suffering with Diabetes Mellitus type 1. The prototype development is a result from a cooperation between Brazilian academy and industry. We comment the development of such a prototype and the lessons learned obtained from it. Continue reading >>

How Much Do Diabetes Supplies/medications Cost In The U.s.?

How Much Do Diabetes Supplies/medications Cost In The U.s.?

While everyone’s diabetes treatment plan, medications, and technology may be different, there is one thing we can all agree on: diabetes is expensive. In two previous posts at The Perfect D, I gave some sense of what the bare minimum of care for a U.S. adult with Type 1 diabetes would be and also financial resources and programs to help with the financial burden of living with diabetes. However, this post is about how much it could cost an adult with Type 1 diabetes if they used the technology and medications that are currently out on the market (and thought of as “the latest and greatest”) and paid out of pocket with no insurance. Research on this topic has shown me that: 1) prices can fluctuate wildly, so it pays to shop around and 2) there is a very big gap (financially, medically, and technologically) between the bare minimum and “surviving” and actually utilizing the tools and latest technology that is out there. So, the hypothetical person for this exercise is a Type 1 adult in the United States who weighs 60kg, just like the other calculation post I did. Ground Rules These prices are accurate on the websites I have referenced for December 1, 2014. They may change, they may add shipping, they may not offer the services, technology, or drugs on their website after this is posted. These prices are not a guarantee. They are to be used as a reference. The listing of prices/websites on this post does not mean that I endorse the company or product or service. I have not listed all the products available on the market for people with Type 1 diabetes. I have listed major ones to give you an idea of major manufacturers’ costs for the products that are available for general public viewing. I did not call any companies and ask for pricing. Why? Because I believe Continue reading >>

An Integrated Intelligent Insulin Pump

An Integrated Intelligent Insulin Pump

Abstract: As an evangel to diabetics, the invention of insulin pump has drastically renovated the ways of treatment for diabetes. Having been developing since 1970s, insulin pump is an advanced product now. However, the insulin pump in the market is still far from being satisfactory, as pains were caused to patients out of the injection and finger blood extraction. Even worse, if insulin is over injected, the patient can have low blood sugar level that could be life threatening to the patient. And the treatment is expensive to the patients and it is estimated to be 10 RMB/hour due to the high cost of the current insulin systems. It is desirable for regular patients to be provided with a closed-loop, low cost glucose-insulin pump diabetes treatment system, which is not yet available in the market. This closed-loop system will make the glucose measurement and insulin pumping be conducted continuously so that a complete diabetic management can be realized. A novel intelligent insulin pump with painless and automatic injection coupled with the glucose metering was introduced in the present study Continue reading >>

Institute Develops Cheap Insulin Pump

Institute Develops Cheap Insulin Pump

Gulf Times: Ashraf Padanna Here is good news for diabetics. A Kerala institute has developed a cheap automated insulin pump designed for the precise, personalised and continuous delivery of insulin in a subcutaneous manner with all the advanced functionalities. "We received the US patent last month for the innovation which we want to make available in the market at one-tenth the price of the existing ones which cost between $6,000 and $8,000,” Dr Bipin Nair, head of the Amrita Institute of Biotechnology (AIB), who led the research, said. Insulin pumps and most of the devices used for managing blood sugar are currently imported in India but they are not popular with ordinary people because of the high prices. Dr Nair said the scene would change once the low-cost device, which matches its current counterparts in every aspect, hits the market. The AIB under the Kerala-based Amrita Vishwapeetham developed the device with the support of India’s Technology Information Forecasting and Assessment Council (TIFAC), global bio-pharma major Biocon Limited and Media Lab Asia. "We are in talks with some companies in the field for its commercial production and marketing. We need to ensure that it should be in reach of ordinary people in India which has become the world’s diabetes capital,” said Dr Nair who has numerous publications to his credits in international scientific journals. The pager-like devise, which is smaller than an average cell phone, is expected to hit the market in the next two years. The AIB has also developed blood glucose metre strips that cost only Rs5 a piece to measure insulin level. India has some 45mn diabetes patients and the number is expected to grow to 79.4mn by 2030, according to the International Diabetes Foundation. If a fraction of the patient Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump

Insulin Pump

First things first – registering with the NDSS When a patient is diagnosed with diabetes, they should register with the Australian Government’s National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS), which is administered by Diabetes Australia. The NDSS provides subsidised insulin pump consumables, including reservoirs and infusion sets. Who is eligible for NDSS subsidies? To be eligible, the patient must be an Australian resident, hold a current Australian Medicare card or a Department of Veteran Affairs file number and should have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner. Several countries also have a reciprocal agreement with Australia. If the patient is visiting Australia, and comes from a country with a Reciprocal Health Care Agreement, they may be entitled to temporary NDSS registration. Please note, different rules apply for patients with Type 2 diabetes, and in most instances, these patients may not be able to access these subsidy programs. However, Medtronic is currently offering a grant on insulin pump consumables for patients with Type 2 insulin dependent diabetes, with the opportunity to save up to 90% on RRP30.This means that pump consumables will cost roughly the same as they do for people with Type 1 Diabetes who can access the NDSS consumable prices. See here for more information. Getting access to insulin The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) covers a considerable proportion of drug and medication costs through Medicare. Patients can get insulin from pharmacies with a prescription (from a GP or Endocrinologist) using the PBS; one prescription is generally 3-6 months’ supply, depending on the patient’s insulin needs. Other subsidy options for Type 1 patients Another option for subsidy assistance for Type 1 diabetes patients is the Type 1 Diabetes Insulin Pu Continue reading >>

India University Creates Low-cost Insulin Pump: Commercial Partners Wanted

India University Creates Low-cost Insulin Pump: Commercial Partners Wanted

Amrita University in southern India has developed what it bills as a low-cost insulin pump about one-tenth as expensive as imported alternatives. The university is also apparently talking to two "biomedical devices" companies about producing it commercially, though the school hasn't disclosed any names, according to The Hindu Business Line. Larger insulin pump makers like Medtronic ($MDT) may want to take note. With India's emerging market of 1 billion-plus people, we've long known that there are enormous opportunities there for life sciences companies, and either one of the parties in negotiations could be a major player. But the article also emphases the goal of developing a product that is much cheaper than "imported pumps," and a local enterprise based in India could easily win out in producing the cell-phone sized insulin delivery system. Story Continue reading >>

Rent, Don't Buy, Your Insulin Pump?

Rent, Don't Buy, Your Insulin Pump?

Here's a novel -- and utterly pragmatic American -- idea: What if you could rent your insulin pump instead of buying it? So all you'd need to buy was the disposable supplies, and you'd be ready to trade up to new models in a minute? David Kliff of Diabetic Investor explores the concept in his latest (subscription) newsletter, which I've been poring over with great interest. Under this new pricing model, the patient would pay an annual lease payment to cover the pump's manufacturing costs, and would continue to purchase pump disposables. It's basically like leasing a car, Kliff explains. "Why spend $40,000 or more when for a few hundred dollars a month a consumer has almost all the same benefits as someone who purchases the car outright? At the end of the lease, the consumer simply returns the car and the process begins all over." The idea seems to be exclusively Kliff's at this point. So what would happen to the insulin pump market if just one of the conventional pump companies decided to take the leap? Currently the hottest growth companies are Medtronic and Insulet, makers of the new tubeless OmniPod System -- but a leasing model could level the playing field again, according to Kliff. For example, Insulet currently has an advantage in the low upfront cost of its pumping unit ($800), but the annual supply costs are quite high (nearly $4,000 for a year's worth of Pods), Kliff reports. A leasing structure could be better for everyone, Kliff argues: Patients could eliminate buyer's remorse, and would have the opportunity to consistently upgrade to new and improved pumping technology. Manufacturers would avert price wars, which may soon otherwise force a number of players out of the market altogether (leaving patients with fewer choices). Third-party payers (Medicare, HMO Continue reading >>

Use Of Insulin Pumps In India: Suggested Guidelines Based On Experience And Cultural Differences

Use Of Insulin Pumps In India: Suggested Guidelines Based On Experience And Cultural Differences

Go to: What Is an Insulin Pump? The continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) pump (insulin pump for short) is a pager-sized device that can be connected to the body through an infusion set so as to deliver insulin continuously. It consists of a disposable reservoir for insulin and a disposable infusion set, including a cannula for subcutaneous insertion and a tubing system that connects the insulin reservoir to the cannula. Insulin pump therapy by itself is not a new therapy for diabetes mellitus. It is an alternative delivery mechanism for administration of insulin and is found to be superior to ordinary syringes and insulin pens. When insulin is administered subcutaneously via a properly programmed insulin pump, delivery of insulin is expected to mimic the insulin release pattern of a normal healthy pancreas better than other modalities of insulin delivery. Willingness on the part of the patient is absolutely essential before going on the pump. However, mere willingness to initiate pump therapy does not make a patient a candidate for the same. Other indications mentioned below need to be present if a patient is to be considered for pump therapy. Conversely, if a patient who fulfils one or more of the indications is not comfortable wearing the pump even after due explanation and counseling, he or she should not be put on the pump. In India at present, insulin pumps are usually not reimbursable or covered by insurance, and the patient needs to buy the pump and also the consumables, both of which are currently expensive. Cost of the pump is a one-time expense, but the cost of the consumables is a recurring expenditure. Hence, the family should be aware of the continuing expenditure when they decide to start with insulin pump therapy. If they cannot afford it in th Continue reading >>

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