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Levemir Dosage Maximum

How High A Dose Do You Take Of Levemir And Novolog?

How High A Dose Do You Take Of Levemir And Novolog?

How high a dose do you take of Levemir and Novolog? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. How high a dose do you take of Levemir and Novolog? I am a new to this forum and wanted to ask what the max people have taken of these two meds. I have been on injections for about a year. When I started, Endo said I would feel better very soon. Well still feel lously and my A1C has increased. They started me on very small amounts and am now on 40units of Levemir in the morning and 50units at bedtime. Also take about 25 units of Novolog at dinner and sometimes 10 to 15 units at lunch depending on what I have. My A1c is over 8. My GP says to increase meds slowly , that there is no max amount on these drugs. My Endo says no, dont increase as I may go under when I sleep. My morning bloods sugars are between 170 and 200. I am in the process of getting a thread mill and am getting religion as far as exercise goes. Want to know what the max amount of these drugs that people have taken. Am caught between two Doctors and am confused. Thanks for any thoughts. I am obviously insulin resistant and gained about 7 pounds since I started the insulin. Have just lost 3 of those pounds but am starving all the time. I am a new to this forum and wanted to ask what the max people have taken of these two meds. I have been on injections for about a year. When I started, Endo said I would feel better very soon. Well still feel lously and my A1C has increased. They started me on very small amounts and am now on 40units of Levemir in the morning and 50units at bedtime. Also take about 25 units of Novolog at dinner and sometimes 10 to 15 units at lunch depending on w Continue reading >>

Long-acting Insulins

Long-acting Insulins

Rapid-Acting Analogues Short-Acting Insulins Intermediate-Acting Insulins Long-Acting Insulins Combination Insulins Drug UPDATES: TRESIBA ®- insulin degludec injection [Drug information / PDF] Click link for the latest monograph Dosing: Click (+) next to Dosage and Administration section (drug info link) Initial U.S. Approval: 2015 Mechanism of Action: The primary activity of insulin, including TRESIBA, is regulation of glucose metabolism. Insulin and its analogs lower blood glucose by stimulating peripheral glucose uptake, especially by skeletal muscle and fat, and by inhibiting hepatic glucose production. Insulin also inhibits lipolysis and proteolysis, and enhances protein synthesis. TRESIBA forms multi-hexamers when injected into the subcutaneous tissue resulting in a subcutaneous insulin degludec depot. The protracted time action profile of TRESIBA is predominantly due to delayed absorption of insulin degludec from the subcutaneous tissue to the systemic circulation and to a lesser extent due to binding of insulin-degludec to circulating albumin. INDICATIONS AND USAGE: TRESIBA is indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use TRESIBA is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Dosing: Individualize dose based on type of diabetes, metabolic needs, blood glucose monitoring results and glycemic control goal. Rotate injection sites to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy. Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin or solution. Administer subcutaneously once daily at any time of day. Do NOT perform dose conversion when using the TRESIBA U-100 or U-200 FlexTouch pens. The TRESIBA U-100 and U-200 FlexTouch pens dose window shows the number of insulin units to be delivered and NO conversion is needed. HOW SUPPLIE Continue reading >>

Insulin Detemir (rx)

Insulin Detemir (rx)

Dosing & Uses Type I or II Diabetes Mellitus Once daily dosage: Administer SC with evening meal or at bedtime Twice daily dosage: Administer SC with morning meal and either with evening meal, at bedtime, or 12 hr after the morning dose Type 1 diabetes: Approximately one third of the total daily insulin requirements SC; rapid-acting or short-acting, premeal insulin should be used to satisfy the remainder of the daily insulin requirements; usual daily maintenance range is 0.5-1 unit/kg/day in divided doses; nonobese may require 0.4-0.6 unit/kg/day; obese may require 0.6-1.2 units/kg/day Type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on oral medication: 10 units/day SC (or 0.1-0.2 unit/kg/day) in evening or divided q12hr Type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on GLP-1 receptor agonist: 10 units/day SC given once daily in evening Subsequently adjust dose based on blood glucose measurements Conversion from other insulins If converting from insulin glargine: Change can be accomplished on a unit-to-unit basis If converting from NPH insulin: Change can be accomplished on a unit-to-unit basis; however, some patients with type 2 diabetes may require more insulin detemir than NPH insulin Closely monitor blood glucose during transition and in the initial weeks thereafter; concurrent rapid-acting or short-acting insulins or other concomitant antidiabetic treatment may require dose adjustment Dosing Considerations Dosage of human insulin, which is always expressed in USP units, must be based on the results of blood and urine glucose tests and must be carefully individualized to optimal effect Dose adjustments should be based on regular blood glucose testing Adjust to achieve appropriate glucose control Look for consistent pattern in blood sugars for >3 days Same time each day: Compare bloo Continue reading >>

Levemir Dosage

Levemir Dosage

Dosing LEVEMIR is a recombinant human insulin analog for once- or twice-daily subcutaneous administration. Patients treated with LEVEMIR once-daily should administer the dose with the evening meal or at bedtime. Patients who require twice-daily dosing can administer the evening dose with the evening meal, at bedtime, or 12 hours after the morning dose. The dose of LEVEMIR must be individualized based on clinical response. Blood glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy. Patients adjusting the amount or timing of dosing with LEVEMIR should only do so under medical supervision with appropriate glucose monitoring [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. In patients with type 1 diabetes, LEVEMIR must be used in a regimen with rapid-acting or short-acting insulin. As with all insulins, injection sites should be rotated within the same region (abdomen, thigh, or deltoid) from one injection to the next to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. LEVEMIR can be injected subcutaneously in the thigh, abdominal wall, or upper arm. As with all insulins, the rate of absorption, and consequently the onset and duration of action, may be affected by exercise and other variables, such as stress, intercurrent illness, or changes in co-administered medications or meal patterns. When using LEVEMIR with a glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonist, administer as separate injections. Never mix. It is acceptable to inject LEVEMIR and a GLP-1 receptor agonist in the same body region but the injections should not be adjacent to each other. Initiation of LEVEMIR Therapy The recommended starting dose of LEVEMIR in patients with type 1 diabetes should be approximately one-third of the total daily insulin requirements. Rapid-acting or short-ac Continue reading >>

Levemir Overview

Levemir Overview

Levemir is a prescription medication used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Levemir, a long-acting form of insulin, works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping the body to use sugar for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. This medication comes in an injectable form and is typically injected under the skin once or twice daily. Common side effects include redness and skin thickening at the injection site, weight gain, and constipation. Levemir is a man-made long-acting insulin that is used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Levemir may cause serious side effects. See "Drug Precautions" section. Common side effects of Levemir include: Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Reactions at the injection site (local allergic reaction). You may get redness, swelling, and itching at the injection site. If you keep having skin reactions or they are serious, talk to your doctor. Weight gain. This can occur with any insulin therapy. Talk to your doctor about how Levemir can affect your weight. Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or does not go away. These are not all of the possible side effects from Levemir. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you take: angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), enalap Continue reading >>

Levemir Dosage

Levemir Dosage

For those who are beginning diabetes treatment with Levemir, dosage recommendations will vary, based on factors such as your weight, the dosage of other insulin medications you are taking, and other medical conditions you have. Levemir comes in injectable form, and is typically used once or twice a day. Your Levemir dosage can be injected into the skin and fat layer of the stomach, upper arm, or thigh. Levemir Dosage: An Introduction The dose of Levemir® (insulin detemir) your healthcare provider recommends will vary, depending on a number of factors, including: Your current dose of other insulins Your weight How you respond to Levemir (especially as measured by your blood sugar levels) Other medications you are taking, including other diabetes medications Other medical conditions you may have. As is always the case, do not adjust your dose unless your healthcare provider specifically instructs you to do so. What Is a "Unit" of Levemir? In order to understand the dosing of Levemir and other insulin medications, it is important to understand what exactly a "unit" of insulin means. There are various different types of insulin. A single unit of insulin should have the same biological activity, no matter what type of insulin you use, as all insulins are compared to a single standard. Levemir Dosing Guidelines You can take Levemir once or twice a day. If you take it just once a day, you should take it consistently, either at bedtime or with your evening meal. If you take it twice a day, the first dose should be in the morning, and the second dose can be with your evening meal, at bedtime, or 12 hours after the first dose. Your healthcare provider will help you determine which way is best for you. If you are currently using a "basal-bolus" insulin regimen (a long- or interme Continue reading >>

Getting High Blood Sugar Levels Under Control

Getting High Blood Sugar Levels Under Control

Getting high blood sugar levels under control Getting high blood sugar levels under control A 70-year-old man with a history of type 2 diabetes takes insulin glargine (Lantus) 100 units every morning (he is afraid of developing hypoglycemia at night) and insulin aspart (Novolog) 20 units with each meal. However his blood sugar is still around 250 mg/dL. Can the Lantus dose be increased, and if so, to what? Or should the patient be switched to insulin detemir (Levemir) twice daily? Can the dose of Levemir be greater than 100 units? What else would you suggest for this patient? If your patient's blood sugars are in the 250 range all day, he likely needs more insulin. Patients with type 2 diabetes will routinely need 1-2+ units/kg body weight per day. If he is requiring more than this, one should look for factors that might increase insulin resistance (infection, Cushing syndrome, etc.), noncompliance, or incorrect administration. (I have discovered that some patients who were supposed to be taking multiple shots of insulin per day were injecting air and not insulin!). There is no maximum dose of glargine per se, although at doses >100 units, I usually prescribe this agent b.i.d. In addition, we are finding that in some patients, Lantus seems to last only 12-18 hours, so that splitting the dose to 80 units in the morning and 30 units at bedtime would likely improve his morning/fasting blood sugars. Using insulin detemir b.i.d. at this dose would also suffice. Most patients on stable insulin regimens are taking approximately 50% as basal (glargine in this case) and 50% as bolus (mealtime aspart), so this patient likely needs an increase in his prandial doses. If, despite dosing adjustments that put him at 250-300+ units/day of insulin U-100, he is still not at goal, many d Continue reading >>

What Is Levemir (insulin Detemir)?

What Is Levemir (insulin Detemir)?

Levemir is the brand name for the prescription drug insulin detemir. It's used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Levemir is a long-acting insulin that lowers blood sugar by encouraging tissues to take excess glucose, discouraging the body from making more glucose, preventing the breakdown of fat and protein, and helping the body regulate levels of blood sugar. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Levemir in 2006. Novo Nordisk manufactures the drug. Levemir FlexTouch Levemir FlexTouch is an insulin pen syringe prefilled with Levemir. It's designed to make the drug easier to use. You should keep unopened Levemir FlexTouch in the refrigerator until you’re ready to use it. After opening, store it at room temperature no warmer than 86 degrees Fahrenheit. You should dispose of FlexTouch 42 days after opening, regardless of whether or not there is any left in the device. Levemir versus Lantus Levemir is similar to another man-made form of insulin, insuline glargine, which is sold under the brand name Lantus. Both drugs have similar side effects and have been to be effective at managing blood sugar levels in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Talk to your doctor about which drug is better for you. Levemir Warnings You should not take Levemir if: You’re allergic to Levemir or any other ingredient in the drug Your blood sugar is low Talk to your doctor before taking Levemir if: You’re sick, stressed, or have an infection You have kidney or liver problems The potassium level in your blood is low Your doctor may lower your dose of Levemir if you are taking certain drugs, such as exenatide (Bydureon), liraglutide (Victoza), or albiglutide (Tanzeum). Levemir Storage You can store unopened vials of Levemir at room temperature or in the refrigerator, but toss a Continue reading >>

New Here. What Is The Maximum Amount Of Levemir And Novolog That You Take?

New Here. What Is The Maximum Amount Of Levemir And Novolog That You Take?

New here. What is the maximum amount of Levemir and Novolog that you take? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. New here. What is the maximum amount of Levemir and Novolog that you take? I have been put on injectables for about a year but my A1C is getting worse. At first I was put on low amounts of Levemir and Novolog but nothing worked and am now at 40 units of Levimir in the morning and 50 units at night. I also am taking 25 units of Novolog at dinner and sometimes 10 to 15 at lunch. My A1c is still over 8 and I test at 170 to 200 in the morning. My GP say that I should jut slowly increase my meds. My endo says not to do this. I am in the process of getting a treadmill so I can do at least 30 minute a day. How high can I go with these meds. I am so confused and am so upset that I have been at this for a year and my A1c has increased and I believe I have gained about 7 pounds over the year from the insulin. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated. Should I go on a pump and if I do so would that record the amount of insulin I need. My endo has me afraid to increase my insulin but I feel sick from my raised blood sugars. Thank you for any thoughts you may have. I am so grateful to join this forum Hi Christine, this is a good place for you to get help. I take 140 units of Lantus, split morning and night, and anywhere from 10 to 30 units of Novolog per meal. I still have some days I cannot keep my numbers low enough. I did not start at those amounts though. I was told to keep increasing the units by 3 a day until I had a decent fasting number or 2 hour post meal number. I don't understand why your endo would tell you not to incr Continue reading >>

Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection) Indications And Usage

Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection) Indications And Usage

Levemir® is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to Levemir® or any of its excipients. Never Share a Levemir® FlexTouch® Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Dosage adjustment and monitoring: Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Insulin regimens should be modified cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment of concomitant anti-diabetic treatment. Administration: Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin or solution. Do not administer subcutaneously via an insulin pump, intramuscularly, or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Levemir® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) is indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Levemir® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Intravenous rapid-acting or short-acting insulin is the preferred treatment for this condition. Levemir® is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to Levemir® or any of its excipients. Never Share a Levemir® FlexTouch® Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Dosage adjustment and monitoring: Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Insulin regimens should be modified cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in the insulin dose or an adjustment of concomitant anti-diabetic treatment. Administration: Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin Continue reading >>

What Else Do I Need To Know About The Needles With Levemir Flextouch Pen?

What Else Do I Need To Know About The Needles With Levemir Flextouch Pen?

The Levemir® (LEV-uh-mere) FlexTouch® allows you to give your child insulin without having to get the medicine out of a vial with a separate syringe. Levemir FlexTouch contains insulin detemir (DE-te-mir), also called Levemir, which is a long-acting insulin. It is used to help patients with high blood sugar levels. It can provide blood sugar control for up to 24 hours. It is a clear, colorless liquid that is injected under the skin. The Levemir FlexTouch is often called a Levemir FlexTouch pen, because it looks like a pen and can be carried in your pocket or purse. What is a Levemir FlexTouch pen? Levemir FlexTouch pen is a prefilled disposable device containing 300 units of U-100 Levemir. It uses a built-in spring mechanism to inject the insulin. The push button does not extend and requires a small amount of force to inject a dose. When your child’s dose is delivered, you should hear an audible click letting you know that the full dose has been received. How much insulin can I give with my Levemir FlexTouch pen? Levemir FlexTouch pen can deliver doses from 1 to 80 units in a single injection. The large dose display shows the number of units you have selected to give as a dose. You will receive needles made specifically for the Levemir FlexTouch pen, called NovoFine® needles. Always use a new needle for each injection. Dispose of the needle right after you give the injection. Do not store your Levemir FlexTouch pen with a needle attached. The medicine in your Levemir Flex Touch pen should be given using this device. Do not attempt to remove the medicine from the Levemir FlexTouch pen or transfer it from one Levemir FlexTouch pen to another. How do I store my Levemir FlexTouch pen? Keep the Levemir FlexTouch pen you are currently using out of the refrigerator and at Continue reading >>

Levemir

Levemir

Adult Dosing . Dosage forms: INJ (U-100 pen): 100 units per mL; INJ (U-100 vial): 100 units per mL diabetes mellitus, type 1 [individualize dose SC qd-bid] Start: approx. 33% of total daily insulin requirement; Info: usual total daily insulin requirement 0.5-1 units/kg/day (basal + prandial); for once-daily regimen, give w/ evening meal or at bedtime; onset 1h, no true peak, duration 6-24h (long-acting basal insulin analog) diabetes mellitus, type 2 [individualize dose SC qd-bid] Start: 10 units/day SC divided qd-bid; Alt: start 0.1-0.2 units/kg/day SC divided qd-bid; Info: if on GLP-1 receptor agonist tx, start 10 units SC qd; for once-daily regimen, give w/ evening meal or at bedtime; onset 1h, no true peak, duration 6-24h (long-acting basal insulin analog) renal dosing [adjust dose amount] renal impairment: decr. dose, amount not defined; HD/PD: not defined hepatic dosing [adjust dose amount] hepatic impairment: decr. dose, amount not defined Continue reading >>

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

Toujeo® is a long-acting human insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use: Toujeo® is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Toujeo® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or any of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Toujeo® contains the same active ingredient, insulin glargine, as Lantus®. The concentration of insulin glargine in Toujeo® is 300 Units per mL. Insulin pens and needles must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimens cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Changes in insulin regimen may result in hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. Unit for unit, patients started on, or changed to, Toujeo® required a higher dose than patients controlled with Lantus®. When changing from another basal insulin to Toujeo®, patients experienced higher average fasting plasma glucose levels in the first few weeks of therapy until titrated to their individualized fasting plasma glucose targets. Higher doses were required in titrate-to-target studies to achieve glucose control similar to Lantus®. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Toujeo®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label bef Continue reading >>

Label: Levemir- Insulin Detemir Injection, Solution

Label: Levemir- Insulin Detemir Injection, Solution

DEA Schedule: None Marketing Status: New Drug Application Find additional resources (also available in the left menu) Safety More Info on this Drug Continue reading >>

Levemir Dosing: Not Always Clear Cut

Levemir Dosing: Not Always Clear Cut

I asked about trying Levemir back in December, 2007. My PCP gave me some sample pens and said to take it twice a day. Later I saw another doctor who tried to tell me that it was a once a day insulin. Although in the beginning I did better on Levemir than I had on Lantus, I found that it just didn’t last long enough and I would run high before my 12 hours was up. The following spring, there was a discussion on a message board and several of us felt that Levemir was not lasting for 12 hours. I brought up trying it three times a day and I decided to give it a try. I actually found that worked a lot better for me. Right around when I tried that was when I also learned about doing basal testing. By doing basal testing, I know that my rates are set correctly and I can go 24 hours and have my blood sugar stay fairly stable. Another person on that message started taking Levemir three times a day also after I started. There is a third person on TuDiabetes that also takes her Levemir that way. I know that there are at least three of us taking Levemir three times a day successfully. A couple weeks ago, there was a discussion on TuDiabetes about Levemir. Someone has having trouble with it and I told her what I did. Every time I suggest that to someone, I also suggest doing basal testing and state that I know it works for me because of doing basal testing. Someone else immediately piped up and told her that she couldn’t do that. My response was why not. I have been doing it for 3 ½ years less the 8 months that I was on the pump. I get pretty good results from it. If you read the prescribing information for Levemir, under Pharmacodynamics, it states “The mean duration of action of insulin detemir ranged from 5.7 hours at the lowest dose to 23.2 hours at the highest dose (sampl Continue reading >>

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