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Lantus Insulin Pen Price

How Do I Get Lantus Insulin Less Expensively?

How Do I Get Lantus Insulin Less Expensively?

November 2, 2013-- How do I get Lantus Insulin Less Expensively? DCIN receives this question a few times a week from US caregivers of diabetic cats. I am often amazed by the question because of the “good” insulins for diabetic cats, Lantus can be the least expensive per unit. The problem often lies in knowing how to find the insulin inexpensively. (The hints I give also apply to Levemir, another human insulin often used by diabetic cats.) Your vet gave you a prescription that probably read “U100 Glargine/Lantus 10ml vial.” Lantus is the brand name for the generic insulin Glargine. Lantus is an insulin for humans and is only available from a human pharmacy (although some vets do hold some in stock). The company Sanofi makes Lantus, and no other companies currently make a generic Glargine because Sanofi still has an international patent on the insulin. That may change in 2014, and by then Sanofi may have developed a “second-generation” Lantus that is patent protected. Lantus is a U100 insulin, which describes the concentration of the insulin in the liquid suspension. A 10ml vial is the insulin’s containment device. It is a small glass bottle with a rubber stopper at the end that you pierce with a syringe. At a US retail pharmacy, a 10ml vial of Lantus can cost about $180 to $200. WOWZA! That does seem cause for sticker shock. A 10ml vial of U100 insulin holds 1000 units of insulin. At $200/vial, that is a price of $.20/unit. If your cat gets 2 units of insulin twice a day, that is $.80/day for its insulin (if you could completely use a vial of Lantus insulin). It would cost less each day to give your cat its life-saving medicine that to buy a soda from a vending machine. However, the problem with buying Lantus in a 10ml vial is that, properly handled, Lantus Continue reading >>

Lantus Solostar Prices, Coupons And Patient Assistance Programs

Lantus Solostar Prices, Coupons And Patient Assistance Programs

Lantus Solostar (insulin glargine) is a member of the insulin drug class and is commonly used for Diabetes - Type 1 and Diabetes - Type 2. Lantus Solostar Prices This Lantus Solostar price guide is based on using the Drugs.com discount card which is accepted at most U.S. pharmacies. The cost for Lantus Solostar subcutaneous solution (100 units/mL) is around $409 for a supply of 15 milliliters, depending on the pharmacy you visit. Prices are for cash paying customers only and are not valid with insurance plans. Lantus Solostar is available as a brand name drug only, a generic version is not yet available. For more information, read about generic Lantus Solostar availability. Subcutaneous Solution Important: When there is a range of pricing, consumers should normally expect to pay the lower price. However, due to stock shortages and other unknown variables we cannot provide any guarantee. Drugs.com Printable Discount Card Print Now The free Drugs.com Discount Card works like a coupon and can save you up to 80% or more off the cost of prescription medicines, over-the-counter drugs and pet prescriptions. Please note: This is a drug discount program, not an insurance plan. Valid at all major chains including Walgreens, CVS Pharmacy, Target, WalMart Pharmacy, Duane Reade and 63,000 pharmacies nationwide. Lantus Solostar Coupons and Rebates Lantus Solostar offers may be in the form of a printable coupon, rebate, savings card, trial offer, or free samples. Some offers may be printed right from a website, others require registration, completing a questionnaire, or obtaining a sample from the doctor's office. Sanofi Rx Savings Card for Lantus: Eligible patients may pay $0 copay on each of up to 12 prescriptions; for additional information contact the program at 800-981-2491. Appl Continue reading >>

(insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml

(insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Pay No More Than $10

Pay No More Than $10

Our database contains 2 offers for Lantus: This is a discount offer provided by the manufacturer of Lantus. Click the link below to visit their website for additional information or to sign up for the offer. Manufacturer Coupon 2018 Lantus Sign up for the Lantus® Savings Card and you'll pay no more than $10 per Lantus® SoloSTAR® prescription for the program duration. The Sanofi Rx Savings Card carries a maximum savings up to $500 per prescription for all patients who are enrolled in a commercial insurance plan and $100 per prescription for patients not enrolled in a commercial insurance plan. Offer provided by: Sanofi NOTE: This is an offer provided by the manufacturer. Save Up To 50% Off Retail PriceLantus Discount Drug Coupon (Free – No Membership Fees) This Free drug coupon has No Membership Fees and provides access to wholesale Lantus prices. Over 68,000 participating pharmacies accept this Reusable drug coupon. Note: prescription is required for savings. Continue reading >>

Get To Know The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

Get To Know The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Understanding Insulin Sticker-shock

Understanding Insulin Sticker-shock

Why are some forms of insulin so expensive, and what happens if you can’t afford the price? Mary Clark, a realtor in Cincinnati, has grown accustomed recently to being the center of attention at the pharmacy. An independent contractor, Clark has had trouble finding affordable health insurance that covers the costs of the insulin she needs to control her Type 1 diabetes. Since 2012, she’s noticed the price she must pay out-of-pocket has increased steeply; it’s been a big enough leap that even the pharmacists pause in their work when filling her order. “Everyone was just stunned and they would just stand and stare at me,” Clark says. Read “Can I Use Insulin Past the Expiration Date?” She knows many other people with diabetes that are in the same situation, especially those who use long-acting insulin like Lantus. She says she can’t afford pump therapy and she has cut out all other expenses, including doctor’s visits and dental care, to keep up with the cost of insulin. “We do without everything. There will be diabetics who will go without insulin and they can’t,” Clark says. “You won’t make it.” sponsor She’s not alone in worrying about the costs of insulin, although not everyone would notice the same price spikes as Clark, says David Kliff, who owns the newsletter Diabetes Investor.com. It’s the underinsured and the uninsured who feel the brunt of it. People with good health insurance might not even notice, as health insurance companies often demand lower prices from insulin makers for their customers, Kliff says. That’s why two people with diabetes standing in line at the pharmacy might pay dramatically different prices for insulin; the difference might even be a couple hundred dollars per vial of insulin, he says. Read about a woman Continue reading >>

‘generic’ Basaglar Is Cheaper Than Lantus But Does It Work?

‘generic’ Basaglar Is Cheaper Than Lantus But Does It Work?

Basaglar U-100 insulin glargine, which is a follow-on biologic insulin to Lantus is now available by prescription in the US. Basaglar, from Eli Lilly and Company and Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is not technically a generic to Lantus but it does have an amino acid sequence identical to Lantus and has been FDA approved as a long-acting insulin for patients of all ages with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. David Kendall, M.D. and the vice president of Global Medical Affairs for Lilly Diabetes said in Lilly’s press release, “Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim are proud to bring another proven effective diabetes treatment choice to people who may need a long-acting insulin to help control their blood sugar,” and that “We know that starting insulin can be a challenging experience for some people with type 2 diabetes. As part of our continuing commitment to the diabetes community, we are expanding our educational resources.” Is it Cheaper? Business Insider reported that Basaglar “is 15% less than the list price of Lantus and Toujeo, two long-acting insulins made by Sanofi Aventis, 21% less than the list price of Levemir, and 28% less than Tresiba, two long-acting insulins made by Novo Nordisk.” An Eli Lilly spokesperson told Business Insider that before discounts or insurance coverage, the list price for a 5-pen pack of Basaglar is $316.85. You will be able to get Basaglar from retail and mail order pharmacies. Basaglar has also been chosen for the formularies of the top three pharmacy benefit managers and is expected to be covered by many commercial insurance plans. The pharmacy benefit manager CVS Health has dropped Lantus and replaced it with Basaglar for their next year’s formulary. In their announcement, CVS Health stated that th Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: Improving Adherence And Reducing Costs

Insulin Pens: Improving Adherence And Reducing Costs

The advantages offered by insulin pens may help improve patient adherence. Currently 8.3% of the United States adult population, or 25.8 million people, have diabetes. Of these cases, more than 90% are cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and at least 1 million are estimated to be cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Although a variety of oral medications are available for patients with diabetes, insulins remain an important component of treatment.1,2 Insulins are the standard therapy in patients with T1DM and are ultimately used in patients with T2DM who do not respond adequately to other treatment modalities. Although in some settings insulins may be administered intravenously (eg, with an insulin pump), the vast majority of insulin administrations are subcutaneous injections.1,2 Available Forms and Administration In the United States, 2 types of insulins are available: recombinant human insulins and insulin analogs. Recombinant human insulin is available from 2 manufacturers (Humulin by Eli Lilly and Novolin by Novo Nordisk); each of these is available in a regular form and in a longer-acting neutral protamine hagedorn (NPH) form. Unlike recombinant human insulins, insulin analogs are structurally modified forms of insulin that are designed to either lower blood sugar rapidly or maintain low blood sugar levels over time. These insulin analogs may be classified as rapid-acting and long-acting insulins. Rapid-acting insulins include insulin lispro, insulin aspart, and insulin glulisine, and long-acting insulins include insulin glargine and insulin detemir. Premixed formulations of insulin are also available.1,2 Regardless of the differences between insulin formulations, all conventional types of insulin can be administered subcutaneously. Subcutaneous injectio Continue reading >>

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

Insulin can be expensive. If you’re one of the 6 million Americans with diabetes relying on this main-stay treatment, you could be paying out-of-pocket costs anywhere from $120 to $400 per month, according to a 2015 New England Journal of Medicine commentary. Drugs such as Lantus (insulin glargine) and Levemir (insulin detemir) have seen significant cost increases, according to a recent trend report by pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts. One reason for the high prices is the lack of generic options for insulin. So for now, you’re stuck having to search around to find affordable options. Where do you shop for more affordable insulin? For some people though, high drug costs can mean making difficult financial choices. Our national polls show people might cut back on groceries and paying bills to pay for their medications. To minimize your costs, consider these options: Prescription Assistance Programs If you don’t have health insurance or are without drug coverage, look into applying for a patient assistance program (PAP). Through the nonprofit NeedyMeds, you can find some programs that offer free or low-cost insulin as long as you meet the eligibility requirements. Those are usually based on your insurance status, income, and diagnosis. You might also qualify for a diagnosis-specific program that can help you save on syringes, pumps, and other diabetes supplies. Pharmacists are also a great resource and can help you find a PAP that meets your financial needs. Switch Drugs Another way to save is by asking your doctor whether there’s a lower-priced insulin that’s right for you. While “long-acting” is a more popular type of insulin, it's also more expensive, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it works better. “It’s mostly a marketing ploy,” says M Continue reading >>

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