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Lantus (insulin Glargine) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Hormone secreted by pancreatic beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans and essential for the metabolism and homeostasis of carbohydrate, fat, and protein. Insulin glargine is a once-daily basal insulin analog without pronounced peaks. BASAGLAR, Lantus, Lantus SoloStar, Toujeo SoloStar BASAGLAR/Lantus/Lantus SoloStar/Toujeo SoloStar Subcutaneous Inj Sol: 1mL, 100U, 300U For the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus. For the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Subcutaneous dosage (100 units/mL, i.e., Lantus, Basaglar) Initially, administer one-third of the total daily insulin requirements/dose subcutaneously once daily. Titrate dosage to achieve blood glucose control and A1C goals in conjunction with a short-acting insulin. Give the dose at the same time every day, at any time. Administration in the morning may avoid nocturnal hypoglycemia. When transferring from once daily NPH insulin, the dose is usually not changed. However, when transferring from twice-daily NPH insulin to insulin glargine, the total daily dose of NPH insulin (or other twice daily basal insulin) should be reduced by 20% and administered as single dose once daily. When transferring from once-daily Toujeo to once-daily Lantus or Basaglar, the recommended initial Lantus or Basaglar dose is 80% of the Toujeo dose that is being discontinued. Thereafter, the dosage of insulin glargine should be adjusted to response. Children and Adolescents 6 years and older Insulin requirements are highly variable and must be individualized based on patient-specific factors and type of insulin regimen. During partial remission phase, total combined daily insulin requirement is often less than 0.5 units/kg/day. Prepubertal children (outside the partial remission phase) usually require 0.7 to Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

LANTUS® (insulin glargine) Injection DESCRIPTION LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) is a sterile solution of insulin glargine for subcutaneous use. Insulin glargine is a recombinant human insulin analog that is a long-acting, parenteral blood-glucose-lowering agent [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY]. Insulin glargine has low aqueous solubility at neutral pH. At pH 4 insulin glargine is completely soluble. After injection into the subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized, leading to formation of microprecipitates from which small amounts of insulin glargine are slowly released, resulting in a relatively constant concentration/time profile over 24 hours with no pronounced peak. This profile allows oncedaily dosing as a basal insulin. LANTUS is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli (K12) as the production organism. Insulin glargine differs from human insulin in that the amino acid asparagine at position A21 is replaced by glycine and two arginines are added to the C-terminus of the B-chain. Chemically, insulin glargine is 21A-Gly-30Ba-L-Arg-3030b-L-Arg-human insulin and has the empirical formula C267H404N72O78S6 and a molecular weight of 6063. Insulin glargine has the following structural formula: LANTUS consists of insulin glargine dissolved in a clear aqueous fluid. Each milliliter of LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) contains 100 Units (3.6378 mg) insulin glargine. The 10 mL vial presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, 20 mcg polysorbate 20, and water for injection. The 3 mL prefilled pen presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, and water for inje Continue reading >>

Glargine Drug Information, Professional

Glargine Drug Information, Professional

Glargine HOE 71GT HOE 901 Note:For a listing of dosage forms and brand names by country availability, see Dosage Forms section(s). Diabetes mellitus (treatment)Insulin glargine is indicated in the treatment of diabetes mellitus for the control of hyperglycemia in adult and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes and in adult patients with type 2 diabetes who require insulin {01} . Analog of human insulin created by replacing the amino acid at position 21 of the A-chain (asparagine) with glycine and by adding two arginines to the C-terminus of the B-chain. {01} Synthesized by recombinant DNA process involving a genetically engineered Escherichia coli {01} . Like other types of insulin, the primary action of insulin glargine is to regulate glucose metabolism {01} . Also, insulin glargine lowers the blood glucose concentration by stimulating glucose uptake especially by muscle and fat {01} . It also inhibits hepatic glucose production {01} . Insulin also inhibits lipolysis in adipocytes, inhibits proteolysis, and enhances protein synthesis. {01} Insulin glargine was formulated to have a low aqueous solubility at neutral pH {01} . The insulin glargine solution has a pH of 4, and at this pH, it is completely soluble {01} . However, in the neutral pH of the subcutaneous tissue, microprecipitates are formed from which small amounts of insulin glargine are slowly released {01} . This results in a relatively constant concentration over 24 hours {01} . There is no pronounced peak with insulin glargine. {01} . Like other insulins, the time course of action of insulin glargine may vary between individuals and within the same individual {01} . In contrast to other insulin products, the duration of action of insulin glargine was similar after subcutaneous injection into abdominal, d Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

What Is Lantus (Insulin Glargine)? Lantus is the brand name of insulin glargine, a long-acting insulin used to treat adults and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus to control high blood sugar. Lantus replaces the insulin that your body no longer produces. Insulin is a natural substance that allows your body to convert dietary sugar into energy and helps store energy for later use. In type 2 diabetes mellitus, your body does not produce enough insulin, or the insulin produced is not used properly, causing a rise in blood sugar. Like other types of insulin, Lantus is used to normalize blood sugar levels. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual dysfunction. Proper control of diabetes has also been shown to reduce your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Lantus is meant to be used alongside a proper diet and exercise program recommended by your doctor. Lantus is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. It was approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000 as the first long-acting human insulin administered once a day with a 24-hour sugar-lowering effect. Lantus Warnings You will be taught how to properly inject this medication since that is the only way to use it. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. Always wash your hands before measuring and injecting insulin. Lantus is always clear and colorless; look for cloudy solution or clumps in the container before injecting it. Do not use Lantus to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. A short-acting insulin is used to treat this condition. It is recommended that you take a diabetes education program to learn more about diabetes and how to manage it. Other medical problems may affect the use of this Continue reading >>

Twenty-four Hour Action Of Insulin Glargine (lantus) May Be Too Short For Once-daily Dosing: A Case Report

Twenty-four Hour Action Of Insulin Glargine (lantus) May Be Too Short For Once-daily Dosing: A Case Report

The insulin analog insulin glargine has a pharmacodynamic profile described as peakless and of longer duration than human NPH insulin (1). This allows for convenient once-daily dosing for coverage of basal insulin needs. We recently had the opportunity to examine whether this is the case in the following patient. T.L. is a 53-year-old man with a history of type 1 diabetes for the past 16 years. Before hospitalization, he had a history of widely variable blood glucose levels, from 50 to 400 mg/dl, while using a 4-injection regimen of premeal insulin lispro and ultralente at dinner. He has no known diabetic complications. Before admission, he had a history of heavy ethanol abuse, with a daily intake of 48–72 oz wine or beer per day. On the day of admission, the patient developed left arm weakness and progressive loss of consciousness. A computed tomography scan revealed a massive intracerebral bleed. Admission laboratory data revealed glucose of 292 mg/dl, a bicarbonate of 15 mEq/l, an anion gap of 18, trace urine ketones, and a blood pH of 7.34. After treatment of compensated diabetic ketoacidosis, the patient was maintained on an intravenous insulin infusion between 1 and 2 units/h. On the fifth hospital day, enteral feedings via a feeding tube were initiated. The enteral formula provided 2 kcal/ml, with a composition consisting of 43% carbohydrate, 17% protein, and 40% fat. The feeding rate was successfully increased and maintained at 35 ml (70 calories) per hour without residual stomach accumulation. Total nutrition intake was 1,680 kcal/day. On the sixth hospital day, the patient was given a 30-unit dose of insulin glargine at 9:00 p.m. and was weaned off of the insulin infusion over the next 4 h. For the next 11 days, the patient continued to receive continuous en Continue reading >>

Lantus® Can Still Be Your Choice For A Product With Demonstrated Efficacy And Safety

Lantus® Can Still Be Your Choice For A Product With Demonstrated Efficacy And Safety

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Lantus U-100 Insulin Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Lantus U-100 Insulin Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Insulin glargine is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes . Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke . Insulin glargine is a man-made product that is similar to human insulin . It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. It acts longer than regular insulin, providing a low, steady level of insulin. It works by helping blood sugar ( glucose ) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. Insulin glargine may be used with a shorter-acting insulin product. It may also be used alone or with other diabetes drugs. Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist. Follow all package directions for proper use/injection/storage of the particular type of device/ insulin you are using. Your health care professional will teach you how to properly inject this medication. If any of the information is unclear, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. The insulin container you are currently using can be kept at room temperature (see also Storage section). Wash your hands before measuring and injecting insulin . Before using, check the product visually for particles, thickening, or clumps. If any are present, discard that container. Insulin glargine should be clear and colorless. To avoid damaging the insulin, do not shake the container. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Measure each dose car Continue reading >>

Insulin Actions Times And Peak Times

Insulin Actions Times And Peak Times

A good way to improve your glucose levels is to track the peaks and drops in your glucose , so you can figure out why they happened and how to correct them. Once you identify glucose patterns (they ARE there!), you also want to understand when each of your insulins is active and when they typically stop lowering your glucose. This helps you adjust your doses or food intake to stop unwanted ups and downs in your readings. The table below shows the start, peak, and end times for various insulins with some explanations and typical uses for each. When Does My Insulin Peak and How Long Does It Last? designed to peak, covers meals and lowers high BGs Humalog , Novolog and Apidra insulins currently give the best coverage for meals and help keep the glucose lower afterward. Their glucose lowering activity starts to work about 20 minutes after they are taken, with a gradual rise in activity over the next 1.75 to 2.25 hours. Their activity gradually falls over the next 3 hours with about 5 to 6 hours of activity being common with these insulins.Although insulin action times are often quoted as 3-5 hours, the actual duration of insulin action is typically 5 hours or more. See our article Duration of Insulin Action for more information on this important topic. In general, "rapid" insulins are still too slow for many common meals where the glucose peaks within an hour and digestion is complete within 2-3 hours. The best kept secret on stopping post meal spiking is to eake the injection or bolus earlier before the meal and to eat slower low glycemic carbs. Regular insulin still carries its original name of "fast insulin" but its slower action often works better for people who take Symlin or for those who have gastroparesis (delayed digestion). It is also a great choice for those who Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (lantus)

Insulin Glargine (lantus)

What is INSULIN GLARGINE-INJECTABLE, and how does it work (mechanism of action)? Insulin glargine is a bioengineered (man-made) injectable form of long-acting insulin that is used to regulate sugar (glucose) levels in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Individuals with type 1 diabetes do not produce insulin on their own; and individuals with type 2 diabetes do not produce enough insulin, or insulin is not as effective due to insulin resistance. Insulin glargine works the same way as natural human insulin, but it's action lasts longer. It helps diabetic patients regulate glucose or sugar in the body. Insulin glargine works by promoting movement of sugar from blood into body tissues and also stops sugar production in liver. Insulin glargine is man-made insulin that mimics the actions of human insulin. The FDA approved insulin glargine in April 2000. What are the side effects of INSULIN GLARGINE-INJECTABLE? Common side effects of insulin glargine are: Local allergic reactions that may occur at the injection sites are: Long term use of insulin glargine can lead to thickening of fat tissues at the injection site. Severe allergic reactions are: Swelling under the skin Bronchospasm (tightening of chest that leads to difficulty breathing) Individuals should contact a healthcare professional if they experience any of the above reactions. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes can affect all people, regardless of age. Early symptoms of type 2 diabetes may be missed, so those affected may not even know they have the condition. An estimated one out of every three people within the early stages of type 2 diabetes are not aware they have it. Diabetes interferes with the body's ability to metabolize carbohydrates for energy, leading to high levels of blood sugar. These chronically high blo Continue reading >>

Mechanism Of Action Video Presentation | Levemir

Mechanism Of Action Video Presentation | Levemir

Levemir [package insert]. Plainsboro, NJ: Novo Nordisk Inc; 2015. Klein O, Lynge J, Endhal L, Damholt B, Nosek L, Heise T. Albumin-bound basal insulin analogues (insulin detemir and NN344): comparable time-action profiles but less variability than insulin glargine in type 2 diabetes.Diabetes Obes Metab.2007;9(3):290-299. Philis-Tsimikas A, Charpentier G, Clauson P, Ravn GM, Roberts VL, Thorsteinsson B. Comparison of once-daily insulin detemir with NPH insulin added to a regimen of oral antidiabetic drugs in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes.Clin Ther.2006;28(10):1569-1581. Kurtzhals P. Engineering predictability and protraction in a basal insulin analogue: the pharmacology of insulin detemir.Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord.2004;28(suppl 2):S23-S28. Heise T, Nosek L, Rnn BB, et al. Lower within-subject variability of insulin detemir in comparison to NPH insulin and insulin glargine in people with type 1 diabetes.Diabetes.2004;53(6):1614-1620. Danne T, Datz N, Endahl L, et al. Insulin detemir is characterized by a more reproducible pharmacokinetic profile than insulin glargine in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: results from a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.Pediatr Diabetes.2008;9(6):554-560. King AB. Once-daily insulin detemir is comparable to once-daily insulin glargine in providing glycaemic control over 24 h in patients with type 2 diabetes: a double-blind, randomized, crossover study.Diabetes Obes Metab.2009;11(1):70 fig.1. Levemir is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to Levemir or any of its excipients. Never Share a Levemir FlexTouch Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Dosage adjustment and monitoring: Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated w Continue reading >>

Duration Of Action Of Two Insulin Glargine Products, Ly2963016 Insulin Glargine And Lantus Insulin Glargine, In Subjects With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Duration Of Action Of Two Insulin Glargine Products, Ly2963016 Insulin Glargine And Lantus Insulin Glargine, In Subjects With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Duration of action of two insulin glargine products, LY2963016 insulin glargine and Lantus insulin glargine, in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus 1Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana 2LillyNUS Centre for Clinical Pharmacology, Singapore, Singapore Helle Linnebjerg, Email: [email protected]_grejbennil . *Corresponding Author: H. Linnebjerg, MSc, PhD, Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, IN 46285 USA ( [email protected]_grejbennil ) Received 2016 Feb 17; Revised 2016 Jul 22; Accepted 2016 Jul 24. Copyright 2016 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons AttributionNonCommercialNoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is noncommercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. LY2963016 (LY IGlar) and Lantus (IGlar) are insulin glargine products manufactured by distinct processes, but with identical amino acid sequences. This study compared the duration of action of LY IGlar and IGlar in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). This was a randomized, doubleblind, singledose, twoperiod, crossover study. Twenty subjects underwent 42hour euglycaemic clamps after a single subcutaneous 0.3U/kg dose of LY IGlar or IGlar. In this study, the duration of action was defined as the time required for blood glucose levels to rise consistently above a predefined cutoff of 8.3 mmol/L (150 mg/dL) from a state of euglycaemia. Blood samples were collected to measure blood glucose for pharmacodynamic (PD) evaluations. End of action was reached within 42 hours in 26 of 40 clamps (13 LY IGlar and 13 IGlar). Th Continue reading >>

Lantus® Is Still Your Choice

Lantus® Is Still Your Choice

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine

Insulin Glargine

Insulin glargine, marketed under the names Lantus, among others, is a long-acting basal insulin analogue, given once daily to help control the blood sugar level of those with diabetes. It consists of microcrystals that slowly release insulin, giving a long duration of action of 18 to 26 hours, with a "peakless" profile (according to the insulin glargine package insert). Pharmacokinetically, it resembles basal insulin secretion of non-diabetic pancreatic beta cells. Sometimes, in type 2 diabetes and in combination with a short acting sulfonylurea (drugs which stimulate the pancreas to make more insulin), it can offer moderate control of serum glucose levels. In the absence of endogenous insulin—type 1 diabetes, depleted type 2 (in some cases) or latent autoimmune diabetes of adults in late stage—insulin glargine needs the support of fast acting insulin taken with food to reduce the effect of prandially derived glucose. Medical uses[edit] The long-acting insulin class, which includes insulin glargine, do not appear much better than neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin but have a significantly greater cost making them, as of 2010, not cost effective.[1] It is unclear if there is a difference in hypoglycemia and not enough data to determine any differences with respect to long term outcomes.[2] Mixing with other insulins[edit] Unlike some other longer-acting insulins, glargine must not be diluted or mixed with other insulin or solution in the same syringe.[3] However, this restriction has been questioned.[4] Adverse effects[edit] Cancer[edit] As of 2012 tentative evidence shows no association between insulin glargine and cancer.[5] Previous studies had raised concerns.[6] Pharmacology[edit] Mechanism of action[edit] Insulin glargine has a substitution of glycine for Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

Insulin analogs are now replacing human insulin in the US. Insulins are categorized by differences in onset, peak, duration, concentration, and route of delivery. Human Insulin and Insulin Analogs are available for insulin replacement therapy. Insulins also are classified by the timing of their action in your body – specifically, how quickly they start to act, when they have a maximal effect and how long they act.Insulin analogs have been developed because human insulins have limitations when injected under the skin. In high concentrations, such as in a vial or cartridge, human (and also animal insulin) clumps together. This clumping causes slow and unpredictable absorption from the subcutaneous tissue and a dose-dependent duration of action (i.e. the larger dose, the longer the effect or duration). In contrast, insulin analogs have a more predictable duration of action. The rapid acting insulin analogs work more quickly, and the long acting insulin analogs last longer and have a more even, “peakless” effect. Background Insulin has been available since 1925. It was initially extracted from beef and pork pancreases. In the early 1980’s, technology became available to produce human insulin synthetically. Synthetic human insulin has replaced beef and pork insulin in the US. And now, insulin analogs are replacing human insulin. Characteristics of Insulin Insulins are categorized by differences in: Onset (how quickly they act) Peak (how long it takes to achieve maximum impact) Duration (how long they last before they wear off) Concentration (Insulins sold in the U.S. have a concentration of 100 units per ml or U100. In other countries, additional concentrations are available. Note: If you purchase insulin abroad, be sure it is U100.) Route of delivery (whether they a Continue reading >>

Long-acting Insulin: How It Works

Long-acting Insulin: How It Works

When you eat, your pancreas releases a hormone called insulin. Insulin moves sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells for energy or storage. If you take insulin, you may need some at mealtime to help lower your blood sugar after you eat. But even between meals, you need insulin in small amounts to help keep blood sugar stable. This is where long-acting insulin comes in. If you have diabetes, either your pancreas can’t produce enough (or any) insulin, or your cells can’t use it efficiently. To control your blood sugar, you need to replace or supplement the normal function of your pancreas with regular insulin injections. Insulin comes in many types. Each type differs in three ways: onset: how quickly it starts working to lower your blood sugar peak: when its effects on your blood sugar are strongest duration: how long it lowers your blood sugar According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the five types of insulin are: Rapid-acting insulin: This type starts to work just 15 minutes after you take it. It peaks within 30 to 90 minutes, and its effects last for three to five hours. Short-acting insulin: This type takes about 30 to 60 minutes to become active in your bloodstream. It peaks in two to four hours, and its effects can last for five to eight hours. It is sometimes called regular-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting insulin: The intermediate type takes one to three hours to start working. It peaks in eight hours and works for 12 to 16 hours. Long-acting insulin: This type takes the longest amount of time to start working. The insulin can take up to 4 hours to get into your bloodstream. Pre-mixed: This is a combination of two different types of insulin: one that controls blood sugar at meals and another that controls blood sugar between meals. Lo Continue reading >>

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