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Is There A Difference Between Levemir And Lantus?

Difference And Similarities Of Lantus And Levemir

Difference And Similarities Of Lantus And Levemir

Lantus and Levemir are two types of long-acting insulin which is injectable and used in the treatment of diabetes. They can be used by both children and adults. Human insulin is made up of amino acid chains, A and B. Insulin is produced naturally in the body by the pancreas. It converts tissues in the bloodstream into energy which we use daily. With no insulin in the torso, the sugar levels will become dangerously high and out of balance. Hence, diabetes takes birth. Diabetes is a condition where the pancreas uses little or no insulin at all. Patients with diabetes type 1 and type 2 must use insulin to maintain body sugar. Both are insulin analogues, where the insulin molecules are analogous to human insulin. But when recombined with slight differences it reduces their absorption. How are Lantus and Levemir made? Lantus: Vat of E bacteria produces Glargine. It’s then purified and added to a watery solution containing zinc and glucose and hydrochloric acid for a little bit of acidity. The pH levels are brought down to 4. Once it’s down, glargine completely dissolves in water hence the vial is absolutely clear. Once it’s injected, the acidic solution is neutralized by the body. Levemir: This is made with insulin detemir. It’s created with a recombination of DNA technology like Lantus but made with baker’s yeast and not E.coil. It contains some additional chemicals as used in Lantus. Insulin detemir differs from human insulin where one amino acid has been omitted from B chain. One fatty acid has been attached instead. Similarities between Lantus and Levemir Both, Lantus and Levemir are meant for daily diabetes management. Both are not meant for treating high sugar or ketoacidosis. Levemir resulted in less weight gain, whereas Lantus had fewer skin reactions and r Continue reading >>

Lantus® Is Still Your Choice

Lantus® Is Still Your Choice

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Long-acting Insulins

Long-acting Insulins

Rapid-Acting Analogues Short-Acting Insulins Intermediate-Acting Insulins Long-Acting Insulins Combination Insulins Drug UPDATES: TRESIBA ®- insulin degludec injection [Drug information / PDF] Click link for the latest monograph Dosing: Click (+) next to Dosage and Administration section (drug info link) Initial U.S. Approval: 2015 Mechanism of Action: The primary activity of insulin, including TRESIBA, is regulation of glucose metabolism. Insulin and its analogs lower blood glucose by stimulating peripheral glucose uptake, especially by skeletal muscle and fat, and by inhibiting hepatic glucose production. Insulin also inhibits lipolysis and proteolysis, and enhances protein synthesis. TRESIBA forms multi-hexamers when injected into the subcutaneous tissue resulting in a subcutaneous insulin degludec depot. The protracted time action profile of TRESIBA is predominantly due to delayed absorption of insulin degludec from the subcutaneous tissue to the systemic circulation and to a lesser extent due to binding of insulin-degludec to circulating albumin. INDICATIONS AND USAGE: TRESIBA is indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use TRESIBA is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Dosing: Individualize dose based on type of diabetes, metabolic needs, blood glucose monitoring results and glycemic control goal. Rotate injection sites to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy. Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin or solution. Administer subcutaneously once daily at any time of day. Do NOT perform dose conversion when using the TRESIBA U-100 or U-200 FlexTouch pens. The TRESIBA U-100 and U-200 FlexTouch pens dose window shows the number of insulin units to be delivered and NO conversion is needed. HOW SUPPLIE Continue reading >>

Toujeo, A More Concentrated Version Of Lantus Is Now Available

Toujeo, A More Concentrated Version Of Lantus Is Now Available

As most of you may know, Lantus, the most commonly prescribed basal insulin, saw its patent protection expire in February of this year. Several new competitors in the basal insulin niche are waiting in the wings, hoping to siphon off some of the $9 billion a year the French firm Sanofi has been earning from Lantus. Two brand new basal insulins currently on deck are Novo Nordisk's Tresiba and a peglispro, from Lilly. Tresiba has been already available in Europe since 2013 but is not approved in the U.S.. It achieves similar blood sugar results as Lantus while claiming to produce fewer nighttime hypos. Peglispro is not yet approved anywhere yet, and its approval appears to be getting delayed due to some troubling signs found in clinical trial data that suggest it may harm the liver and that it may cause more severe hypos than existing basal insulins. Besides these new analog insulins, there is another kind of competitor ready to take away Lantus' market share: biosimilars. These are protein molecules that claim to be similar in action, though not identical in structure, to another drug. They are as close as we can get to a generic product with hormones like insulin. Lilly, in partnership with Boehringer Ingelheim, has already received approval to market its biosimilar insulin glargine, Basaglar in Europe and has tentative FDA approval to market it in the U.S. though because of a patent dispute with Sanofi, it can't bring Basaglar to market in the U.S. until mid 2016. . What is Toujeo? To defend itself against this dramatic ramp up in competition, Sanofi has come out with its own "new" basal insulin, which it is calling Toujeo. However, Toujeo is not really a new insulin, as it uses the same molecule, insulin glargine, as Lantus. All that is different is that it now comes Continue reading >>

Auth/2038/8/07 - Novo Nordisk V Sanofi-aventis

Auth/2038/8/07 - Novo Nordisk V Sanofi-aventis

Case Summary: Novo Nordisk complained about a Lantus (insulin glargine) mailing sent by Sanofi-Aventis. Novo Nordisk had a competitor product, Levemir (insulin detemir). Novo Nordisk alleged that a cost comparison claim ‘Lantus offers a significant cost advantage over insulin detemir in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes’ followed by two bullet points which claimed that Lantus treatment costs were 10% lower and 28% lower (p<0.001) in type 1 and type 2 diabetes respectively, than for insulin detemir, was in breach of the Code. The Poole et al reference clearly emphasised that there was a significant difference between the two products in terms of the applied insulin regimens in type 2 diabetes; like had not been compared with like. The more frequent use of basal plus oral regimen with Lantus thus related to lower costs therefore the overall claim about the reduced treatment-related costs in type 2 diabetes was unfair and misleading. Furthermore during the analysed period Levemir did not have a marketing authorization for basal plus oral indication and was used off-label. The Code stated that an economic evaluation must be consistent with the marketing authorization, therefore using Poole et al for promotional claims was in breach of the Code. The Panel noted that the mailing was entitled ‘Which basal insulin analogue has lower anti-diabetic prescribing costs compared with Levemir in similar patients?’ Beneath ‘Once-daily Lantus’ it continued ‘Evidence from a retrospective database analysis of routine general practice of people with diabetes being initiated on basal insulin therapy’. Page 2 was headed ‘Lantus offers a significant cost advantage over Levemir in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes’. Pages 1 and 2 were referenced to Poole et al which compared th Continue reading >>

Lantus Vs. Levemir

Lantus Vs. Levemir

What is Lantus? What is Levemir? 3 How do Lantus and Levemir work? Lantus is a Brand name for a man-made hormone product form called insulin glargine. It works by lowering glucose levels in blood. It is a long-acting form of insulin, a slightly different from other insulin forms that are not man-made. Lantus is used to for the treatment of diabetes type 1 and type 2. Levemir is a Brand name for a man-made hormone product form of insulin called insulin detemir. It works by lowering glucose levels in blood. It is a long-acting form of insulin, a slightly different from other insulin forms that are not man-made. Levemir is used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in adults. Levemir can be also used to treat type 1for the treatment of diabetes type 1 in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. Lantus and Levemir do have many similarities but they are not the same thing. They are both man-made long-acting form of insulin and they are both used for the treatment of diabetes type 1 and 2, and they are intended for daily management. Studies showed no significant difference in the effectiveness and safety of Lantus and Levemir for the treamtnent of type 2 diabetes. They’re both absorbed slowly over a 24-hour period. Both products are basal insulin formulas, which mean that sugar levels in blood are lowered more slowly but they last much longer. They act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low insulin output produced by a healthy pancreas. They are not used to correct sugar spikes or to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis treatment requires short-acting insulin. However, there are some differences. Levemir is an insulin detemir solution, while Lantus is an insulin glargine solution. Insulin glargine -Lantus is made by recombinant DNA Continue reading >>

Levemir

Levemir

Levemir detemir by Novo Nordisk long-acting analog U100 Special-via albumin binding Line new molecular entity Also known as Detemir (generic) Similar to Lantus, ultralente Action in cats dose dependent peak times onset ~3h, flattish peak at 8 to 12h duration 10-24h depending on dose Action in dogs use 1/4 usual dose for dogs! onset Xh (unknown), peak Xh, duration Xh See Fleeman-Rand protocol[1] Use and Handling Type clear Shelf Life 24 months When opened 6 weeks room temp.[2] (often more refrig.) In pen 6 weeks room temp.[3] (often more refrig.) Notes protect from light and heat Do Not Freeze do not refrigerate after opening no need to roll before use mixing with other insulins may change action of one or both dilution effects unknown Do not use intravenously[4] Avoid intramuscular use[5] Levemir is Novo Nordisk A/S's worldwide brand name for insulin detemir, a long-lasting insulin analog that lasts up to 24 hours in humans. Its chief benefits according to Novo are a "peakless" action, less weight gain[6] than other insulins, and less day-to-day variability[7] than NPH or Lantus insulins. Levemir has been shown (by the manufacturer) to vary less day-to-day than NPH or Lantus.[8][9] It was also found to vary less between patients[10]. Warning: This press release from Novo Nordisk dated June 13, 2009, advises there is some stolen Levemir on the market[11]. From the press release, the items were stolen in North Carolina and some vials have surfaced at a medical center in Houston. The stolen lot numbers are:XZF0036, XZF0037, XZF0038. FDA also issued an advisory; there was an adverse event reported in connection with a vial from one of these lot numbers[12]. Note: For vets and prospective new users, please see these Cases of cats using Levemir. If dogs try it, they would lik Continue reading >>

Novo Nordisk’s New Insulin Tresiba To Take On Lantus

Novo Nordisk’s New Insulin Tresiba To Take On Lantus

Novo Nordisk’s insulin degludec injection, known by the brand name Tresiba, met with FDA approval in late September. It is expected to be available to patients with a doctor’s prescription in the first few months of 2016, according to Novo Nordisk’s chief medical officer for North America, Dr. Todd Hobbs. “This insulin is very predictable and stable,” Hobbs says about Tresiba, which is a long-acting basal insulin. “It has a half life of 25 hours, and can last at least 42 hours.” Hobbs points out while it’s advisable, and desirable, for diabetics to take their daily dose, or doses, of insulin at the same time each day, sometimes that simply isn’t possible. Sometimes, he says, life intrudes and a person is delayed in taking their medication. But, with Tresiba, such an occurrence wouldn’t necessarily impact blood sugar in a significant way. “A patient might miss their dose by a few hours, but we designed Tresiba to accommodate those sorts of events,” he says. Approval for Tresiba comes almost a decade after the molecule that forms the basis for the treatment was first isolated. Hobbs says that even before Novo filed its first attempt for approval through the FDA in 2012, Tresiba had already been in pre-clinical development for five or six years. Tresiba is poised to be a direct competitor to the long-acting insulin, Lantus, which is sold by the pharmaceutical company Sanofi SA. Lantus is the market leader in long acting insulin with more than 80 percent of market share and annual sales of almost $8 billion. These figures, however, were before the patent on Lantus expired in Europe and the U.S. earlier this year. Tresiba already boasts a commanding presence in the world insulin market. According to Science Times, Tresiba is sold in 30 countries aroun Continue reading >>

Cochrane Review – Long-acting Analogues Vs Nph Insulin In Type 2 Diabetes

Cochrane Review – Long-acting Analogues Vs Nph Insulin In Type 2 Diabetes

Reviews and reports K Horvath, K Jeitler, A Berghold, SH Ebrahim, TW Gratzer, J Plank, T Kaiser, TR Pieber, A Siebenhofer Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2007 Issue 2 (Status: New) Insulin analogues are the latest form of GM synthetic insulin and this review compares long-acting analogues glargine [Lantus] and determir [Levemir] with long-acting ‘human’ isophane [NPH] insulin for Type 2 diabetes. For us to have an informed choice of treatment, it is necessary to look at evidence from high quality systematic reviews and Cochrane Reviews provide just such evidence. The authors’ conclusions are: "If at all there is only a minor clinical benefit of treatment with long-acting insulin analogues for patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 treated with "basal" insulin regarding symptomatic nocturnal hypoglycaemic events. Until long-term efficacy and safety data are available, we suggest a cautious approach to therapy with insulin glargine or detemir." Below is the ‘Plain Language Summary’ but the full review can be found on the Cochrane Database www.cochrane.org Plain language summary No unambiguous clinical benefits of treatment with long acting insulin analogues in the majority of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus demonstrated NPH (Neutral Protamine Hagedorn) insulin is the current standard for basal insulin in the blood glucose lowering therapy in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mode of action of this insulin is highly variable, which may be the cause for the difficulties some people with diabetes have to achieve current goals for long-term metabolic control. Therefore, new insulins which are thought to show more favourable properties of action have been developed: insulin glargine and insulin detemir. Because of their theoretical advantages, it Continue reading >>

Glargine And Detemir: Safety And Efficacy Profiles Of The Long-acting Basal Insulin Analogs

Glargine And Detemir: Safety And Efficacy Profiles Of The Long-acting Basal Insulin Analogs

Go to: Diabetes mellitus is a common, chronic illness. In the year 2000, the number of cases of diabetes in the US was 17.7 million.1 Worldwide, that number is at least 171 million.2 The number of people with diabetes continues to grow in epidemic proportions. The worldwide prevalence of diabetes is projected to increase to 366 million in 2030.1 Along with the prevalence of the disease, the global burden of diabetes continues to grow. Although the incidence of type 2 diabetes is increasing at younger ages, most of the people with diabetes in developed countries are older adults.2 However, in developing countries, diabetes affects mostly people aged 35–64 years.2 This has serious implications in terms of the costs of loss in productivity. Due to its chronic nature, diabetes is a costly disease for the individual, health care systems, and society. Complications of diabetes cause 3.2 million deaths per year, and 2.5%–15% of annual health care budgets are used for diabetes-related care.2 As we rise to meet the challenges of the diabetes epidemic, prevention of complications through glycemic control in persons with diabetes is the goal, and safe and efficacious treatment will play a role in achieving that goal. This review focuses on insulin therapy, specifically on the safety and efficacy profiles of the long-acting basal insulin analogs, glargine and detemir, and the place of each in therapy. Go to: Glycemic control in patients with diabetes The underlying pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus is absolute or relative insulinopenia and, in the case of type 2 diabetes, there is insulin resistance as well. Large-scale landmark studies have demonstrated the benefits of insulin therapy.3–7 The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) showed that in type 1 diabetes m Continue reading >>

Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection) Indications And Usage

Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection) Indications And Usage

Levemir® is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to Levemir® or any of its excipients. Never Share a Levemir® FlexTouch® Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Dosage adjustment and monitoring: Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Insulin regimens should be modified cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment of concomitant anti-diabetic treatment. Administration: Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin or solution. Do not administer subcutaneously via an insulin pump, intramuscularly, or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Levemir® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) is indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Levemir® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Intravenous rapid-acting or short-acting insulin is the preferred treatment for this condition. Levemir® is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to Levemir® or any of its excipients. Never Share a Levemir® FlexTouch® Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Dosage adjustment and monitoring: Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Insulin regimens should be modified cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in the insulin dose or an adjustment of concomitant anti-diabetic treatment. Administration: Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin Continue reading >>

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

Insulin can be expensive. If you’re one of the 6 million Americans with diabetes relying on this main-stay treatment, you could be paying out-of-pocket costs anywhere from $120 to $400 per month, according to a 2015 New England Journal of Medicine commentary. Drugs such as Lantus (insulin glargine) and Levemir (insulin detemir) have seen significant cost increases, according to a recent trend report by pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts. One reason for the high prices is the lack of generic options for insulin. So for now, you’re stuck having to search around to find affordable options. Where do you shop for more affordable insulin? For some people though, high drug costs can mean making difficult financial choices. Our national polls show people might cut back on groceries and paying bills to pay for their medications. To minimize your costs, consider these options: Prescription Assistance Programs If you don’t have health insurance or are without drug coverage, look into applying for a patient assistance program (PAP). Through the nonprofit NeedyMeds, you can find some programs that offer free or low-cost insulin as long as you meet the eligibility requirements. Those are usually based on your insurance status, income, and diagnosis. You might also qualify for a diagnosis-specific program that can help you save on syringes, pumps, and other diabetes supplies. Pharmacists are also a great resource and can help you find a PAP that meets your financial needs. Switch Drugs Another way to save is by asking your doctor whether there’s a lower-priced insulin that’s right for you. While “long-acting” is a more popular type of insulin, it's also more expensive, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it works better. “It’s mostly a marketing ploy,” says M Continue reading >>

Key Facts About Basaglar: A Less Expensive Long-acting Insulin

Key Facts About Basaglar: A Less Expensive Long-acting Insulin

If you’ve been using a long-acting insulin like Lantus, you might have heard about a friendly competitor called Basaglar which is coming soon to pharmacies. Basaglar is insulin glargine known as a biosimilar (also called a follow-on biologic). Because of the manufacturing process it isn’t considered a generic, but there are no differences from Lantus in regard to safety, purity and potency. To get to know Basaglar better, here are some details you’ll want to be aware of. What is the difference between a biosimilar and a generic? Generic drugs are copies of a brand name drug, and their manufacturing process can be replicated exactly through chemical reactions. Biologics are made using manufacturing processes and living organisms that are unique to each manufacturer. Therefore, it is not really possible to make an exact copy of a biologic. For an in-depth look at the definition of biosimilar, see here. Is Basaglar less expensive than Lantus? The cost of Basaglar is estimated to be about 20% cheaper than Lantus. It is manufactured by Eli Lilly as a KwikPen. Basaglar won’t be sold in a vial form. Will my insurance switch me to Basaglar? In some cases, yes. CVS Health has announced that Basaglar will be on formulary in place of Lantus. Is it really equivalent to Lantus? Yes, the onset, peak and duration of action are almost identical. Will my dose be the same as the insulin I’m currently taking? Your healthcare provider will tell you exactly how to make the switch. In general, Lantus and Basaglar can be interchanged unit for unit. If you were on Levemir, the conversion will also be unit for unit. If you were taking Levemir twice a day, the total number of units will likely be given as one Basaglar injection. If you are switching from Toujeo or NPH, your dose might Continue reading >>

New Data From Head-to-head Study Confirms Once-daily Levemir® Is As Effective As Glargine Over A 24-hour Period In Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes

New Data From Head-to-head Study Confirms Once-daily Levemir® Is As Effective As Glargine Over A 24-hour Period In Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes

San Francisco – A head-to-head study announced over the weekend at the American Diabetes Association (ADA) meeting demonstrated that Levemir® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) can be used once daily and had a comparable blood glucose response to insulin glargine over a 24-hour period in patients with type 2 diabetes. “Our study reinforces that once-daily Levemir® has a similar 24-hour action profile as once-daily glargine,” said Professor Allen B King, Diabetes Care Center, Salinas, CA, whose research compared 24-hour blood glucose response of Levemir® and glargine. A retrospective study using recent data from a large US health plan database showed that in addition to providing similar blood glucose response as glargine, Levemir® had no significant difference versus glargine in daily average consumption and diabetes-related pharmacy costs. Novo Nordisk announces the decision to conduct the first and only safety and efficacy study to compare once-daily Levemir® versus once-daily glargine Novo Nordisk also announced at ADA the first and only full-scale study of once-daily Levemir® versus a single daily dose of glargine to generate the first robust comparative data set of the two treatments. “By establishing the efficacy profiles of these drugs in a direct comparison, we will help physicians choose the best possible treatment for their patients,” said Mads Krogsgaard Thomsen, chief science officer. “In clinical trials with patients with type 2 diabetes, once-daily Levemir® has shown good 24-hour glycaemic control, improved HbA1c control and a low incidence of hypoglycaemic events, without the weight gain observed for other insulins. For people with diabetes, once-daily Levemir® may thus offer a favourable balance between effect and side effects. Continue reading >>

A 24-week, Randomized, Treat-to-target Trial Comparing Initiation Of Insulin Glargine Once-daily With Insulin Detemir Twice-daily In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Inadequately Controlled On Oral Glucose-lowering Drugs

A 24-week, Randomized, Treat-to-target Trial Comparing Initiation Of Insulin Glargine Once-daily With Insulin Detemir Twice-daily In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Inadequately Controlled On Oral Glucose-lowering Drugs

OBJECTIVE To determine whether glargine is noninferior to detemir regarding the percentage of patients reaching A1C <7% without symptomatic hypoglycemia ≤3.1 mmol/l. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this 24-week trial, 973 insulin-naive type 2 diabetic patients on stable oral glucose-lowering drugs with A1C 7.0–10.5% were randomized to glargine once daily or detemir twice daily. Insulin doses were systematically titrated. RESULTS 27.5 and 25.6% of patients reached the primary outcome with glargine and detemir, respectively, demonstrating the noninferiority of glargine. Improvements in A1C were −1.46 ± 1.09% for glargine and −1.54 ± 1.11% for detemir (P = 0.149), with similar proportions of patients achieving A1C <7% (P = 0.254) but more detemir-treated patients reaching A1C <6.5% (P = 0.017). Hypoglycemia risk was similar. Weight gain was higher for glargine (difference: 0.77 kg, P < 0.001). Glargine doses were lower than detemir doses: 43.5 ± 29.0 vs. 76.5 ± 50.5 units/day (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS In insulin-naive type 2 diabetic patients, glargine reached similar control as detemir, with more weight gain, but required significantly lower doses. The “treat-to-target” clinical trials have demonstrated that the addition of systematically titrated basal insulin to existing oral therapy results in adequate glycemic control in the majority of patients with type 2 diabetes (1⇓–3). The basal insulin analogs, insulin glargine and insulin detemir, achieve this with a reduced risk of hypoglycemia compared with the conventional NPH insulin (1,2). The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy, safety, and the effect on quality of life of once-daily glargine with twice-daily detemir in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on oral Continue reading >>

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