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Is There A Difference Between Diabetes And Insulin Resistance?

Difference Between Pre-diabetes, Insulin Resistance, And Metabolic Syndrome X

Difference Between Pre-diabetes, Insulin Resistance, And Metabolic Syndrome X

Is pre-diabetes the same thing as Insulin Resistance Syndrome (or Metabolic Syndrome X)? No. Pre-diabetes is not the same thing as Insulin Resistance Syndrome, which is also still sometimes called Metabolic Syndrome X. However, people with pre-diabetes may also be diagnosed with insulin resistance syndrome/Metabolic Syndrome X based on other symptoms they have. If a person is insulin resistant, the body gradually loses sensitivity to (resists) the hormone insulin. This insensitivity is made worse by excess body fat, hormones, an unhealthy lifestyle, other medical disorders, aging, or a combination of things. A person with insulin resistance syndrome (Metabolic Syndrome X) is at high risk for developing pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes, but not all people with insulin resistance syndrome are pre-diabetic. On the flip side, all people with pre-diabetes do have some sort of glucose impairment. How are pre-diabetes and Insulin Resistance Syndrome (Metabolic Syndrome X) different from each other? Pre-Diabetes Pre-diabetes is condition that is diagnosed by mildly elevated blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) Testing to confirm a diagnosis of pre-diabetes may include checking blood glucose with a finger stick, a lab test for A1C levels (average blood glucose levels), either with or without undergoing an oral glucose tolerance test. If blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes, the patient may be diagnosed with pre-diabetes. Prediabetes is becoming more common in the United States. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimates that at least 86 million U.S. adults ages 20 or older had prediabetes in 2012. People with prediabetes are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and CVD, which can lead to heart attac Continue reading >>

Signs Of Insulin Resistance

Signs Of Insulin Resistance

What is insulin resistance? Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas. It allows your cells to use glucose (sugar) for energy. People with insulin resistance have cells throughout their bodies that don’t use insulin effectively. This means the cells have trouble absorbing glucose, which causes a buildup of sugar in their blood. If your blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes, you have a condition called prediabetes caused by insulin resistance. It’s not entirely clear why some people develop insulin resistance and others don’t. A sedentary lifestyle and being overweight increases the chance of developing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. The effects of insulin resistance Insulin resistance typically doesn’t trigger any noticeable symptoms. You could be insulin resistant for years without knowing, especially if your blood glucose levels aren’t checked. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimates that nearly 70 percent of individuals with insulin resistance and prediabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes if significant lifestyle changes aren’t made. Some people with insulin resistance may develop a skin condition known as acanthosis nigricans. This condition creates dark patches often on the back of the neck, groin, and armpits. Some experts believe it may be caused by a buildup of insulin within skin cells. There’s no cure for acanthosis nigricans, but if caused by a specific condition, treatment may allow for some of your natural skin color to return. Insulin resistance increases the risk of being overweight, having high triglycerides, and having elevated blood pressure. Since insulin resistance increases your risk for progressing to diabetes, you may not notice right away if you develop Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

Tweet Insulin resistance is the name given to when cells of the body don’t respond properly to the hormone insulin. Insulin resistance is the driving factor that leads to type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes and prediabetes. Insulin resistance is closely associated with obesity; however, it is possible to be insulin resistant without being overweight or obese. Modern research has shown that insulin resistance can be combatted by treatment methods that reduce how much insulin the body is producing or taking via insulin injections or insulin pumps. Reducing insulin resistance can be achieved by following low-carbohydrate and ketogenic diets. What is insulin resistance? The role of insulin is to allow cells of the body to take in glucose to be used as fuel or stored as body fat. [282] It also means that glucose is more likely to build up in the blood and this can lead to too high blood sugar levels. When the body becomes resistant to insulin, it tries to cope by producing more insulin. People with insulin resistance are often producing too more insulin than healthy people. Producing too much insulin is known as hyperinsulinemia. Symptoms of insulin resistance Initially, insulin resistance presents no symptoms. The symptoms only start to appear once it leads to secondary effects such as higher blood sugar levels. When this happens, the symptoms may include: Lethargy (tiredness) Hunger Difficulty concentrating (brain fog) Other signs that often appear in people with insulin resistance include: Weight gain around the middle (belly fat) High blood pressure High cholesterol levels If insulin resistance develops into prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, the symptoms will include increased blood glucose levels and more of the classic symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Causes of insulin r Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin Resistance?

What Is Insulin Resistance?

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps unlock the body's cells so that sugar (glucose) from the food we eat can be used by the cells for energy. In people with type 2 diabetes, a combination of problems occurs, and scientists aren't really sure which is the chicken and which is the egg. The person's body may not be producing enough insulin to meet their needs, so some glucose can't get into the cells. Glucose remains in the bloodstream, causing high blood glucose levels. In many cases, the person may actually be producing more insulin than one might reasonably expect that person to need to convert the amount of food they've eaten at a meal into energy. Their pancreas is actually working overtime to produce more insulin because the body's cells are resistant to the effects of insulin. Basically the cells, despite the presence of insulin in the bloodstream, don't become unlocked and don't let enough of the glucose in the blood into the cells. Scientists don't know exactly what causes this insulin resistance, and many expect that there are several different defects in the process of unlocking cells that cause insulin resistance. Medications for type 2 diabetes focus on different parts of this insulin-cell interaction to help improve blood glucose control. Some medications stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin. Others improve how the body uses insulin by working on this insulin resistance. Physical activity also seems to improve the body's ability to use insulin by decreasing insulin resistance, which is why activity is so important in diabetes management. Find more information about diabetes in The Joslin Guide to Diabetes available from the Joslin Online Store. Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes - Did You Know Insulin Resistance Can Be Reversed?

Pre-diabetes - Did You Know Insulin Resistance Can Be Reversed?

What you're about to read could transform your health forever. If you have been diagnosed with Pre-Diabetes or believe you have this condition, we are so glad you found us. We are here to help. Our website is dedicated to helping you better understand your condition and the specific steps you can take to reverse it. The information on this site is not about fad diets, magic pills or fantasy claims to transform the way you look and feel overnight. It is about accurate scientific information that can help you change the way your body responds to food and reverse a condition called Insulin Resistance. This important information cannot be easily explained in a brief way. So we urge you to take a little time to read the next few pages to learn why and how you can finally achieve your goals of losing weight and feeling healthy. Insulite Laboratories firmly believes that information is power when it comes to managing your health. We put your health first, ahead of making business success. Our primary aim and commitment is to support your efforts toward health and wellbeing. You can contact us at any time to have your questions about Pre-Diabetes answered. As part of our pledge to do all we can to help you feel better, we offer free consultations with our Consulting and Advisory teams about any issues you might have concerning your condition. You can take advantage of a free consultation without commiting to start the multi-level Insulite System. If you do begin the System, however, you will enjoy the reassurance of knowing you can continue to contact our experts for free advice. To learn about Pre-Diabetes and Insulin Resistance, continue reading below. To learn about a system that is specifically designed to help you manage Pre-Diabetes and reverse insulin resistance Click he Continue reading >>

Difference Between Insulin Resistance And Diabetes

Difference Between Insulin Resistance And Diabetes

Insulin Resistance vs Diabetes Insulin resistance and diabetes have come into the day to day vocabulary in recent years because of the sheer number of people who suffer due to elevated levels of blood sugar. World Health Organization has declared diabetes as the biggest pandemic to sweep the earth in known human history. It is even bigger than the infamous Black Plague. The importance of knowing about diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance cannot be overemphasized in light of the recent situation. Insulin Resistance Insulin is the hormone that controls the blood glucose level with the help of other hormones. Out of all these hormones insulin is the best known. Insulin is secreted by beta cells of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. There are insulin receptors on the cell surfaces of every cell, utilizing glucose as the energy source. Insulin molecule binds to these receptors to trigger all its actions. Insulin resistance is in essence a poor response to the insulin molecule at the cellular level. Insulin in general lowers blood glucose level by promoting absorption of glucose into cells, glycogen synthesis, fat synthesis and triggering energy production via glycolysis. Blood glucose level is controlled by highly complex mechanisms. When the blood sugar level drops below a certain level, the brain detects it and triggers the need to consume food; AKA hunger. When we eat carbohydrates, they get digested in the alimentary canal. Saliva contains carbohydrases which break down sugars. Food gets released into the small bowel slowly after being stored in the stomach. The luminal surface of the small intestinal lining cells contains enzymes which break complex carbohydrates down to glucose and other sugars. The pancreas also secretes some hormones that break carbohydrates down. T Continue reading >>

The Causes Of Insulin Resistance In Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes And Prediabetes (video)

The Causes Of Insulin Resistance In Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes And Prediabetes (video)

Most people believe that people with type 1 diabetes are not insulin resistant simply because they are not overweight. This could not be farther from the truth. While insulin resistance affects many overweight individuals, many people with type 1 diabetes remain skinny their entire lives despite a large degree of insulin resistance (1–3). Over the past decade, I have helped many people with type 1 diabetes measure, track and reverse insulin resistance. In practice, 100% of all my clients with type 1 diabetes suffer from insulin resistance despite the assumption that they were insulin sensitive. By measuring their baseline insulin resistance, we were able to identify an impaired ability to utilize glucose as a fuel, and through dedicated diet modification and frequent exercise, some of my clients have reduced their insulin usage by as much as 60%. If you have type 1 diabetes, do not be fooled into thinking that you are insulin sensitive simply because you are skinny. Insulin resistance is a hidden condition, and affects both normal weight and overweight individuals (1–3). What Causes Insulin Resistance? Insulin resistance underlies all forms of diabetes, and is a condition which primarily affects your muscles, liver and adipose tissue. Many people think that diabetes is caused by an excess intake of sugar and candy starting from a young age. While eating artificial sweeteners and drinking soda can certainly increase your risk for the development of insulin resistance and diabetes, in most cases diabetes is caused by excessive FAT intake. The most important thing you can do as a person with diabetes is understand the following: Diabetes is caused by a fat metabolism disorder, which results in a glucose metabolism disorder. At the heart of all forms of diabetes is insu Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Different From Insulin Resistance?

Is Diabetes Different From Insulin Resistance?

My blood sugar remains high (135 or higher) for 12 to 15 hours after I eat. My general practitioner says I have diabetes, but my ob-gyn has diagnosed me with insulin resistance. What is the difference and should these conditions be treated differently? How is it possible that two doctors think I have two different conditions? — Patricia, Florida Insulin resistance is usually found in people who are overweight. The metabolic changes that are brought on by excess weight prevent cells in the liver and muscles from utilizing glucose, despite normal insulin levels in the body. Insulin is the hormone that helps our body metabolize, or burn, glucose. The body in effect becomes "resistant" to insulin. The body's response to this is to produce more insulin. Unlike some diabetics, whose bodies produce insufficient amount of insulin, individuals who have insulin resistance have high levels of insulin early on in the disease. This process is rather complex and genetic susceptibility to diabetes plays a big role, but suffice it to say that long-term insulin resistance eventually leads to diabetes. The goal of treatment is to normalize day-to-day sugar levels. If you are carrying excess weight and your pancreas still produces an adequate amount of insulin, most likely you have some degree of insulin resistance. You will benefit, therefore, from medicines that are considered insulin "sensitizers." These include medications that fall under the classes of drugs known as metformin (Glucophage) and thiazolinediones (two drugs in this class are pioglitazone — Actos — and rosiglitazone — Avandia). They help your liver and muscle cells better utilize glucose. It is possible, however, that additional medicines will be required to manage your diabetes. In this case, medicines that incr Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

Jackie's cholesterol, triglyceride, and blood pressure levels are too high. She's overweight and a couch potato. Her best friends describe her as being apple shaped, although her doctor calls it abdominal obesity. Her underlying problem that she is insulin resistant. That means the cells in her body aren't using the insulin produced by her pancreas well enough. But the beta cells in her pancreas are producing lots of insulin—enough of it to overcome her insulin resistance and escort the glucose from the food she eats to the cells that need it. Jack has the same problems—but there's one big difference. He has diabetes. Why? Because his pancreas isn't producing enough insulin to overcome his body's resistance to it. Beta cells of the pancreas tend to wear out after years of trying to make up for the resistance the body has to the insulin that it needs. Insulin resistance What is known as the Insulin Resistance Syndrome or Syndrome X is a very common metabolic disorder that between 60 and 75 million Americans have, according to Gerald Reaven, M.D., in his new book Syndrome X: Overcoming the Silent Killer that can Give You a Heart Attack (Simon & Schuster, 2000). Dr. Reaven identified the risk factors that tend to go together to form what he dubbed Syndrome X back in 1988. "I wrote this lay book because I was getting disgusted with all the diet books that were starting with my work and were twisting it in ways that were totally wrong," he told me. He has written more than 500 professional papers and books, but this is the first for a lay audience. Dr. Reaven names many risk factors for Syndrome X, not all of which everyone with the syndrome has: Impaired glucose tolerance High insulin levels (hyperinsulinemia) Elevated triglycerides (blood fat) Low HDL "good" cholestero Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

If your child or someone you know has been recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you may be wondering how the disease differs from type 2 diabetes — the form people tend to know more about. What causes type 1 versus type 2 diabetes? Are the symptoms the same? And how is each treated? Here to clear up the confusion with an overview of key differences — and similarities — between these two types of diabetes are experts Julie Settles, M.S.N., A.C.N.P.-B.C., C.E.N., a clinical research scientist at Lilly Diabetes, and Rosemary Briars, N.D., P.N.P.-B.C., C.D.E., C.C.D.C., clinical director and program co-director of the Chicago Children’s Diabetes Center at La Rabida Children’s Hospital. Causes Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus, as it’s formally known in medical terms, describes a group of metabolic diseases in which a person develops high blood glucose (blood sugar). The underlying health factors causing the high blood sugar will determine whether someone is diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which “the body’s immune system starts to make antibodies that are targeted directly at the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (islet cells),” explains Briars. Over time, the immune system “gradually destroys the islet cells, so insulin is no longer made and the person has to take insulin every day, from then on,” she says. As for why this happens, Settles notes, “The immune system normally fights off viruses and bacteria that we do not want in our body, but when it causes diabetes, it is because something has gone wrong and now the body attacks its own cells.” Triggering this autoimmune response is a complex mix of genetic and environmental factors that researchers are still trying to fully understand. O Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin Resistance? Does It Mean You're Going To Get Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is Insulin Resistance? Does It Mean You're Going To Get Type 2 Diabetes?

If your doctor has told you that you have this condition, you're probably asking these questions. It means your body can't respond properly to the insulin it makes. Over time, this sends your blood sugar levels up. That can set you up for type 2 diabetes, as well as heart disease, but it doesn't have to. Exercise and a good diet can help you stay healthy. You can't tell that you have insulin resistance by how you feel. You'll need to get a blood test that checks your blood sugar levels. Likewise, you won’t know if you have most of the other conditions that are part of insulin resistance syndrome (high blood pressure, low "good" cholesterol levels, and high triglycerides) without seeing your doctor. If you already have insulin resistance, you can take actions that will help your health. Exercise. Go for at least 30 minutes a day of moderate activity (like brisk walking) 5 or more days a week. If you're not active now, work up to that. Get to a healthy weight. If you're not sure what you should weigh or how to reach a weight loss goal, ask your doctor. You may also want to talk with a nutritionist and a certified personal trainer. Eat a healthy diet. Think fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, beans, fish, legumes, and other lean protein. Some people with insulin resistance may also need to take metformin. Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance (IR) is a pathological condition in which cells fail to respond normally to the hormone insulin. The body produces insulin when glucose starts to be released into the bloodstream from the digestion of carbohydrates in the diet. Normally this insulin response triggers glucose being taken into body cells, to be used for energy, and inhibits the body from using fat for energy. The concentration of glucose in the blood decreases as a result, staying within the normal range even when a large amount of carbohydrates is consumed. When the body produces insulin under conditions of insulin resistance, the cells are resistant to the insulin and are unable to use it as effectively, leading to high blood sugar. Beta cells in the pancreas subsequently increase their production of insulin, further contributing to a high blood insulin level. This often remains undetected and can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes or latent autoimmune diabetes of adults.[1] Although this type of chronic insulin resistance is harmful, during acute illness it is actually a well-evolved protective mechanism. Recent investigations have revealed that insulin resistance helps to conserve the brain's glucose supply by preventing muscles from taking up excessive glucose.[2] In theory, insulin resistance should even be strengthened under harsh metabolic conditions such as pregnancy, during which the expanding fetal brain demands more glucose. People who develop type 2 diabetes usually pass through earlier stages of insulin resistance and prediabetes, although those often go undiagnosed. Insulin resistance is a syndrome (a set of signs and symptoms) resulting from reduced insulin activity; it is also part of a larger constellation of symptoms called the metabolic syndrome. Insuli Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

What medical conditions are associated with insulin resistance? While the metabolic syndrome links insulin resistance with abdominal obesity, elevated cholesterol, and high blood pressure; several other medical other conditions are specifically associated with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance may contribute to the following conditions: Type 2 Diabetes: Overt diabetes may be the first sign insulin resistance is present. Insulin resistance can be noted long before type 2 diabetes develops. Individuals reluctant or unable to see a health-care professional often seek medical attention when they have already developed type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Fatty liver: Fatty liver is strongly associated with insulin resistance. Accumulation of fat in the liver is a manifestation of the disordered control of lipids that occurs with insulin resistance. Fatty liver associated with insulin resistance may be mild or severe. Newer evidence suggests fatty liver may even lead to cirrhosis of the liver and, possibly, liver cancer. Arteriosclerosis: Arteriosclerosis (also known as atherosclerosis) is a process of progressive thickening and hardening of the walls of medium-sized and large arteries. Arteriosclerosis is responsible for: Other risk factors for arteriosclerosis include: High levels of "bad" (LDL) cholesterol Diabetes mellitus from any cause Family history of arteriosclerosis Skin Lesions: Skin lesions include increased skin tags and a condition called acanthosis nigerians (AN). Acanthosis nigricans is a darkening and thickening of the skin, especially in folds such as the neck, under the arms, and in the groin. This condition is directly related to the insulin resistance, though the exact mechanism is not clear. Acanthosis nigricans is a cosmetic condition strongly Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance And Igt

Insulin Resistance And Igt

Diabetes isn't simple. Although every diabetic, by definition, has difficulty with insulin supply and glucose metabolization, there are a number of different ways to arrive there. You may encounter the terms insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. What are they? Insulin resistance is the body's inability to correctly utilize its normal (endogenous) insulin supply, even though that insulin is present in sufficient volume. IGT, Impaired Glucose Tolerance, once called "borderline diabetes," or "subclinical" diabetes, means your numbers are still short of the diabetic threshold, but exhibit abnormalities in the processing of blood sugar. If a person has insulin resistance, the body is incorrectly using the hormone. Let's track it: You're hungry. You eat. Blood sugar levels rise...all strictly normal. Remembering insulin is necessary for that last stage of digestion—moving the glucose from the blood into the cells—your body puts out insulin, to do its job. But, for whatever reason, the body does not fully respond to the insulin, and the sugars stay in the blood. The pancreas senses the problem, and puts out MORE insulin, trying mightily to bring down those blood sugars. It isn't subtle about it, and, in the early stages, can over-produce, and down you can go into hypoglycemia. This is IGT, Impaired Glucose Tolerance. The overworked pancreas can, and often does, "go on strike." Perhaps 50% of all individuals with IGT go on to full-blown diabetes. In time, insulin output slows below insulin needs, and sugars rise into the hyperglycemic range, where they stay, until medication (sulfonylureas, Metformin, Rezulin) brings them back down. They have progressed to type 2 diabetes. If you have not been diagnosed with diabetes, how do you know if you are insulin resistan Continue reading >>

Difference Between Insulin Resistance And Diabetes

Difference Between Insulin Resistance And Diabetes

Insulin resistance occurs when insulin is produced by the body but not used effectively by the cells. Insulin is a hormone that allows cells throughout the body, particularly in the liver and in the muscles, to absorb glucose and use it to create energy. Insulin resistance interferes with that absorption and can lead to the development of pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes. How Insulin Resistance Develops Insulin resistance has a strong genetic factor. Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are all at increased risk for developing insulin resistance. Ultimately, this is likely to lead to type 2 diabetes for these populations. A family history of type 2 diabetes is also an indicator of a higher risk of developing insulin resistance. Certain medications can contribute to insulin resistance, including a number of drugs used to treat bipolar disorder (Zyprexa, Depakote, clozaril, Seroquel and Risperdal) as well as certain steroids. Metabolic syndrome, a group of disorders including excess weight (particularly around the middle), high blood pressure, and elevated blood lipid levels can also cause insulin resistance. Pregnancy, stress, infection, untreated sleep apnea or severe illnesses are other risk factors for developing insulin resistance. How Insulin Resistance and Diabetes Differ There is considerable overlap in the diagnoses of insulin resistance and diabetes, but they are not the same disease. With insulin resistance, the body continues to produce insulin. In fact, as the muscle, fat and liver cells begin not to take in the insulin produced, the body increases its production of insulin in an attempt to get these cells to accept the glucose that begins to build up in the bloodstream. Diabetes results when the body s Continue reading >>

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