diabetestalk.net

Is Novolog The Same As Regular Insulin?

Is Novolin R Same As Novolog R?

Is Novolin R Same As Novolog R?

No, you can't use one or the other. They have different profiles. Novolog is a rapid acting insulin. Novolin R (regular) is a short acting insulin. Please see link below for more information. Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: What’s The Difference?

Humalog Vs. Novolog: What’s The Difference?

The two leaders in the fast acting insulin market, Humalog and Novolog, are the most common types of fast acting insulin used by those with diabetes today. Fast Acting, mealtime insulin is a type of insulin that is injected before or right after eating. When you eat your blood glucose begins to rise. Fast acting insulin, Humalog and Novolog work to help manage these rises or spikes to keep your blood glucose levels more within range and balanced. When you use a fast acting insulin like Humalog or Novolog, you typically will continue to take a long acting insulin to help manage your levels between your meals and throughout the night. The question is though, is there really a difference between the two? Endocrinologists and other medical professionals don’t seem to really think there is, stating the two are virtually interchangeable. But that’s not really the full story. Humalog (Insulin Lispro) Insulin Lispro (Humalog) has been on the market since 1996, when it was first introduced by Eli Lily. Humalog is the first insulin analogue that was used clinically. Insulin Lispro received its name due to its structure. The difference between it and regular insulin was the switch between the lysine B28 (an amino acid) and proline B29. The formula consists of a hexametric solution available in vials and pen form. After a subcutaneous injection, the formula converts into a monomeric formula which allows it to have a fast absorption in the body. The one noted negative factor of Humalog is its short term control of glucose levels. Additionally, if it is injected and mealtime happens to be delayed, a hypoglycemic episode may occur. For Humalog to be most effective it is to be injected 15 minutes prior to the start of a meal. I recommend reading the following articles: Humalog is a Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin?

What Is Insulin?

The insulin your body makes naturally is a hormone. Insulin helps move sugar from the blood into the body’s cells, where it can be used for energy. The pancreas releases insulin all the time. The pancreas is an organ that sits near the stomach. Special cells in the pancreas, called beta cells, make insulin. In between meals, the pancreas releases a low level of insulin to help the body produce energy. When you eat, your blood sugar (also known as blood glucose) rises. The pancreas releases more insulin to take sugar from the food you eat and bring it to the cells to be changed into energy. This brings the blood sugar level in the blood back down. Insulin works like a key, unlocking cells to help deliver sugar from the blood. Every cell in the body has a lock on its cell wall, called a receptor. Insulin fits into that lock like a key, allowing sugar to enter the cells. When the body is not able to make enough insulin, blood sugar is locked out of the cells, causing it to stay in the bloodstream. This leads to blood sugar building until the levels are too high, which is also called hyperglycemia. This extra sugar is what makes people feel the symptoms of diabetes, such as often feeling tired or thirsty. In the case of diabetes, when the body is either not making enough insulin, or cannot use it properly, insulin therapy is often used to replace what the body no longer produces. History of Insulin Therapy From the 1920s to the 1980s, insulin from animals is used for treatment In the 1980s, the first generation of man-made insulin, called "human insulin," is created. This man-made insulin was genetically identical to the body’s naturally produced insulin By the late 1990s, man-made insulin analogs were being developed. Insulin analogs are similar to regular human insuli Continue reading >>

Basal-bolus Insulin

Basal-bolus Insulin

Multiple Daily Subcutaneous Injections (Non-ICU Protocol) What is Basal Insulin? Basal insulin is long-acting and maintains steady, continuous level of insulin during the day and night resulting in better control when no food is eaten at bedtime. Basal insulin is 40-50% of Total Daily Dose (TDD). Per Basal Bolus Insulin: Non ICU Protocol, Basal Insulin may be ordered as: Basal Insulin: Glargine (Lantus): ____ units SubQ at bedtime. Contact physician prior to administration if blood glucose is less than 70. Basal Bolus can be given at any time of the day; it just has to be administered at the same time each day. Per the Garden City Hospital Basal Bolus Insulin: Non-ICU Protocol, basal insulin is scheduled at bedtime. What is Bolus Insulin? Bolus insulin is short-acting insulin to cover nutritional needs. · Nutritional Insulin (50-60% of Total Daily Dose) to cover patients eating meals, tube feeding, or TPN. · Correction Dose Insulin to be administered in addition to scheduled nutritional insulin dose to correct hyperglycemia (May be used alone to establish Total Daily Dose) How is Nutritional Insulin Administered? · If the patient is eating meals or receiving bolus tube feedings, the blood glucose would be checked AC and HS before insulin is administered. Per Basal Bolus Non ICU Protocol, administer Novolog (insulin aspart) at breakfast, lunch, and dinner as ordered by the physician. · Administer Novolog when the food tray is present. · Do not administer Novolog if the patient is not receiving a meal or bolus tube feedings. · Do not administer if the patients blood glucose is <70 mg/dl and symptomatic. Follow the Hypoglycemic Protocol and contact physician. · If the patient is receiving continuous tube feeding or TPN, use Human Regular Insulin per Ba Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Aspart (novolog, Novolog Flexpen, Novolog Penfill)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Aspart (novolog, Novolog Flexpen, Novolog Penfill)?

NOVOLOG (insulin aspart) Injection DESCRIPTION NOVOLOG (insulin aspart injection) is a rapid-acting human insulin analog used to lower blood glucose. NOVOLOG is homologous with regular human insulin with the exception of a single substitution of the amino acid proline by aspartic acid in position B28, and is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast). Insulin aspart has the empirical formula C256H381N65O79S6 and a molecular weight of 5825.8. Figure 1: Structural formula of insulin aspart NOVOLOG is a sterile, aqueous, clear, and colorless solution, that contains insulin aspart 100 Units/mL, glycerin 16 mg/mL, phenol 1.50 mg/mL, metacresol 1.72 mg/mL, zinc 19.6 mcg/mL, disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate 1.25 mg/mL, sodium chloride 0.58 mg/mL and water for injection. NOVOLOG has a pH of 7.2-7.6. Hydrochloric acid 10% and/or sodium hydroxide 10% may be added to adjust pH. font size A A A 1 2 3 4 5 Next What is Type 2 Diabetes? The most common form of diabetes is type 2 diabetes, formerly called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or "adult onset" diabetes, so-called because it typically develops in adults over age 35, though it can develop at any age. Type 2 diabetes is diagnosed more often in people who are overweight or obese, and who are not physically active. Type 2 diabetes is an illness in which the body does not process ingested sugars (glucose) properly. In type 2, the body usually produces some insulin, but not enough to allow the glucose into the cells for the body to use as energy. In addition, there can be insulin resistance, where it becomes difficult for the body to use the insulin produced. Type 2 diabetes is seen both in men and in women, though men have a slightly higher incidence of developing the dise Continue reading >>

Insulin Types

Insulin Types

What Are the Different Insulin Types? Insulin Types are hormones normally made in the pancreas that stimulates the flow of sugar – glucose – from the blood into the cells of the body. Glucose provides the cells with the energy they need to function. There are two main groups of insulins used in the treatment of diabetes: human insulins and analog insulins, made by recombinant DNA technology. The concentration of most insulins available in the United States is 100 units per milliliter. A milliliter is equal to a cubic centimeter. All insulin syringes are graduated to match this insulin concentration. There are four categories of insulins depending on how quickly they start to work in the body after injection: Very rapid acting insulin, Regular, or Rapid acting insulins, Intermediate acting insulins, Long acting insulin. In addition, some insulins are marketed mixed together in different proportions to provide both rapid and long acting effects. Certain insulins can also be mixed together in the same syringe immediately prior to injection. Rapid Acting Insulins A very rapid acting form of insulin called Lispro insulin is marketed under the trade name of Humalog. A second form of very rapid acting insulin is called Aspart and is marketed under the trade name Novolog. Humalog and Novolog are clear liquids that begin to work 10 minutes after injection and peak at 1 hour after injection, lasting for 3-4 hours in the body. However, most patients also need a longer-acting insulin to maintain good control of their blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog can be mixed with NPH insulin and are used as “bolus” insulins to be given 15 minutes before a meal. Note: Check blood sugar level before giving Humalog or Novalog. Your doctor or diabetes educator will instruct you in determini Continue reading >>

Novolog Mix 70/30 Confusion

Novolog Mix 70/30 Confusion

When prescribing NovoLog® Mix 70/30 analog insulin, health care professionals may write an unclear prescription, or if using an EMR system, inadvertently select Novolin® 70/30 human insulin instead. Be on the lookout for these errors. Read on for a breakdown of the key differences between these 2 types of insulin. Before the new “insulin pens” came out, there were four types of insulin: rapid-acting, short-acting, intermediate-acting, and long-acting. When it comes to the pre-mixed insulins, like Novolog 70/30, there are fewer differences between the brands (for example, Novolog versus Novolin)…. Whether contained in a bottle or in a pen, the premixed insulins all contain a combination of both an intermediate-acting insulin and a short-acting insulin. The numbers on the bottle or pen refer to the percentage of each type of insulin contained in the mixture. That means both Novolin 70/30 and Novolog 70/30 contain a mixture that is 70% intermediate-acting insulin with 30% short-acting insulin. However, Novolin 70/30 takes slightly longer to begin working than Novolog 70/30, which has a rapid onset. Both Novolin 70/30 and Novolog 70/30 may last up to 24 hours in the system. Novolin® 70/30 is not available in a pen. Novolin is the brand name given to all human insulins made by Novo Nordisk. Under this brand are specific types of insulin such as regular, nph, and 70/30. Novolog insulin is a synthetic recombinant insulin that is very rapid acting. You may often get this question because novolog is more expensive than any of the novolins. However, they cannot be substituted for each other. Two euglycemic clamp studies assessed glucose utilization after dosing of healthy volunteers. NovoLog Mix 70/30 has an earlier onset of action than human premix 70/30 in studies of n Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog Vs. Novolog: Important Differences And More

Humalog and Novolog are two diabetes medications. Humalog is the brand-name version of insulin lispro, and Novolog is the brand-name version of insulin aspart. These drugs both help control blood glucose (sugar) in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Humalog and Novolog are both rapid acting. That means they work more quickly than other types of insulin. There are important distinctions between Humalog and Novolog, however, and the drugs are not directly interchangeable. Check out this comparison so you can work with your doctor to choose a drug that’s right for you. Insulin is injected under your skin fat. It’s the most common type of treatment for type 1 diabetes because it works quickly. It’s also the only type of diabetes medication that’s absorbed into the bloodstream. Humalog and Novolog are both equivalent to the insulin made in your body. Unlike oral diabetes drugs, insulin provides fast relief for changes in your blood sugar. The type of insulin your doctor prescribes depends on how often and how much your blood sugar fluctuates each day. The table below provides quick facts at a glance. Brand name Humalog Novolog What is the generic drug? insulin lispro insulin aspart Is a generic version available? no no What does it treat? type 1 and type 2 diabetes type 1 and type 2 diabetes What form does it come in? solution for injection solution for injection What strengths does it come in? • 3-mL cartridges • 3-mL prefilled KwikPen • 3-mL vials • 10-mL vials • 3-mL FlexPen • 3-mL FlexTouch • 3-mL PenFill cartridges • 10-mL vials What is the typical length of treatment? long-term long-term How do I store it? Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Refrigerate at 36° to 46°F (2° to 8°C). Do not freeze the drug. Continue reading >>

Novolog Mix 70-30

Novolog Mix 70-30

NovoLog® Mix 70/30 (70% insulin aspart protamine suspension and 30% insulin aspart) Injection, [rDNA origin]) Suspension for Subcutaneous Injection DESCRIPTION NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart rdna origin) (70% insulin aspart protamine suspension and 30% insulin aspart injection, [rDNA origin]) is a human insulin analog suspension containing 70% insulin aspart protamine crystals and 30% soluble insulin aspart. NovoLog Mix 70/30 is a blood glucoselowering agent with an earlier onset and an intermediate duration of action. Insulin aspart is homologous with regular human insulin with the exception of a single substitution of the amino acid proline by aspartic acid in position B28, and is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's part (NovoLog) has the empirical formula C256H381N65O79S6 and a molecular weight of 5825.8 Da. Figure 1: Structural formula of insulin aspart NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart rdna origin) is a uniform, white, sterile suspension that contains insulin aspart 100 Units/mL. Inactive ingredients for the 10 mL vial are mannitol 36.4 mg/mL, phenol 1.50 mg/mL, metacresol 1.72 mg/mL, zinc 19.6 μg/mL, disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate 1.25 mg/mL, sodium chloride 0.58 mg/mL, and protamine sulfate 0.32 mg/mL. Inactive ingredients for the NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart rdna origin) FlexPen are glycerol 16.0 mg/mL, phenol 1.50 mg/mL, metacresol 1.72 mg/mL, zinc 19.6 μg/mL, disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate 1.25 mg/mL, sodium chloride 0.877 mg/mL, and protamine sulfate 0.32 mg/mL. NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart rdna origin) has a pH of 7.20 - 7.44. Hydrochloric acid or sodium hydroxide may Continue reading >>

The Difference Between Novolin Vs Novolog

The Difference Between Novolin Vs Novolog

What is Novolin? Novolin is a man made insulin that is used to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone that is produced by the hormone to help glucose get absorbed by the body cells for energy. Without insulin, there will be a build up of glucose in the blood, which can lead to high blood sugar. If high blood sugar is left untreated, it can lead to severe health complications including nerve damage, kidney damage, blindness and loss of limbs. Novolin is usually a combination of insulin isophane and insulin regular, that uses proper diet and exercise to improve blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Whereas insulin isophane is an intermediate acting insulin, insulin regular is a short acting insulin. When you take this combination of insulin it starts to work within 10 to 20 minutes after injecting it under your skin. The medication usually peaks after 2 hours and can last up to 24 hours. What is Novolog? Novolog refers to a fast acting insulin, which helps to control blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. This insulin begins to work within 15 minutes after injection. Novolog usually peaks after one hour and the effects can last between 2 to 4 hours. Since Novolog is a very fast acting insulin, it is recommended you eat within 5 to 10 minutes after taking an injection. Similarities Both Novolin and Novolog refer to man made insulin that is taken by diabetic patients to help them control their blood sugar levels. Both medications are injectable insulins that are taken by injecting them subcutaneously. To avoid the risk of transferring infections from one person to another, you should not share an injection pen with anyone. Another similarity is that both medicines have a clear appearance. You should n Continue reading >>

What Is Novolog

What Is Novolog

®? NovoLog® helps improve blood sugar control in people with diabetes. It is used to help lower blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes (aged 2 years and older) and adults with type 2 diabetes. But you may hear your health care provider refer to it by a few other names: As an insulin that you take at mealtime, NovoLog® is usually called “mealtime” or "bolus" insulin Because it goes to work quickly, it is also sometimes called “rapid-acting” or “fast-acting” insulin It is also called "analog insulin" because it is a man-made insulin that is a slightly changed version of the insulin your body makes naturally All of these things are true. What is NovoLog®? NovoLog® is a fast-acting mealtime insulin that helps lower mealtime blood sugar spikes. It has been proven to help control high blood sugar in people with diabetes when taken with a long-acting insulin. And, it has been used by millions of people since 2001. NovoLog® is fast-acting and works to help control blood sugar spikes when you eat. You should take NovoLog® and eat within 5 to 10 minutes. So you don’t have to wait 30 minutes before you eat, like you would with regular human insulin. Controlling your blood sugar at mealtime with NovoLog® can help lower your A1C when taken with a long-acting insulin. And, NovoLog® has a low rate of low blood sugar (also known as hypoglycemia). Keep in mind that low blood sugar is a common side effect of all insulins, including NovoLog®. NovoLog® is a fast-acting analog insulin, but it is not the only analog insulin. Different types of analog insulin are available. Each type of insulin helps keep diabetes under control. But no one type is right for everyone. Each person's insulin needs are different. And each person's insulin needs may change Continue reading >>

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. NovoLog® (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin therapy. The timing of hypoglycemia may reflect the time-action profile of the insulin formulation. Glucose monitoring is re Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

Insulin analogs are now replacing human insulin in the US. Insulins are categorized by differences in onset, peak, duration, concentration, and route of delivery. Human Insulin and Insulin Analogs are available for insulin replacement therapy. Insulins also are classified by the timing of their action in your body – specifically, how quickly they start to act, when they have a maximal effect and how long they act.Insulin analogs have been developed because human insulins have limitations when injected under the skin. In high concentrations, such as in a vial or cartridge, human (and also animal insulin) clumps together. This clumping causes slow and unpredictable absorption from the subcutaneous tissue and a dose-dependent duration of action (i.e. the larger dose, the longer the effect or duration). In contrast, insulin analogs have a more predictable duration of action. The rapid acting insulin analogs work more quickly, and the long acting insulin analogs last longer and have a more even, “peakless” effect. Background Insulin has been available since 1925. It was initially extracted from beef and pork pancreases. In the early 1980’s, technology became available to produce human insulin synthetically. Synthetic human insulin has replaced beef and pork insulin in the US. And now, insulin analogs are replacing human insulin. Characteristics of Insulin Insulins are categorized by differences in: Onset (how quickly they act) Peak (how long it takes to achieve maximum impact) Duration (how long they last before they wear off) Concentration (Insulins sold in the U.S. have a concentration of 100 units per ml or U100. In other countries, additional concentrations are available. Note: If you purchase insulin abroad, be sure it is U100.) Route of delivery (whether they a Continue reading >>

Fiasp Insulin, Insulin Aspart, Fiasp Vs Novolog

Fiasp Insulin, Insulin Aspart, Fiasp Vs Novolog

It’s understandable if you are wondering what Fiasp insulin is. The truth is, we were wondering the same thing when the FDA announced its approval of Novo Nordisk’s new, first in class, injectable, “faster-acting” insulin. What do we mean by faster-acting insulin? Well, now there are two levels of fast when it comes to mealtime (rapid-acting) insulin: Fast and Faster. Insulin aspart is a powerhouse in the world of diabetes. It was introduced under the brand name Novolog in June of 2000. For over 15 years, Novolog has been a staple of insulin regimens for many patients. Novolog and Humalog are the two most commonly prescribed fast-acting insulins that patients take within 15 minutes of mealtime. For this article, we will be paying closer attention to insulin aspart (more commonly called Novolog or Novorapid® in Europe and Canada). Novolog itself is an insulin analogue. This means it has been modified from regular insulin to change its structure and how quickly it is absorbed from under the skin. Novo Nordisk teamed up their workhorse Novolog insulin with a B3 vitamin (nicotinamide) to make it absorb more quickly and the amino acid arginine to stabilize it. That’s right! Fiasp insulin is simply Novolog with two small additions: Vitamin B3 and naturally occurring arginine. Researchers discovered that adding nicotinamide to the insulin aspart molecule causes its initial absorption to happen more quickly. This means it acts more like the insulin normally made by your pancreas. Fiasp insulin can even be taken up to 20 minutes AFTER starting the meal! So if Fiasp were racing Novolog, it could give Novolog a 15-minute head start and still catch up! Not only that, but twice as much insulin is available within 30 minutes of injecting Fiasp as compared to Novolog. More Continue reading >>

Short-acting Insulins

Short-acting Insulins

Rapid-Acting Analogues Short-Acting Insulins Intermediate-Acting Insulins Long-Acting Insulins Combination Insulins Onset: 30 minutes Peak: 2.5 - 5 hours Duration: 4 - 12 hours Solution: Clear Comments: Best if administered 30 minutes before a meal. Mixing NPH: If Regular insulin is mixed with NPH human insulin, the Regular insulin should be drawn into the syringe first. Aspart - Novolog ®: Compatible - but NO support clinically for such a mixture. Draw up Novolog first before drawing up Regular Insulin. Lispro - Humalog ®: Compatible - but NO support clinically for such a mixture. Draw up Humalog first before drawing up Regular Insulin. Mixtures should not be administered intravenously. When mixing insulin in a syringe, draw up the quickest acting insulin first (e.g. draw up Humalog or Novolog before drawing up Regular Insulin, or draw up Regular insulin before Novolin N (NPH) or Lente insulin. CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY Insulin is a polypeptide hormone that controls the storage and metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. This activity occurs primarily in the liver, in muscle, and in adipose tissues after binding of the insulin molecules to receptor sites on cellular plasma membranes. Insulin promotes uptake of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats in most tissues. Also, insulin influences carbohydrate, protein, and fat metabolism by stimulating protein and free fatty acid synthesis, and by inhibiting release of free fatty acid from adipose cells. Insulin increases active glucose transport through muscle and adipose cellular membranes, and promotes conversion of intracellular glucose and free fatty acid to the appropriate storage forms (glycogen and triglyceride, respectively). Although the liver does not require active glucose transport, insulin increases hepatic gl Continue reading >>

More in insulin