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Is Metformin Used For Irregular Periods?

Can Metformin Help Women With Pcos?

Can Metformin Help Women With Pcos?

Home / Fertility / Boosting Fertility We asked doctors whether the drug Metformin really helps women with PCOS conceive, reduce miscarriage risk and increase milk supply. Here's what they say. If you have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), you're not alone. According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information , this hormonal disorder affects between 5 percent and 15 percent of women of reproductive age in this country. In polycystic ovary syndrome, cysts develop on the ovaries, and the body produces excess hormones called androgens, which cause an irregular menstrual cycle. As a result, ovulation can be unpredictable, and getting pregnant can be challenging. "Since puberty, I've averaged one menstrual cycle per year," says Carrie, a mother from the Midwest who has PCOS. "I always wondered if I could have children." Carrie tried getting pregnant for several months, but wasn't able to because she wasn't ovulating. After evaluating her bloodwork, her OB/GYN suggested she go on either Clomid or Metformin to help balance her hormones to promote ovulation. "Because I had a very slight imbalance in my hormones, my doctor suggested trying Metformin before going straight to Clomid. Since I heard horror stories about Clomid causing multiples, I was happy to try Metformin first," Carrie says. Metformin is a diabetes medication that is sometimes used to regulate hormones in women with PCOS by balancing their insulin level. This effect leads to more regular menstruation and ovulation cycles , according to WebMD . Carrie got pregnant the first month she took Metformin. But not all women with polycystic ovary syndrome have such good results. In fact, experts say more evidence is needed to prove that Metformin helps conception in PCOS patients . "When putting all the data tog Continue reading >>

Irregular Periods - Management & Treatment

Irregular Periods - Management & Treatment

Although some women with PCOS have regular periods, high levels of androgens ('male' hormones) and excess insulin can disrupt the monthly cycle of ovulation and menstruation. If you have PCOS, your periods may be 'irregular' or stop altogether. The average menstrual cycle is 28 days with one ovulation when eggs are released, but anywhere between 21 and 35 days is considered 'normal'. An 'irregular' period cycle is defined as either: Eight or less menstrual cycles per year Menstrual cycles longer than 35 days Some women with PCOS also experience heavier or lighter bleeding during their menstrual cycle. Regular periods help to prevent excess thickening of the lining of the uterus (womb). Long gaps between periods can lead to abnormal cells building up inside the womb. It is important you have at least four cycles per year to avoid a build up that may include abnormal cells. Treatment options Hormonal contraception Your doctor can prescribe hormonal contraception to help regulate your menstrual periods. The medication can also reduce menstrual cramps, acne and excess hair growth. These medications include: A low–dose oral contraceptive pill ('the pill') Progesterone which stimulates the uterus and induces bleeding Hormonal implants Vaginal contraceptive rings Intra-uterine devices containing progesterone How they work The oestrogen and progesterone in hormonal contraception act to override the body's normal hormonal control of the menstrual cycle and ovulation. The oral contraceptive pill works by "switching the ovaries off", which means that when a woman is taking the pill the production of hormones such as testosterone is greatly reduced. The pill also increases the body's production of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), which binds to the main androgen testosterone Continue reading >>

Irregular Menstrual Cycles In A Young Woman

Irregular Menstrual Cycles In A Young Woman

Irregular menstrual cycles in a young woman Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia Correspondence to: Jacqueline Boyle, [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 1995-2014, Canadian Medical Association A 28-year-old woman reports irregular menstruation since she stopped taking an oral contraceptive pill three years earlier. Menarche occurred at 14 years of age, and her menstrual cycles had been regular before she started the oral contraceptive pill for contraception at age 16. She has gained 15 kg since age 16 and has hair growth on her top lip, which she waxes. She is planning to conceive a child in the next two years. Does this woman have polycystic ovary syndrome? The most likely diagnosis is polycystic ovary syndrome, which is the most common endocrine condition among women of reproductive age. It affects 12%21% of women and increases in frequency with increasing weight. 1 , 2 The differential diagnoses to consider for this patient include hyperprolactinemia, thyroid dysfunction and, rarely, nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia, Cushing syndrome and virilizing tumours. 1 , 3 What questions should be asked and what should be looked for on clinical examination? Diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome using the Rotterdam criteria requires the presence of two of the following symptoms: oligo-ovulation or anovulation, hyperandrogenism (clinical or biochemical) and polycystic ovaries on ultrasonography. 3 The following questions and features may assist in establishing a diagnosis: What is the patients menstrual cycle pattern? Cycles shorter than 21 or longer than 35 days are likely to be anovulatory. 1 Is there excess unwanted body or facial hair? If so, Continue reading >>

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Young women with PCOS often have elevated insulin levels and are more likely to develop diabetes. Metformin is a medication often prescribed for women with PCOS to help prevent diabetes. A lifestyle that includes healthy nutrition and daily exercise is the most important part of a PCOS treatment plan. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ in the body called the pancreas. The food you eat is broken down into simple sugar (glucose) during digestion. Glucose is absorbed into the blood after you eat. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells of the body to be used as energy. If there’s not enough insulin in the body, or if the body can’t use the insulin, sugar levels in the blood become higher. What is insulin resistance? If your body is resistant to insulin, it means you need high levels of insulin to keep your blood sugar normal. Certain medical conditions such as being overweight or having PCOS can cause insulin resistance. Insulin resistance tends to run in families. What can insulin resistance do to me? High insulin levels can cause thickening and darkening of the skin (acanthosis nigricans) on the back of the neck, axilla (under the arms), and groin area. In young women with PCOS, high insulin levels can cause the ovaries to make more androgen hormones such as testosterone. This can cause increased body hair, acne, and irregular or few periods. Having insulin resistance can increase your risk of developing diabetes. How can I lower my insulin levels? You can help lower your insulin levels naturally by eating fewer starches and sugars, and more foods that are high in fiber and low in refined carbohydrates. Low glycemic foods, on the other hand, don’t raise your blood sugar or insulin levels as much as foods that are high in sugar or refined carbohydr Continue reading >>

Metformin And Almost Constant Bleeding

Metformin And Almost Constant Bleeding

I've been taking metformin for nearly three months to try to sort out very infrequent periods from PCOS, and have now hurtled to the other extreme and have been bleeding to one degree or another (but mostly mediumish spotting) for about 2/3 of the time. I am pretty certain I can discern a longish period, then a week off, then two weeks of this spotting. Obviously the thing to do is talk to my doctor about it, and I will, but would love some advance thoughts of what she might say. Has anyone experienced anything similar? Hi I've not had experience of this yet. I just got put on metformin a month ago, so far my first perido on it was the normal 5 week length I always get. That's got me worried now though. Have you found the metformin helped with other symptoms? I've been on metformin for ages for PCOS. I think I might have had similar issues at the start, but it did calm down. I found it pretty amazing tbh and I was able to regulate cycles enough to be able to pinpoint ovulation and concieve first time of trying (huge suprise when i was told that I'd probably not have kids ever!) I am a slim PCOS-er though- not sure if that makes a differece in how effective it is How are you finding the gastric side effects? I haven't even had the gastric side effects! I was perversely quite looking forward to them as a possible weightloss tactic. In that case I will ask about progesterone, but be prepared to wait a little longer to see if it calms down naturally if my doctor suggests it. pipistrello you do not want the gastric side effects. I've had them right from the first pill. They're horrendous. Agree with A. I was same. I recently reatarted after having dd and it was hellish. I have to build from 1/4 to 2 whole tabs over 6 months or it's like food poisoning nausea and stomach pai Continue reading >>

9 Ways To Kick Start Your Period With Pcos

9 Ways To Kick Start Your Period With Pcos

9 Ways to Kick Start your Period with PCOS One of the symptoms that most women with PCOS struggle with is an irregular menstrual cycle. It impacts on fertility and is an indication that our bodies are simply not doing what they are meant to be doing. So, lets have a look at 8 ways to kick start your period with PCOS. Before we get on to that, lets explore why women with PCOS have an irregular cycle. What is going on with that? Why do Women with PCOS have an Irregular Menstrual Cycle? To understand how to kick start a period, we need to understand what is actually happening in our bodies to cause an irregular menstrual cycle. In the diagram below, you can see that just before ovulation, there is a spike in levels of luteinizing hormone (LH). The problem is that many women with PCOS have high levels of LH throughout their cycle. That means that you arent getting that spike of LH so no ovulation is being triggered. Now, the next problem is that youll see that progesterone levels go up after ovulation. This is because progesterone is produced by the corpus luteum (the left over follicle, after the egg has been released. It is the sharp fall of progesterone that causes a bleed. If we are not ovulating, we wont have a corpus luteum to produce the progesterone. If we have no progesterone, we are not going to have a period. We have one more thing that we need to consider. ANDROGENS or testosterone, The American Congress of Obstetricans and Gynecologists suggest that high levels of testosterone also impact on ovulation and may prevent an egg from being released ( 1 ). How can we kick start a period with PCOS? Unfortunately when it comes to kickstarting a period, we need to be patient. You see, it takes a while for hormones to balance, for the egg to develop before ovulation. Th Continue reading >>

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Fertility Treatment With Metformin (glucophage)

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Fertility Treatment With Metformin (glucophage)

How Metformin Is Used for Polycystic Ovaries Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a common cause of anovulation and infertility in women. These women do not ovulate (release eggs) regularly and therefore have irregular menstrual periods. The ovaries have many small cysts (2-7 mm diameter) called antral follicles, giving the ovaries a characteristic "polycystic" (many cysts) appearance on ultrasound. A relatively new method of treating ovulation problems in women with polycystic ovarian disease is to use an oral medication called metformin (brand name is Glucophage). Metformin has traditionally been used as an oral drug to help control diabetes. Then, some smart doctor figured out that polycystic ovarian syndrome treatment with metformin can be very effective. If Glucophage alone does not result in ovulation and pregnancy, we often use: If the combination therapy is not effective, we can try: Metformin Use with IVF Treatment We also use Glucophage in women going through in vitro fertilization for PCOS, and for those with very high antral follicle counts - if their ovaries are "polycystic" by ultrasound. We find that some women with polycystic ovaries respond with a "smoother" response to the injectable FSH medication if they have been taking Glucophage. Risks and Side Effects of Metformin / Glucophage In about 25% of women Glucophage causes side effects which may include abdominal discomfort, cramping, diarrhea and nausea. The side effects may be severe enough to make the woman stop the Glucophage medication. We are not aware of any serious complications resulting from Glucophage treatment. Another oral medication used for diabetes called Troglitazone has been associated with liver failure and death in rare cases. This has been publicized on television shows, in newspapers, et Continue reading >>

How To Manage Your Pcod - A Guide For Infertile Women

How To Manage Your Pcod - A Guide For Infertile Women

PCOD ( polycystic ovarian disease) is one of the commoner causes of infertility. It's a chronic disease, which patients need to learn to manage themselves. Sadly, lots of patients with PCOD are very confused. They seem to understand very little about their own problem and I think this is partly because their doctors are very confused themselves and do not take the time and trouble to teach patients about their disease. Patients with PCOD have irregular periods ; and they know that their irregular periods also means that they will be infertile. How the irregular periods cause infertility is something they are not clear about . They also know that they have a "hormonal imbalance" - but are clueless about which hormones are not in balance. Because they miss their periods every month, many of them go to the doctor regularly so that he can prescribe medications for them to take in order to induce a period. While many know that the medicine the doctor prescribes is progesterone, they are very scared to take this for themselves on their own. For one thing, most patients are scared to self-medicate; and they are worried about the side effects of these hormones. Also, their doctors do not empower them with information because they prefer keeping their patients dependent on them ( ensuring them a regular monthly income for these repeat visits). This is not a happy state of affairs. PCOD is a chronic illness, just like diabetes is; and patients need to learn to manage this for themselves, rather than have to depend upon their doctor ! Here are some basic principles which every PCO patient needs to learn ! Firstly, you should plan to get 12 periods every year. There's no point in waiting week after week for the period to come on its own - you are just wasting time and adding to you Continue reading >>

Absent Menstruation (amenorrhea) And Pcos

Absent Menstruation (amenorrhea) And Pcos

Copyright 2017 Insulite Health. All rights reserved. Absent Menstruation (Amenorrhea) and PCOS Is PCOS Disrupting Your Natural Menstrual Cycle? Have you experienced missing periods associated with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome? You are not alone! Missed periods, or Amenorrhea, is a very common symptom of PCOS, along with other types of menstrual irregularities. Missing one period is not usually considered a major issue because most women experience that a few times in their lives; however, missing three periods in a one-year span is one of the criteria for diagnosing PCOS. A large number of women actually discover they have PCOS when they seek help for irregular or missing periods. Amenorrhea can be a major concern because absence of menstruation can create infertility issues.3 To avoid future distress it is better to try to correct your Amenorrhea by addressing PCOS and the conditions that influence its severity like Insulin Resistance. Amenorrhea can be chronic or occur temporarily because of an underlying condition. It is classified as primary or secondary depending on when and how it manifests. Primary Amenorrhea: ?This is when menstruation does not commence by age 14 and secondary sex characteristics such as breast development are absent. Girls who develop normally but do not start their period by 16 also have primary amenorrhea.2 Secondary Amenorrhea: ?The absence of period for three consecutive cycles in a woman who previously menstruated. Women who are on birth control, pregnant, or lactating are excluded from this classification.1 Your menstrual cycle is influenced by many factors, such as stress, diet, lifestyle choices, medications, and underlying conditions such as PCOS. Understanding PCOS and treating this condition can improve menstrual irregularities like Continue reading >>

Metformin For The Treatment Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Metformin For The Treatment Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a disorder of body metabolism that affects 5-10% of women and can cause infrequent periods, weight gain, acne, unwanted hair growth and infertility. PCOS should not be confused with the incidental finding of polycystic ovaries on an ultrasound scan which occur in about 20% of the female population and usually do not cause any symptoms. The cause of PCOS is not fully understood but is thought to have a genetic component. The small cysts seen in the ovaries do not cause PCOS but are the result of the underlying disturbance of metabolism. Most women with PCOS do not have every symptom and the treatment that a doctor recommends is usually chosen to treat the symptoms that bother the woman. In recent years there has been a lot of interest in the use of Metformin to treat the symptoms of PCOS. This information sheet aims to answer many of the questions that women have about this treatment. What is Metformin? Metformin is a medicine that is taken by mouth. It is from a family of drugs known as biguanides and was developed to treat type 2 (late onset) diabetes. Why is it used to treat PCOS? There are a number of similarities between PCOS and adult-onset diabetes. In both conditions, people have a resistance to the effects of insulin with resulting high levels of insulin in their blood stream. These high insulin levels cause an increased production of androgens (male-type hormones that can cause acne and unwanted hair growth) in the ovaries and adrenal glands. This in turn affects the pituitary hormones (LH and FSH) that normally stimulate the ovaries to produce eggs. The result is often irregular infertile periods. Metformin increases the effectiveness of insulin, resulting in a lowering of blood insulin levels which in turn lowers the androg Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance: A Cause For Not Ovulating

Insulin Resistance: A Cause For Not Ovulating

There are many reasons why a woman may not ovulate. Some women are resistant to the hormone insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps keep blood sugar under control. Insulin is part of a complex system that keeps the blood sugar low. It is estimated that 25% to 50% of overweight adults have insulin resistance. If blood sugar, also known as blood glucose levels, become too high, then a person is said to have diabetes. There are two main causes for diabetes: failure to make insulin (Type 1 Diabetes) and becoming resistant to the effects of insulin (Type 2 Diabetes). In women, there are two common conditions that may result in insulin resistance: PCOS , also known as polycystic ovary syndrome , and obesity . Some women with PCOS are also obese. This can intensify the symptoms of PCOS. Women may also be obese and have insulin resistance without having PCOS. Women with PCOS or obesity or both problems will commonly have problems with ovulation. Common signs that a woman may not be ovulating involve disruption of the normal pattern her menstrual cycles. Women who do not ovulate will often note absence of their periods, infrequent periods or irregular periods. Rarely, a woman with regular monthly periods may not be ovulating. Diagnosis of insulin resistance Diagnosis of insulin resistance can sometimes be challenging. This is due to wide variations in the levels of the hormones needed to assess for insulin resistance. When insulin resistance occurs, the body needs a higher level of insulin to keep the blood glucose under control. Therefore, high insulin levels are frequently seen in this condition. Other possible signs of insulin resistance include: Blood tests High triglyceride levels A low glucose to insulin ratio High leptin levels Low adiponectin le Continue reading >>

Pcos Treatment And Metformin

Pcos Treatment And Metformin

Insulin Sensitizers The newer treatments for PCOS aim at the root cause – elevated insulin levels. Insulin sensitizers are intended to help the body begin to effectively process insulin again. These medications were originally prescribed to people with type II diabetes but have also been shown to successfully treat women with PCOS who have insulin resistance. Let’s use the door-and-key analogy again. Insulin sensitizers help the body rediscover the key to unlock the cell doors, allowing the entry and storage of excess glucose. As insulin and glucose levels return to normal, the ovary resumes normal function, and many of the other hormones return to a more appropriate level. In turn, many PCOS symptoms diminish. For many women, insulin sensitizers restore menstrual cycles and alleviate such symptoms as hair growth on the body, thinning hair, acne, and excess weight. Insulin sensitizers lower the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. These medications ay also cause insulin-resistant women to start ovulating again. If you are taking insulin sensitizers, report any changes in your monthly cycle to your doctor. In addition, let your health-care provider know if you are trying to become pregnant, are already pregnant, or are breast-feeding. Side effects of insulin sensitizers are rate. Although these medications lower elevated blood sugar levels in people with diabetes, when given to women with high insulin levels, they only lower insulin levels. Blood sugar levels will not change; therefore, women will not experience episodes of “low blood sugar.” Because research has indicated that some insulin sensitizers might cause liver problems, your physician should monitor your liver function by conducting periodic blood tests as a precaution is any of the medications Continue reading >>

Early Effects Of Metformin In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Prospective Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial

Early Effects Of Metformin In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Prospective Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial

Early Effects of Metformin in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Prospective Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial Departments of Gynecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine (S.E., N.S., A.G., M.v.W., T.S.), 69115 Heidelberg, Germany Obstetrics and Gynecology (S.E.), 69115 Heidelberg, Germany Address all correspondence and requests for reprints to: S. Eisenhardt, M.D., Womens University Hospital, Department of Gynecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vossstr. 9, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany. Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Gynecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine (S.E., N.S., A.G., M.v.W., T.S.), 69115 Heidelberg, Germany Search for other works by this author on: Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, and Biostatistics (V.H.), University of Heidelberg, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Gynecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine (S.E., N.S., A.G., M.v.W., T.S.), 69115 Heidelberg, Germany Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Gynecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine (S.E., N.S., A.G., M.v.W., T.S.), 69115 Heidelberg, Germany Search for other works by this author on: Internal Medicine (A.H.), 69115 Heidelberg, Germany Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Gynecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine (S.E., N.S., A.G., M.v.W., T.S.), 69115 Heidelberg, Germany Search for other works by this author on: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 91, Issue 3, 1 March 2006, Pages 946952, S. Eisenhardt, N. Schwarzmann, V. Henschel, A. Germeyer, M. von Wolff, A. Hamann, T. Strowitzki; Early Effects of Metformin in Women with Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (pcos) (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (pcos) (beyond The Basics)

PCOS OVERVIEW Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition that causes irregular menstrual periods because monthly ovulation is not occurring and levels of androgens (male hormones) in women are elevated. The condition occurs in approximately 5 to 10 percent of women. The elevated androgen levels can sometimes cause excessive facial hair growth, acne, and/or male-pattern scalp hair thinning. Most, but not all, women with PCOS are overweight or obese, and they are at higher-than-average risk of developing diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea. For women with PCOS who want to become pregnant, fertility pills or injections are often needed to help women ovulate. Although PCOS is not completely reversible, there are a number of treatments that can reduce or minimize bothersome symptoms. Most women with PCOS are able to lead a normal life without significant complications. PCOS CAUSE The cause of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is not completely understood. It is believed that abnormal levels of the pituitary hormone luteinizing hormone (LH) and high levels of male hormones (androgens) interfere with normal function of the ovaries. To explain how these hormones cause symptoms, it is helpful to understand the normal menstrual cycle. Normal menstrual cycle — The brain (including the pituitary gland), ovaries, and uterus normally follow a sequence of events once per month; this sequence helps to prepare the body for pregnancy. Two hormones, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and LH, are made by the pituitary gland. Two other hormones, progesterone and estrogen, are made by the ovaries. During the first half of the cycle, small increases in FSH stimulate the ovary to develop a follicle that contains an egg (oocyte). The follicle produces rising levels of estrogen, which cau Continue reading >>

Have Pcos Or Diabetes? Is Metformin (glucophage) Your Best Choice?

Have Pcos Or Diabetes? Is Metformin (glucophage) Your Best Choice?

Should you take metformin -- nor not? Is there a better alternative? This page will answer your questions. It's an anti-diabetic drug sometimes used to treat PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome), although it is used chiefly to help control Type 2 diabetes. This drug offers both benefits and significant risks. Free PCOS Newsletter The FDA has approved it only for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. Because of this limitation, some physicians don't have much clinical experience using Glucophage to treat PCOS and don't always feel comfortable using it unless you have diabetes. 13 Side Effects of Metformin Your Doctor Didn't Tell You About Did you know that metformin has at least 13 under-recognized side effects? Some of them can be serious. Read more about the side effects. Can't Tolerate It? Try This! Medical research is now showing that there are natural alternatives to this and other drugs for treating PCOS, diabetes or metabolic syndrome. So if you're uncomfortable with the idea of taking Glucophage for years to come, or you've tried it but can't tolerate its side effects, take a look at the natural alternatives that are just as effective as metformin. Does It Reduce PCOS Symptoms? Some medical guidelines say it is not the first thing you should try for controlling PCOS. However, it may be helpful IF you have insulin resistance. Read more... Take Supplemental Vitamin B12! Recent research is showing that you will develop a vitamin B12 deficiency if you take this drug for over a year or so. A deficiency in vitamin B12 could have undesirable consequences if for fetal development if you're pregnancy or trying to become pregnant. Read more... Is It Appropriate for Girls? As girls and teenagers start to have trouble with their weight, irregular periods, early appearance of public Continue reading >>

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