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Is Liraglutide The Same As Insulin?

How Victoza® Works

How Victoza® Works

Victoza® is different from diabetes pills because it works in 3 ways to lower blood sugar. Victoza® works in 3 ways like the hormone GLP-1 (7-37)a to help control blood sugar levels Victoza® slows food leaving your stomach. GLP-1 is normally released from your small intestine when you eat. This slows down the process of food leaving your stomach, which helps control your blood sugar after meals. Victoza® helps prevent your liver from making too much sugar. Victoza® helps the pancreas produce more insulin when your blood sugar levels are high. Victoza® does this by helping important cells work the way they should. These cells are called beta cells and they help control blood sugar by making and releasing insulin. aGLP-1 (7-37) represents <20% of the total circulating GLP-1 produced by your body. Victoza® is not insulin Victoza® is not insulin. But it can be taken with long-acting insulin. When using Victoza® with insulin, take them as separate injections. You may give both injections in the same body area (for example, your stomach area), but you should not give the injections right next to each other. Never mix insulin and Victoza® together. Victoza® may also be taken alone or in combination with one or more common oral type 2 diabetes medications. These include biguanides (such as metformin), sulfonylureas (SUs), and thiazolidinediones (TZDs). While not a weight-loss product, Victoza® may help you lose some weight In clinical studies ranging from 26 to 52 weeks in length, many people lost some weight. In our largest study, when Victoza® was added to metformin, people lost on average up to 6.2 pounds. While many people in clinical trials lost weight, some did gain weight. The American Diabetes Association recommends weight loss as an important goal for over Continue reading >>

Liraglutide

Liraglutide

Liraglutide (NN2211) is a derivative of human incretin (metabolic hormone) glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) that is used as a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, binding to the same receptors as does the endogenous metabolic hormone GLP-1 that stimulates insulin secretion. Marketed under the brand name Victoza, it is an injectable drug developed by Novo Nordisk for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In 2015, Novo Nordisk began marketing a separate strength in the U.S. and E.U. under the brand name Saxenda as a treatment for adults who are obese or overweight with at least one weight-related comorbid condition. The product was approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) on July 3, 2009, and by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on January 25, 2010.[1][2][3] More recently, Liraglutide was approved by the FDA on December 23, 2014 and by the European Medicines Agency on January 23, 2015, for adults with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater (obesity) or a BMI of 27 or greater (overweight) who have at least one weight-related condition.[4][5] Medical uses[edit] Liraglutide is a once-daily injectable derivative of the human incretin (metabolic hormone) glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), for the treatment of type 2 diabetes or obesity. Type 2 diabetes[edit] Liraglutide improves control of blood glucose.[6] It reduces meal-related hyperglycemia (for 24 hours after administration) by increasing insulin secretion (only) when required by increasing glucose levels, delaying gastric emptying, and suppressing prandial glucagon secretion.[7][8] As of 2017 it is unclear if they affect a person's risk of death.[9] In common to various degrees with other GLP-1 receptor agonists, liraglutide has advantages over more traditiona Continue reading >>

Liraglutide In People Treated For Type 2 Diabetes With Multiple Daily Insulin Injections: Randomised Clinical Trial (mdi Liraglutide Trial)

Liraglutide In People Treated For Type 2 Diabetes With Multiple Daily Insulin Injections: Randomised Clinical Trial (mdi Liraglutide Trial)

Abstract Study question What are the effects of liraglutide, an incretin based treatment, on glycaemic control in people with type 2 diabetes treated with multiple daily insulin injections? Methods The study was a randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial with a parallel group design carried out at 13 hospital based outpatient clinics and one primary care unit in Sweden. Patients were considered eligible for inclusion if they had type 2 diabetes and inadequate glycaemic control (HbA1c concentrations ≥58 mmol/mol (7.5%) and ≤102 mmol/mol (11.5%)), a body mass index of 27.5-45 kg/m2, and required multiple daily insulin injections. Overall, 124 participants were randomised 1:1 to subcutaneous liraglutide or placebo by minimisation allocation. The main outcome measure was change in HbA1c level from baseline to week 24. Study answer and limitations Liraglutide was associated with a significant reduction of 16.9 mmol/mol (1.5%) in HbA1c versus 4.6 mmol/mol (0.4%) for placebo, difference −12.3 mmol/mol (95% confidence interval −15.8 to −8.8 mmol/mol; −1.13%, −1.45 to −0.81 mmol/mol). Body weight was significantly reduced in participants in the liraglutide compared with placebo group (3.8 v 0.0 kg, difference −3.8, −4.9 to −2.8 kg), and total daily insulin doses were significantly reduced, by 18.1 units and 2.3 units (difference −15.8, −23.1 to −8.5 units). Reductions in mean and standard deviation of glucose levels estimated by masked continuous glucose monitoring were significantly greater in the liraglutide group than placebo group (−1.9 and −0.5 mmol/L). Neither group experienced severe hypoglycaemic events nor were there any significant differences in symptomatic or asymptomatic non-severe hypoglycaemia (<4.0 or <3.0 mmol/L). The me Continue reading >>

Compare Victoza Vs. Lantus

Compare Victoza Vs. Lantus

Lowers A1c (average blood sugar over time) up to 1.5%. Helps with weight loss and controls appetite. No limitation for people with kidney problems, but close monitoring is recommended. Medicine is ready to use, without need to mix. Insulin is one of the most effective blood sugar-lowering medication and can lower your A1c (average blood sugar over time) by up to 2-3%. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-lasting insulin that provides consistent, all-day sugar control with just once or twice daily dosing. Dose can be easily adjusted to make a customized regimen that's tailored to your body's needs. Lantus (insulin glargine) can be used with liver or kidney problems. 22 reviews so far Have you used Victoza (liraglutide)? Leave a review 584 reviews so far Have you used Lantus (insulin glargine)? Leave a review Low blood sugar - self-treatable27% Continue reading >>

Efficacy And Safety Of Liraglutide Added To Insulin Treatment In Type 1 Diabetes: The Adjunct One Treat-to-target Randomized Trial

Efficacy And Safety Of Liraglutide Added To Insulin Treatment In Type 1 Diabetes: The Adjunct One Treat-to-target Randomized Trial

OBJECTIVE To investigate whether liraglutide added to treat-to-target insulin improves glycemic control, and reduces insulin requirements and body weight in subjects with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A 52-week, double-blind, treat-to-target trial involving 1,398 adults randomized 3:1 to receive once-daily subcutaneous injections of liraglutide (1.8, 1.2, or 0.6 mg) or placebo added to insulin. RESULTS HbA1c level was reduced 0.34–0.54% (3.7–5.9 mmol/mol) from a mean baseline of 8.2% (66 mmol/mol), and significantly more for liraglutide 1.8 and 1.2 mg compared with placebo (estimated treatment differences [ETDs]: 1.8 mg liraglutide −0.20% [95% CI −0.32; −0.07]; 1.2 mg liraglutide −0.15% [95% CI −0.27; −0.03]; 0.6 mg liraglutide −0.09% [95% CI −0.21; 0.03]). Insulin doses were reduced by the addition of liraglutide 1.8 and 1.2 mg versus placebo (estimated treatment ratios: 1.8 mg liraglutide 0.92 [95% CI 0.88; 0.96]; 1.2 mg liraglutide 0.95 [95% CI 0.91; 0.99]; 0.6 mg liraglutide 1.00 [95% CI 0.96; 1.04]). Mean body weight was significantly reduced in all liraglutide groups compared with placebo ETDs (1.8 mg liraglutide −4.9 kg [95% CI −5.7; −4.2]; 1.2 mg liraglutide −3.6 kg [95% CI −4.3; −2.8]; 0.6 mg liraglutide −2.2 kg [95% CI −2.9; −1.5]). The rate of symptomatic hypoglycemia increased in all liraglutide groups (estimated rate ratios: 1.8 mg liraglutide 1.31 [95% CI 1.07; 1.59]; 1.2 mg liraglutide 1.27 [95% CI 1.03; 1.55]; 0.6 mg liraglutide 1.17 [95% CI 0.97; 1.43]), and hyperglycemia with ketosis increased significantly for liraglutide 1.8 mg only (event rate ratio 2.22 [95% CI 1.13; 4.34]). CONCLUSIONS Liraglutide added to insulin therapy reduced HbA1c levels, total insulin dose, and body weight in a population Continue reading >>

Liraglutide As Add-on Therapy To Insulin In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Retrospective, Observational Study From A Daily Clinical Practice Setting In Switzerland

Liraglutide As Add-on Therapy To Insulin In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Retrospective, Observational Study From A Daily Clinical Practice Setting In Switzerland

Go to: Abstract In most patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and progressive beta-cell insufficiency, insulin therapy is required to achieve sufficient glycemic control. However, insulin therapy may lead to weight gain and increasing risk of hypoglycemia. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists are being used as add-on therapy to insulin with favorable metabolic effects. Nonetheless, to date only few studies exist reporting on the combination of liraglutide and insulin with a short follow-up period. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of liraglutide as add-on to insulin in patients with T2DM over a time period of up to 24–28 months. Data of patients with T2DM, treated with insulin and liraglutide at an outpatient clinic in a tertiary referral hospital from October 2009 until December 2011 were retrospectively examined (n = 36). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), weight, total daily insulin dose and side effects were assessed 5–8 months prior to liraglutide, at baseline and at follow-up visits after 3, 6, 12–16 and 24–28 months. Median HbA1c decreased significantly from 7.7% [interquartile range (IQR) 7.0–8.6] at baseline to 6.8% (IQR 6.5–7.7, p = 0.001) at 3 months and 6.9% (IQR 6.3–7.6, p = 0.0001) at 6 months, but re-increased thereafter (at 24–28 months, median 7.5%, IQR 7.1–8.2, p = 1.0). Median weight decreased significantly from 99.8 kg (IQR 81–110) at baseline to 97.7 kg (IQR 81.2–108.2, p = 0.027) at 3 months, but rose again thereafter. Insulin dosage did not change significantly over time. No severe hypoglycemia or major side effects occurred. In this observational study, adding liraglutide to insulin in daily clinical practice reduced HbA1c significantly within 6 months, but there may be a non-sustainable ef Continue reading >>

Victoza For Diabetes And Saxenda For Obesity

Victoza For Diabetes And Saxenda For Obesity

I usually don’t prominently mention the brand names of drugs, but in this case there’s a reason why: Saxenda and Victoza are exactly the same thing: a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist called liraglutide. Many folks with diabetes probably have heard of liraglutide under the brand name Victoza: it’s the stuff that Paula Deen pitched for her own T2D a while ago. It’s been a moderate success for the manufacturer, although newer once-weekly GLP-1 agonists have stolen its thunder (or decreased the likelihood that physicians will prescribe it). One of the favorable “side effects” of the GLP-1 agonist drugs is the likelihood of weight loss, although the Victoza label doesn’t mention weight loss amongst the common side effects. But drug companies never fail to exploit side effects (remember, Rogaine wasn’t originally developed as a hair restorative product). And a side effect of weight loss is a lovely one for PWD – especially for obese T2D folks. So the manufacturer did a bunch of trials, and persuaded the FDA and its Endocrine Advisory Committee to approve using liraglutide as a weight-loss drug. (The AdCom vote for approval was 14 in favor, 1 opposed, no abstentions; the FDA announced its approval this past week, “as a treatment option for chronic weight management in addition to a reduced-calorie diet and physical activity. The drug is approved for use in adults with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater (obesity) or adults with a BMI of 27 or greater (overweight) who have at least one weight-related condition such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes, or high cholesterol (dyslipidemia).” Several thoughts to chew upon: The manufacturer christened the version of liraglutide for weight loss with a new name: Saxenda. Other companies have pla Continue reading >>

Liraglutide Vs Insulin Glargine And Placebo In Combination With Metformin And Sulfonylurea Therapy In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (lead-5 Met+su): A Randomised Controlled Trial

Liraglutide Vs Insulin Glargine And Placebo In Combination With Metformin And Sulfonylurea Therapy In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (lead-5 Met+su): A Randomised Controlled Trial

Go to: Abstract The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy and safety of liraglutide in type 2 diabetes mellitus vs placebo and insulin glargine (A21Gly,B31Arg,B32Arg human insulin), all in combination with metformin and glimepiride. This randomised (using a telephone or web-based randomisation system), parallel-group, controlled 26 week trial of 581 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on prior monotherapy (HbA1c 7.5–10%) and combination therapy (7.0–10%) was conducted in 107 centres in 17 countries. The primary endpoint was HbA1c. Patients were randomised (2:1:2) to liraglutide 1.8 mg once daily (n = 232), liraglutide placebo (n = 115) and open-label insulin glargine (n = 234), all in combination with metformin (1 g twice daily) and glimepiride (4 mg once daily). Investigators, participants and study monitors were blinded to the treatment status of the liraglutide and placebo groups at all times. The number of patients analysed as intention to treat were: liraglutide n = 230, placebo n = 114, insulin glargine n = 232. Liraglutide reduced HbA1c significantly vs glargine (1.33% vs 1.09%; −0.24% difference, 95% CI 0.08, 0.39; p = 0.0015) and placebo (−1.09% difference, 95% CI 0.90, 1.28; p < 0.0001). There was greater weight loss with liraglutide vs placebo (treatment difference –1.39 kg, 95% CI 2.10, 0.69; p = 0.0001), and vs glargine (treatment difference −3.43 kg, 95% CI 4.00, 2.86; p < 0.0001). Liraglutide reduced systolic BP (−4.0 mmHg) vs glargine (+0.5 mmHg; −4.5 mmHg difference, 95% CI 6.8, −2.2; p = 0.0001) but not vs placebo (p = 0.0791). Rates of hypoglycaemic episodes (major, minor and symptoms only, respectively) were 0.06, 1.2 and 1.0 events/patient/year, respectively, in the liraglutide group (vs 0, 1.3, 1.8 and 0, 1.0, 0.5 with g Continue reading >>

Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection) Indications And Usage

Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection) Indications And Usage

Levemir® is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to Levemir® or any of its excipients. Never Share a Levemir® FlexTouch® Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Dosage adjustment and monitoring: Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Insulin regimens should be modified cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment of concomitant anti-diabetic treatment. Administration: Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin or solution. Do not administer subcutaneously via an insulin pump, intramuscularly, or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. WARNING: RISK OF THYROID C-CELL TUMORS Liraglutide causes dose-dependent and treatment-duration-dependent thyroid C-cell tumors at clinically relevant exposures in both genders of rats and mice. It is unknown whether Victoza® causes thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans, as the human relevance of liraglutide-induced rodent thyroid C-cell tumors has not been determined. Victoza® is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of MTC and in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Counsel patients regarding the potential risk for MTC with the use of Victoza® and inform them of symptoms of thyroid tumors (eg, a mass in the neck, dysphagia, dyspnea, persistent hoarseness). Routine monitoring of serum calcitonin or using thyroid ultrasound is of uncertain value for early detection of MTC in patients treated with Victoza®. Levemir® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) Indications and U Continue reading >>

Is Victoza The Same As Lantus Or Humalog?

Is Victoza The Same As Lantus Or Humalog?

A: Victoza (liraglutide) is a medication in the class called GLP-1 agonists. The other medication in this class is Byetta (exenatide). Both medications work by mimicking the effects of a hormone called GLP-1. These medications have been shown to be effective in improving diabetes control, as well as in promoting weight loss. The other medications that you mention are different types of insulin – Lantus and Humalog. Lantus is a long-acting basal insulin that lasts up to 24 hours. The other long-acting insulin is Levemir insulin. Humalog is one of three rapid-acting insulins – the other two being Novolog and Apidra. These rapid-acting insulins are useful to control blood glucose levels after meals. You should discuss with your healthcare provider which of these medications would be indicated in your situation. Continue reading >>

Victoza Side Effects

Victoza Side Effects

Generic Name: liraglutide (LIR a GLOO tide) Brand Names: Saxenda, Victoza What is Victoza? Victoza (liraglutide) is similar to a hormone that occurs naturally in the body and helps control blood sugar, insulin levels, and digestion. Victoza is used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Victoza may also help reduce the risk of serious heart problems such as heart attack or stroke in adults with type 2 diabetes and heart disease. It is usually given after other diabetes medicines have been tried without success. Victoza is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Important information The Saxenda brand of liraglutide is used together with diet and exercise to help people lose weight when they have certain health conditions. Saxenda is not for treating type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Do not use Saxenda and Victoza together. You should not use Victoza if you have multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (tumors in your glands), a personal or family history of medullary thyroid cancer, insulin-dependent diabetes, or diabetic ketoacidosis. In animal studies, liraglutide caused thyroid tumors or thyroid cancer. It is not known whether these effects would occur in people using regular doses. Call your doctor at once if you have signs of a thyroid tumor, such as swelling or a lump in your neck, trouble swallowing, a hoarse voice, or shortness of breath. Before using Victoza You should not use Victoza if you are allergic to liraglutide, or if you have: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (tumors in your glands); a personal or family history of medullary thyroid carcinoma (a type of thyroid cancer); or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). To make sure Victoza is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: stomach Continue reading >>

Xultophy

Xultophy

Generic Name: insulin degludec and liraglutide (IN su lin de GLOO dek and LIR a GLOO tide) Brand Names: Xultophy What is Xultophy? Xultophy is an injection pen containing a combination of insulin degludec and liraglutide. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin degludec is a long-acting insulin that starts to work several hours after injection and keeps working evenly for 24 hours. Liraglutide is similar to a hormone that occurs naturally in the body and helps control blood sugar, insulin levels, and digestion. Xultophy is used to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This medicine should be used together with diet and exercise. Xultophy is usually given when your blood sugar levels have not been well controlled by using other medications. Xultophy is not for people with type 1 diabetes. Important information You should not use Xultophy if you have multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (tumors in your glands), a personal or family history of medullary thyroid cancer, insulin-dependent diabetes, or if you are having an episode of low blood sugar or diabetic ketoacidosis. In animal studies, liraglutide caused thyroid tumors or thyroid cancer. It is not known whether these effects would occur in people. Call your doctor at once if you have signs of a thyroid tumor, such as swelling or a lump in your neck, trouble swallowing, a hoarse voice, or shortness of breath. Before taking this medicine You should not use Xultophy if you are allergic to insulin or liraglutide. Do not use this medicine during an episode of low blood sugar, or if you have: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (tumors in your glands); a personal or family history of medullary thyroid carcinoma (a type of thyroid cancer); diabetic ketoa Continue reading >>

For Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

For Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

What is the most important information I should know about Victoza®? Victoza® may cause serious side effects, including: Possible thyroid tumors, including cancer. Tell your health care provider if you get a lump or swelling in your neck, hoarseness, trouble swallowing, or shortness of breath. These may be symptoms of thyroid cancer. In studies with rats and mice, Victoza® and medicines that work like Victoza® caused thyroid tumors, including thyroid cancer. It is not known if Victoza® will cause thyroid tumors or a type of thyroid cancer called medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in people. Who should not use Victoza®? Do not use Victoza® if: you or any of your family have ever had MTC or if you have an endocrine system condition called Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). you are allergic to liraglutide or any of the ingredients in Victoza®. What should I tell my health care provider before using Victoza®? Before using Victoza®, tell your health care provider if you: have or have had problems with your pancreas, kidneys, or liver. have any other medical conditions or severe problems with your stomach, such as slowed emptying of your stomach (gastroparesis) or problems with digesting food. are pregnant or breastfeeding or plan to become pregnant or breastfeed. Tell your health care provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, herbal supplements, and other medicines to treat diabetes, including insulin or sulfonylureas. How should I use Victoza®? Do not mix insulin and Victoza® together in the same injection. You may give an injection of Victoza® and insulin in the same body area (such as your stomach area), but not right next to each other. Do not share your Victoza® pen with ot Continue reading >>

Byetta, Victoza, Bydureon: Diabetes Drugs And Weight Loss

Byetta, Victoza, Bydureon: Diabetes Drugs And Weight Loss

Tell me about the diabetes drugs Byetta, Victoza and Bydureon. Can they really help people who have diabetes lose weight? Are there side effects? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. Exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon) and liraglutide (Victoza) are taken by injection, similar to insulin, but they're not insulin. These medications are in a class of drugs called incretin mimetics, which improve blood sugar control by mimicking the action of a hormone called glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Among other things, these drugs stimulate insulin secretion in response to rising blood sugar levels after a meal, which results in lowering of the blood sugar. Byetta, Bydureon and Victoza not only improve blood sugar control, but may also lead to weight loss. There are many proposed ways in which these medications cause weight loss. They appear to help suppress appetite. But the most prominent effect of these drugs is that they delay the movement of food from the stomach into the small intestine. As a result, you may feel "full" faster and longer, so you eat less. Byetta is injected twice daily, and Victoza is injected once a day. Bydureon, a newer formulation, is injected once a week. These drugs do have different effects and side effects to consider. Exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon). The most common side effect of exenatide is mild to moderate nausea, which improves with time in most people. Several cases of kidney problems, including kidney failure, have been reported in people who have taken exenatide. Rarely, exenatide may cause harmful inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis). Liraglutide (Victoza). Some studies have found that liraglutide reduces systolic blood pressure and triglycerides, in addition to improving blood sugar control. The most common side effects are headache, nausea and Continue reading >>

New Oral Victoza May End Daily Insulin Injections

New Oral Victoza May End Daily Insulin Injections

An oral drug being developed by Novo Nordisk shows that it can boost the body’s own insulin production and may banish daily insulin injections for millions of people with diabetes…. The drug is about to be tested on 155 British patients as part of a trial that could transform treatment of the disease. It is an oral form of Victoza, a medicine already FDA approved for use in diabetes, which ‘turbo-charges’ insulin production in the pancreas, the organ responsible for making the hormone. But in its current form, it has to be injected. If trials are successful, it could mean many diabetics are freed from the burden of daily injections to make up for the body’s inability to make enough insulin. Type 1 diabetes affects 2.5 million in the U.S. and often starts in childhood. The pill is unlikely to replace daily insulin jabs for these patients, as this form of diabetes often destroys the pancreas beyond repair. But it could help more than the 24 million in the U.S. who have Type 2 diabetes, a much more common condition that tends to affect people from middle age onwards. Victoza, launched in Britain last year, and recently in the U.S. belongs to a new class of medicines called glucagonlike peptides. These drugs, which are injected at the same time every day, send out a signal for the pancreas to increase insulin output when blood sugar levels have risen too high. They also help by triggering weight loss. One major trial last year suggested that they are almost twice as effective as some other anti-obesity drugs. But the fact that patients still need to inject themselves is seen as a potential barrier to its widespread use. Now Novo Nordisk, the company that makes the drug, has turned it into a pill and is recruiting 155 patients in Britain to try it out in a trial, w Continue reading >>

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