diabetestalk.net

Is Levemir Generic For Lantus?

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

Insulin can be expensive. If you’re one of the 6 million Americans with diabetes relying on this main-stay treatment, you could be paying out-of-pocket costs anywhere from $120 to $400 per month, according to a 2015 New England Journal of Medicine commentary. Drugs such as Lantus (insulin glargine) and Levemir (insulin detemir) have seen significant cost increases, according to a recent trend report by pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts. One reason for the high prices is the lack of generic options for insulin. So for now, you’re stuck having to search around to find affordable options. Where do you shop for more affordable insulin? For some people though, high drug costs can mean making difficult financial choices. Our national polls show people might cut back on groceries and paying bills to pay for their medications. To minimize your costs, consider these options: Prescription Assistance Programs If you don’t have health insurance or are without drug coverage, look into applying for a patient assistance program (PAP). Through the nonprofit NeedyMeds, you can find some programs that offer free or low-cost insulin as long as you meet the eligibility requirements. Those are usually based on your insurance status, income, and diagnosis. You might also qualify for a diagnosis-specific program that can help you save on syringes, pumps, and other diabetes supplies. Pharmacists are also a great resource and can help you find a PAP that meets your financial needs. Switch Drugs Another way to save is by asking your doctor whether there’s a lower-priced insulin that’s right for you. While “long-acting” is a more popular type of insulin, it's also more expensive, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it works better. “It’s mostly a marketing ploy,” says M Continue reading >>

How To Find A Lantus Coupon

How To Find A Lantus Coupon

It looks like this page may be out of date. Please visit NerdWallet’s health hub for our latest content. Diabetics don’t have much of a choice when it comes to taking their insulin, and the costs can be very high, so a Lantus coupon can be invaluable. Paired with diabetic supplies like syringes and blood glucose testing equipment, diabetes is an expensive disease. But with a little bit of information and some resourcefulness, you may be able to save on your monthly prescriptions. Lantus is a long-acting insulin made by Sanofi-Aventis and prescribed to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics. Diabetics are unable to naturally produce or use insulin like most people, so they take injections of synthetic insulin to help regulate their blood sugar. Generic Lantus At this time, there is no generic form of Lantus available. However, that may soon change. The patents protecting Lantus from cheaper generic alternatives expired in February 2015, so less expensive forms of the drug may be coming. When this happens, opting for generic will likely be the best way to save on Lantus, and because of FDA requirements, you don’t have to worry about the generic version being less effective or less safe. Although some people avoid buying generics because they are afraid they won’t work as well as the name brands, those fears are largely unfounded. Lantus coupons from the manufacturer One carton of Lantus can cost close to $400 without insurance, according to GoodRx.com, though Lantus may very well be part of your insurance formulary. Currently, the maker of the drug offers a Lantus Savings Card. According to its website, the card can reduce your prescription cost to no more than $25. However, it also says there is a maximum benefit of $100 off each prescription for the duration of the pr Continue reading >>

What Is Long-acting Insulin?

What Is Long-acting Insulin?

Long-acting insulins are insulin analogs that are steadily released and can last in the body for up to 24 hours. It is often used in the morning or at bedtime as a basal insulin to help control your blood sugar throughout the day. Insulin is made inside the beta cells of the pancreas. It helps regulate the glucose (sugar) in the bloodstream by stimulating the cells to absorb the glucose, which is needed by the cells for energy. Insulin also keeps the liver from producing more glucose. In type 2 diabetes, the body can lose the ability to produce insulin and if insulin is produced, the body isn’t able to use it properly (insulin resistance). Different types of insulin therapies, such as long-acting insulin, enables the body to get the insulin that is needed for optimal glycemic control. Some of the long-acting insulins available in the US include: Levemir contains insulin detemir, which is a long-acting, basal insulin that is used to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes. It can help keep your blood sugar levels within a normal range by moving glucose from the bloodstream into the cells, and it prevents the liver from producing more glucose. Levemir is available in a vial and pre-filled pen called Levemir FlexTouch, each containing 100 units/ml (U-100) of insulin detemir. Once the pen is in use, it is good for 42 days and should not be refrigerated but stored at room temperature (below 86°F). The vial is also good for 42 days after first use, and can be stored in the refrigerator or at room temperature. Levemir is injected under the skin (subcutaneously) in the abdomen, thigh or upper arm once daily, or twice daily depending on your personal requirements. Injection sites should be rotated within the same region from one injection to the next to red Continue reading >>

Levemir Side Effects Center

Levemir Side Effects Center

Levemir (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat diabetes in adults and children. Common side effects of Levemir include: injection site reactions (e.g., pain, redness, irritation), swelling of the hands/feet, thickening of the skin where you inject Levemir, weight gain, headache, back pain, stomach pain, flu symptoms, or cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat. Tell your doctor if you experience serious side effects of Levemir including: signs of low potassium level in the blood (such as muscle cramps, weakness, or irregular heartbeat). Levemir is for once- or twice-daily subcutaneous (under the skin) administration. Patients treated with Levemir once-daily should administer the dose with the evening meal or at bedtime. Patients requiring twice-daily dosing can administer the evening dose with the evening meal, at bedtime, or 12 hours after the morning dose. Levemir may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, guanethidine, or beta-blockers. Other medicines can increase or decrease the effects of insulin Levemir on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Levemir. Discuss a plan for managing your blood sugars with your doctor before you become pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. It is not known if this medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Insulin needs may change while breastfeeding. Our Levemir (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. T Continue reading >>

Lantus And Levemir: What’s The Difference?

Lantus And Levemir: What’s The Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas. Both are insulin analogues, which means that their insulin molecules are analogous to human insulin, but engineered, or recombined, with slight differences that slow their absorption. Lantus is a clear formula made with glargine, a genetically modified form of human insulin, dissolved in a special solution. Levemir is also a clear formula, but it contains dissolved detemir, a different form of genetically modified insulin. Human insulin is made of two amino acid chains, called A and B, that have two disulfide bonds between them. In glargine, one amino acid has been switched out, and two extra amino acids have been added to one end of the B chain. The modifications make glargine soluble at an acidic pH, but much less soluble at the neutral pH that’s found in the body To make Lantus, first the glargine is produced by a vat of E. coli bacteria. Then it’s purified and added to a watery solution containing a little zinc and some glycerol; a dash of hydrochloric acid is also added to make it acidic, bringing its pH down to about 4. At that degree of acidity, glargine completely dissolves into the watery solution, which is why the vial is clear. After you inject it into your subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized by your body to a neutral pH. Because glargine is not soluble at a neutral pH, it precipitates out into a form that’s not soluble in subcutaneous fat, and there forms a relatively insoluble depot. From that pool, or depot, of precipitated glargine in the tissues, small amounts slowly move back Continue reading >>

A Cheaper Version Of The Lifesaving Diabetes Medication Just Launched In The Us

A Cheaper Version Of The Lifesaving Diabetes Medication Just Launched In The Us

A Type 1 diabetes patient holds up bottles of insulin.Reuters/Lucy Nicholson A new form of insulin just hit American markets. It's called Basaglar, and it is 15% less than the list price of Lantus and Toujeo, two long-acting insulins made by Sanofi Aventis, 21% less than the list price of Levemir, and 28% less than Tresiba, two long-acting insulins made by Novo Nordisk. Basaglar was approved in December 2015, but had to wait a year before launching on Thursday. A spokeswoman for Eli Lilly, the company that makes Basaglar and other insulins, told Business Insider that the list price for a pack of 5 pens is $316.85 — that's before any discounts, or factoring in what insurance might cover. It is part of a group of medications called "follow-on biologics" and together, they are expected to save the US billions of dollars over the next decade. Why there's no generic form of insulin For people living with Type 1 diabetes and some who live with Type 2, injections of insulin — a hormone that helps people absorb and process the sugar in food — are a necessary part of daily life. And insulin, in one form or another, has been around since the 1920s. But because it's made of living cells, it’s what doctors call a biologic product, and it's more complicated and difficult to manufacture than the medicines most often produced generically. That's why Basaglar isn't considered a generic, it's called a "follow-on biologic." Others taking this approach have gotten approved as biosimilars, and like Basaglar have come in at a slight discount — roughly 15% — off the list price of the original drug. To become a follow-on biologic, Basaglar had to show that its version of the drug was "sufficiently similar to Lantus to scientifically justify reliance," and the drug had to be tested Continue reading >>

Can I Get Insulin Over The Counter?

Can I Get Insulin Over The Counter?

Jennifer Smith of Integrated Diabetes Services answers a question about generic insulin brands available at WalMart. We receive many questions about over-the-counter insulin, so we decided to ask certified diabetes educator Jennifer Smith of Integrated Diabetes Services (IDS) about it. Here’s her answer: Today, most prescriptions for those using insulin cover the most up-to-date types of insulin – basal insulins such as Lantus and Levemir, as well as rapid-acting insulins like Novolog, Humalog and Apidra. Read “Can I Use Insulin Past Its Expiration Date?” When you buy insulin over the counter (OTC), these brand-name insulins are not available. sponsor ReliOn Brand of insulin at Walmart is available without prescription in some states. However, it includes very limited types of insulin. These are the older generation of insulins, including R insulin, also called Regular (a short-acting insulin and N insulin (an intermediate-acting insulin taken twice a day). These generic OTC insulins have a very different action profile than prescribed insulins. However, generic does not by any means indicate low quality. Having an insulin back-up plan in case you find yourself with an outdated prescription or short on funds is important. It would be beneficial to discuss with a health care provider how to go about using these generic OTC insulins before you have to use them, however. Read “Why Walmart Insulins Aren’t the Answer to High Insulin Prices.” Rapid-acting insulin works faster and clears your body faster. Basal insulin analogs typically work longer and more evenly without a peak in action, unlike the intermediate-acting insulin that has to be taken two times a day. R and N insulin types require users to have a bit more stability to their meals and daily activitie Continue reading >>

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir and Lantus are both long-acting injectable insulins that can be used for long-term management of diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that is naturally produced in the body by the pancreas. It helps convert the glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream into energy. This energy is then distributed to cells throughout your body. With diabetes, your pancreas produces little or no insulin or your body is unable to use the insulin correctly. Without insulin, your body can’t use the sugars in your blood and can become starved for energy. The excess sugar in your blood can also damage different parts of your body, including your blood vessels and kidneys. Everyone with type 1 diabetes and many people with type 2 diabetes must use insulin to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Levemir is a solution of insulin detemir, and Lantus is a solution of insulin glargine. Both are basal insulin formulas. That means that they work slowly to lower your blood sugar levels. They’re both absorbed into your body over a 24-hour period. They keep blood sugar levels lowered for longer than short-acting insulins do. Although the formulations are slightly different, Levemir and Lantus are very similar drugs. There are only a few differences between them. Children and adults can use both Levemir and Lantus. Specifically, Levemir can be used by people who are 2 years or older. Lantus can be used by people who are 6 years or older. Levemir or Lantus can help with daily management of diabetes. However, you may still need to use short-acting insulin to treat spikes in your blood sugar levels and diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous buildup of acids in your blood). Learn more: All about diabetic ketoacidosis » Administration Both Levemir and Lantus are given through injection in the same way. You can gi Continue reading >>

‘generic’ Basaglar Is Cheaper Than Lantus But Does It Work?

‘generic’ Basaglar Is Cheaper Than Lantus But Does It Work?

Basaglar U-100 insulin glargine, which is a follow-on biologic insulin to Lantus is now available by prescription in the US. Basaglar, from Eli Lilly and Company and Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is not technically a generic to Lantus but it does have an amino acid sequence identical to Lantus and has been FDA approved as a long-acting insulin for patients of all ages with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. David Kendall, M.D. and the vice president of Global Medical Affairs for Lilly Diabetes said in Lilly’s press release, “Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim are proud to bring another proven effective diabetes treatment choice to people who may need a long-acting insulin to help control their blood sugar,” and that “We know that starting insulin can be a challenging experience for some people with type 2 diabetes. As part of our continuing commitment to the diabetes community, we are expanding our educational resources.” Is it Cheaper? Business Insider reported that Basaglar “is 15% less than the list price of Lantus and Toujeo, two long-acting insulins made by Sanofi Aventis, 21% less than the list price of Levemir, and 28% less than Tresiba, two long-acting insulins made by Novo Nordisk.” An Eli Lilly spokesperson told Business Insider that before discounts or insurance coverage, the list price for a 5-pen pack of Basaglar is $316.85. You will be able to get Basaglar from retail and mail order pharmacies. Basaglar has also been chosen for the formularies of the top three pharmacy benefit managers and is expected to be covered by many commercial insurance plans. The pharmacy benefit manager CVS Health has dropped Lantus and replaced it with Basaglar for their next year’s formulary. In their announcement, CVS Health stated that th Continue reading >>

Ada: Once-daily Dosing With Lantus And Levemir Similar For Type 2 Diabetes But Different For Type 1

Ada: Once-daily Dosing With Lantus And Levemir Similar For Type 2 Diabetes But Different For Type 1

WASHINGTON, June 13 — Long-acting insulin analogs Levemir (insulin detemir) and Lantus (insulin glargine) appear equal for once-daily use in type 2 diabetes, yet Lantus may have an edge for type 1 diabetes. The two head-to-head comparisons of the metabolism activity of the long-acting insulins, presented at the American Diabetes Association meeting here, are virtually the first reports of their kind for these drugs. Both agents are FDA-approved. "We do not have any pharmacodynamic studies in type 2 diabetes for either insulin," said Tim Heise, M.D., CEO of clinical science at Profil Institute for Metabolic Research in Neuss, Germany, "and up to this conference we had no direct comparison between these two long-acting agents at all." In an oral presentation, Dr. Heise reported the results of a study that randomized 13 patients with type 2 diabetes to Levemir and 14 to receive Lantus. Both agents were given at 0.4, 0.8, and 1.4 U/kg doses to "cover the dose range" used by clinicians, with periodic 24-hour glucose monitoring under glucose clamp conditions. "There is no difference in the time-action profiles between glargine and detemir with regard to the duration of action and mean metabolic impact," he said. The groups had similar baseline characteristics with an average body mass index (BMI) of about 30 kg/m and an HbA1c of about 7.6%. The researchers included only patients with fasting C-peptide levels below 1 nmol/L to eliminate endogenous insulin production as a confounding factor. Also, all participants were male, which Dr. Heise said was to control for the differences in glucose metabolism that occur during the menstrual cycle. The researchers found that "there is really no difference" in glucose infusion rates between the Lantus and Levemir. The only differe Continue reading >>

Fda Approves New Insulin Glargine Basaglar – The First “biosimilar” Insulin In The Us

Fda Approves New Insulin Glargine Basaglar – The First “biosimilar” Insulin In The Us

Twitter Summary: 1st ever “biosimilar” insulin approved in US – potential to come cheaper than other insulins, with launch in December 2016 Lilly/BI recently announced the FDA approval of its long-awaited biosimilar insulin glargine, Basaglar, for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Basaglar is biologically similar to Sanofi’s basal insulin Lantus (insulin glargine), including the same protein sequence and a similar glucose-lowering effect. While the FDA does not call it a “biosimilar” drug for regulatory reasons, it can essentially be thought of as an alternative form of Lantus. Pricing for Basaglar is unknown at this time (more on this below), and the drug will not be launching in the US until after December 15, 2016. Why are “biosimilar” insulin options exciting? Most notably, they could potentially be offered at lower costs than brand name insulins. Basaglar has already launched in several international countries (under the brand name Abasaglar) and is typically priced at a 15%-20% discount relative to Lantus in those markets. It’s not clear yet how the discounts for Basaglar will compare in the US, and how much less patients with insurance might pay. “Generic” versions of drugs in the US typically come at a 50-80% discount to the original product. But unlike most generic drugs, biosimilar insulins are much more expensive to manufacture, so it’s unlikely they’ll see that same level of discount in the US. Indeed, Novartis launched the first “biosimilar” drug approved in the US last September (not in diabetes), which came at a 15% discount. Still, we’ve heard great optimism that biosimilar insulin glargine will help patients facing higher insulin costs. At the IDF conference in December, Dr. Matthew Riddle suggested that of all the insulins new Continue reading >>

Levemir

Levemir

LEVEMIR® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin]) Injection DESCRIPTION LEVEMIR® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) is a sterile solution of insulin detemir for use as a subcutaneous injection. Insulin detemir is a long-acting (up to 24-hour duration of action) recombinant human insulin analog. LEVEMIR® is produced by a process that includes expression of recombinant DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae followed by chemical modification. Insulin detemir differs from human insulin in that the amino acid threonine in position B30 has been omitted, and a C14 fatty acid chain has been attached to the amino acid B29. Insulin detemir has a molecular formula of C267H402O76N64S6 and a molecular weight of 5916.9. It has the following structure: Figure 1: Structural Formula of insulin detemir LEVEMIR® is a clear, colorless, aqueous, neutral sterile solution. Each milliliter of LEVEMIR® contains 100 units (14.2 mg/mL) insulin detemir, 65.4 mcg zinc, 2.06 mg m-cresol, 16.0 mg glycerol, 1.80 mg phenol, 0.89 mg disodium phosphate dihydrate, 1.17 mg sodium chloride, and water for injection. Hydrochloric acid and/or sodium hydroxide may be added to adjust pH. LEVEMIR® has a pH of approximately 7.4. Continue reading >>

High-alert Medications - Levemir (insulin Detemir)

High-alert Medications - Levemir (insulin Detemir)

The leaflets are FREELY available for download and can be reproduced for free distribution to consumers. Or, if you are a facility or organization, you can order professional pre-printed leaflets shipped directly to you. Extra care is needed because Levemir is a high-alert medicine. High-alert medicines have been proven to be safe and effective. But these medicines can cause serious injury if a mistake happens while taking them. This means that it is very important for you to know about this medicine and take it exactly as directed. Top 10 List of Safety Tips for Levemir When taking your medicine 1. Know your insulin. Levemir is a long-acting insulin that should be injected below the skin once or twice daily. (When taken in smaller doses, Levemir may be considered an intermediate-acting insulin.) When Levemir is taken once daily, inject the insulin with the evening meal or at bedtime. When taken twice daily, the evening dose should be taken with the evening meal, at bedtime, or 12 hours following the morning dose. 2. Prepare your insulin. A rapid- or short-acting insulin is often prescribed with Levemir. However, Levemir should never be mixed in the same syringe with other insulins before injection. Do not vigorously shake insulin before use. 3. Don't reuse or recycle. Discard used syringes/needles, pens, and lancets in a sealable hard plastic or metal container (e.g., empty detergent bottle, sharps container from your pharmacy). When the container is full, seal the lid before placing it in the trash. Don't reuse or recycle syringes, needles, or lancets. 4. Don't share. Even if you change the needle, sharing an insulin pen or syringe may spread diseases carried in the blood, including hepatitis and HIV. To avoid serious side effects 5. t Avoid mix-ups. If you use more t Continue reading >>

Fda Approves New Basal Insulin Toujeo

Fda Approves New Basal Insulin Toujeo

The FDA has approved Sanofi’s once-daily basal insulin, but will it compete with Sanofi’s own Lantus? Quick Hits Sanofi, which has been bracing for increased competition for Lantus, has won the race to bring a new basal insulin to the marketplace. This week, the drug manufacturer announced the FDA has approved Toujeo, its new once-daily long-acting basal insulin. The new insulin is expected to go on sale in the U.S. by the start of the second quarter of this year. Studies found that Toujeo’s overall ability to control blood sugar levels matched that of Lantus. It also proved more effective at controlling nighttime hypoglycemia, according to a Bloomberg report. The biggest difference between the two basal insulins is that while Lantus contains 100 units/mL, Toujeo is more concentrated and triples Lantus’ capacity, yielding 300 units/mL. While Lantus is suitable for people with diabetes who are age 6 and up, Toujeo is only approved to treat patients who are 18 years and older. Interestingly, pharmaceutical market watchers weren’t overwhelmed by the news of Toujeo’s approval, according to a report in Fierce Pharma. One market analyst predicted that many Lantus users will not switch over to Toujeo because they will not see enough difference between the two insulins. Since Sanofi owns both products, you would think that would be good news, but Sanofi’s profit margin for Lantus has come under threat. Insurance payors are demanding a cut in the price of Lantus in 2015. Also, there is the pending threat of generic versions of Lantus flooding the marketplace. It’s believed that Sanofi must establish a strong foothold with Toujeo in the basal insulin marketplace if it is to maintain its profit margin. UPDATE – 3/5/15 – EU regulators have given Toujeo the green Continue reading >>

Levemir Vs Lantus: What's The Difference?

Levemir Vs Lantus: What's The Difference?

Levemir and Lantus are both long-acting forms of insulin that work for most of the day. Levemir Vs Lantus: Both human insulin analogs Levemir is a brand name for insulin detemir. Levemir takes at least one hour to start working (some sources state up to three hours), and its effects are dependent on the initial dosage given. Dosages of 0.1 units per kg may last only six hours whereas dosages equal to or greater than 0.8 units/kg last approximately 22 to 24 hours. Levemir has a relatively peakless profile but may be more slowly absorbed from the thigh compared to the deltoid (arm) and the abdomen after subcutaneous administration. Lantus is the brand name for insulin glargine. Lantus takes approximately an hour to start working and lasts for an average of 24 hours; however, there is some variability and in some people, it may only act for just over 10 hours, whereas for others it may last longer than 24 hours. Lantus releases consistently, so doesn't really have a peak effect. Levemir Vs Lantus: Differences in formulation account for some differences in action Both Levemir and Lantus are made by modifying human insulin. Both should be clear solutions before they are injected (discard if cloudy). Insulin glargine (Lantus) tends to be absorbed more slowly and for longer than detemir ( Levemir) because it is not as soluble once injected just under the skin. This means it has a longer duration of action and an insignificant peak effect - instead, it delivers consistent blood levels of insulin. Insulin detemir (Levemir) remains soluble after injection but is able to bind to protein in the tissue and bond to itself which gives it a prolonged action. How do Levemir and Lantus compare to NPH insulin? Both Levemir and Lantus were created to improve on NPH insulin, and to better m Continue reading >>

More in insulin