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Is Lantus And Glargine The Same Thing?

Insulin Glargine

Insulin Glargine

Pronunciation: IN su lin GLAR gine Brand: Basaglar KwikPen, Lantus, Lantus Solostar Pen, Toujeo SoloStar What is the most important information I should know about insulin glargine? Never share an injection pen or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. What is insulin glargine? Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin that starts to work several hours after injection and keeps working evenly for 24 hours. Insulin glargine is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Some brands of this medicine are for use only in adults. Carefully follow all instructions for the brand of insulin glargine you are using. Insulin glargine is used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. Insulin glargine is also used to treat type 1 diabetes in adults and children who are at least 6 years old. Insulin glargine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using insulin glargine? You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Insulin glargine should not be given to a child younger than 6 years old. Insulin glargine should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure insulin glargine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia); or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using insuli Continue reading >>

Difference Between Lantus & Humalog

Difference Between Lantus & Humalog

Lantus and Humalog are two different insulin medications that serve a similar purpose. Lantus slowly releases to regulate low levels of insulin while Humalog is a supplemental insulin taken with a meal to control a carbohydrate spike in diabetics. Control Adults with type 2 diabetes and some children with type 1 diabetes require constant dosing of insulin to control sugar levels in the bloodstream. Lantus is intended to give users a 24-hour period of control, whereas Humalog is used to fill in the gaps, and effects diminish in the first hour. Dose Dosing for Lantus and Humalog is personalized to accommodate the blood sugar range of the individual. Both are taken by injection, with Lantus on a once a day schedule and Humalog taken at meals or as needed. Side Effects Humalog and Lantus have similar side effects that may include irritation at or around the injection site, and dangerously low blood sugar levels, also called hypoglycemia. Diabetics should consult with a medical professional if any serious side effects or allergic reactions persist. Absorption The insulin in Lantus is slowly absorbed by the body in a steady stream over a 24-hour period, with the patient feeling little or no reaction. Humalog, on the other hand, is quickly absorbed with results being felt within the first fifteen minutes after taking, depending on doseage and body mass. Timing Lantus is taken once a day, usually in the morning, and left at home. Humalog is taken to supplement the release of insulin coming from a daily Lantus shot. Humalog is taken on a much more flexible, as-needed basis, as dictated by your day's schedule and mealtimes. Continue reading >>

Basaglar

Basaglar

The FDA has approved Basaglar (insulin glargine injection; Eli Lilly and Company), a long-acting human insulin analog, to improve glycemic control in adults and children with type 1 diabetes and in adults with type 2 diabetes. The approval carries the limitation that Basaglar should not be used for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis.1 Basaglar has an identical amino acid sequence as Lantus, another U-100 insulin glargine,2 and was approved through an abreviated approval process that partly relied on the FDA’s previous finding of safety and effectiveness for Lantus. Basaglar was found sufficiently similar to Lantus, and data were provided specific to Basaglar to establish its safety and efficacy for its approved uses.3 PHARMACOLOGY AND PHARMACOKINETICS Insulin’s primary activity is the regulation of glucose metabolism. Insulin and insulin analogs stimulate peripheral glucose uptake, especially by skeletal muscle and fat, and inhibit hepatic glucose production to lower blood glucose. A single subcutaneous 0.5-U/kg dose of Basaglar demonstrated a serum concentration with a slow and prolonged absorption and a relatively constant concentration/ time profile over 24 hours, with no pronounced peak. The average time to maximum serum insulin concentration was 12 hours after injection. Serum insulin concentrations declined to baseline by approximately 24 hours.1 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION The dose of Basaglar should be individualized based on metabolic needs, blood glucose monitoring, glycemic control, type of diabetes, and prior insulin use. It should be given subcutaneously once daily, at the same time each day. The injection sites should be rotated to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy. When treatment with Basaglar begins, blood glucose levels should be monitored closely Continue reading >>

What Is Lantus? (insulin Glargine)

What Is Lantus? (insulin Glargine)

What is Lantus? Lantus is the brand name of insulin glargine, a long-acting insulin used to treat adults and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and adults with type 2 diabetes mellitusto control high blood sugar. Lantus replaces the insulin that your body no longer produces. Insulin is a natural substance that allows your body to convert dietary sugar into energy and helps store energy for later use. In type 2 diabetes mellitus, your body does not produce enough insulin, or the insulin produced is not used properly, causing a rise in blood sugar. Like other types of insulin, Lantus is used to normalize blood sugar levels. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual dysfunction. Proper control of diabetes has also been shown to reduce your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Lantus is meant to be used alongside a proper diet and exercise program recommended by your doctor. Lantus is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. It was approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000 as the first long-acting human insulin administered once a day with a 24-hour sugar-lowering effect. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin that starts to work several hours after injection and keeps working evenly for 24 hours. Lantus is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Lantus is used to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes in adults, and type 1 diabetes children who are at least 6 years old. LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) is a sterile solution of insulin glargine for subcutaneous use. Insulin glarg Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Hormone secreted by pancreatic beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans and essential for the metabolism and homeostasis of carbohydrate, fat, and protein. Insulin glargine is a once-daily basal insulin analog without pronounced peaks. BASAGLAR, Lantus, Lantus SoloStar, Toujeo SoloStar BASAGLAR/Lantus/Lantus SoloStar/Toujeo SoloStar Subcutaneous Inj Sol: 1mL, 100U, 300U For the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus. For the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Subcutaneous dosage (100 units/mL, i.e., Lantus, Basaglar) Initially, administer one-third of the total daily insulin requirements/dose subcutaneously once daily. Titrate dosage to achieve blood glucose control and A1C goals in conjunction with a short-acting insulin. Give the dose at the same time every day, at any time. Administration in the morning may avoid nocturnal hypoglycemia. When transferring from once daily NPH insulin, the dose is usually not changed. However, when transferring from twice-daily NPH insulin to insulin glargine, the total daily dose of NPH insulin (or other twice daily basal insulin) should be reduced by 20% and administered as single dose once daily. When transferring from once-daily Toujeo to once-daily Lantus or Basaglar, the recommended initial Lantus or Basaglar dose is 80% of the Toujeo dose that is being discontinued. Thereafter, the dosage of insulin glargine should be adjusted to response. Children and Adolescents 6 years and older Insulin requirements are highly variable and must be individualized based on patient-specific factors and type of insulin regimen. During partial remission phase, total combined daily insulin requirement is often less than 0.5 units/kg/day. Prepubertal children (outside the partial remission phase) usually require 0.7 to Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

LANTUS® (insulin glargine) Injection DESCRIPTION LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) is a sterile solution of insulin glargine for subcutaneous use. Insulin glargine is a recombinant human insulin analog that is a long-acting, parenteral blood-glucose-lowering agent [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY]. Insulin glargine has low aqueous solubility at neutral pH. At pH 4 insulin glargine is completely soluble. After injection into the subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized, leading to formation of microprecipitates from which small amounts of insulin glargine are slowly released, resulting in a relatively constant concentration/time profile over 24 hours with no pronounced peak. This profile allows oncedaily dosing as a basal insulin. LANTUS is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli (K12) as the production organism. Insulin glargine differs from human insulin in that the amino acid asparagine at position A21 is replaced by glycine and two arginines are added to the C-terminus of the B-chain. Chemically, insulin glargine is 21A-Gly-30Ba-L-Arg-3030b-L-Arg-human insulin and has the empirical formula C267H404N72O78S6 and a molecular weight of 6063. Insulin glargine has the following structural formula: LANTUS consists of insulin glargine dissolved in a clear aqueous fluid. Each milliliter of LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) contains 100 Units (3.6378 mg) insulin glargine. The 10 mL vial presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, 20 mcg polysorbate 20, and water for injection. The 3 mL prefilled pen presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, and water for inje Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (rx)

Insulin Glargine (rx)

Dosage Forms & Strengths injectable solution 100 units/mL (Lantus; 10mL vial) 100 units/mL (Lantus SoloSTAR; Basaglar KwikPen; 3 mL disposable prefilled pens) 300 units/mL (Toujeo; 1.5 mL SolosStar disposable prefilled pen) Note: Recent studies have suggested that glargine-300 extends blood glucose control well beyond 24 hr Type 1 or 2 Diabetes Mellitus Lantus and Toujeo are recombinant human insulin analogs indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus Dosing Considerations Indicated for once-daily SC administration; exhibits relatively constant glucose-lowering profile over 24 hr May be administered at any time during the day; should be administered SC once daily at the same time every day Dose must be individualized based on clinical response; blood glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Patients adjusting the amount or timing of dosage should do so only under medical supervision with appropriate glucose monitoring In patients with type 1 diabetes, insulin glargine must be used in regimens with short-acting insulin Should not be administered IV or via an insulin pump; IV administration of the usual SC dose could result in severe hypoglycemia As with all insulins, injection sites should be rotated within the same region (abdomen, thigh, or deltoid) from one injection to the next to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy; no clinically relevant difference in insulin glargine absorption after abdominal, deltoid, or thigh SC administration As with all insulins, the rate of absorption and, consequently, the onset and duration of action may be affected by exercise and other variables (eg, stress, intercurrent illness, changes in coadministered drugs, meal patterns) Type 1 diabetes mellitus: Starting dose sho Continue reading >>

Toujeo - Lantus In Its Concentrated Form

Toujeo - Lantus In Its Concentrated Form

Many patients with Type 2 diabetes often require insulin to help reduce their blood sugars. Insulin is the hormone produced by the pancreas that is responsible for taking glucose (sugar) from the blood to the cells to use for energy. A person with Type 2 diabetes may need insulin if he is very insulin resistant, unable to control his blood sugars with oral medicine or, if he has had diabetes for an extended period of time, beta cells that make insulin can die off or become sluggish and injectable insulin may be required to help get blood sugars to goal level. Often, people with diabetes start with a small amount of basal insulin to help get their blood sugars to goal. Basal insulin is meant to act as baseline or background insulin - its goal is to release a small amount of insulin over a 24 hour period. It is not used to lower mealtime sugars, but rather to help lower your blood sugars throughout the day. Two types of basal insulin are Lantus and Levemir. Both insulins are available in pen form as well as vial and syringe. Lantus is losing patent protection and a cheaper generic version with not be available in the United States for another 30 more months. Companies are working on generic formulas of Lantus, which will likely be less costly. And while Lantus is still available for use, a more concentrated form of Lantus, Toujeo, has also hit the market. What is Toujeo and is it Meant for You? Toujeo is three times more concentrated (300 units/ml) than Lantus, which makes the release of insulin slower and therefore may reduce the risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Toujeo might be a good alternative for patients with hypoglycemia or insulin resistance requiring larger doses of insulin. However, unless you have had problems with hypoglycemia, there doesn't appear to b Continue reading >>

Lantus Dosing

Lantus Dosing

Well, I never thought I’d say this, but it’s a great week to be a person with Type 1 diabetes. With all of the bad news surrounding the Type 2 drug Avandia (rosiglitazone), it’s a relief to know I don’t have to worry about it. I recommended you read my colleague Tara’s blog entry (“Type 2 Drug Avandia Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Attacks”) for the full story. That’s one of the first times in my life I’ve referred to someone as a colleague. What can I say? It’s just not a word in my describe-a-friend/coworker vocabulary. While all of the controversy surrounds Avandia, I’m way over in Type 1 land contemplating whether or not to lower my daily dose of Lantus (insulin glargine). I’ve just started a brand new bottle of Lantus and I’ve been taking my normal 15 units in the morning and then eating a rather normal breakfast and lunch, but I’m still going low in the midmorning and early afternoon. This happened Monday after eating Brussels sprouts and whole-wheat pasta for lunch and only taking one unit of rapid-acting NovoLog (insulin aspart) to help out the Lantus. I’ve known for a while that my body is sensitive to insulin, but lately it’s been a little more sensitive than usual. I took 13 units of Lantus yesterday and my blood glucose was 86 mg/dl before lunch. I often wonder how much of an adjustment two units of Lantus is. While I’m very much locked in on an insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio with my NovoLog, it’s a bit tricky to judge how much the longer-lasting insulins affect your blood glucose. Is there a chart for your Lantus dose? I seem to remember something from when I was diagnosed. I wonder what Google will tell me to do. I realize that Lantus doesn’t have a true peak the way some of the other insulins do, but sometimes it su Continue reading >>

Lantus Vial

Lantus Vial

Uses Insulin glargine is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Insulin glargine is a man-made product that is similar to human insulin. It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. It acts longer than regular insulin, providing a low, steady level of insulin. It works by helping blood sugar (glucose) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. Insulin glargine may be used with a shorter-acting insulin product. It may also be used alone or with other diabetes drugs. How to use Lantus Vial Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist. Follow all package directions for proper use/injection/storage of the particular type of device/insulin you are using. Your health care professional will teach you how to properly inject this medication. If any of the information is unclear, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. The insulin container you are currently using can be kept at room temperature (see also Storage section). Wash your hands before measuring and injecting insulin. Before using, check the product visually for particles, thickening, or clumps. If any are present, discard that container. Insulin glargine should be clear and colorless. To avoid damaging the insulin, do not shake the container. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. M Continue reading >>

Use Of Abasaglar (biosimilar Insulin Glargine)

Use Of Abasaglar (biosimilar Insulin Glargine)

The patent for Lantus® (Insulin glargine) has expired and a biosimilar preparation called Abasaglar®, which has a lower cost, has been launched. It has yet to be considered in the Local medicines decision making process, guidance for use with defined patient criteria is pending. NB: The administration devices for Lantus and Abasaglar are slightly different. Lantus uses the Solostar pen, and Abasaglar the Kwikpen device. Existing patients should continue to receive Lantus. Patients should not be routinely switched between brands. Automatic substitution, defined here as the practice of dispensing one medicine instead of another equivalent and interchangeable medicine at the pharmacy level without consulting the prescriber is not appropriate for biological medicines, including biosimilar medicines and is not permitted at this time. Prescribers, of course, are always able to switch treatments for a given patient, provided it is safe to do so and there are appropriate monitoring arrangements in place. As biosimilar medicines often use the same international non-proprietary name (INN) as their reference product, the main way to ensure automatic substitution does not take place is through brand name prescribing. Brand name prescribing should be adhered to by all prescribers for biological medicines, including biosimilar medicines, and is in line with recommendations from the MHRA and NICE, as well as being enshrined in EU law. Prescribing It is essential that patients stay on the same brand. All prescribing should be by Brand Name as recommended in local prescribing guidance for all insulin prescribing. In primary care we recommend that all practices search for any patients currently prescribed insulin glargine generically and change to the existing branded product, Lantus® Continue reading >>

Insulin For Cats

Insulin For Cats

Most diabetic cats will require insulin therapy as part of their treatment. Diet is also an important cornerstone of treatment for feline diabetes mellitus, and a few diabetic cats can be managed with diet alone, but the majority will require insulin. There are a variety of types of insulin available. Some are designed for human use but can be useful in pets, while others have been developed specifically for animal use. The natural insulins produced by cat and dog pancreatic cells have slightly different structures than the natural insulin produced by human pancreatic cells. Insulin types made for human use match the natural human insulin, and may not always be as effective in pets. With any insulin, the goal of treatment is to safely reduce or eliminate the symptoms of diabetes (weight loss with excessive thirst, urination and appetite). There is no ‘best’ insulin for all cats, but some are preferable to others. Many veterinary internal medicine specialists recommend glargine (Lantus®, made by Sanofi Aventis) as a first-line choice. Lantus® is a recombinant human insulin which is usually very effective in cats. In combination with an appropriate diet (canned cat food with less than 7% carbohydrates), glargine has the best chance of inducing a remission, meaning that the cat will no longer require insulin. Lantus® is typically dosed at 1 or 2 units twice daily (BID). In some cats it can be used once daily. Once daily administration is not as likely to induce remission—and won’t control the blood sugar very tightly—but is an option for families or cats who can’t do twice daily injections. The glargine product information for human use recommends replacing the vial every 28 days, but if kept refrigerated, the insulin is effective for cats for at least three Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin Glargine (rdna Origin) Injection

Insulin glargine is used to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to treat people with type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control their diabetes. In people with type 1 diabetes, insulin glargine must be used with another type of insulin (a short-acting insulin). In people with type 2 diabetes, insulin glargine also may be used with another type of insulin or with oral medication(s) for diabetes. Insulin glargine is a long-acting, manmade version of human insulin. Insulin glargine works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin glargine comes as a solution (liquid) to inject subcutaneously (under the Continue reading >>

Is Toujeo The New Lantus?

Is Toujeo The New Lantus?

Sanofi hoping to convert patients to Toujeo as Lantus is due to lose U.S. patent protection. (Find the full prescribing info for Toujeo at the bottom of this article.)…. Toujeo is a more potent follow-up to the drugmaker’s top-selling Lantus insulin product, which accounts for a fifth of Sanofi sales. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration late last week approved the once daily, long-acting basal insulin to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Analysts noted, however, that lower rates of hypoglycemia seen in clinical trials comparing Toujeo to Lantus, were not mentioned on the FDA-approved label. It also highlighted the need for higher doses to achieve the same level of blood glucose control as Lantus. The Toujeo label is probably going to be viewed as more undifferentiated than expected. Sanofi bought some patient conversion time with a patent infringement lawsuit filed last year against Eli Lilly and Co that keeps a cheaper Lantus generic off the market for 30 months. In addition to gaining patients through conversions, there are about a million new patients for basal insulin each and every year. Toujeo has the same active ingredient as Lantus, called insulin glargine, but at three times the concentration and with a design to release the insulin more gradually. Lantus is the world’s most prescribed insulin. Full Prescribing Information for Toujeo® Continue reading >>

Lantus 100 Units/ml Solution For Injection

Lantus 100 Units/ml Solution For Injection

Lantus 100 units/ml solution for injection in a vial Lantus 100 units/ml solution for injection in a cartridge Lantus SoloStar 100 units/ml solution for injection in a pre-filled pen Each ml contains 100 units insulin glargine* (equivalent to 3.64 mg). Vial Each vial contains 5 ml of solution for injection, equivalent to 500 units, or 10 ml of solution for injection, equivalent to 1000 units. Cartridge, SoloStar pre-filled pen Each cartridge or pen contains 3 ml of solution for injection, equivalent to 300 units. *Insulin glargine is produced by recombinant DNA technology in Escherichia coli. For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1. Treatment of diabetes mellitus in adults, adolescents and children aged 2 years and above. Posology Lantus contains insulin glargine, an insulin analogue, and has a prolonged duration of action. Lantus should be administered once daily at any time but at the same time each day. The dose regimen (dose and timing) should be individually adjusted. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, Lantus can also be given together with orally active antidiabetic medicinal products. The potency of this medicinal product is stated in units. These units are exclusive to Lantus and are not the same as IU or the units used to express the potency of other insulin analogues (see section 5.1). Special population Elderly population (≥65 years old) In the elderly, progressive deterioration of renal function may lead to a steady decrease in insulin requirements. Renal impairment In patients with renal impairment, insulin requirements may be diminished due to reduced insulin metabolism. Hepatic impairment In patients with hepatic impairment, insulin requirements may be diminished due to reduced capacity for gluconeogenesis and reduced insulin metabolism Continue reading >>

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