diabetestalk.net

Is It Possible To Overdose On Insulin?

Insulin Overdose: A Mom Accidentally Gives Way Too Much Insulin To Her Son

Insulin Overdose: A Mom Accidentally Gives Way Too Much Insulin To Her Son

Every time I draw up an insulin shot for my son Joey I am acutely aware of what could happen if the immediate future does not proceed as I expect. Most of the time the problems that arise are not the result of anything Joey or I have consciously done, but rather are the fault of circumstance, i.e., a meal is not delivered on time, an unexpected phone call is received or a car breaks down after an insulin injection has been given. Unforeseen events like these can usually be remedied by carrying supplies of sugar and insulin. But recently I experienced an unpredictable event that had dangerous consequences. It was late September and it was one of those California days of sunshine and cool breezes. I had just returned from a James Taylor concert and my head was full of music. I was feeling relaxed and happy to be home with my children following a day of rest from the chores of motherhood and managing my son’s diabetes. I was busy preparing dinner, listening to my new CD and in a terrific mood. My children were playing outside as I talked and laughed with my visiting mother-in-law. A half-hour before dinner I performed my son Joey’s predinner blood test. I then carried the meter back into the kitchen, drew the shot and went back outside to give Joey his shot. The moment I finished pushing in the plunger I said to myself, “That shot took too long.” I immediately realized that I had given Joey his morning insulin dose instead of his evening dose. Joey’s morning dose at the time was three units of Regular and seven units of NPH, and his evening dose was two units of Regular and two units of NPH. In other words, I had given Joey a potentially lethal dose of insulin. My first reaction was to run and hide. I found myself sitting on the ground in a nearby hedge and reali Continue reading >>

Insulin Overdose: Dosage, Symptoms, And Treatment

Insulin Overdose: Dosage, Symptoms, And Treatment

Insulin is an important hormone used in medical treatments for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It helps the body's cells to properly absorb sugar. Insulin is a lifesaving medication when taken correctly, but an insulin overdose can have some serious side effects. This article explores signs of insulin overdose to look out for, as well as steps to take to avoid insulin overdoses. Contents of this article: Safe vs. unsafe insulin doses There are a few things to consider to ensure a correct insulin dose. Insulin doses can vary greatly from person to person. The normal dose for one person may be considered an overdose for another. Basal insulin The insulin needed to keep the blood sugar steady throughout the day is called basal insulin. The amount of insulin needed changes from person to person based on what time of day they take it, and whether their body is resistant to insulin or not. It is best to consult a doctor to figure out the appropriate basal insulin dosage. Mealtime insulin Mealtime insulin is insulin that is taken after a meal. Glucose (sugar) is released into the bloodstream as the body breaks down food, which raises the blood sugar levels. In people with diabetes, this extra sugar must be met with extra insulin so the body can use it properly. There are a few different factors to be considered in terms of the mealtime insulin levels. People with diabetes have to consider: their pre-meal blood sugar how many carbs are in the food they are eating if they plan to do anything active after the meal Then they must factor in their own level of insulin sensitivity and the blood sugar target they want to hit after the insulin is taken. The process can be complicated and, as such, there is room for error. Other variables There are also a few different types of Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

Link to 2.1.7.1.1 Insulin Teaching Resources Link to Problems for Discussion DRUGS INCLUDED Insulin Aspart Protamine, Recombinant/Insulin Aspart, Recombinant Insulin Aspart, Recombinant Insulin Degludec1 Insulin Degludec/Insulin Aspart, Recombinant Insulin Detemir Insulin Glargine, Recombinant Insulin Glulisine Insulin Human Isophane (NPH) Insulin Human Isophane (NPH)/Insulin Human Regular Insulin Human Regular2 Insulin Lispro Protamine, Recombinant/Insulin Lispro, Recombinant Insulin Lispro, Recombinant 1Also available in a 200 Unit/mL concentration (rather than the usual 100 U/mL) 2Also available in a 500 Unit/mL concentration (rather than the usual 100 U/mL) OVERVIEW As expected, the toxicity of insulin in overdose is primarily due to hypoglycaemia, although hypokalaemia may also cause problems. The duration of the hypoglycaemic effect depends on the type of insulin injected (duration of action), the amount and age, diabetes (insulin resistance) and other factors that may increase or decrease the patient`s sensitivity to insulin. Mortality in attempted suicidal overdose with insulin is 25%. Death has occurred after as little as 20 units but doses of 400 to 900 units or more are more common in fatal cases. Irreversible neurological injury occurs when glycogen stores are depleted since the brain is totally dependent on glucose metabolism. It is the duration of hypoglycaemia in the presence of signs or symptoms of neurological compromise that determines post hypoglycaemic encephalopathy, rather than the quantity of insulin injected. The period from injection of an overdose of insulin to irreversible brain damage is frequently about 7 hours (about the time glycogen stores are completely). Treatment is with 50% glucose IV, food (and lots of it) and close observation. MECH Continue reading >>

Teenage Girl Died Of Insulin Overdose After Injecting Herself With Diabetic Boyfriend's Pen 'in Cry For Attention'

Teenage Girl Died Of Insulin Overdose After Injecting Herself With Diabetic Boyfriend's Pen 'in Cry For Attention'

A teenage girl who died after injecting herself with insulin may have taken it to try to lose weight. Charlie Dunne, 19, used an insulin pen belonging to her diabetic boyfriend while he was out at a hospital appointment. An inquest heard the trainee hairdresser may have taken the hormone previously after hearing that it could help slimmers. But the teenager, who was fit and healthy, would have been unaware of the ‘catastrophic’ danger the drug posed to non-diabetics, a coroner said. Miss Dunne was discovered collapsed at the home in Atherton, Greater Manchester, she shared with boyfriend Terence Rhoden, 28, when he returned hours later. She suffered brain damage caused by a dramatic drop in blood sugar and died in hospital six days later. Police later investigated claims by Miss Dunne’s family that Mr Rhoden had confessed to injecting her with insulin in the past to help her lose weight. But he denied doing so and officers found no evidence that he was involved in his girlfriend’s death. Bolton Coroner’s Court was told that ‘bubbly’ Miss Dunne was a regular at her local Methodist church, where she was given the community title of ‘rose queen’ for her charity fundraising. However, the inquest was told she suffered mood swings and had tried to overdose on tablets during a previous relationship. She also claimed to have suffered a miscarriage and was worried she could not have children, despite a lack of medical evidence to support her fears. The court heard that Mr Rhoden was woken when Miss Dunne returned from her local pub in an ‘agitated’ state on December 17 last year and threatened to take painkillers. She told him to leave, saying he was ‘too good for her’. After talking, she calmed down and fell asleep on the sofa. Mr Rhoden left for his a Continue reading >>

What Is Toujeo (insulin Glargine)?

What Is Toujeo (insulin Glargine)?

Toujeo is a brand name for the medicine insulin glargine, available in a prefilled injectable pen (SoloStar). It's used to treat people with type 1 diabetes (the body doesn't produce the hormone insulin) and type 2 diabetes (the body doesn't make or use insulin normally). Toujeo is a long-acting form of insulin that works by helping your body use sugar properly. For people with type 1 diabetes, Toujeo must be used with another type of insulin known as a short-acting insulin. People with type 2 diabetes may use other types of insulin or oral drugs along with Toujeo. Taking this prescription medicine along with adopting a healthy lifestyle can decrease your risk of developing serious or life-threatening complications, which may include heart disease, stroke, nerve damage from neuropathy, kidney problems, or eye issues. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Toujeo in 2015. It's marketed by Sanofi. Toujeo Warnings Toujeo shouldn't be used to treat diabetic ketoacidosis, a dangerous condition that can occur if high blood sugar is untreated. Before using Toujeo, tell your doctor if you have or have ever had: Diabetic neuropathy Heart, liver, or kidney disease Hypokalemia (low potassium levels in the blood) A severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) to any medicines, especially insulin products Toujeo shouldn't be used in children, and it should be used with caution in elderly people. Be sure to let your physician know that you're taking Toujeo before having any type of surgery, including a dental procedure. Your healthcare provider may recommend that you follow a specific diet and exercise plan while using Toujeo. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Illnesses, injuries, or unusual stress can affect your blood sugar levels. Talk to your physician if you experi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prescription Insulin Medications (cont.)

Diabetes Prescription Insulin Medications (cont.)

font size A A A Previous 1 2 3 4 5 Next What are the side effects of the diabetes drug insulin? The main side effects of insulin have to do with taking too little or too much of the drug. The former can result in high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia. A person with diabetes who has hyperglycemia frequently or for long periods of time may suffer damage to the blood vessels, nerves, and organs. In a worst-case scenario, hyperglycemia can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, a potentially life-threatening condition. Loss of appetite, thirst, flushing, drowsiness, and a fruity odor on the breath are the first signs of diabetic ketoacidosis. Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia can result from taking too much insulin, although missing meals and exercising excessively can also bring it on. This, too, can be a life-threatening. Initial signs of hypoglycemia include dizziness, sweating, tremor, confusion, and hunger. It's important to intervene before symptoms progress. High doses of insulin can lower levels of potassium. If potassium gets too low, it can cause muscle aches or weakness, abnormal heart rhythms and even death. Other side effects of insulin include break down of fat at the injection site, the injection site might be depressed or raised, and allergic reactions, which can be local or involve the entire body. The latter may be life-threatening. lower your blood sugar Amputations. INVOKANA® may increase your risk of lower-limb amputations. Amputations mainly involve removal of the toe or part of the foot; however, amputations involving the leg, below and above the knee, have also occurred. Some people had more than one amputation, some on both sides of the body. You may be at a higher risk of lower-limb amputation if you: have a history of amputation, have heart disease or are at Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Taking Insulin When You Don't Need It

Side Effects Of Taking Insulin When You Don't Need It

Insulin-dependent diabetics take insulin injections because their pancreas no longer produces insulin. Insulin helps cells absorb glucose, the body’s main energy source, from the blood. All Type 1 diabetics, formerly called juvenile diabetics, and some Type 2 diabetics, formerly called adult-onset diabetics, need insulin because their bodies no longer produce enough of the hormone. Without insulin to remove glucose from the blood, blood glucose levels rise, a condition called hyperglycemia. Taking too much insulin or taking insulin when your body already makes enough removes too much glucose from the blood, a condition called hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Video of the Day All cells require glucose to function. When you eat, carbohydrates in the food break down in the intestines into glucose. The blood absorbs the glucose. When this happens, your blood glucose levels rise. In response to the increase in blood sugar, the pancreas releases insulin. Insulin facilitates a cell’s ability to remove glucose from the blood and utilize it for energy. If your body has already released enough insulin and you take more, too much glucose is removed from your blood and you become hypoglycemic. Taking an overdose of short-acting or intermediate-acting insulin is more dangerous than taking too much long-acting insulin, eMedTV explains. Taking insulin when you don’t need it causes symptoms such as sweating, shaking, headache, irritability, nervousness, anxiety, weakness, dizziness, hunger, tremors, nausea, and difficulty concentrating or thinking. For diabetics, the treatment for hypoglycemia is to eat something containing quickly absorbed glucose, such as candy or special glucose tablets. If you have a hypoglycemic reaction and take glucose, follow up with a snack containing b Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

Drug Name: Insulin Common Name: Vetsulin®, Humulin®, PZI Vet®, Novolin®, Iletin®, Velosulin® Drug Type: Synthetic hormone Used For: Diabetes mellitus Species: Dogs, Cats Administered: 40units/ml, 100units/ml, and 500units/ml Injectable How Dispensed: Prescription only FDA Approved: Yes General Description Insulin is used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps convert your pet’s food into energy by allowing the uptake of sugar by cells. By allowing this uptake and use of sugar, insulin decreases the blood glucose concentrations in the body. When you pet does not produce insulin, sugar can’t enter cells, your pet’s body cannot create fat, sugar, or protein. This also results in a dangerously high blood glucose level. How It Works Insulin replaces the insulin that your pet’s body does not produce. The type of insulin you give to your pet is a synthetic hormone derived from pigs or cows. Storage Information Some forms of insulin need to be refrigerated, pay close attention to the manufacturer’s label. DO NOT FREEZE. Protect from heat and sunlight. Do not use if past the expiration date. Insulin must be given to your pet by an injection 1 to 2 times a day. Because it is a protein, the acids in the stomach would digest it if you were to administer it orally. The proper dose of insulin is determined by your veterinarian through a series of glucose level tests. It is best to give this drug to a pet with a full stomach. It is best to give insulin right after a meal. DO NOT SHAKE THE BOTTLE OF INSULIN Proper handling of insulin: Be sure you have the appropriate size syringe for the concentration of insulin you are using. Variations include: U-40, U-100, and U-500 syringes which go to their c Continue reading >>

Rumors Suggest That Bodybuilder Rich Piana Died From An Insulin Overdose

Rumors Suggest That Bodybuilder Rich Piana Died From An Insulin Overdose

Trending News: This Bodybuilder's Mysterious Death Is Stirring Up Controversy Long Story Short Medical examiners are still looking into Rich Piana's tragic sudden death, but a fitness expert has given voice to a rumor that suggests the famous bodybuilder died after taking too much insulin and neglecting to regulate his sugar. Long Story Rich Piana was no stranger to insulin, a hormone often taken by people with diabetes to regulate their blood sugar. In a video posted to YouTube four years ago, he decried how dangerous the hormone can be if you're not careful. Still, he uses it for muscle growth all the same. "The thing is, insulin works," he said, according to The Sun. "It definitely works and does what is supposed to do. And it is dangerous, but as long as you know what you are doing, everything can be fine. If you know what you are doing it is not dangerous, as long as you are taking the sugar which is necessary to match up the insulin you are taken." Bodybuilders take insulin because it works like an undetectable form of steroids. Could it be that Piana died suddenty at 46-years-old from the same thing that he warned about? Sponsored Content by Connatix Fitness expert Matt Fiddes alleges — baselessly, I might add, as the medical examiner has not finalized the cause of death — that Piana's sudden death in August at the age of 46 could have been due to insulin. Fiddes' theory is that Piana didn't consume enough sugar after taking insulin. “He would naturally take a pre-workout and then get to the photo shoot, do some press ups, some curls, get his body in condition and then come home,” Fiddes said to The Daily Star. “They have to eat enough sugar to balance the insulin just like a diabetic would, otherwise they will go into a coma and die. If the photoshoot Continue reading >>

Intentional Overdose With Insulin: Prognostic Factors And Toxicokinetic/toxicodynamic Profiles

Intentional Overdose With Insulin: Prognostic Factors And Toxicokinetic/toxicodynamic Profiles

Abstract Prognostic factors in intentional insulin self-poisoning and the significance of plasma insulin levels are unclear. We therefore conducted this study to investigate prognostic factors in insulin poisoning, in relation to the value of plasma insulin concentration. We conducted a prospective study, and used logistic regression to explore prognostic factors and modelling to investigate toxicokinetic/toxicodynamic relationships. Twenty-five patients (14 female and 11 male; median [25th to 75th percentiles] age 46 [36 to 58] years) were included. On presentation, the Glasgow Coma Scale score was 9 (4 to 14) and the capillary glucose concentration was 1.4 (1.1 to 2.3) mmol/l. The plasma insulin concentration was 197 (161 to 1,566) mIU/l and the cumulative amount of glucose infused was 301 (184 to 1,056) g. Four patients developed sequelae resulting in two deaths. Delay to therapy in excess of 6 hours (odds ratio 60.0, 95% confidence interval 2.9 to 1,236.7) and ventilation for longer than 48 hours (odds ratio 28.5, 95% confidence interval 1.9 to 420.6) were identified as independent prognostic factors. Toxicokinetic/toxicodynamic relationships between glucose infusion rates and insulin concentrations fit the maximum measured glucose infusion rate (Emax) model (Emax 29.5 [17.5 to 41.1] g/hour, concentration associated with the half-maximum glucose infusion rate [EC50] 46 [35 to 161] mIU/l, and R2 range 0.70 to 0.98; n = 6). Intentional insulin overdose is rare. Assessment of prognosis relies on clinical findings. The observed plasma insulin EC50 is 46 mIU/l. Introduction Contrasting with the common occurrence of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes patients, deliberate overdose with insulin are rarely reported [1]. In the 2005 Annual Report of the American Continue reading >>

Insulin Overdose

Insulin Overdose

Tweet Save If you take too much insulin, symptoms of an overdose may include blurry vision, shakiness, and extreme hunger. These are the early symptoms of low blood sugar levels. More severe (and potentially life-threatening) problems may include seizures, difficulty speaking, and loss of consciousness. Treatment for an overdose of insulin involves supportive care, which consists of treating the symptoms that occur as a result of the overdose. Can You Overdose on Insulin? An insulin overdose can be extremely dangerous. Insulin can be a difficult medication to properly dose, and it is actually fairly easy to accidentally overdose on this medication. It is very important to recognize the symptoms of an overdose and to know exactly how to respond. If you or someone else may have overdosed on insulin, seek immediate medical attention. General Information on an Insulin Overdose An overdose with a short- or rapid-acting insulin is typically more dangerous than an overdose with an intermediate- or long-acting insulin (although an overdose with any type of insulin can be lethal). An overdose of insulin can be caused by several factors, such as misjudging how much insulin is needed. Also, not eating after taking a dose of a rapid- or short-acting insulin may result in an overdose. Eating less or exercising more than usual could also lead to an insulin overdose. Symptoms of an Overdose An insulin overdose can cause low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia), which can be quite dangerous. Some of the early symptoms of low blood sugar include: Sweating Extreme hunger Dizziness Cold sweats Shakiness Blurry vision. More severe symptoms include: Loss of consciousness Changes in behavior, such as irritability Loss of coordination Difficulty speaking Confusion Coma Loss of life. You may find Continue reading >>

Woman Kills Herself By Insulin Overdose

Woman Kills Herself By Insulin Overdose

“I LOVE you” were the last words a diabetic woman wrote in a suicide note to her step-daughter before killing herself with an insulin overdose. Andrea Smith had already tried to kill herself once with an insulin overdose in the months leading up to her death, aged 45, on August 8 last year, Aberdare Coroner’s Court was told. She had attempted to take her own life in May 2008 with insulin and tablets, which had led to her month-long admission to Royal Glamorgan Hospital’s psychiatric ward. In a statement read to the court, step-daughter Susan Davies said that on that occasion she had found her step-mother sitting grey-faced on the bed with eight empty insulin pens by her side. “She said that I had caught her in time but that next time I would not be so lucky,” said Susan. She had called into her step-mother’s home at Cae Glas, Penrhiwfer, Tonypandy, after concerned neighbours contacted her to say the cat was crying outside and had been there for some time, which was unusual. Andrea, a cashier at a local petrol station, was discharged in June and was under the care of a crisis team who made several visits a week. The court heard she had a history of depression for which she was receiving medication, and stomach problems and was receiving treatment for a hernia. She had become depressed following her mother’s death in 2005 and was also upset because her dog had died and she had taken it badly. Susan said she was in regular touch with Andrea. She said that her step-mother and father had not been getting on well and on the Tuesday before the death he had taken his wife to work for the night shift and by the time she returned, he was gone. Susan took her to work the following day. “She was laughing and joking and she said that she had to be strong,” said S Continue reading >>

Insulin Overdose

Insulin Overdose

Tweet Taking too much insulin can lead to hypoglycemia. This can become particularly serious if your insulin dose was significantly more than it should have been. If you are worried that you have overdosed on insulin, take ample fast-acting carbohydrate immediately and seek advice from your health team, or the out-of-hours service at your local hospital, if applicable. Symptoms of an insulin overdose The list of symptoms below are symptoms of hypoglycemia which can result from an insulin overdose: Depressed mood Drowsiness Headache Hunger Inability to concentrate Irritability Disorientation Nausea Nervousness Personality changes Rapid heartbeat Restlessness Sleep disturbances Slurred speech Pale skin Sweating Tingling Tremor Unsteady movements Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 Continue reading >>

Intentional Insulin Overdose Associated With Minimal Hypoglycemic Symptoms In A Non-diabetic Patient

Intentional Insulin Overdose Associated With Minimal Hypoglycemic Symptoms In A Non-diabetic Patient

Go to: CASE REPORT A young medical professional is brought to the emergency department (ED) by ambulance, following insulin overdose 3.5 hours previously. There was a history of chronic alcohol abuse, physical self-harm and substance misuse (paracetamol/codeine); no regular medications or allergies. After drinking approx. 300 mls of vodka, the person impulsively decides to commit suicide by injecting in the abdomen (4 times over 90 minutes) a total of 10 mls (1000 units) of Actrapid® insulin (100 units/ml) from a vial procured for this purpose 3 months before. On the onset of the hypoglycaemic symptoms, the person became scared, however, and informed family members. The family called the emergency services who attended the patient approx. 2.75 hours after the overdose. On initial assessment, the GCS was 15/15 and the capillary glucose 1.4 mmol/L. Oral glucose gel (20 g) was administered; after 15 minutes the capillary glucose was still 1.4 mmol/L. After 1 mg of glucagon, the capillary glucose rose to 2.9 mmol/L. An 18 G IV access was established and a bolus of 250 mls of dextrose 10% was given. This increased the capillary glucose to 13.3 mmol/L; the remaining 250 mls was given over 90 minutes. On arrival, the patient was alert and oriented; GCS 15/15, capillary glucose 9.3, blood pressure 127/79 mmHg, pulse 109 bpm, temperature 35.1°C, respiratory rate 16, SaO2 100% on room air. Clinical examination was unremarkable. A second 18 G IV access was established and blood drawn for a full blood count, urea and electrolytes, liver function tests, plasma glucose, creatinekinase, amylase, CRP, salicylates/paracetamol levels. Initial ECG: sinus tachycardia with a normal axis and a QTc of 492 msec. The ECG was repeated after 5 minutes and the QTc was 477 msec. Also multiple ven Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection

Insulin Injection

Insulin injection is used to control blood sugar in people who have type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not make insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or in people who have type 2 diabetes (condition in which the blood sugar is too high because the body does not produce or use insulin normally) that cannot be controlled with oral medications alone. Insulin injection is in a class of medications called hormones. Insulin injection is used to take the place of insulin that is normally produced by the body. It works by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. All of the types of insulin that are available work in this way. The types of insulin differ only in how quickly they begin to work and how long they continue to control blood sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to be injected subcutaneousl Continue reading >>

More in insulin