diabetestalk.net

Is Insulin Bad For Your Kidneys

Insulin Is Key To Kidney Disease

Insulin Is Key To Kidney Disease

A form of kidney disease may result from defective insulin signaling, challenging conventional wisdom Diabetic kidney disease likely results from defective insulin signaling in the kidneys, contradicting long-standing suspicions, according to findings appearing online today (October 5) in Cell Metabolism. Scientists have long attributed this type of kidney disease -- the leading cause of renal failure -- to high glucose levels in the blood and defects in the kidney microvasculature. The study "suggests there's a direct effect of insulin" on epithelial cells in the kidney, "which is really a new idea," said nephrologist linkurl:Thomas Coffman;of Duke University School of Medicine, who was not involved in the research. "I'm sure it will be a highly cited paper." Diabetes causes numerous health problems, including a form of kidney disease known as diabetic nephropathy (DN). DN is characterized by protein in the urine, enlarged kidneys, and abnormalities in the glomeruli, specialized capillaries where the urine filtration process begins, and other parts of the kidney. Researchers most often attribute the disease to defects in the microvasculature of the kidneys as a result of high blood glucose levels, which are known to be toxic to a variety of cell types. But growing evidence suggests that another cell type may be involved -- epithelial cells known as podocytes. Furthermore, some people with insulin resistance accumulate protein in their urine, even when glucose is normal. To investigate the role of podocytes and insulin signaling in the development of DN, a team led by molecular biologist and pediatrician linkurl:Richard Coward;of the University of Bristol in the UK examined two knockout mice models whose podocytes lacked the insulin receptor. Within 5 weeks of birth, th Continue reading >>

Management Of Diabetes Mellitus In Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

Management Of Diabetes Mellitus In Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

Abstract Glycemic control is essential to delay or prevent the onset of diabetic kidney disease. There are a number of glucose-lowering medications available but only a fraction of them can be used safely in chronic kidney disease and many of them need an adjustment in dosing. The ideal target hemoglobin A1c is approximately 7 % but this target is adjusted based on the needs of the patient. Diabetes control should be optimized for each individual patient, with measures to reduce diabetes-related complications and minimize adverse events. Overall care of diabetes necessitates attention to multiple aspects, including reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, and often, multidisciplinary care is needed. Introduction Diabetes mellitus is a growing epidemic and is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and kidney failure. Diabetic nephropathy affects approximately 20–40 % of individuals who have diabetes [1], making it one of the most common complications related to diabetes. Screening for diabetic nephropathy along with early intervention is fundamental to delaying its progression in conjunction with providing proper glycemic control. Given the growing population that is now affected by diabetes and thus, nephropathy, knowledge regarding the safe use of various anti-hyperglycemic agents in those with nephropathy is of importance. In addition, attention to modification of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors is essential. Altogether, knowledge regarding the prevention and management of diabetic nephropathy, along with other aspects of diabetes care, is part of the comprehensive care of any patient with diabetes. Review Recommendations for nephropathy screening in diabetes Patients with diabetes should be screened on an annual basis for nephropathy. I Continue reading >>

Too Much Insulin Shortens Your Life

Too Much Insulin Shortens Your Life

Eating a lot of bakery products, pasta or foods and drinks made with added sugars can shorten your life and cause diabetes. When you eat, your blood sugar rises, causing your pancreas to release insulin into your bloodstream. The foods that cause your blood sugar to rise the most are called "high glycemic index foods." The foods that cause the highest rise are those made with flour, milled corn, white rice or other refined grains, and added sugars. You need insulin to keep blood sugar levels from rising too high, but having too much insulin can kill you. Excess insulin makes you fat by causing fat to enter fat cells, your brain to tell you that you are hungry, and your liver to make fat from extra calories. It causes strokes and heart attacks by causing clots, raising triglycerides and lowering the good HDL cholesterol. Insulin promotes oxidation that converts the bad LDL cholesterol to oxidized LDL that forms plaques in arteries. High levels of insulin cause your kidneys to retain salt and raise blood pressure. The best ways to lower insulin are to avoid being overweight, restrict foods made with flour or added sugars, and eat fruits and root vegetables with other foods to keep blood sugar levels from rising too high. See my report on insulin resistance. Checked 4/19/15 Continue reading >>

What Every Diabetic Should Know About Liver Disease

What Every Diabetic Should Know About Liver Disease

What Every Diabetic Should Know About Liver Disease Did you know that diabetics are 50% more likely to develop liver disease? Particularly fatty liver disease. Fatty liver disease is incredibly common in overweight people; nearly everyone with excess weight on their abdomen has some degree of fatty liver. Type 2 diabetics are prone to carrying excess weight on their abdomen, but even slim diabetics often have a fatty liver. It is well known that diabetes increases the risk of kidney disease, nerve damage, blood vessel damage, infections, blindness, erectile problems and heart disease, but you may not realise diabetes has terrible effects on the liver. You can’t see or feel the effects it’s having on your liver until liver cells become damaged. According to Gillian Booth, MD, MSc, of St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, in a population-based study, newly diagnosed diabetes was linked with a near doubling in the rate of cirrhosis, liver failure or liver transplant compared with non-diabetics. Clearly these are significant findings that should be taken seriously. Insulin resistance (syndrome X) is the driving force behind the development of fatty liver. Insulin resistance is a forerunner to type 2 diabetes. If the insulin resistance becomes severe enough, a person usually develops type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually develops in childhood, although by the time they are in their mid 30s, most type 1 diabetics have developed insulin resistance as well, and they face the same risks as type 2 diabetics when they get older. People with insulin resistance have high levels of insulin in their bloodstream. Insulin signals to your liver to manufacture fat, especially triglycerides and cholesterol. This promotes the accumulation of fat inside the liver, inside other organs, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Metformin Safe For Patients With Kidney Disease: Review

Diabetes Drug Metformin Safe For Patients With Kidney Disease: Review

TUESDAY, Dec. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Although metformin, the popular type 2 diabetes medication, is usually not prescribed for people with kidney disease, a new analysis shows the drug may be safer for these patients than once thought. Metformin has been used in the United States for two decades to help lower blood sugar levels among people with type 2 diabetes. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration cautions that people with kidney disease should not take the drug because it could increase their risk for a potentially serious condition called lactic acidosis. This is when lactic acid builds up in the bloodstream after oxygen levels in the body are depleted. After reviewing published research to evaluate the risks associated with metformin among people with mild to moderate kidney disease, a team of researchers led by Dr. Silvio Inzucchi, a professor of medicine at Yale University, found these patients were at no greater risk for lactic acidosis than people who were not taking the drug. "What we found is that there is essentially zero evidence that this is risky," Inzucchi, who is also medical director of the Yale Diabetes Center, said in a university news release. "The drug could be used safely, so long as kidney function is stable and not severely impaired," he said. Despite warnings, many doctors are already prescribing metformin to patients with kidney disease, the study published in the Dec. 24/31 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association revealed. "Many in the field know that metformin can be used cautiously in patients who have mild to moderate kidney problems," Inzucchi said. "Most specialists do this all the time." Still, the researchers said their findings are significant because many doctors stop prescribing metformin once their patients g Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease

Kidney Disease

Diabetes and RE F. N O. : B R- DI AB ET ES -E NG -1 0 The foundation of kidney care. n What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that is caused by a lack of insulin in the body or the body’s inability to properly use normal amounts of insulin. n Are there different types of diabetes? There are several types of diabetes. The most common ones are Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 Diabetes n Develops mainly in young people n Is caused by an inability of the pancreas to produce insulin n Requires regular insulin injections Type 2 Diabetes n Can develop at any age n Usually (but not always) seen in people who are overweight n The pancreas can produce insulin, but the body has difficulty using it properly n Treatments include diet, exercise and medication (pills, insulin injections or both) 1T H E K I D N E Y F O U N D A T I O N O F C A N A D A Diabetes and kidney disease 2 n What does insulin do? The body converts some food that we eat into sugar (glucose). The body uses this sugar as a source of energy to perform its functions. The pancreas produces a hormone called insulin that regulates the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood, and helps glucose get into cells to be used as a source of energy. If the body does not make enough insulin or does not use the insulin properly, then this imbalance results in high blood sugar. Eventually many unhealthy changes can occur in different body organs, including the kidneys. n What are the kidneys? The kidneys are the master chemists of the body. Normally, there are two of them, one on either side of the spine under the lower ribs. They are reddish brown in colour and shaped like kidney beans. Each kidney is about the size of your clenched fist. LOCATION OF THE KIDNEYS Kidneys Bladder Ureters Urethra 3 n What do the kidneys do? Healthy k Continue reading >>

This Is Exactly What Happens To Your Body When You Eat A Ton Of Sugar

This Is Exactly What Happens To Your Body When You Eat A Ton Of Sugar

As mouth-watering as a sugar-laden sundae or icing-topped cupcake is, we should all know by now that sugar isn't exactly healthy. In fact, it may be one of the worst things you can eat (that is, if you're trying to live a long, healthy life). One study from UC San Francisco actually found that drinking sugary drinks like soda can age your body on a cellular level as quickly as cigarettes. The way the sweet stuff impacts your body is way more complex than just causing weight gain. In fact, when you eat a ton of sugar, almost every part of your body feels the strain—and that's bad news for your health in both the short term and especially the long term. From an initial insulin spike to upping your chances of kidney failure down the road, this is what really happens in your body when you load up on sugar. Your brain responds to sugar the same way it would to cocaine. Eating sugar creates a surge of feel-good brain chemicals dopamine and serotonin. So does using certain drugs, like cocaine. And just like a drug, your body craves more after the initial high. "You then become addicted to that feeling, so every time you eat it you want to eat more," explains Gina Sam, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Gastrointestinal Motility Center at The Mount Sinai Hospital. Your insulin spikes to regulate your blood sugar. "Once you eat glucose, your body releases insulin, a hormone from your pancreas," Dr. Sam explains. The insulin's job is to absorb the excess glucose in the blood and stabilize sugar levels. And a little while later you get that familiar sugar crash. Once the insulin does its job, your blood sugar drops again. Which means you've just experienced a sugar rush, and then a drastic drop, leaving you feeling drained. "That's the feeling you get when you've gone to the buffet a Continue reading >>

Diabetic Kidney Disease

Diabetic Kidney Disease

What is diabetic kidney disease? Long-standing diabetes causes changes in small blood vessels that can lead to damage of the kidneys. This damage can result in severe kidney failure. Subtle damage to the kidneys can start within a year or so of type 1 diabetes, and can be present at diagnosis in type 2, but it usually takes 5 to 10 years to become a noticeable problem. Who gets diabetic kidney disease? Nephropathy: the medical term for the type of kidney disease that occurs in diabetes. There are wide differences in estimates of how many people with diabetes will progress to having diabetic kidney disease – from 6 to 27 per cent of people with type 1 diabetes, to 25 to 50 per cent of type 2. Poor glucose control and even modestly high blood pressure can increase your risk of making kidney disease worse. In type 2 diabetes, people from an Asian or Afro-Caribbean origin are twice as likely to develop diabetic kidney disease. What are the symptoms? There are no symptoms when diabetic kidney disease first develops. Later, the following signs of decreased kidney function are: nausea and vomiting itchy skin a metal taste in the mouth swelling in the limbs and/or eyelids due to the build-up of fluid in the tissues (oedema). What problems does diabetic kidney disease cause? The kidneys are essential organs: they filter and eliminate the waste products of metabolism they have a central role in controlling blood pressure and fluid balance in the body they produce the key hormone, erythropoietin, that stimulates the bone marrow to manufacture red blood cells. Diabetic kidney disease is the most common cause of kidney failure in the UK. People with very poor kidney function require some form of artificial kidney support (dialysis) or a kidney transplant. The increasing numbers of Continue reading >>

Effect Of Insulin Resistance In Chronic Kidney Disease

Effect Of Insulin Resistance In Chronic Kidney Disease

1Imperial College Kidney and Transplant Institute, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK 2Prevention of Metabolic Disorders Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran *Corresponding Author: Andrew H Frankel Imperial College Kidney and Transplant Institute Hammersmith Hospital Imperial College London London, UK Tel: +98 912 188 1096 E-mail: [email protected] Citation: Frankel AH, Kazempour-Ardebili S (2016) Effect of Insulin Resistance in Chronic Kidney Disease. Endocrinol Metab Syndr 5:255. doi:10.4172/2161-1017.1000255 Copyright: © 2016 Frankel AH, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Endocrinology & Metabolic Syndrome Abstract Insulin resistance accompanies many well-established cardiovascular risk factors, such as obesity, hypertension, dyslipidaemia and type 2 diabetes. Since cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD), insulin resistance is thought to play a role in the morbidity and mortality associated with ESRD. This paper reviews the available information on insulin resistance in patients with impaired kidney function as well as those on renal replacement therapy in the form of maintenance hemodialysis. Potential mechanisms for the dynamic changes in insulin resistance, which occur through the different stages of kidney disease, are also discussed. We hypothesize that stabilizing insulin sensitivity may have a positive effect on improving outcome in ESRD subjects Continue reading >>

Can Have Serious Effects

Can Have Serious Effects

GET VISIBLE! Advertise Here. Find Out More Rapid cellular absorption ~ Amazing picometer ionic 60,000ppm . Diabetes Wonder Drug Can Have Serious Effects By Ted Twietmeyer 8-4-14 TYPE 2 PATIENTS With diabetes now the silent epidemic, it is important for EVERYONE to have at least one fasting glucose test done periodically. This can detect the disease before it becomes serious. Now even people with NO family history of the disease are finding themselves type 2 diabetics. Type 2 patients are those who develop diabetes after childhood. You can walk around for many years with type 2 diabetes and have no clue you have it - until something serious happens like a heart attack, stroke or kidney failure among other things. A relatively new drug (as of this writing) is being hailed as a wonder drug. Mitsubishi pharmaceutical developed Invokana. This drug has the generic name canagliflozin. This drug is licensed to at least two big pharmaceutical companies who re-sell it as their drug, with the name Invokana. While type 2 diabetes patients often go from pills to insulin injections, sometimes insulin just will not get their glucose level down near 100. This is often described by doctors as becoming insulin resistant among other names. When a patient no longer responds to insulin this is bad news. Continuing elevated glucose levels will cause kidney damage over time and lead to kidney failure, requiring dialysis to prevent death. Immediate placement on a kidney transplant list is mandatory. Under Obamacare, there is no way to know if hidden healthcare "advisory" committees will approve a transplant until that day comes. Dialysis treatments are not something you can have done indefinitely, as the process is far from being as effective in filtering blood as real kidneys are. Often patie Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Insulin On The Body

The Effects Of Insulin On The Body

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas. Its function is to allow other cells to transform glucose into energy throughout your body. Without insulin, cells are starved for energy and must seek an alternate source. This can lead to life-threatening complications. The Effects of Insulin on the Body Insulin is a natural hormone produced in the pancreas. When you eat, your pancreas releases insulin to help your body make energy out of sugars (glucose). It also helps you store energy. Insulin is a vital part of metabolism. Without it, your body would cease to function. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is no longer able to produce insulin. In Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas initially produces insulin, but the cells of your body are unable to make good use of the insulin (insulin resistance). Uncontrolled diabetes allows glucose to build up in the blood rather than being distributed to cells or stored. This can wreak havoc with virtually every part of your body. Complications of diabetes include kidney disease, nerve damage, eye problems, and stomach problems. People with Type 1 diabetes need insulin therapy to live. Some people with Type 2 diabetes must also take insulin therapy to control blood sugar levels and avoid complications. Insulin is usually injected into the abdomen, but it can also be injected into the upper arms, thighs, or buttocks. Injection sites should be rotated within the same general location. Frequent injections in the same spot can cause fatty deposits that make delivery of insulin more difficult. Some people use a pump, which delivers insulin through a catheter placed underneath the skin of the abdomen. When you eat, food travels to your stomach and small intestines where it is broken down into nutrients. The nutrients are absorbed and distributed v Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Kidneys

Diabetes And Your Kidneys

American Kidney Fund reaching out giving hope improving lives Large Print Edition reaching out giving hope improving lives Your doctor told you that you have diabetes. You mayhave a lot of questions. This guide will help. You will learn: ◠What diabetes is ◠How diabetes can hurt the kidneys ◠What to ask your doctor ◠How to stay healthy ◠Where to find more help While reading this guide, you may see a word that you don’t know in bold. If so, turn to page 21 and look for the word in our glossary. We know we can’t answer all of your questions. So, write down any questions that you have and talk about them with your health care team. Diabetes: The #1 Cause of Kidney Failure 1 Diabetes is sometimes called “sugar.†It is a diseasewhere your body has problems with a hormone called insulin. Insulin helps your body use the sugar you eat (also called glucose) for energy. When your body doesn’t use insulin the way it should, too much sugar stays in your blood. Too much sugar in your blood can damage parts of your body. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes ◠Your body does not make enough insulin. ◠Insulin shots every day or an insulin pump are needed. ◠This kind of diabetes is usually found in children or young adults. ◠Only 5% of adults with diabetes have Type 1. Type 2 diabetes ◠Your body makes insulin, but it can’t use it well. ◠A special diet, exercise, medicines and sometimes insulin shots are needed. ◠This kind of diabetes usually starts after age 40, but it can start earlier. ◠African Americans, Native Americans, Latin Americans and Asian Americans are more likely to have Type 2 diabetes. What is Diabetes? 2 Your kidneys are like a filter for your body. They Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar And Chronic Kidney Disease

Low Blood Sugar And Chronic Kidney Disease

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice or diagnosis from a physician. The most common cause of kidney disease is diabetes. The bodies of people with diabetes do not use the hormone insulin properly or does not make insulin at all, so insulin injections or other diabetes medications are required. Because insulin helps keep the amount of sugar in the blood at a normal level, people with diabetes are at risk for both low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), especially when there are changes in diet, activity or medications. Blood sugar below 70 mg/dL is considered low. Kidney disease and the risk for low blood sugar The greatest risk of low blood sugar occurs in someone who has both chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes. Whether or not someone has diabetes, a person with CKD is at risk for low blood sugar because of changes in appetite and meal routine. When kidney function declines insulin and other diabetes medications remain in the system longer because of decreased kidney clearance. For a person with diabetes, insulin and other diabetes medications that lower blood sugar may require an adjustment to prevent low blood sugar. Causes of low blood sugar Common causes of low blood sugar include: Skipping meals or waiting too long to eat A decrease in usual food intake because of poor appetite Taking too much insulin or diabetes medicine Receiving insulin or diabetes medicine at the wrong time Increasing physical activity Drinking alcoholic beverages People with chronic kidney disease sometimes experience a loss of appetite that can lead to skipping meals or not eating enough. This often causes a drop in blood sugar. Symptoms of low blood sugar Some of the symptoms Continue reading >>

Which Diabetes Drug Is Best For Diabetics With Kidney Disease?

Which Diabetes Drug Is Best For Diabetics With Kidney Disease?

Highlights Sitagliptin is as effective as glipizide at lowering blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Sitagliptin is less likely than glipizide to cause dangerously low blood sugar levels. Patients on sitagliptin tend to lose weight, while those on glipizide gain weight. Some blood-sugar-lowering drugs have caused kidney problems in patients with type 2 diabetes, so physicians are especially cautious when prescribing these agents to diabetics who also have chronic kidney disease (CKD). Previous research indicates that the diabetes drugs sitagliptin and glipizide may not cause considerable kidney damage. New clinical trial results presented during the American Society of Nephrology's Annual Kidney Week compared the two drugs. Sitagliptin and glipizide act on different targets but generate the same result--they boost the effects of insulin, which lowers blood sugar levels. Juan Arjona Ferreira, MD, (MSD Corp.) and his colleagues conducted a 54-week study to compare the efficacy and safety of sitagliptin and glipizide in patients with type 2 diabetes and moderate or severe CKD who were not on dialysis. The researchers randomized 426 patients to receive sitagliptin or glipizide. Among the major findings at the end of the study: Blood glucose levels dropped to a similar extent in patients in both groups. Patients receiving sitagliptin were less likely to experience hypoglycemia--or dangerously low blood sugar levels--than patients receiving glipizide (6.2% vs 17.0%). Patients who took sitagliptin tended to lose a small amount of weight, while most patients who took glipizide experienced a slight weight gain. Study authors for "Efficacy and Safety of Sitagliptin vs. Glipizide in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Moderate to Severe Chr Continue reading >>

Will Taking Insulin Cause Complications?

Will Taking Insulin Cause Complications?

Great question! Thanks for asking. In many areas of the country it’s widely believed that the very worst of diabetes complications are caused by insulin. People remember their grandparents being put on insulin then going blind, suffering kidney failure, amputations, and even death. No wonder many families are terrified of insulin! But here’s the deal, no you-know-what, insulin is the safest diabetes medication on the planet. After all, it is something that belongs in your body in the first place. So why does it have such a bad reputation? Is modern insulin different than old-time insulin? Actually, it is a bit different, but not by much. The truth is that we in medicine have to take much of the blame for insulin’s bad name. In times past there was a much greater emphasis in diabetes care on various diets. To keep their patients motivated and focused on these difficult diets, many doctors in the past used the threat of insulin as a form of negative reinforcement. “Follow my directions or I’ll put you on the needle!” nonsense. This was bad medicine in many different respects. First off, diabetes is a chronic, progressive illness. That means it never goes away and it gets a little worse over time, no matter how well you take care of yourself. If you have diabetes long enough, and don’t get run over by a truck, you will need insulin. So now we can see the first error, using something that is inevitable as a threat is a bad battle plan. Past patients who tried their best, but failed to the inevitable, then felt miss-placed guilt. The more serious outcome of this misguided approach, however, is that it caused insulin to be started too late in the course of the disease. Grandpa didn’t die because he was put on insulin. Grandpa died because he was not put on ins Continue reading >>

More in insulin