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Is Insulin Anabolic

Ways To Boost Your Natural Anabolic Hormones To Build Muscle Faster

Ways To Boost Your Natural Anabolic Hormones To Build Muscle Faster

If you want to build muscle as quickly as possible, there are four things that need to be in order. These include a sufficient overloading stimulus, enough rest for repair and recovery, the proper nutrients to build muscle tissue out of, and a maximized hormonal environment to promote the growth of lean muscle tissue. Your body is controlled by hormones. As much as you may like to think you have control over all the actions you take, you are very much governed by the hormones that are flowing through your veins. A hormone is basically like a massager signal that is transported in the blood stream and targets certain cells to perform specific actions. With the case of muscle building, the primary hormones that get called into play are testosterone, growth hormone, and insulin. Together, these hormones will help determine how quickly you are able to build muscle mass and the degree of strength gains you realize. When optimized, they can turn slow and sluggish progress into great progress that has you realizing your true potential. To help you gain a better understand of what each of these hormones is and how you can maximize them, let’s go through some basics. A Primer On Testosterone Testosterone you may already know of as the primary male sex hormone. It is the hormone that is released heavily during the puberty years and what causes males to develop their secondary sex characteristics. This includes deepening of the voice, growing of facial and body hair, as well as increasing muscle size and strength level. Without testosterone, a man would fail to become a man. He may still have the necessary parts to being a man, but he would lack the characteristics that separate man from boy. Behold The Power Of Testosterone When you have sufficient testosterone levels in your b Continue reading >>

Insulin Sensitivity: Common Insulin Resistance Signs And Symptoms

Insulin Sensitivity: Common Insulin Resistance Signs And Symptoms

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that turns the carbohydrates you eat into glucose and pushes them into the cells for direct use as metabolic fuel. But what happens when you’re insulin resistant? Simply put, your body fails to respond to the effects of insulin, and it isn’t sensitive towards it. Instead of uptaking it into the cells from the bloodstream, the excess insulin will just float around your system and your body even overproduces it as a result of your cells not utlizing it properly. This leads to a host of signs and symptoms of insulin resistance: High blood sugar - the body uses insulin to push the glucose into the cells, when your body doesn’t respond to insulin, the cellular uptake of glucose is impaired and the levels of blood sugar stay constantly elevated in the bloodstream. High blood insulin - as you can imagine, the inability of the cells to uptake insulin, and the subsequent compensatory effect where your beta cells and pancreas keep producing more and more insulin, result in elevated serum insulin levels. Hunger and cravings - elevated insulin levels tend to increase hunger and cravings towards sugar and other forms of carbs. Studies have shown that high serum insulin correlates with overeating, increased hunger, and higher perceived pleasantness of sweet taste. Abdominal obesity - insulin serves as somewhat of a “fat storing hormone”, having chronically high levels due to your body not utilizing it properly, can lead to more of your eaten calories being converted to fat (especially the visceral kind). Fatty liver disease - the occurrence of a possibly life threatening condition called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is significantly higher in people with metabolic syndrome and/or insulin resistance. Water retention Continue reading >>

The Facts About Insulin

The Facts About Insulin

Insulin is one of the most misunderstood hormones in your body. There are some diet plans that say to keep it as low as possible and there are some bodybuilders who want a lot of it, there are those who inject it for survival but the wrong dosage can send you into a coma. Is insulin as deadly as some say it is? What is the real truth? In this article I’ll separate fact from fiction so you can determine for yourself if this is the cause of all evil in your body or what can help you perform at your peak. What is it? Insulin is one of the most powerful hormones in the body. For starters, it regulates the carbohydrates, fats and proteins that are in the blood. When there is too much sugar (glucose) in the blood the body will regulate this by causing the pancreas to produce insulin. The insulin will then lower the glucose level by absorbing it into the body. This is something that is necessary, since too much glucose in the blood can be toxic. The body can also make insulin if too much protein is detected in the blood. The glucose can be stored as glycogen in the muscles and liver. When the blood glucose levels fall, the body can convert the glycogen back to glucose and use it as energy. The insulin can also cause the excess glucose to be stored in your adipose (fat) tissue as excess body fat. When insulin levels spike too quickly, usually it will be the fat tissue that will absorb the extra glucose. This is why you don’t want too much sugar when you are trying to lose weight. Insulin and Weight Loss Yes… insulin is very good at creating stored fat, so if you are trying to lose weight you need to keep your insulin levels in check. That is a fact, but what the heck causes this fat gain to happen? The reason insulin is very good at increasing body fat is because it doesn Continue reading >>

Insulin: Our Most Important Anabolic Hormone Uncovered

Insulin: Our Most Important Anabolic Hormone Uncovered

Arguably, our most important hormone from a health standpoint is insulin. Without it, we would quickly enter a state of starvation, fall ill, and require synthetic versions of this amino-acid-based-peptide-protein to stay alive. An Introduction to Insulin For most of us, insulin is most readily associated with diabetes mellitus, a disorder characterized by either a complete absence of insulin (Type 1), or poor production of and/or cellular resistance to insulin (Type 2, or adult onset diabetes). In other words, most people do not often pay insulin a second thought until they, or someone they know, experiences diminishing levels of it – then they’re made acutely aware of its importance. Use it or Lose it Regardless of whether we consume 300 or 3000 daily calories, without sufficient levels of insulin the nutrients we take in may not be used to their fullest advantage, if at all (depending on how much insulin we produce and how well our cells respond to insulin’s effects). Upon absorption, the foods we eat are broken down into their constituent molecules (glycogen from carbohydrates, amino acids from protein and triglycerides from fats) and used to fuel our daily activities, repair and rebuild tissues and run our cellular machinery. However, in the absence of insulin these processes are severely curtailed. Simply put, without sufficient insulin output our cells do not receive the raw materials they need to function as they should. Further, without insulin’s ability to transport and store nutrients, blood glucose levels rapidly rise to where extreme weakness, abdominal pain, nausea/vomiting, irritability and other negative mood changes and immune system dysfunction may occur. When enough of these symptoms accumulate we are diagnosed as diabetic and may require the Continue reading >>

Metabolism, Insulin And Other Hormones

Metabolism, Insulin And Other Hormones

Metabolism literally means transformation but has become a general term that encompasses all chemical processes that occur in the living body; processes that are the essence of life. These include processes that build up tissues (anabolism) and that make tissues function, which generally cost energy, and processes that degrade tissues (catabolism), which generally produce energy. However, a full description of everything that goes on in the body is beyond our scope: in this section we will focus on the normal physiology of processes that are related to the handling of nutrients (sugars, proteins and fat) and their regulation, with particular attention for the processes that become disturbed in diabetes. These processes of glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, ketone body metabolism, protein metabolism and amino acid metabolism are controlled by a set of glucoregulatory hormones such as insulin, glucagon , amylin, the incretins (GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP)), several adipokines (leptin, adiponectin, acylation stimulating protein and resistin), epinephrine, cortisol, and growth hormone. Of these, insulin and amylin are derived from the β-cells of the pancreas, glucagon from the α-cells of the pancreas, GLP-1 and GIP from the L-cells of the intestine and the adipokines from adipose tissue[1][2][3]. What is Metabolism? Metabolism refers to the pathways of biochemical processes (metabolic pathways) that occur in all living organisms to maintain life[4][5][6]. These biochemical processes allow us to grow, reproduce, repair damage, and respond to our environment. Throughout its lifetime the body undergoes cycles of building and degradation, taking up fuel and building blocks in the form of food, ultimately to lose them as water, carbon dioxide, urea Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Naturally Reduce Insulin Resistance To Better Handle Carbohydrates Again

5 Ways To Naturally Reduce Insulin Resistance To Better Handle Carbohydrates Again

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, which turns the carbohydrates you eat into the simplest form of sugar; glucose. Insulin sensitivity on the other hand, is the term used to describe how responsive your cells are to insulin or how well they can utilize it for glucose conversion. If your cells can't work well with the released insulin, then energy production goes down. Since the insulin now stays in circulation, a host of health problems will arise too. That's what insulin resistance is. And if insulin resistance is left untreated and the condition becomes worse, eventually turning into chronic one, you may soon find yourself with type 2 diabetes. Here are the 5 ways to naturally prevent this and make your body more insulin sensitive naturally: Polyunsaturated fatty-acids (PUFA) are hailed as healthy fats, when in reality they're quite possibly the worst type of lipids you can consume. This is because - due to their long chain of double carbon bonds - they are incredibly sensitive to oxidation by heat, oxygen, and light. Eating - and storing - PUFA causes increased inflammation through the process of lipid peroxidation, this in turn increases cortisol, and cortisol promotes insulin resistance, aka. reduces insulin sensitivity. Not to mention the other harmful effects of PUFA, like lowered thyroid gland activity and reduced testosterone and DHT production in men. In many cases, movement is medicine. This is very true for improving insulin sensitivity too. It has been shown through countless of studies that exercise from light walking all the way to heavy weight lifting can be used to significantly improve the cellular sensitivity towards insulin. The best types of exercise for promoting insulin sensitivity are walking in nature (low-stress, easy to do daily) a Continue reading >>

Enhancing The Anabolic Effect Of Perioperative Nutrition With Insulin While Maintaining Normoglycemia

Enhancing The Anabolic Effect Of Perioperative Nutrition With Insulin While Maintaining Normoglycemia

The purpose of this study is to find out whether adding insulin after current colorectal cancer surgery promotes making and keeping proteins in the body, and to find out whether or not this effect can be further increased by increasing the amount of protein given. Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Estimated Enrollment : 24 participants Allocation: Randomized Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment Masking: None (Open Label) Primary Purpose: Treatment Official Title: Enhancing the Anabolic Effect of Perioperative Nutrition With Insulin While Maintaining Normoglycemia Study Start Date : December 2013 Estimated Primary Completion Date : April 2018 Estimated Study Completion Date : April 2018 Arm Intervention/treatment Experimental: Insulin, Travasol (35%) postop Insulin (hyperinsulinemic-normoglycemic clamp) with Travasol (amino acid supplementation) given from start of surgery to 6 hours after, at an amount of 35% of patient's energy expenditure as measured before surgery, . Dietary Supplement: Travasol (amino acid injection) an amino acid supplementation infused intravenously containing essential and non-essential amino acids Other Name: Travasol Drug: Insulin After the insertion of an arterial catheter and obtaining a baseline arterial blood glucose value, 2 units of insluin will be administered iv followed by an infusion of 2 microunits/kg*min. Ten minuts after starting the insulin, and when the the blood glucose is<6 mmol/L, dextrose 20% supplemented with phosphate (30mmol/L) will be infused. Blood glucose levels measured every 15 minutes and the dextrose infusion rate adjusted to maintain arterial glycemia between 4 and 6 mmol/L until end of study. Other Names: HNC Hyperinsulinemic-normoglycemic clamp Experimental: Insulin, Travasol (20%) postop Insulin (h Continue reading >>

Pharmacological Vasodilation Improves Insulin-stimulated Muscle Protein Anabolism But Not Glucose Utilization In Older Adults

Pharmacological Vasodilation Improves Insulin-stimulated Muscle Protein Anabolism But Not Glucose Utilization In Older Adults

OBJECTIVE Skeletal muscle protein metabolism is resistant to the anabolic action of insulin in healthy, nondiabetic older adults. This defect is associated with impaired insulin-induced vasodilation and mTORC1 signaling. We hypothesized that, in older subjects, pharmacological restoration of insulin-induced capillary recruitment would improve the response of muscle protein synthesis and anabolism to insulin. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twelve healthy, nondiabetic older subjects (71 ± 2 years) were randomized to two groups. Subjects were studied at baseline and during local infusion in one leg of insulin alone (Control) or insulin plus sodium nitroprusside (SNP) at variable rate to double leg blood flow. We measured leg blood flow by dye dilution; muscle microvascular perfusion with contrast enhanced ultrasound; Akt/mTORC1 signaling by Western blotting; and muscle protein synthesis, amino acid, and glucose kinetics using stable isotope methodologies. RESULTS There were no baseline differences between groups. Blood flow, muscle perfusion, phenylalanine delivery to the leg, and intracellular availability of phenylalanine increased significantly (P < 0.05) in SNP only. Akt phosphorylation increased in both groups but increased more in SNP (P < 0.05). Muscle protein synthesis and net balance (nmol · min−1 · 100 ml · leg−1) increased significantly (P < 0.05) in SNP (synthesis, 43 ± 6 to 129 ± 25; net balance, −16 ± 3 to 26 ± 12) but not in Control (synthesis, 41 ± 10 to 53 ± 8; net balance, −17 ± 3 to −2 ± 3). CONCLUSIONS Pharmacological enhancement of muscle perfusion and amino acid availability during hyperinsulinemia improves the muscle protein anabolic effect of insulin in older adults. Recent studies have highlighted that insulin resistance is one o Continue reading >>

Insulin: The 2nd Most Anabolic Hormone

Insulin: The 2nd Most Anabolic Hormone

Print QUESTION: Is it true that Insulin is the most anabolic hormone in the body? ANSWER: First of all, let's just deal with this belief that insulin is the "most anabolic hormone". In some ways this may be true because insulin is the primary hormonal signal that helps deliver protein, carbs, fat and creatine from the bloodstream into the cell. Think of insulin as a "storage" hormone - so it delivers raw materials nutrients) into the body's millions of tiny factories (the cells). However, if we're discussing which hormone delivers the signal to increase the activity of the muscle-building machinery to the cell, the most anabolic hormone is, hands down, testosterone. Testosterone instructs the cell to increase the size of muscle fibres (among other things). So to put it simply, if you strategically injected insulin (which is, by the way, a very dangerous practice that can result in coma or death) for say eight weeks, you'd put on size but you'd also gain a lot of fat. You see, insulin clears sugar from your bloodstream, which signals the body that it's running low on fuel, which in turn signals hunger cravings. So the anabolic effect of insulin probably comes primarily through a good old fashion high-calorie diet. EFFECTS OF INSULIN Now, when we talk about insulin, we need to be clear that it can deliver its effects in two ways: Obviously by increasing insulin levels - either by increasing production or injecting it. By increasing "insulin efficiency" - this refers to how much work each molecule of insulin can do, if you increase its efficiency the same amount of insulin has a stronger effect. OK, remember me saying that insulin management is in some ways very simple? Well, here's the simple rules: Before exercise, minimize insulin. The last thing you want is to increase Continue reading >>

Anabolism

Anabolism

This article is about anabolism and catabolisms as classifications of metabolism. For steroids with anabolic properties, see Anabolic steroid. Anabolism (from Greek: ἁνά, "upward" and βάλλειν, "to throw") is the set of metabolic pathways that construct molecules from smaller units.[1] These reactions require energy, known also as an endergonic process. One way of categorizing metabolic processes, whether at the cellular, organ or organism level, is as "anabolic" or as "catabolic", which is the opposite and thus the separation of a macromolecule. Anabolism is powered by catabolism, where large molecules are broken down into smaller parts and then used up in cellular respiration. Many anabolic processes are powered by the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP).[2] Anabolic processes tend toward "building up" organs and tissues. These processes produce growth and differentiation of cells and increase in body size, a process that involves synthesis of complex molecules. Examples of anabolic processes include the growth and mineralization of bone and increases in muscle mass. Endocrinologists have traditionally classified hormones as anabolic or catabolic, depending on which part of metabolism they stimulate. The classic anabolic hormones are the anabolic steroids, which stimulate protein synthesis, muscle growth, and insulin.[3] The balance between anabolism and catabolism is also regulated by circadian rhythms, with processes such as glucose metabolism fluctuating to match an animal's normal periods of activity throughout the day.[4] [edit] Continue reading >>

Does Insulin Stimulate Muscle Growth?

Does Insulin Stimulate Muscle Growth?

You probably heard about insulin before. It’s the hormone that’s released when you eat those tasty carbohydrates and that makes you fat. At least, that is what all your diet books have told you right? But if insulin is so bad for your physique, then why do bodybuilders inject insulin? Well I’m glad you asked. Insulin 101 One of the main functions of insulin is too keep your blood sugar under control. Your body can become resistant to insulin and this results in diabetes. In recent years, insulin has gotten a bad name as ‘’the evil storage hormone’’. Insulin is demonised as a hormone that stores the food you eat as body fat and prevents your body from using body fat as a fuel. This is principle where most low carb diets are based upon: eating less carbs results in less insulin release, which results in less body fat. While that sounds nice in theory, things are nowhere near as simple as that. A topic I’m sure I’ll be talking a lot about in the future. So a lot of people are afraid of insulin because they think it’s bad for their health and weight. Yet many dedicated gym rats intentionally try to increase insulin levels through food strategies or even injections because they think it will help them build muscle mass. But are they right or wrong? Insulin and building muscle Chances are if you have the guts to read one of my research reviews, you’ve been reading about fitness for a while. In that case, I’m wondering what you currently believe the effect of insulin is on building muscle? Is it extremely effectively, totally useless, somewhere in between? Second question: how sure are you of your answer? Because not all scientists agree with each other on this question. Simply because there’s quite a few studies saying it’s working, but just as man Continue reading >>

Is Insulin An Anabolic Agent In Bone? Dissecting The Diabetic Bone For Clues

Is Insulin An Anabolic Agent In Bone? Dissecting The Diabetic Bone For Clues

IN A RECENT REVIEW by Riggs and Parfitt (94) the authors propose specific criteria for classifying an agent, be it drug or hormone, as an anabolic agent for bone. They provide the following definition: [An anabolic drug] increases bone strength by increasing bone mass substantially as a result of an overall increase in bone remodeling [more BMUs (bone multicellular units) are formed] combined with a positive BMU balance (the magnitude of the formation phase is more than that of the resorption phase). Although some anabolic drugs also may induce renewed modeling, increased periosteal apposition, and repair of trabecular microstructure, these are not required properties. In this review, we will evaluate the literature to apply these criteria to insulin to determine whether this hormone is indeed an anabolic agent in bone. Insulinopenia as occurs in type 1 diabetes (T1DM) or resistance to the metabolic actions of insulin as occurs in type 2 diabetes (T2DM), are both associated with several deleterious consequences for skeletal health. Skeletal defects that are observed in conjunction with T1DM include 1) diminished linear bone growth during the pubertal growth spurt in adolescents with diabetes, 2) decreased adult bone density, 3) an increased risk for adult osteoporosis, 4) an increased risk of fragility fracture, and 5) poor bone healing and regeneration characteristics. In contrast, T2DM, a state of hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance, is typically associated with increased bone density, yet seemingly decreased bone strength contributing again to an increased risk of fracture. Recognizing that these two clinical entities are typically characterized by differences in insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, and/or exogenous insulin administration, we present a review Continue reading >>

Insulin's Anabolic Effect Is Influenced By Route Of Administration Of Nutrients

Insulin's Anabolic Effect Is Influenced By Route Of Administration Of Nutrients

Objective To determine if the anabolic effects of intravenous insulin on protein kinetics could be exploited in the enterally fed trauma victim. Design Randomized, crossover control protocol. Setting Level I trauma center. Patients Ten trauma patients with an Injury Severity Score higher than 20. Exclusion criteria included diabetes mellitus, pregnancy, steroid use, and aged younger than 18 years or older than 65 years. Interventions Within the first 24 hours of admission to the intensive care unit, each patient had a transpyloric feeding tube inserted radiographically. Enteral nutrition was provided with a protein supplement (Ensure, Ross Laboratories, Columbus, Ohio) and Promod, supplemented with protein powder to supply 1.5 g/kg per day of protein and 156.9 kJ/kg per day. Intravenous insulin was provided at 0.043 U/kg per hour beginning on the second or fourth day. Main Outcome Measures Urinary nitrogen balance and 3-methylhistidine excretion rates were measured at the end of the third and fifth days. Plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide levels were obtained at these same times. Results Urinary nitrogen balance was not significantly different with or without the administration of insulin (−4.58±50.1 mg/kg per day vs −9.38±50.9 mg/kg per day, respectively). 3-Methylhistidine excretion rates did not change significantly with or without the administration of insulin (5.77±0.67 µmol/kg per day vs 6.15±0.43 µmol/kg per day, respectively). Serum insulin levels did not differ significantly when exogenous infusions were added (57.8±17.9 µU/mL vs 82.1±44.9 µU/mL), but serum C-peptide levels did decrease significantly when exogenous insulin was added (5.11±3.2 µU/mL vs 10.28±3.5 µU/mL; P=.04). Serum glucose levels decreased significantly when insulin was ad Continue reading >>

Anabolism, Catabolism, & Insulin: The Definitions I Go By

Anabolism, Catabolism, & Insulin: The Definitions I Go By

I just want to provide some basic definitions to illustrate the terms that I’m using & how I understand them, & to try to state my basic understandings as clearly as I know how to. Anabolism: The phase of metabolism in which simple substances are synthesized into the complex materials of living tissue. Catabolism: The metabolic breakdown of complex molecules into simpler ones, often resulting in a release of energy. Both of my sources for these definitions (through the clickable links) are worth looking at, because they include dictionary definitions from several sources, as well as Wikipedia articles which explain in more depth. Basically, anabolism means taking simpler stuff & using it to build more complex stuff within the body: amino acids into protein into muscle, blood glucose into adipose tissue (body fat), etc. Catabolism does the opposite: it breaks larger, more complex molecules into simpler stuff, usually with a release of energy, for example, burning off fat through exercise or going on a low-calorie starvation diet that leads to the loss of lean muscle mass. Insulin is anabolic in these ways: Insulin tranfers blood glucose to the liver & to muscle cells to either be burned for energy, or to be synthesized (that is, built into) glycogen. Glycogen is “animal carbohydrate” which can be burnt (catabolized) when quick energy is needed for exercise or an emergency. Insulin is anabolic because it helps build glycogen. [Edit: I misstated that. Actually, glycogen itself isn’t burnt for energy. Rather, it’s converted back into glucose (a conversion stimulated by the catabolic hormone glucagon) & the resulting glucose can then be burnt for energy.] Insulin transfers excess blood glucose, that is more than the body needs for its immediate energy requirements Continue reading >>

Bodybuilder Anabolic Steroid Abuse May Lead To Insulin Resistance

Bodybuilder Anabolic Steroid Abuse May Lead To Insulin Resistance

A new study links the abuse of anabolic steroids like testosterone to metabolic disease through insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is generally the precursor to type 2 diabetes and means that the body isn’t properly using its insulin. HealthDay News reported on the study carried out by researchers from in Denmark. Led by Dr. Jon Rasmussen from Herlev University Hospital in Copenhagen sought to find out the effects of anabolic steroid use on abdominal fat and insulin sensitivity in 100 men age 50 or under. Anabolic steroids are used by some men looking to increase their muscle building abilities. Their use is common among those involved in strength training. The researchers used 100 participants who did strength training and divided them into three groups. So 37 men in one group used anabolic steroids, 33 had taken them in the past, and 30 other men never took anabolic steroids before. The men were asked to fast overnight for at least 8 hours and then take a two-hour oral glucose tolerance test. Their blood sugar and insulin levels were then measured every half hour for two hours during the test. HealthDay reports that “Their insulin sensitivity–how well their bodies use insulin–was then determined using a standard formula. The higher the men’s result, the better their insulin sensitivity. Lower scores, on the other hand, were associated with greater insulin resistance, the study reported.” Can Anabolic Steroids Lead to Diabetes? Though researchers could not prove that anabolic steroids lead to diabetes by way of insulin resistance, they did find that the past and present users of anabolic steroids did have less insulin sensitivity than the men who never took the drugs. Using a DEXA scan, researchers discovered that while the men on steroids had a lower b Continue reading >>

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