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Insulin Syringe Measurements In Iu

Using U-40 Insulin With U-100 Syringes

Using U-40 Insulin With U-100 Syringes

I’ve generally used a U-40 insulin (PZI-Vet) with U-100 syringes. The advantages being that U-100 syringes are more widely available, and by using U-100 syringes with U-40 insulin I was able to make smaller dose adjustments. (Before Meow Meow went off insulin, she was getting 0.2 units (two-tenths of a unit) of insulin! NOT TWO UNITS – two-tenths of a unit! No way I could measure that amount using a standard match of syringe to insulin. Many find converting insulin to a different syringe confusing – and if, for that reason, you want to match – GREAT! I recommend ALWAYS checking to make sure you KNOW which syringe and which insulin you’re using. I’ve seen disasterous results when people don’t, and aren’t working with what they think they are. Some insulins come in different strengths (like compounded PZI) and syringes obviously come in various markings – and there have even been cases where syringes were in the wrong box! ALSO – make sure you understand whether your syringe is marked only for whole units, or also half units! I’ve seen people advise others to count “lines” – well, whether you have lines only for whole units or whole and half units can DOUBLE YOUR DOSE! Let’s assume you DO want to use a U-40 insulin (PZI-Vet, Vetsulin/Caninsulin, etc) with a U-100 syringe. Converting isn’t that difficult. 1 unit of U-100 insulin = 1 unit of U-40 insulin. Units are units. The difference is the volume of liquid needed for that unit. There is 100 units in every 1 mL of liquid of U-100 insulin. There are 40 units per mL of liquid in U-40 insulin. Fewer units in U-40 insulin = less concentrated. It’s like the difference between buying laundry detergent that’s concentrated – the “cap” which you fill with detergent per load of laundry is Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pets

Diabetes In Pets

The (International Unit=IU) measurement used to calculate and measure dosages of insulin. Each unit of insulin is expected to have a particular medical effect on the subject. Full unit(s) can also be described as "even units", meaning there are no fractions (example: 1 1/2--1 1/4) involved. In most adult humans, a difference of 1 full unit is roughly the smallest amount that makes a significant repeatable clinical difference in dosage. The smaller the patient, the more chance you will need to deal with dosages having fractions in them. An example is found in children, who are smaller and need less insulin than adults; many find the 3/10 syringes with half-unit markings a great help with drawing children's insulin. Cats are normally about 1/10 the body weight of humans and so it's possible for them to react differently to 1/10 of a unit's difference in dosage. Dogs' weight lies along the range between cats and children. Insulin dosage is often specified (to vets and doctors only) in terms of units/kg body weight. In humans and dogs this is a common way to calculate a rough target dose (though individual cases will differ and dosing should always begin conservatively!). In cats, the current FDMB consensus[1] is that diet and other factors dominate body weight so as to make it inappropriate to base dosing decisions on. Measurement of insulin in syringes is based on the cubic centimeter (cc) volume measurement system for injectable liquid medications. Your box of syringes is labeled as to how many cc's a syringe will hold. U100 and U40 syringes labeled as 1cc will each hold one cubic centimeter (ml) of liquid, although as the insulin strength is increased, more units will be packed into one cc. A cc (holding a milliliter of liquid) contains 40 Units of U40 insulin, 50 Units Continue reading >>

U-40 Insulin/u-100 Syringe

U-40 Insulin/u-100 Syringe

U40 versus U100 Conversion chart Diluted insulin Proper diluent Many people special order protamine zinc insulin (PZI) that is U-40. Some people order U-50 insulin, and some people use insulin that has been diluted. If you are using something other than a standard U-100 insulin, you must understand what the U means and how many units of insulin you are giving your pet. The U refers to actual units of active insulin. Units are a standard measurement system for many drugs. A U-100 insulin has 100 units of active insulin in each mL of liquid. You can think of it as being 100 pieces of insulin in each mL of liquid. A U-40 insulin has 40 units of insulin in each milliliter (mL) of liquid. This means that the same volume (liquid amount) of a U-100 insulin has 2.5 times more insulin in it than a U-40 insulin. Or, the U-100 insulin is 2.5 times stronger than the U-40 insulin. Most commercially available insulins are U-100 and the syringes we purchase at the pharmacy are U-100 syringes. U-100 syringes are specially designed to provide the proper dose of U-100 insulin. If you use a U-100 insulin and a U-100 syringe, you fill the syringe the way the vet showed you. If you use a U-40 insulin and the U-40 syringes that are provided with that insulin, you fill the syringe in the normal manner and don't need to do any conversions. Some people who use special order U-40 PZI often prefer to use the U-100 syringes because they are readily available at the local pharmacy and they have a very thin needle. But if you use a U-40 insulin and a U-100 syringe, you must correct for the difference in the strength of the insulin when you fill the syringe. The following information explains how to fill a syringe using a U-40 insulin and a U-100 syringe. To get a specific number of units of U-40 ins Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

What is it? Insulin is a substance produced by the pancreas that is used by the body to break down sugars in the blood. While in a healthy adult it occurs naturally in the body, it can be manufactured from synthetic materials or harvested and refined from animal sources so that it can be given to patients who have a shortage of insulin in their bodies. What is it used for? Insulin is primarily used in the treatment of diabetes. Someone who has diabetes has too much sugar in their blood; to maintain lower blood sugar levels that are in the normal range, diabetics are often given insulin. What is the correct dosage? The correct dosing of insulin is very important: Giving a patient too little insulin does not adequately lower blood sugar so that they are still left with too much sugar in the blood; too much sugar the the blood can cause damage to blood vessels, leading to blindness, kidney failure, severe problems with limbs (especially the feet), stroke and heart disease. Giving a patient too much insulin can lower blood sugar too much and lead to dangerously low levels of sugar in the blood, which can cause seizures and coma, because the brain depends primarily on glucose (sugar) in the blood for fuel. Even before a person's blood sugar level drops low enough to cause seizure or coma, low blood sugar levels can lead to mood swings, impaired mental function, blurred vision, nausea and vomiting, heart palipitations and shakiness. How is it given? Insulin is given by injection because it cannot be taken orally - the stomach will break it down so that is is no longer effective in breaking down blood sugar. Insulin should always be dosed using special insulin syringes marked with insulin units. Common insulin U-100 syringes can hold 100 units; there are also Lo-dose syringes, Continue reading >>

U40 Syringes

U40 Syringes

U40 syringes are intended for use with U40 (40 units per cc) insulin. The "units" therefore appear larger on a U40 syringe, making fine doses easier to measure than on a U100 syringe. But note -- 1/2cc remains 1/2 cc. Comparing two 1/2cc syringes side by side, you will see that the units on the U40 syringe appear larger than that of the U100 syringe. If you were to take the two syringes and fill them with insulin or fluid, both the U100 and the U40 syringe would each hold 1/2cc of it. Cubic centimeters (cc's) and milliliters (mL's) are interchangable, so syringes marked 1ml equals 1cc; 0.5 ml equals 1/2cc. 3/10cc equals 0.3ml. [1] General information and an overview of syringes at the link. U40 syringes are available in 4 barrel sizes: 2cc (2ml), 1cc (1ml), 1/2cc (0.5ml), and 3/10cc (0.3ml). The size refers to the maximum volume of insulin the syringe will hold. A 3/10cc-0.3ml syringe is available in UltiCare brand only. The 2cc (2ml) syringe was introduced in early 2007 in the UK by Intervet for Caninsulin; this appears to be the only market the larger syringes are sold in. [2][3] Some brands of U40 syringes (Caninsulin, [11] BD) also have all red barrel markings. Intervet branded Vetsulin syringes and Ulti-Care do not; theirs are in black like those of U100 syringes. [12] U40 insulin syringes are available in standard 1/2" length with a choice of either 28 or 29 gauge needles. The thinnest gauge U40 syringe currently available in the US is 29. [13] BD markets U-40 syringes with 30 gauge needles outside of the US under its MicroFine brand name. [14][15] The higher the gauge number, the thinner the needle. [16] AAHA recommends 12.7 mm or 1/2", standard length needles at 29 gauge. [17] Though it's not recommended by veterinarians, some caregivers use a U100 syringe with Continue reading >>

Peptide Calculator - Reconstituting Bodybuilding Peptides

Peptide Calculator - Reconstituting Bodybuilding Peptides

The Peptide Calculator measures reconstitution and peptide dosage for research. Double check peptide calculator math with 1/3ml, 50cc and 100 unit syringes. Microgram (mcg) peptide measurements are used to find dosage in each unit and tick mark on an insulin syringe. How to Measure bodybuilding Peptides ml = milliliter. This is a VOLUME measurement. it is 1/1000 of a liter. When talking about water or similar liquids, it is equivalent to one cubic centimeter. cc = cubic centimeter.This is also a VOLUME measurement. Most syringes measure their capacity in cc's. If you have a 1cc syringe, it will hold 1ml of liquid. iu = international unit. This is a unit used to measure the activity (that is, the effect) of many vitamins and drugs. For each substance to which this unit applies, there is an international agreement specifying the biological effect expected with a dose of 1 IU. Other quantities of the substance are then expressed as multiples of this standard. This also means that this measurement is not based on sheer volume or weight of the substance, but rather the effect. mg = milligram. This is a WEIGHT measurement. It is 1/1000 of a gram. the amount of chemical substance is often measured in milligrams. For injectable solutions, this will be reported as a concentration of weight to volume, such as mg/ml (milligrams per milliliter). In the case of orally administered substances, the weight of chemical is labeled, although the actual weight of the pill/capsule may be much higher, because of the use of filler substances. This means that a small pill may be much more potent than a large pill, so don't judge a pill based on its size, but the actual amount of substance for which it is labeled as. Typical to buy melanotan peptides in 5 and 10 milligram vials. mcg = microgram Continue reading >>

Choosing The Best Pet Insulin Syringes

Choosing The Best Pet Insulin Syringes

Diabetes can be a difficult disease to manage in humans, and even more difficult in animals. Dogs and cats can both develop diabetes, and currently there is no cure for it. Often, it requires a treatment plan designed by a veterinarian that involves checking blood sugar and giving insulin shots. If you have to give your pet regular insulin shots you may already know the challenges involved, but having the right equipment to get the job done can make it easier. Or, if your pet has recently been diagnosed, you may be wondering what kind of syringes you need. Pet insulin syringes are made in a variety of types and sizes, so it can be tricky to know the difference. U-100 vs U-40 Pet Insulin Syringes Unlike other medications, insulin is measured in units. “Units” is short for international units (IU), which is a form of measurement used for describing volume. Insulin for animals usually comes in two different concentrations, 40 units/mL and 100 units/mL. Depending on the brand of insulin, the concentration may be written on the bottle as 100 units/mL, U-100, 100 IU or 40 units/mL, U-40, 40 IU. When selecting syringes to use with your pet’s insulin you want to make sure they match the concentration, otherwise your pet will receive the wrong dose. This is because the syringes have different dosage markings. For example: if you have Lantus 100 units/mL, you would use U-100 syringes, or Vetsulin 40 units/mL would use U-40 syringes. If you are unsure of the concentration of your pet’s insulin, talk to your veterinarian. Pet Insulin Syringes Needle Gauge & Length Insulin syringes have an attached needle, and the size of a needle is usually measured by gauge and length. The gauge number describes how thick a needle is, and the higher the number, the thinner the needle. For Continue reading >>

How To Read An Insulin Syringe

How To Read An Insulin Syringe

As with all medicine, it is important to take the right dose each time ​ ​​Injecting yourself with the right dose of insulin is very important. This is why you need to know how to read a syringe. ​ Parts of an Insulin Syringe An insulin syringe has three parts: a needle, a barrel and a plunger. The needle is short and thin. It is made of a special material that allows the needle to slide through the skin easily with less pain. It comes with a cap to cover and protect it before it is used. The barrel is the plastic chamber that holds the insulin. It is marked with lines (calibrations) on the side. The lines show you how many units of insulin you are injecting. The plunger is the long thin rod that slides up and down the inside of the barrel. Its function is to either draw the insulin into the barrel or push the insulin out of the barrel through the needle. It has a rubber seal at the lower end to prevent insulin from leaking out. The rubber seal is fitted in such a way that it matches the line on the barrel. Syringes are meant for one-time use. Once used, they must be thrown away in special puncture-proof containers. How to Know What Syringe Size to Choose Insulin syringes come in different sizes. Syringe Size Number of Units the Syringe Holds 0.25 ml 25 0.30 ml 30 0.50 ml 50 1.00 ml 100 The larger the syringe size, the more insulin it can hold. When choosing the size of a syringe, consider: the number of units of insulin you need, and how well you can see the line markings on the barrel. Go for the smallest syringe size you can for the dose of insulin you need. This is because the lines on the barrel of small syringes are further apart and easier to see. How to Read a Syringe When measuring the amount of insulin, read from the top ring (needle side), and not the Continue reading >>

Bd Insulin Syringe With Bd Ultra-fine™ 6mm Needle

Bd Insulin Syringe With Bd Ultra-fine™ 6mm Needle

Choose the syringe that makes a difference they can feel The BD insulin syringe with the BD Ultra-Fine™ 6mm needle features our shortest insulin syringe needle, at 53% shorter than the 12.7-mm needle. This length is supported by the latest recommendations published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings that advocate using the shortest needle first-line for all patient categories.1* In fact, in a 2010 study, 80% of patients preferred shorter needles compared to 8-mm and 12.7-mm needles.2 They also deliver insulin into the subcutaneous tissue, reducing the risk of painful intramuscular (IM) injection.3 Testimonial Videos How to Inject With Insulin Syringes Videos Continue reading >>

How I Find My Dose Of Hcg On An Injection Syringe

How I Find My Dose Of Hcg On An Injection Syringe

Finding the Right HCG Injection Dose. When you are new to the hCG diet, and HCG Injections, it can be pretty overwhelming. Phrases like “syringe” “iu’s” and “bac water” can really throw us off and make the HCG diet feel intimidating. But it doesn’t have to be that way. I guarantee if you take the time to continue to research and read up on the diet, things will start to click. To help you in that way, I thought I’d demonstrate how I go about getting the correction hCG injection dose. If you are here, you are most likely interested in learning other stuff like how to inject and such so you can you find all my hCG injection tutorials here, including a live demo where I stick myself with a needle for your benefit even though I’m no longer on the diet just to show you how not a big deal it is. How’s that for love?? And if you are still in the research phase for purchasing hCG, you can compare my current recommendations for RX pharmaceutical hCG that can indeed be purchased online (and comes in powder form, as it MUST if you are using the real hormone) here: On to the lesson folks! Lesson 1: What the numbers on the Syringe mean The “syringe” part of the injection is the barrel that will contain whatever you’re going to inject and it has little numbers and hash marks to indicate how much it holds. The numbers on the syringe are referred to use “units” and 100 units = 1cc or 1 ml. The most common syringe sizes I see come with the hormone diet kits are 30 unit syringes(.3 cc/ml), 50 units syringes (.5cc/ml) and 100 unit syringes (or 1cc/ml). Please note – some who are purchasing their injection kits from Escrow Refills are receiving different syringes that have 40 units per 1cc/ml syringe (instead of 100 units per 1 cc) and my following instruc Continue reading >>

What To Mix And Dose?

What To Mix And Dose?

See the below instructions on what calculator to use - in all cases you need at least three bits of information to calculate the remaining values. Use the "What to Mix and Dose" calculator if you are mixing and need to know what to inject based on your desired dosage (this is going to be by far the most used calculator) Use the "What IU I am Injecting" calculator if you have already mixed HCG and know what want to know how many IU are injecting (e.g., you have a mixed vial and someone (e.g. Doctor) told you to inject "x" - this is how many IU you are actually injecting - you have to know dilutant value, how much HCG is in the vial) Use the "How much Dilutant I Need" calculator if you have a preferred injection volume and want to dilute with bacteriostatic accordingly (I personally don’t find this useful, but found it on an "online calculator" so thought I would add) This is to be used if you are mixing and planning to inject your own HCG. Note the dilutant (the bacteriostatic water mixed with the HCG) is a personal preference and is not important - this can vary. What is important is to figure out what you want as your dosage and where you pull to on the insulin needle to get the desired dosage of actual HCG (the IU desired per day). Example: if you mix 5ml of Bacteriostatic Water, and want 125iu as your injection, this is the .125 mark on your needle.If you have mixed 10 ml of bacteriostatic water, this is the .25 mark on your insulin needle. Information on your Mix / Dosage Amount Unit of Measure Hints: How Many IU are in my Vial of unmixed HCG? IU Mandatory: Fill in the IU contained in your Vial of unmixed HCG. How much Bacteriostatic Water I mixed or want to mix: ML Mandatory: Fill in the amount of Bacteriostatic water mixed or you intend to mix. The two most popu Continue reading >>

Differences In The Dose Accuracy Of Insulin Pens

Differences In The Dose Accuracy Of Insulin Pens

Go to: Introduction Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) are challenged nowadays with a wide variety of self-monitoring tasks, i.e., daily performance of preprandial blood glucose readings, consecutive performance of insulin dose calculations, as well as insulin administration. Since the introduction of the first pen devices for easier insulin administration in the 1990s, it has been shown that insulin pens improve the quality of life of IDDM patients1 by providing a more convenient and accurate way of insulin delivery than common insulin syringes. The patient preference for insulin pens compared to syringes has been the subject of several previous studies, with the consistent finding that ease of use, discreetness, flexibility, and convenience make them the preferred way of insulin administration.2–6 The widespread acceptance of pen devices among adults and children in the U.S., Europe, and Japan demands for devices with very easy and error-free handling, and high accuracy in dose delivery. Insulin pens should be accurate and precise, especially for low-dose administration.7 While many, especially older patients, use prefilled pen devices, some insulin pen models have a refill system so that they can be used over a period of several months or even years, which requires a high quality product line in terms of stability and accuracy.8 A previous study in Japan9 and an additional report from the U.S.10 indicated some potential problems with at least one of these frequently used pen injection systems—the OptiClik from sanofi-aventis—with regard to dose delivery accuracy. This investigation was performed to establish the dosing accuracy of four currently, commercially available pen injection systems in a controlled laboratory setting (FlexPen®, No Continue reading >>

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