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Insulin Spike Post Workout Myth

If The Insulin Spike Is A Myth, Why The Insulin Mimic Supps?

If The Insulin Spike Is A Myth, Why The Insulin Mimic Supps?

AnabolicMinds.com > Forum > Supplement Forum > Supplements > If the insulin spike is a myth, why the insulin mimic supps? If the insulin spike is a myth, why the insulin mimic supps? If the insulin spike is a myth, why the insulin mimic supps? since I'm going to start Glycobol this week I started to read a bit more about Now I'm gonna start having a carb refeed day a week, I say start because I haven't been doing it despite in a very low carb diet all year round, out of paranoia.. Anyways, you read everything and the opposite and I start getting a bit confused on the carbs/insulin subject, so I'd like to see what's your thoughts on 2011. Goal: *lean gains*, nothing massive, I have around 4/5% BF and I want to keep it that way, - The whole "you need high GI carbs pwo to get the insulin spike" thing is bs, right? PWO we just need carbs, the cleaner the better (aside from whey, crea, beta and/or any other supps we might take, I'm talking about carbs..) because after workout the muscle are rimed to receive nutrients, correct? Now, assuming that's a fact, are high GI carbs pwo bad? - If so, why do we take supplements that mimic insulin? Insulin shuttles carbs/nutrients into muscles? <---- But if that's true, then why the high GI carbs pwo (which will spike insulin) is bad? I'm sure I'm missing something stupid, I'm here to learn so thank to everyone who'll chime in Recompadrol & AAV2 - PM me with any questions Seriously dude, if your avatar is you, you look good no homo. You take whey (which is fast) with fast high GI carbs (like dextrose) and your creatine. Your body is craving nutritents, if you take the protien alone a good amount of it will be used for energy right away and not make it to the muscle. But the fast carbs are used as energy right away while the creatine an Continue reading >>

Why Post Workout Carbs Are Not Necessary

Why Post Workout Carbs Are Not Necessary

Dextrose… waxy maize… maltodextrin… The practise of consuming huge doses of simple post workout carbs has pretty much become a religion in bodybuilding circles. You finish your workout, you mix up a post workout shake consisting of whey protein and “rapidly absorbing carbs”, and you make sure to consume it immediately following your training session. Consuming post workout carbs in the form of simple sugars seems to be a logical move. After all, your glycogen levels need to be re-elevated, and you need to “spike your insulin” in order to increase the absorption of your post workout protein. Well, not so fast. While there is certainly nothing wrong with consuming simple carbohydrates after your workout, it’s not the critical bodybuilding “must” that virtually everyone has made it out to be. Let me dissect this myth for you in 2 simple steps… 2 Post Workout Carb Myths Debunked First of all, a standard weight training workout does not deplete glycogen levels to any significant degree. Unless you’re performing exhaustive endurance work, your glycogen levels will only be depleted by a maximum of about 30% after an intense weight training session. And unless you were planning on training those same muscle groups again in the next 24 hours or so, this is really of no practical concern. (This may be a legit issue for hard-training athletes who work out multiple times per day, but not for the average bodybuilder.) Because of this, the idea that you must immediately replenish these glycogen levels is simply false. By finishing your workout and resuming your regular nutrition plan, those glycogen levels will be naturally re-elevated and ready for your next workout. Secondly, the notion that insulin levels must be “spiked” in order to maximize nutrient a Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About The Post Workout Carb Myth

What You Need To Know About The Post Workout Carb Myth

Why eating carbs after training is not all it cracked up to be, and what to do instead Carbs. Portrayed as the bad guy in many diet books, and avoided by dieters the world over. You’re told that carbs on a diet can be acceptable, but only under special circumstances. This article will attempt to teach you why eating carbs after training is not all it cracked up to be. A tale of two clients The fear of carbs throughout the day has affected two previous clients in different ways. The result was the same both times though. Less sustainability and long-term adherence. Let’s call the first client Jamie. Jamie was lean, muscular, and strong. Jamie had also got into the habit of eating high GI carbs immediately after training. The theory being that this would help with protein synthesis. Eating protein without 100g of dextrose in a shake after training would result in less muscle built over time. Whole foods were also shunned. The idea was to get the glucose in the bloodstream to perform its magic. The sooner after training, the better. We’ll name my other client Emma. Emma was in her early 30’s. She was looking to get back into the kind of shape she was in as a non-exercising, carefree, cocktail-swilling 19-year-old. She had followed the Lean In 15 program before working with me and had seen some decent results. She was also a fan of high carb snacks. She made a ritual of eating tasty pancakes, and other “naughty” foods after her HIT training. She bought into the mantra that “things that you might think are unhealthy but if you eat them at the right time – after a workout – are actually good for you… You can eat them after you train as like a refuel”. The problem Jamie’s problems began when he reduced calories to get lean. Fitting in a 100g of carbs af Continue reading >>

4 Post-workout Myths You Should Stop Believing

4 Post-workout Myths You Should Stop Believing

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. 09/28/2015 02:15 pm ETUpdatedDec 06, 2017 4 Post-Workout Myths You Should Stop Believing When it comes to the best way to work out, chances are you're on the right track--after all, there are trainers around the gym to give you tips, and no shortage of instructional YouTube videos for the at-home fitness enthusiast. But what about after your session? Are you still operating under the assumption that the same post-workout myths your dad believed are actually true? Here are several widely believed and not-quite truths about what to do when you're done exercising, debunked. Having a beer after a workout will dehydrate you. Should the bar be your first stop after you leave the gym? Probably not, but according to the latest research, knocking back a pint post-workout isn't as counterproductive as you might think: A study published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition found that subjects who drank both water and beer after an hour-long run were equally as rehydrated as those who drank just water, suggesting that beer isn't quite as dehydrating as previously thought (probably due in part to the drink's, well, high water content). That said, if you're trying to lose weight, water is still the better option, says Joe Debaun, training manager at DavidBartonGym Uptown in New York City. "Depending on what type of a workout you're doing, beer is basically going to put back the calories you just spent an hour trying to expend," he says. Read more: The 10 Healthiest Beers, Ranked Sports drinks are better than water for rehydration. If you're one of the millions of people who reach for a neon-colored beverage with ade in the name after working up a sweat, you're not alone (as of Continue reading >>

4 Post-workout Nutrition Myths (that Are Actually Relevant)

4 Post-workout Nutrition Myths (that Are Actually Relevant)

There are many myths surrounding the topic of post workout nutrition. Read this article to figure out if the top four myths are fact or fiction! It’s the last set of your training session. You push hard as you grind out the last couple reps. You hastily re-rack the weight and make a mad dash toward the locker room to get your shaker cup filled with protein. Precious seconds tick off the clock as you race against time trying to get some protein in your system. As you open the locker and rifle through your bag, you realize you forgot your protein at home. “NOOOOOOO!!!!”, you scream as you look to the sky. Your workout was completely wasted because everybody knows that if you don’t get protein in immediately after training then it was all for nothing. This is a scenario that is played out at gyms across the country. Gym goers sprinting for their protein as soon as their training session ends for fear of losing all their gains if they don’t. Does it really need to be this dramatic? Does post-training nutrition really matter as much as we’ve all been told? Let’s take a look at what the science actually says about it. What follows are some post-workout myths, claims that are commonly made by people who believe the myths, and scientific evidence for or against the claims. Related: 9 Broscience Myths Destroyed with Actual Science Myth 1: Your post-workout meal should consist of protein and carbohydrates. Theory: Protein is needed to decrease muscle protein breakdown (wasting) and increase muscle protein synthesis (building). Carbohydrates are needed to replenish glycogen stores. Scientific evidence: To understand the science behind post-workout nutrition we must first understand that muscle hypertrophy is the result of positive protein balance. Positive protein ba Continue reading >>

10 Nutrition Myths Debunked

10 Nutrition Myths Debunked

Despite advancements in nutrition research, many people are still clinging to old, outdated ideas. Are you one of them? Here are 10 nutrition myths that have been debunked by science! When it comes to nutrition, false or misleading information seems to be everywhere. Start a conversation with a strangeror even a loved oneand you'll hear how eating fat makes you fat. Too much protein, of course, will kill you deader than a ribeye. And yes, egg yolks are the devil. The worst part? There are still plenty of nutrition "experts" making these claims, even in mainstream media where millions take their word as gospel! For this reason, it can be extremely difficult to determine what's accurate and what's nothing more than a bunch of gibberish. Let's take a look at 10 common nutrition myths and uncover the truth! Myth 1. Your Body Can't Utilize More Than 30 Grams Of Protein People have claimed for years that the human body can only digest 30 grams of proteinor roughly 5 ounces of chickenper meal. Anything over that will end up being stored as fat or just wasted. Can this really be true? To understand how this seemingly arbitrary limit became the rule, it helps to go back to where it started. Years ago, it was shown that maximal muscle protein synthesis (MPS) occurred with roughly 20-30 grams of protein.[1] Increasing that amount to 40-plus grams of protein per meal was shown to be no more beneficial for protein synthesis. So does this mean your body stores the excess protein as fat? Not so fast! Yes, excess amino acids can theoretically be converted into glucoseand ultimately be stored as fat in the bodybut this is a long and costly process for the body. It's highly unlikely you'll get fat from excess protein. In fact, explorers who ate almost nothing but protein found themselve Continue reading >>

Post-workout Carbs: Are You Drinking Tons Of Sugar For No Reason?

Post-workout Carbs: Are You Drinking Tons Of Sugar For No Reason?

There are two kinds of people in the fitness industry: those that give you advice and motivate you, so that you will buy their product, and those that give you advice, because you paid them for it. Nah, that’s just the cynic in me talking. Cynicism can be a good thing though: it allows you to be objective. And that’s exactly what I’m going to do in this article. I’m going to give you an unbiased review of the effects of consuming carbohydrates before and after your training sessions. Should you consume carbs post-workout? Suppose you consumed a shake containing carbohydrates without protein. This has been researched many times and low doses (e.g. 6g) of carbs do not increase net protein balance after training. Of course, 6g is next to nothing: maybe we just need more to see an effect. Børsheim et al. (2004) tested this. Here, subjects were given either a placebo or a post-training shake containing 100g of maltodextrin. The result: protein synthesis did not improve, but protein breakdown did decrease, resulting in a significant increase in protein balance. However, the effect was “minor and delayed” and protein balance was still negative. Furthermore, Glynn et al. (2010) demonstrated that 70g of carbs do not influence protein balance more than 30g, so if you’re going to consume carbs, 30 grams should be your upper limit. Glynn et al. also concluded, in their review of the literature, that elevated protein balance as a result of training shakes is almost all due to increased protein synthesis caused by protein ingestion “with minor changes in muscle protein breakdown, regardless of carbohydrate dose or circulating insulin level.” (Emphasis mine; note that they didn’t study casein.) Still, if carbs help reduce even a tiny bit of protein breakdown, that Continue reading >>

Why You Don’t Need Carbs After A Workout: Post-workout Nutrition Myths Busted

Why You Don’t Need Carbs After A Workout: Post-workout Nutrition Myths Busted

But, you may also come across claims that taking in carbohydrate after exercise will stop you burning fat. Who’s right? If I wanted to make a case for the importance of taking in carbs after a workout, it would go something like this: After a tough workout, your body is depleted of glycogen – the name given to carbohydrate stored in your body – which needs to be replaced as soon as possible. Failure to do so is cheating your muscles and putting the brakes on recovery. Stored glycogen in muscle cells will also pull water into those cells. This increases cell volume, triggering changes in the muscle that will ultimately lead to faster growth. The best way to do this is with a rapidly digested carbohydrate with a high glycemic index. Dextrose, maltodextrin, waxy maize starch or Vitargo will all do the job. The carbs also jack up your insulin levels, which helps to shuttle nutrients into muscle cells, as well as blocking the post-exercise rise in cortisol levels, which would normally have a catabolic effect on your muscles. In short, to truly maximize recovery and muscle growth, carbs after a workout are essential. Insulin will be spiked, cortisol will be shut down, and glycogen will be restored as the post-workout gods deliver you directly to recovery heaven. Or will they? Actually, they won’t. Here’s why: It’s true that muscle glycogen is synthesized more rapidly if you take in some carbs immediately after a workout rather than several hours later. In fact, delaying the consumption of post-workout carbs for just two hours has been shown to slow the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis by as much as 50% [6]. But as long as you’re getting enough carbohydrate in your diet, glycogen levels will return to normal after a day or two, regardless of when that carbohyd Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Post Workout Nutrition Myths

The Top 10 Post Workout Nutrition Myths

The Revolution has come, are you ready? The world of strength training is obviously full of contradiction and confusion. Just pick up any standard bodybuilding magazine and you'll see different people with drastically diverse views, all telling you that they have the one method to help you achieve your goals. But through all of this crap, every now and then we find certain principles that we can take to the grave and apply universally. Examples include: "lift heavy weights and you'll get big," "cardio helps with weight loss," and "Canadian men are hung like moose." Another such principle is the post workout nutrient window, which states that during the time immediately post workout, our bodies are in a state of shock and physical disarray, resulting in an opportunity for enhanced nutrient absorption and accelerated recovery. In fact, it's pretty safe to say that since its inception a decade ago, this scientifically "proven" idea has revolutionized the way we look at nutrition. Unfortunately, this principle has become so engrained in our subculture that much of it has mutated and become dogmatic in scope. While the general principles remain, many of the studies on which they are based were done on populations that aren't completely applicable to us, such as animals or endurance athletes. Despite the emergence of new, more applicable science, we've had a very difficult time in adapting our thinking to these current and better-suited ideas. Making the situation worse is the fact that everyone seems to have their own input about what post workout nutrition should be! This stems from what I like to call the "telephone-chain effect" (derived from the lesson-yielding children's game), which illustrates how easily messages can change when passed through a chain of people. How i Continue reading >>

The Truth About Post-workout Nutrition

The Truth About Post-workout Nutrition

Two years ago I started reading Ori Hofmekler’s work. I was late to the game since he’d been writing for more than a decade, but as the saying goes: better late than never. I was not only fascinated by Ori’s knowledge of biology and human physiology, but his recommendations were also in-line with some of the more progressive research I was seeking out on gut health and hormones. Especially during the period after exercise when we need to maximize post-workout nutrition. Since the spring of 2010 I’ve been implementing Ori’s unique principles and supplements with myself and my clients. The results were so impressive that it was time I met the man in person to talk shop. Listening to Ori speak about nutrition must be what it feels like to sit in a room with Bill Gates and hear him discuss computer technology. Yep, I was blown away by the meeting. And since we all try to maximize post-workout nutrition, I wanted to share what Ori Hofmekler had to say. I’m honored to have Ori here in this exclusive interview. CW: Ori, throughout the majority of my career I’ve recommended fast-acting carbs with protein powder in the post-workout meal in order to get an insulin spike and shuttle amino acids into the muscles for growth and repair. But after consulting with you I’ve realized that I might have been wrong with this approach. Can you explain the problems with ingesting simple carbs such as raisins or cherry juice immediately after training? Ori Hofmekler: First off, after training your muscle becomes temporarily insulin resistant. That’s due to tissue micro-injuries which impair the mechanism that utilizes glucose in your muscle. Putting a high glycemic fuel in your muscle right after exercise will jeopardize energy utilization and disrupt your insulin sensitivity Continue reading >>

Here's Why You Don't Need To Spike Your Insulin After A Workout

Here's Why You Don't Need To Spike Your Insulin After A Workout

What should I eat after a workout to get the best insulin spike? PRADEEP R., LANTANA, FLORIDA Its time to clear up one of the biggest misconceptions about post-workout nutrition . Its been (correctly) reported that your body needs a rise in insulin todrive protein and carbohydrates into the muscles to help them recover and grow. Starchy foods accomplish this, which is why rice and potatoes are staples in any bodybuilders diet. But heres the funny thing: The one time of day you definitely dont need to boost insulinis immediately after a weight workout. Research from the Journal of AppliedPhysiology has shown that muscle contractions facilitate glucose transport into muscle cells, essentially mimicking the work insulin does. In other words, lifting primes the pump for you, so you dont need a sharp rise in insulin to get nutrition into the muscles. So, rather than spend money on fancy post-workout supps that spike insulin,eat a piece of whole fruit . Fast-digesting carbs are still important after a workout because they halt muscle breakdown, so a mere banana will get the job done. Sean Hyson, C.S.C.S., is the Mens Fitness training director and author of 101 Best Workouts of All Time, 101bestworkouts.com . Continue reading >>

Is It A Myth That Protein Should Be Consumed Within 30 Minutes After A Workout For Optimal Muscle Gain?

Is It A Myth That Protein Should Be Consumed Within 30 Minutes After A Workout For Optimal Muscle Gain?

Tim Ernst , 15 + Years Building Muscle, Udemy Teacher and Founder of TurnAroundFitness.com Answered 87w ago Author has 1.7k answers and 16.8m answer views Ive answered this question so many times. The 30 minute protein anabolic window is complete BS adn a MYTH! There are several studies that PROVE it to be completely FALSE. You should do NOTHING after the workout. Heres why After a workout session in the gym, you should absolutely do NOTHING! NO protein shake, NO food, NOTHING. Heres WHY How many times have you read or heard, As soon as the weight hits the floor youve got a 30 minute anabolic window to chug down a protein shake? This has been taught through word of mouth, fitness magazines, and yes even bodybuilders. We have been told repeatedly that we need to get a protein shake (or some other form of protein) in order to keep our muscle gains after a workout. Supposedly the anabolic window is a period of time after your training when your body is primed to accept nutrients better and shuttle it towards muscle. The problem with this is that your body needs to go through the catabolic process in order to recover properly. Two things happen within the body that everyone needs to consider: Today Im going to show you why you may be making a HUGE mistake when trying to optimize your muscle gains through the touted, anabolic window of opportunity by consuming a shake within 30 minutes. Cortisol has been one of the most misunderstood hormones in the body. In general cortisol is a catabolic hormone or more commonly called, The Stress Hormone and is elevated when doing any type of popular strength, 8 minute body-weight circuits or weight training. These catabolic processes are critical to activating the maximum anabolic state. When given the chance to work properly it can bec Continue reading >>

Post Workout Nutrition: Insulin!

Post Workout Nutrition: Insulin!

For muscle to grow, it must be stimulated. Weight training is said to be the best way to stimulate your muscles for growth. After your muscles have been stimulated, they need nutrients. You have just put your body through an intense, strenuous workout, during this time muscle breakdown has occurred. So what do you need to do to maximize building muscle? Insulin Encarta's Interactive Encyclopedia defines insulin as "a pancreatic hormone that regulates the metabolism of carbohydrates and fats by controlling blood glucose levels." As you have probably read in other articles, insulin plays an important part in building muscle. Insulin transports nutrients to the organs in the body. This includes muscle cells and fat cells. "While insulin is driving amino acids and glucose into muscle cells, it appears it also prevents the 'leaking out' of these nutrients from the muscle cells that usually occur in response to training or illness."3 I asked a friend of mine what he knows about insulin. He is a big time powerlifter and is studying this kind of stuff in college (I forget the names of his classes). This is what he had to say: "It is an anabolic/lipogenic hormone triggered by your pancreas upon the consumption of carbohydrates which stores the consumed carbohydrate as glycogen, a glucose polymer. The glycogen is stored in muscles and the liver to which we hold about 1600-1800 calories from glycogen max. It is said that after carbo loading, that number can jump as high as 2800 kcal." So what kind of carbs should you load with? The answer is really quite simple... simple carbs. Carbohydrates To create an insulin spike after training, a simple carbohydrate (sugars) should be consumed. Some examples of good sugary carbs to consume after a workout are, honey and fruit juices. The spi Continue reading >>

The Meal Timing Myth?

The Meal Timing Myth?

If you follow me on Twitter, you know that I enjoy hosting random Q&A’s using the hashtag #AskBorn. Oftentimes this happens while in a Taxi, at the airport, or just because I feel like talking. This week I was asked about meal timing, what to eat post-workout, and the importance of protein and carbs. It’s one of the most common questions I’m asked in my online coaching program. And since 140 characters really isn’t enough to answer on Twitter, here is what you need to know. ASK BORN: How many carbs and protein should I be eating post- workout? You like waixy maize? –Max When I first started training, there was nothing I looked forward to more than my post-workout meal. It was the time when my muscles were starved for food. But more importantly, I thought it was a time when my body needed a massive insulin surge to take carbs and transform them into hard earned muscle. What you eat after a workout is less important than meeting your overall calorie and macronutrient guidelines for the day. In my mind, insulin meant sugar, and sugar meant Frosted Flakes. (And lots of Frosted Flakes, as in several very large bowls.) After all, I was convinced my body was like a sponge after a workout and would soak up all the carbs. Turns out, my mindset regarding the need for significant carbs after a workout was misguided. Of all the ingredients involved in building the body you want, there’s a certain mystique about the role and importance of the meal you enjoy after your workout. There’s no shortage of information and opinions on what you should eat, how much you should eat, the importance of the timing, and the dangers of what you risk by not emphasizing this meal. And while timing is not insignificant, the latest research indicates that most what we thought was true abo Continue reading >>

The 30 Minute Anabolic Window: What The Science Says

The 30 Minute Anabolic Window: What The Science Says

The 30 Minute Anabolic Window: What the Science Says If you dont drinka protein shake within 30 minutesoffinishing your workout, itwill be wasted. If youve done anyresearch on building muscle, then Im sure youve seen this advice. Fitness gurustell you that theres a magic anabolic window after every workout. They swear that drinking protein during this window is a mandatory part of packing on mass But its 100% bullshit! AndIll prove it in this article. Bonus: Download my Free Bulking Routine and get a proven step-by-step routine to quickly pack on mass and get stronger. Before I break down why this myth is false, lets start by explaininghow it gained traction in the first place. Heres the typical logicpeople useto support the anabolic window: After you lift weights,your muscle fibers are in a damaged state and your glycogen stores (the carbs your body stores for immediate energy) are depleted This part is true. But after thatis where the bro science comes into play. By consuming a mixture of protein and quick-release sugary carbs youre able to super-compensate for these effects by preventing furthermuscle protein breakdown, spiking muscle protein synthesis, and refilling your glycogen stores. This results in a temporary state where your body can quickly construct new lean mass the anabolic window. The problem with this theory is that it relies only on simple logic, NOT proven science Again,the basis of this theory is true: intense exercise depletes glycogen and breaks down muscle tissue. But using these facts to justify that you MUSTconsume a mixture of protein and carbs IMMEDIATELY after your workout is making a lot of assumptions. Below are 3 reasons that prove it simply doesnt work this way Note:If youre confused what any of these terms mean, keep reading. Ill explai Continue reading >>

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