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Diabetes In Children: Giving Insulin Shots To A Child

Diabetes In Children: Giving Insulin Shots To A Child

How is insulin prepared and given? Your doctor or certified diabetes educator (CDE) will help you and your child learn to prepare and give insulin injections. If your child is age 10 or older, he or she may be able to give insulin with supervision. Here are some simple steps to help you and your child learn this task. To get ready to give an insulin injection using an insulin vial and insulin syringe or an insulin pen, follow these steps. Wash your hands with soap and running water. Dry them thoroughly. If your child is going to help, wash his or her hands well. Gather the supplies. Keep the supplies in a bag or kit so your child can carry the supplies wherever he or she goes. You will need an insulin syringe and the vial(s) of insulin, and an alcohol wipe or a cotton ball dipped in alcohol. If you are using an insulin pen, you will need a needle that works with your pen. If the pen is reusable, you may need an insulin cartridge. You may also need an alcohol swab. Check the insulin bottle or cartridge. When an insulin vial is used for the first time, write the date on the bottle. Insulin stored at room temperature will last for about a month. Read and follow all instructions on the label, including how to store the insulin and how long the insulin will last. On a reusable insulin pen, note the date you started using the pen. Reusable pens expire (for example, after several years). Check that a disposable pen's insulin has not expired. This date is usually printed on the pen's label. Prepare the injection The preparation will depend on whether you are giving one type of insulin or mixing two types of insulin in the injection. When you are mixing types of insulin to be given in one syringe, follow these precautions. If you are mixing NPH and short-acting regular insulin, Continue reading >>

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Insulin is a hormone that helps manage diabetes when it is injected into the body. It can't be taken as a pill or oral medication. This is because the enzymes in the stomach will break down the insulin before it reaches the bloodstream. Insulin injections are one of many ways to treat and manage diabetes. Others include dietary and lifestyle changes, and oral medications. For people who require insulin injections, there are different types of insulin available. It is important to understand and follow the instructions that the doctor provides about how and where to inject insulin. Common injection sites Insulin is injected into the layer of fat directly under this skin, known as subcutaneous tissue. It is injected with a small needle or a device that looks like a pen. There are several different sites where insulin can be injected, including: Abdomen The abdomen is a common site for insulin injection that many people with diabetes choose to use. To give an injection into the abdomen, take a pinch of the fatty tissue from either side between the waist and the hipbones. It should be about 2 inches away from the belly button. This site is easy to access and some people report that it causes less discomfort than other sites. Upper Arms The upper arm is another site where insulin injections can be given. The needle should be placed into the back of the arm (tricep area), about halfway between the elbow and the shoulder. The main disadvantage of this site is that it is very difficult to use for self-administration and may require somebody else to do it. It may be more comfortable to inject into the non-dominant arm. This means injecting into the left arm of a right-handed person or the right arm of a left-handed person. Thighs The thigh is also a very easy area for self-injec Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children: Giving Insulin Shots To A Child

Diabetes In Children: Giving Insulin Shots To A Child

Introduction If your child doesn't want to feel the insulin needle, your child's doctor can prescribe an indwelling subcutaneous cannula. A small needle is used to insert a soft tube into a place where you give your child an insulin shot, such as the belly. The needle is taken out, but the soft tube (cannula) stays in your child's body and is held in place with tape. Then, when your child needs insulin, the insulin needle is put into the cannula instead of into the skin. This way, your child won't have to feel the insulin needle. The cannula can be used for at least 3 days before your child will need a new one. The three most important elements of success in giving insulin injections include: Making sure you have the right dose of insulin, especially if you are giving two types of insulin in the same syringe. Practicing how to give an injection. Storing insulin properly so that each dose will work effectively. How is insulin prepared and given? Your doctor or certified diabetes educator (CDE) will help you and your child learn to prepare and give insulin injections. If your child is age 10 or older, he or she may be able to give insulin with supervision. Here are some simple steps to help you and your child learn this task. To get ready to give an insulin injection using an insulin vial and insulin syringe or an insulin pen, follow these steps. Wash your hands with soap and running water. Dry them thoroughly. If your child is going to help, wash his or her hands well. Gather the supplies. Keep the supplies in a bag or kit so your child can carry the supplies wherever he or she goes. You will need an insulin syringe and the vial(s) of insulin, and an alcohol wipe or a cotton ball dipped in alcohol. If you are using an insulin pen, you will need a needle that works with y Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites

Insulin Injection Sites

insulin injection sites body tissue areas that allow optimal use of subcutaneous injections of insulin. The choice of sites can affect the rate of absorption and peak action times, but repeated use of the same injection site can lead to localized tissue damage, resulting in malabsorption of insulin. These problems are minimized by systematic rotation of injection sites within the selected anatomical area. Want to thank TFD for its existence? Tell a friend about us, add a link to this page, or visit the webmaster's page for free fun content. Link to this page: insulin injection sites Continue reading >>

How To Inject Insulin

How To Inject Insulin

Tweet When you are injecting insulin, you should aim to inject into the fatty tissue just underneath the skin. If you think you are injecting into the muscle, you may want to change your technique or ask your GP to prescribe shorter needles. The steps below are a broad guide to injecting insulin. If you plan to change your technique, check with your healthcare team, diabetic nurse or consultant for their advice. How to perform an insulin injection Firstly, prepare your kit. You will need: An insulin pen Enough insulin inside to give the required dose A new pen needle Cotton wool or a tissue Make sure you have your kit available at all times and if possible, inform your family as to its location. If you suffer from a hypo, this will allow your family to act quickly. Injecting your insulin shot To perform your insulin injection: Wherever possible, wash your hands with soap and water before injecting Put a new needle onto your pen Perform an ‘air shot’ of at least 2 units to clear any bubbles out of the needle – if you do not get a steady stream, repeat the air shot until you do get a steady stream Dial up your dose – how you do this exactly may depend on which pen you have Pick a soft fatty area to inject – tops of thighs, belly, bum and triceps (not always recommended for children or thinner people) Raise a fold of fatty flesh slightly between your thumb and fingers - leaving plenty of space between to put the needle in Put the needle in – if you are particularly slim, you may need to put the needle in at a 45 degree angle to avoid injecting into the muscle Push the plunger, to inject the dose, relatively slowly After the dose has been injected, hold the needle in for a good 10 seconds to prevent too much insulin from escaping out If any blood or insulin esca Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites

Insulin Injection Sites

This photo – which I first saw posted on my endocrinologist’s office wall – is disturbing, I admit. It is meant to remind people to rotate injection sites. And I think it’s effective. It’s a photo of a man who gave his injections in these two sites – over and over for years. I apologize for the graphic photo; now on to a discussion of insulin injection sites. Things to remember: insulin goes into the fatty, or subcutaneous, tissue. If you inject insulin into muscle it works really fast and erratically. That can be dangerous and we want to avoid it. back in the days of longer insulin needles, we pinched up the fatty tissue to be sure the needle went where we want it to go (not all the way into muscle); now we have short needles and don’t really have to pinch anymore (unless you are using longer needles and you are very thin) rotating sites keeps sites healthy and usable for a long time Here is a picture of injection sites: Many people only use their abdomen (stomach) because it’s easy and most of us have some extra fat there. It’s important to remember to rotate not just between sites (arms, legs, butt, hips, stomach), but also within sites. The abdomen is a large area – you can go up and down and out toward the sides. The hips (“love handles”) are a great site for injections as well. Give your sites a break: avoid injecting in the same area day after day – move around. Sometimes it helps to make a “site rotation chart.” And all of this is true for those who use insulin pumps too. Pump infusion sets get inserted wherever you can inject insulin. Healthy sites can mean more effective insulin absorption and more consistent insulin action. For the best outcomes, choose your sites carefully. Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Insulin Administration Tips

Diabetes, Insulin Administration Tips

If your pet has diabetes, your veterinarian may have prescribed insulin for her. Some pet owners balk at the idea of giving their pet a regular injection, but the types of syringes used, the small amount injected, and the ease of injecting subcutaneously ensure that most pet owners can quickly learn to give the most comfortable injection possible. Insulin measurement: The concentration of insulin is measured in units. Insulin syringes are marked in units, and may also be marked in milliliters. Be sure to use the unit scale. Also, be sure you are using the appropriate insulin syringe for the concentration of insulin you are using. Insulin is available in concentrations of 40 and 100 units/ml. There are corresponding syringes to use for the measurement of the two concentrations of insulin. Pharmacy Note: Insulin comes in a glass vial with a rubber stopper, and must be stored in the refrigerator. Do not use the insulin beyond its expiration date. Different insulin types require different syringes: It is imperative to measure and administer the correct dose of insulin using the correct syringe. For instance, if you use insulin with 40 U/ml, you must measure and administer it with a U-40 syringe; if you used a U-100 syringe, it would result in the wrong amount of insulin being given, with perhaps a fatal outcome. Find out from your veterinarian (or pharmacist) what syringes are available for you to use with the concentration of insulin your pet is receiving. Pharmacy Note: An insulin syringe has 4 basic parts: the barrel, plunger, needle, and needle guard. Many brands of syringes have the needle permanently attached to the syringe barrel so it cannot be removed. How to draw up insulin for your pet: Prior to removing a dose of insulin from the vial, mix the contents by gently Continue reading >>

How To Give A Subcutaneous Injection

How To Give A Subcutaneous Injection

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is a subcutaneous injection? A subcutaneous injection is a shot given into the fat layer between the skin and muscle. Subcutaneous injections are used to give small amounts and certain kinds of medicine. What should I know about the syringe? There are 3 parts to a syringe: the needle, the barrel, and the plunger. The needle goes into your skin. The barrel holds the medicine and has markings on it like a ruler. The markings are for milliliters (mL). The plunger is used to get medicine into and out of the syringe. Insulin syringe: This holds a maximum of 1 mL of medicine. The syringe has markings from 10 to 100. The marking at 100 is the same as 1 mL. The marking at 50 is the same as ½ mL. Tuberculin syringe: This syringe holds up to 1 mL of medicine. It has a needle that is slightly longer than an insulin syringe. The syringe is marked every 0.1 mL. Where can I give a subcutaneous injection? The following are sites where you can give a subcutaneous injection: Abdomen: Uncover your abdomen. You may give an injection within the following area: below the waist to just above the hip bone and from the side to about 2 inches from the belly button. Avoid the belly button. Thigh: Uncover the entire leg. Find the area halfway between the knee and hip and slightly to the side. Gently grasp the area to make sure you can pinch 1 to 2 inches of skin. Lower back: Uncover the back from the waist to the top of the buttocks. Imagine a line that runs across the back just above the crack between the buttocks. An injection may be given below the waist and above this line. Give the injection halfway between the spine and the side. Upper Arm: Uncover the arm to the shoulder. Have the person getting the injection stand with his hand on his hip. Stand next to and a Continue reading >>

'belly Bottom': A Graphic Warning Of What Happens When Diabetics Inject Insulin At The Same Site Every Day

'belly Bottom': A Graphic Warning Of What Happens When Diabetics Inject Insulin At The Same Site Every Day

A 55-year-old man with type 1 diabetes shocked his doctors, after he revealed what looked like two bottom cheeks hanging below his navel. The patient from South Africa, had been told to inject his life-saving insulin jabs into two areas of his stomach to control his blood-sugar levels. However, he hadn't realised that he needed to rotate the injection site around different parts of his body because the hormone insulin encourages the build up of soft fatty swellings within the layers of the skin. The man went on to develop 'firm and pendulous' masses on his stomach - a condition known as lipohypertrophy. Mild cases are surprisingly common, however this patient had a severe case as he hadn't changed his injection sites for three decades. Dr Stan Landau, from the Centre for Diabetes and Endocrinology in Joannesburg, was part of the team who treated the patient. He told Mail Online: 'We are a group of five senior doctors with many years experience between us and have never seen such a case before. 'We felt we needed to publish the picture in a journal because it was such an extreme case.' Dr Landau said the patient had continued to inject himself in his stomach because he thought the lumps were normal in insulin users. 'He had seen others with similar, but smaller masses in the same location. Sadly the lumps, though painless, had never been inspected,' the expert said. Dr Landau added that although the lumps may shrink slightly the disfiguration would be permanent without plastic surgery. The patient was encouraged to rotate the injection-site and use a smaller needle. He was also given a different type of insulin. Unfortunately the team lost contact with the patient after he failed to return for follow-up appointments. Writing in the New England Journal of Medicine, the te Continue reading >>

How To Give Insulin Shots

How To Give Insulin Shots

Expert Reviewed Three Parts:Giving an Insulin Injection with a SyringeGiving an Insulin Injection with a PenUnderstanding the Need for InsulinCommunity Q&A Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas gland in order to shuttle glucose (sugar) from the bloodstream and into cells, which use it to produce energy. People with diabetes either can't produce any insulin at all (type 1) or their bodies can't produce enough (type 2),[1] so they need to inject synthetic forms of the hormone on a daily basis — as well as manage their diet and exercise. If you are a diabetic or have a child with diabetes and need insulin on a regular basis, you need to learn how to inject it properly. Make sure to consult with your doctor for a demonstration before you attempt to give an injection and ask her about proper dosage and your options for insulin delivery. Continue reading >>

How To Improve The Insulin Injection Experience

How To Improve The Insulin Injection Experience

If you have type 1 diabetes, or if you have type 2 and have recently begun injecting insulin, you may have a bit of trouble getting used to the process of preparing and administering your own insulin shots. Andrea Penney, RN, CDE, of the Joslin Diabetes Center, says that injection technique is important to master not only for accurate dosing, but for comfort, too. "With proper practice and good technique, you can avoid pain during an injection," she states. Penney sat down with us recently to answer some common questions about insulin injection. If after reading and practicing insulin injections you still find you’re having trouble, Penney suggests seeing a Certified Diabetes Educator for more assistance. Q: How do I decide where to inject? A: People often select injection sites based on many factors: accessibility, presence of fatty tissue, and rate of insulin absorption (which will be discussed shortly). As a result, popular sites for injection include the stomach, outer thigh, the back of the arm (between the shoulder and the elbow), or the upper outside "wallet" area of the buttock (but not into the lower buttock area). Q: Once I decide on a location for an injection, how do I pick the right "spot"? A: Here are some easy guidelines: -Stomach If you’re going to inject into the stomach, stay at least two inches away from the bellybutton and/or any scars you may already have when using the abdomen for injections. -Thigh For an injection in your thigh, inject at least four inches or about one hand’s width above the knee and at least four inches down from the top of the leg. Do not inject insulin into your inner thigh because of the large number of blood vessels and nerves in this area. - Arm The area between the shoulder and elbow on the outside of the arm is usua Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: How To Give A Shot

Insulin Pens: How To Give A Shot

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful as people imagine because the needles are short and thin. Insulin shots are given into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. The following instructions are for using most disposable insulin pens. If you are using a refillable pen, check with your doctor, diabetes educator or pharmacist on how to use. If you prefer to use a vial and syringe, refer to UPMC patient education page Insulin: How to Give a Shot. ADVANTAGES of insulin pens: Easy to use and carry Looks like a pen for writing (discreet/not easily noticed) No need to draw the insulin dose from a vial/bottle Can be used for most insulin types Doses can be easily dialed Less waste of expired insulin if not much insulin is used within time period designated (300 units in each pen)…see table end of this document To some people it may be less scary than a syringe DISADVANTAGES: Cannot mix different kinds of insulin together in a prescribed dose. Before you give the shot, you will need the following: Insulin pen Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Pen needle (be sure your doctor writes your prescription for the pen needles as well as the specific type of insulin pen) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of an Insulin Pen Wash your hands. Check the drug label to be sure it is what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date on the pen. Do not use a drug that is past the expiration date. Also do not use if beyond number of days listed in table at end of this document once opened and in use. Remove pen cap Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin is a hormone that helps cells use glucose (sugar) for energy. It works as a “key,” allowing the sugar to go from the blood and into the cell. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t make insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin correctly, which can lead to the pancreas not being able to produce enough — or any, depending on the progression of the disease —insulin to meet your body’s needs. Diabetes is normally managed with diet and exercise, with medications, including insulin, added as needed. If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin is required for life. This may seem difficult at first, but you can learn to successfully administer insulin with the support of your healthcare team, determination, and a little practice. There are different ways to take insulin, including syringes, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and jet injectors. Your doctor will help you decide which technique is best for you. Syringes remain a common method of insulin delivery. They’re the least expensive option, and most insurance companies cover them. Syringes Syringes vary by the amount of insulin they hold and the size of the needle. They’re made of plastic and should be discarded after one use. Traditionally, needles used in insulin therapy were 12.7 millimeters (mm) in length. Recent research shows that smaller 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm needles are just as effective, regardless of body mass. This means insulin injection is less painful than it was in the past. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, which means into the fat layer under the skin. In this type of injection, a short needle is used to inject insulin into the fatty layer between the skin and the muscle. Insulin should be injected into the fatty tissue just below your skin. If you inject the insulin deeper int Continue reading >>

Injecting And Adjusting Doses

Injecting And Adjusting Doses

Unfortunately insulin can only be injected because if swallowed it will be destroyed. How to inject When starting on insulin your diabetes specialist nurse/practice nurse will show you how to use your insulin device and help with the injecting technique. They will show you the correct techniques on how to prepare your injection according to the delivery method you have decided with your diabetes team. Injecting with pens/syringes You can download pictures showing how to inject for the following by clicking on the link: Injection techniques Lifted Skin Fold Technique - In order to avoid injecting insulin into the muscle you can do what is called a “Lifted Skin Fold” a correct skin fold is done with the thumb, index finger and middle finger, taking up the skin but not the muscle. (picture form GOSH NHS) The grip on the skin fold should be kept throughout the injection and released once the needle has been removed. The full length of the needle should be inserted into the skin fold at 90 o (NOT at an angle). Injection sites: Where do I inject and do I need to change the area that I inject? The main insulin injection sites are into the fat of the: Buttocks Stomach Do not inject into the upper arm (muscle) or top layer of the skin. These parts of your body absorb insulin at different rates, plan where to inject and ask your diabetes specialist nurse for advice. This is however different for each person and depends on the persons body. Your diabetes team will recommend a specific length of needle. This will help with maximum absorption. Rotating between injection sites Each injection site has different absorption pattern, you should keep a consistent site for each time of the day. DO NOT mix the site of injection and time. For example If it is recommended that you inject Continue reading >>

Suitable Injection Sites

Suitable Injection Sites

Insulin is not absorbed at the same speed at all sites Abdomen and thighs are the most common injection sites.2 At least 1 cm distance from the navel for adults. At least 3 cm distance from the navel for children. Injection sites on the abdomen allow rapid insulin absorption. Injection sites on the thighs and buttocks allow slower insulin absorption for some insulins. The effect of analog insulins is less dependent on the injection site. Follow the recommendations given by your healthcare professional. Rotation principle for injection sites – Avoiding lipohypertrophy Change the injection site after every injection (rotation principle). For adults, the injection sites should be at least 1 cm away from each other to avoid frequent injections into so-called “favourite sites” and thus leading to tissue hardening (lipohypertrophy). Example 1 Example 2 Example 3 2 Upper arms as injection sites: injections into the upper arms should only be performed after training by your healthcare professional. The reason is a higher risk of injecting into the muscle as the subcutaneous fatty tissue is usually thin and injection sites are not easily accessible. Continue reading >>

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