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Insulin Route Of Administration

Insulin Regular Dosage

Insulin Regular Dosage

Applies to the following strengths: beef-pork 100 units/mL; pork 100 units/mL; human recombinant 100 units/mL; pork 500 units/mL; human recombinant 500 units/mL The information at Drugs.com is not a substitute for medical advice. Always consult your doctor or pharmacist. Usual Adult Dose for Diabetes Type 1 Note: Regular human insulin is available in 2 concentrations: 100 units of insulin per mL (U-100) and 500 units of insulin per mL (U-500) Individualize dose based on metabolic needs and frequent monitoring of blood glucose -Total daily insulin requirements are generally between 0.5 to 1 unit/kg/day -Most individuals with type 1 diabetes should be treated with multiple-daily insulin (MDI) injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) MDI Regimens: Utilizing a combination of prandial (i.e., bolus, rapid, or short-acting insulins) and basal (i.e., intermediate or long acting insulin) insulin, administer 3 to 4 injections per day; regular human insulin is a short-acting prandial insulin. --Administer U-100 insulin subcutaneously 3 or more times a day approximately 30 minutes prior to start of a meal --Administer U-500 insulin subcutaneously 2 to 3 times a day approximately 30 minutes prior to start of a meal CSII (Insulin Pump) Therapy: U-100 insulin only -Initial programming should be based on the total daily insulin dose of previous MDI regimen; check with pump labeling to ensure pump has been evaluated with the specific insulin to be used (e.g., Novolin(R) is not recommended for use in insulin pumps due to risk of precipitation). -While there is significant interpatient variability, approximately 50% of the total dose is provided as meal-related boluses and the remainder as a basal infusion. Intravenous Administration: U-100 insulin only; -Closely moni Continue reading >>

What Are The Routes Of Administration For Insulin?

What Are The Routes Of Administration For Insulin?

Insulin is only available as a liquid preparation. Depending on different circumstances it can: be injected subcutaneously (in the skin) via an insulin syringe, pre-filled pen device or insulin pen for certain patients with type 1 diabetes, be delivered as an insulin infusion via a wearable personal insulin pump be administered through an intravenous insulin infusion Injecting insulin subcutaneously How insulin is supplied There are several means by which it can be supplied for use subcutaneously (in the skin): It can be drawn out of an insulin vial ONLY using an insulin syringe. When injecting insulin, it is important to allow at least 10 seconds before the needle is removed. This helps to ensure that the full insulin dose administered is absorbed. Wet skin at the injection site after the needle is removed could be insulin that has not been absorbed. It can be provided as a prefilled pen device, which is disposed of once empty. It can be provided as a cartridge that can be loaded into an insulin pen. Insulin should never be drawn out of a cartridge using a syringe. How insulin should be administered subcutaneously When insulin is to be administered subcutaneously by injection, the injection site should be clean and the person giving the insulin should wash their hands. In the UK, 4-6mm sized needles tend to be used most commonly. Prior to each administration, usual advice is to draw up insulin or dial up the dose using an insulin pen. The user is then asked to perform an ‘air shot’. This is where 2-3 units are discharged into the air to ensure that the syringe or insulin pen are working correctly. Provided that this demonstrates insulin release, the required treatment dose can then be drawn or dialled up. The appropriate injection site is then chosen. The recommend Continue reading >>

Insulin Administration

Insulin Administration

Injection and infusion are the two ways to deliver insulin. Injection is the most common, and infusion is the most the most sophisticated. Injection Insulin syringe: This is the most common insulin delivery method. The classic injection device is an insulin syringe. The plastic, disposable syringes currently are available in three sizes, and hold up to 30, 50 or 100 units of insulin. The needles are fine (up to 31 gauge) with lengths ranging from 3/16th of an inch for infants, to ½ inch or more for adults. The insulin is injected into the layer of fat (subcutaneous tissue) just under the skin. (Rarely, insulin may be injected into a muscle. This should happen only under a medical supervision in a hospital or medical care setting.) A popular alternative to the insulin syringe is an insulin pen. An insulin pen has a replaceable reservoir of insulin called a cartridge, a replaceable needle to puncture the skin and to deliver insulin to the subcutaneous tissue, a dial to choose the insulin dose, and a mechanical pumping or insulin release mechanism. These may be disposable devices or re-useable devices with disposable insulin cartridges. They are very convenient for active individuals taking multiple injections, as well as those who are visually or dexterity-challenged. Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Device: Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) devices (also known as insulin pumps) are the most sophisticated form of insulin delivery. These are small, computerized devices that are programmed to deliver insulin under the skin. The insulin pump is durable and lasts for years, but the insulin supply and certain pump components (insulin reservoir, tubing and infusion set) are changed every few days. We have provided more detailed information in the insulin Continue reading >>

The Route Of Insulin Administration In The Management Of Diabetes Mellitus

The Route Of Insulin Administration In The Management Of Diabetes Mellitus

By utilizing I131-labeled lente insulin, data from the study presented here suggest that the rates of clearance of insulin which may be expected when insulin is injected in the thigh differ from those which may be expected when it is injected into the upper arm. Such variability was not observed in relation to the tissue of injection. Similar rates of clearance were found following injections in both subcutaneous and intramuscular tissues. The interest of precise diabetic control would appear to be best served by consistently injecting insulin into the same anatomic region (e.g., the thigh), but by varying the sites within the region. Utilization of intramuscular tissue sites for injection provides a reasonable alternative to subcutaneous injections and could have application in the treatment and prevention of lipodystrophic complications. Continue reading >>

Insulin Administration

Insulin Administration

Insulin is a protein formed by two cross-linked peptide chains. Insulin is secreted in pulses by the pancreas and reaches the liver via the portal circulation. Some 80% of the insulin reaching the liver is cleared from the circulation, which means that insulin attains much higher concentrations in the liver than in the peripheral circulation. Insulin has a short plasma half-life (3-4 minutes), and choice of the route and timing of insulin administration is a major determinant of metabolic control. Conventional insulin injections are given into the thigh, abdomen or outer side of the buttock. Standard needles range from 0.8 - 1.6 cm in length, are used with a syringe or pen device and deliver insulin into the subcutaneous fat. Too long a needle or poor injection technique can result in injection into a muscle, which is painful and results in more rapid absorption of insulin. Many alternative routes of administration have been tested, but none can match direct injection or infusion. Subcutaneous insulin injection or infusion share the disadvantages of delivery into the systemic rather than portal circulation, and rates of appearance in the blood stream which are delayed and rendered somewhat erratic by the process of absorption from subcutaneous tissues. Characteristics of an ideal insulin administration system Nature has placed the pancreatic beta cell inside a digestive gland and astride an arterial supply that continuously samples the rate of nutrient absorption from the gut. It responds instantaneously to these blood-borne signals by releasing insulin in synchronised pulses, a pattern of secretion that maximises its effect on liver cells. Furthermore, it matches this insulin secretion with reciprocal suppression or release of its partner hormone pancreatic glucagon, t Continue reading >>

Insulin Regular Human (rx, Otc)

Insulin Regular Human (rx, Otc)

Dosage Forms & Strengths injectable solution Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Initial: 0.2-0.4 units/kg/day SC divided q8hr or more frequently Maintenance: 0.5-1 unit/kg/day SC divided q8hr or more frequently; in insulin-resistant patients (eg, due to obesity), substantially higher daily insulin may be required Approximately 50-75% of the total daily insulin requirements are given as intermediate- or long-acting insulin administered in 1-2 injections; rapid- or short-acting insulin should be used before or at mealtimes to satisfy the remainder balance of the total daily insulin requirements Premixed combinations are available that deliver rapid- or short-acting components at the same time as the intermediate- or long-acting component Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled by diet, exercise, or oral medication: Suggested beginning dose of 10 units/day SC (or 0.1-0.2 unit/kg/day) in evening or divided q12hr Severe Hyperglycemia (Diabetic Ketoacidosis) 0.1 unit/kg/hr IV continuous infusion; if serum glucose does not fall by 50 mg/dL in the first hour, check hydration status; if possible, double the insulin hourly until glucose levels fall at the rate of 50-75 mg/dL/hr; decrease infusion to 0.05-0.1 unit/kg/hour when blood sugar reaches 250 mg/dL Dosing Considerations Dosage of human insulin, which is always expressed in USP units, must be based on the results of blood and urine glucose tests and must be carefully individualized to optimal effect Dose adjustments should be based on regular blood glucose testing Adjust to achieve appropriate glucose control Look for consistent pattern in blood sugars for >3 days Same time each day: Compare blood glucose levels with previous levels found at that time of day For each time of day: Calculate blood glucose range Continue reading >>

Insulin (medication)

Insulin (medication)

"Insulin therapy" redirects here. For the psychiatric treatment, see Insulin shock therapy. Insulin is used as a medication to treat high blood sugar.[3] This includes in diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2, gestational diabetes, and complications of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states.[3] It is also used along with glucose to treat high blood potassium levels.[4] Typically it is given by injection under the skin, but some forms may also be used by injection into a vein or muscle.[3] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] Insulin can be made from the pancreas of pigs or cows.[5] Human versions can be made either by modifying pig versions or recombinant technology.[5] It comes in three main types short–acting (such as regular insulin), intermediate–acting (such as NPH insulin), and longer-acting (such as insulin glargine).[5] Insulin was first used as a medication in Canada by Charles Best and Frederick Banting in 1922.[6] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[7] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$2.39 to $10.61 per 1,000 iu of regular insulin and $2.23 to $10.35 per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[8][9] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of regular or NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds, while this amount of insulin glargine costs 30.68 pounds.[5] Medical uses[edit] Giving insulin with an insulin pen. Insulin is used to treat a number of diseases including diabetes and its acute complications such as diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

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