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Insulin Resistance Test Normal Range

Blood Levels Of Insulin And Hemoglobin A1c In Foundation Members

Blood Levels Of Insulin And Hemoglobin A1c In Foundation Members

Life Extension® has an advantage in identifying modern causes of premature aging and death. That’s because we have direct access to tens of thousands of our members’ blood test results. Our review of this real-world data enables us to uncover disease risk factors that are overlooked by the mainstream media. We then alert members about simple steps they can take to mitigate these hazards. Earlier this year, we analyzed fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c blood levels in over 10,000 members. A startling 66% had higher than desired fasting insulin. Twenty-two percent had hemoglobin A1c levels that placed them in a pre-diabetic state. Hemoglobin A1c measures the percentage of glycated hemoglobin in one’s blood. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be below 5.6%,1 yet more than one in five people we tested had a reading over 6%. Gaining early access to this kind of data can spare aging humans the ravages of degenerative illness. Armed with this knowledge, Foundation members can slash their risk of cancer, vascular occlusion, and other complications before frank diabetes is diagnosed. This article will describe the dangers of elevated fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c, our recent analysis of member blood tests, and a novel way to protect against glycemic overload. What Is Insulin Supposed to Do? Insulin is a hormone that regulates carbohydrate and fat metabolism.2 Insulin enables liver and muscle cells to take up blood sugar (glucose) for energy production or storage.2 Insulin also facilitates the packing of glucose into fat cells as triglycerides.2 A burst of insulin is released in response to food ingestion. Once glucose has been safely shuttled into energy producing cells or stored, insulin levels should drop below 5 µIU/mL.3 Only a tiny amount of residual insulin should b Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Insulin Resistance By Simple Quantitative Methods In Subjects With Normal Glucose Metabolism

Diagnosing Insulin Resistance By Simple Quantitative Methods In Subjects With Normal Glucose Metabolism

OBJECTIVE—To identify a reliable yet simple indirect method for detection of insulin resistance (IR). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A total of 65 subjects (44 men and 21 women aged 30–60 years) were selected by a simple random sampling method. Inclusion criteria were voluntary participation from staff and hospital personnel, absence of abnormal glucose tolerance, and normal results of lipid profile and basic blood chemistry. A blood sample was taken after a 12-h overnight fast to determine plasma lipid, glucose, and insulin levels. An intravenous glucose tolerance test with administration of insulin after 20 min and extraction of multiple blood samples for glucose and insulin measurements and calculation of the minimal model approximation of the metabolism of glucose (MMAMG) Si value were performed. Three indirect indexes used to predict insulin sensitivity or IR were calculated, and metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criteria. All results were correlated with those of the MMAMG. RESULTS—The 75th percentile value as the cutoff point to define IR corresponded with a fasting plasma glucose level of 12 mU/l, a homeostasis model assessment of 2.6, a 25th percentile for Si value of 21, and QUICKI (quantitative insulin sensitivity check index) and McAuley indexes of 0.33 and 5.8, respectively. The Si index correlated (P < 0.001) with all the indirect indexes and parameters of the metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSIONS—When compared with the Si index, the most sensitive and specific indirect method was the score proposed by McAuley et al. (specificity 0.91, sensitivity 0.75, 9.2 probability ratio of a positive test), followed by the existence of metabolic syndrome (specificity 0.91, sensitivity 0.66, 7.8 probability ratio of a posit Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance/t2 Diabetes: Map Your Test Results

Insulin Resistance/t2 Diabetes: Map Your Test Results

The following post is from Step Three of The Blood Code: Unlock the secrets of your metabolism. I know this seems complicated at first sight but once you know your placement, you can act accordingly and move toward your metabolic recovery. Are You Insulin Resistant? You show no insulin resistance if your Blood Code reveals: Fasting glucose is between 75–95 mg/dL (4.2–5.3 mmol/L). TG:HDL ratio is near 1.0, +/- 0.5. Fasting insulin is between 3–8 uIU/mL (18–48 pmol/L). HgbA1C level is less than 5.6% (<37 mmol/mol). Glucose/insulin as HOMA-IR is near 1 (.5–1.5). Your total body fat is <28% for men and <32% for women. You show slight insulin resistance if you have two or more of the following: Fasting glucose is greater than 95 mg/dL (5.3 mmol/L). TG:HDL ratio is greater than 2. Fasting insulin is greater than 8 uIU/mL (>48 pmol/L). HgbA1C level is greater than 5.5% (>36 mmol/mol). HOMA-IR is greater than 1.5. The skin fold at your hip is greater than that at your triceps (by at least 5 mm). You show moderate insulin resistance if you have three or more of the following: Fasting glucose is greater than 100 mg/dL (>5.6 mmol/L). TG:HDL ratio is 3 or greater. Fasting insulin is greater than 10 uIU/mL (>60 pmol/L). HgbA1C level is greater than 5.7% (>39 mmol/mol). HOMA-IR is greater than 2.5. The skin fold at your hip measures near twice that at your triceps. You show severe insulin resistance if you have three or more of the following: Fasting glucose is greater than 110 mg/dL (>6.1 mmol/L). Greater than 125 mg/dL (>7.0 mmol/L) is diabetes.* TG:HDL ratio is greater than 4. Fasting insulin is greater than 12 uIU/mL (>72 pmol/L). HgbA1C level is greater than 6.0% (>42 mmol/mol). Greater than 6.4% (>46 mmol/mol) is diagnostic of diabetes.* HOMA-IR is greater than 3. The Continue reading >>

The One Test Your Doctor Isn’t Doing That Could Save Your Life

The One Test Your Doctor Isn’t Doing That Could Save Your Life

Insulin resistance doesn’t happen overnight. When most of your diet includes empty calories and an abundance of quickly absorbed sugars, liquid calories, and carbohydrates like bread, pasta, rice, and potatoes, your cells slowly become resistant to the effects of insulin. Your body increasingly demands more insulin to do the same job of keeping your blood sugar even. Eventually your cells become resistant to insulin’s call, resulting in insulin resistance. The higher your insulin levels are, the worse your insulin resistance. Your body starts to age and deteriorate. In fact, insulin resistance is the single most important phenomenon that leads to rapid, premature aging and all its resultant diseases, including heart disease, stroke, dementia, and cancer. Insulin resistance and the resulting metabolic syndrome often comes accompanied by increasing central obesity, fatigue after meals, sugar cravings, high triglycerides, low HDL, high blood pressure, problems with blood clotting, as well as increased inflammation. Even without these warning signs, one test can determine high insulin levels years or even decades before diabetes develops. Early detection can help you reverse these symptoms, yet doctors rarely use this crucial test that can detect high insulin levels. Why Doctors Miss the Initial Warning Sign of Insulin Resistance Doctors have been trained to measure a person’s fasting blood sugar, or the glucose levels present in your blood, at least eight hours after your last meal. Most don’t express concern until results show blood sugar levels reaching 110 mg/dl. That’s when they start “watching it.” Then, once your blood sugar reaches 126 mg/dl, your doctor will diagnose you with diabetes and put you on medication. The important thing to note is that bloo Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Diagnosis

Insulin Resistance Diagnosis

Insulin resistance describes the body's lack of sensitivity to the hormone insulin, meaning body cells such as the muscle, fat and liver cells are not adequately stimulated to take up glucose from the blood, even when insulin levels are high. This under-utilization of blood glucose results in hyperglycemia or a raised blood sugar level. Tests for diagnosing insulin resistance include: Fasting blood sugar and postprandial blood sugar - Blood sugar is almost always raised in people with insulin resistance. Fasting insulin assessment - In a healthy person who has fasted for 6 to 8 hours (usually overnight), the insulin level is approximately 60 pmol/L. A level higher than this is considered indicative of insulin resistance. Glucose tolerance testing (GTT) - For a glucose tolerance test, a person fasts for 8 to 12 hours (usually overnight) and is then given a 75 gram oral dose of glucose. After two hours, the blood levels of glucose are measured. In a healthy person, the blood sugar level after two hours is usually less than 7.8 mmol/L (140 mg/dl). A blood sugar level between 7.8 and 11.0 mmol/dl (140 to 197 mg/dl), however, indicates impaired glucose tolerance. If the level is over 11.1 mmol/dl (200 mg/dl), diabetes mellitus is diagnosed. Modified insulin suppression test - For this test, patients are given 25 mcg of octreotide (an inhibitor of insulin and glucagon) over 3 to 5 minutes and are then infused with somatostatin (0.27 μgm/m2/min) to suppress the release of insulin and glucose into the blood. Next, the patient is administered insulin and 20% glucose and a series of blood sugar tests are then performed and the values averaged out to give the steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) level. An SSPG greater than 150 mg/dl indicates insulin resistance. Other measures of i Continue reading >>

Early Detection Of Insulin Resistance For Improved Patient Outcomes

Early Detection Of Insulin Resistance For Improved Patient Outcomes

Twenty years and more ago, when many of the practitioners reading this article were in medical school, we were taught that a fasting blood glucose measurement was an adequate screen for blood sugar issues. As long as it was below 100, it was considered normal and therefore of no consequence. Even those who practiced more proactively often considered fasting glucose a reliable indicator of glucose regulation, although perhaps levels above 90 would raise red flags. Glucose levels higher than 100 might trigger further evaluation with an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Hemoglobin A1c (glycosylated hemoglobin) was then considered only for use in patients already diagnosed as diabetic. The focus was entirely on blood glucose. Insulin was rarely measured. The limitation of relying entirely on these measurements is that, in the insulin-resistant individual, rising insulin levels may well keep blood sugar at normal, even optimal, levels for years, while elevated circulating insulin damages blood vessels and contributes to central weight gain. By the time the overworked pancreatic cells begin to decrease production of insulin and blood glucose levels skyrocket, the damage has been done. The road back to optimal blood sugar control is much more difficult at this point. Typically, patients go on blood–sugar lowering pharmaceuticals and remain on them the rest of their lives, even if they make changes in their dietary and exercise habits. Today, of course, the phenomenon of insulin resistance is widely recognized, but the tests commonly used for screening may be missing a great number of patients who could benefit earlier detection and intervention. Let's look at the available tests. Fasting Glucose Fasting glucose, as noted above, doesn't really test for insulin resistance, b Continue reading >>

Do You Have Insulin Resistance?

Do You Have Insulin Resistance?

I have been concerned recently with the way we physicians make a diagnosis of insulin resistance: we're late. We wait to make the diagnosis until it's “definite”, but by then it's also advanced and more difficult to reverse. Meanwhile, we have often been overlooking brilliantly colored red flags along a long and winding road of disease development. Happily, there are ways you can speed up the process through your own awareness of a potential problem. Insulin resistance is the defining factor of type 2 diabetes, the type of diabetes almost always associated with weight gain, yet insulin resistance starts long before the blood sugar reaches diabetic levels. Many people have early insulin resistance without realizing it, as routine lab tests focus only on the later stages of the problem. Certain symptoms, physical findings and laboratory findings suggest the possibility of early insulin resistance and some simple blood tests can be pursued to nail down the diagnosis. The true benefit of diagnosing insulin resistance before it becomes diabetes is that the problem is more easily reversible by dietary changes, and you have a real choice. In general insulin resistance is thought of as a progressive problem that is more easily reversed the earlier it is diagnosed. Early awareness of a potential problem allows time for the body to heal itself with more moderate changes in food and activity choices. Insulin resistance left unchecked causes two serious problems. Continued resistance causes progressively higher insulin levels; insulin is the “aging” hormone, associated with increased rates of almost every serious chronic disease. Secondly, continued insulin resistance almost always progresses to diabetes, one of the most costly diseases of modern life, both in monetary and Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Insulin Resistance: Q&a With Researchers

Diagnosing Insulin Resistance: Q&a With Researchers

Over the past few years researchers have described a strong association between insulin resistance and laminitis in equines. They are working now on defining standard testing protocols and interpretations to identify horses at highest risk for laminitis. Many questions remain unanswered. How should insulin resistance be defined and diagnosed? How do researchers interpret test results? Can blood tests alone determine the risk of our horse or pony to get laminitis? Until they have more solid science to configure a standard definition of equine insulin resistance, those attempting to define it might find themselves in the same predicament as the proverbial group of blind men describing an elephant. A study in the United States showed that laminitis affected 2% of all horses, with the incidence going up to 5% in spring, which is when grass sugars peak. The ability to identify high risk animals before laminitis strikes is essential, as this can allow caretakers to implement appropriate management practices to prevent it. Sinking or rotation of the coffin bone requires treatment and rehabilitation regimes that can be difficult, long, expensive, and emotionally draining. Even then, the treatments often fail. But how do we identify the high-risk animal? Of course any horse that has had a brush with laminitis should have tests for underlying endocrine problems, but certain physical characteristics should lead proactive owners to test for insulin resistance. A "cresty neck" is the classic sign of insulin resistance, and researchers note a solid correlation between neck circumference and the condition. Horses that gain weight much more quickly, often described as "blowing up on grass" than their herdmates under similar management, might be candidates for testing, especially if the Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

What medical conditions are associated with insulin resistance? While the metabolic syndrome links insulin resistance with abdominal obesity, elevated cholesterol, and high blood pressure; several other medical other conditions are specifically associated with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance may contribute to the following conditions: Type 2 Diabetes: Overt diabetes may be the first sign insulin resistance is present. Insulin resistance can be noted long before type 2 diabetes develops. Individuals reluctant or unable to see a health-care professional often seek medical attention when they have already developed type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Fatty liver: Fatty liver is strongly associated with insulin resistance. Accumulation of fat in the liver is a manifestation of the disordered control of lipids that occurs with insulin resistance. Fatty liver associated with insulin resistance may be mild or severe. Newer evidence suggests fatty liver may even lead to cirrhosis of the liver and, possibly, liver cancer. Arteriosclerosis: Arteriosclerosis (also known as atherosclerosis) is a process of progressive thickening and hardening of the walls of medium-sized and large arteries. Arteriosclerosis is responsible for: Other risk factors for arteriosclerosis include: High levels of "bad" (LDL) cholesterol Diabetes mellitus from any cause Family history of arteriosclerosis Skin Lesions: Skin lesions include increased skin tags and a condition called acanthosis nigerians (AN). Acanthosis nigricans is a darkening and thickening of the skin, especially in folds such as the neck, under the arms, and in the groin. This condition is directly related to the insulin resistance, though the exact mechanism is not clear. Acanthosis nigricans is a cosmetic condition strongly Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes/ Insulin Resistance Test

Pre-diabetes/ Insulin Resistance Test

I find it truly amazing that most doctors don't automatically send people for a blood test for insulin resistance. Why am I amazed? Because insulin resistance is a precursor for the development of type 2 diabetes and it's often present for up to 10 years before an ‘official' diagnosis. Now that's a long time you could do something about it if only you knew! Insulin resistance is also known as prediabetes, they are both considered the same thing, just in case you didn't know. A couple of common tests your doctor might have ordered are the fasting glucose or oral glucose test, which is still important because having elevated blood glucose is also a risk factor and indicator. But it is not uncommon to have a normal blood glucose and high insulin resistance. In fact, one of my clients recently came back with blood sugar levels in normal range but an insulin level of 16, putting her in the ‘moderate to severe insulin resistance' range and heading on a trajectory toward type 2 diabetes! So in my eyes testing for insulin resistance is very important. If you know your own individual status, you can work on your lifestyle habits so you don't develop type 2 diabetes, why wouldn't anyone want that right?! You can ask your doctor for a test so let's talk about what to ask for. Blood Test for Insulin Resistance / Prediabetes Ask your doctor for: A fasting blood glucose test And a fasting insulin test With the results from the two tests you can calculate your insulin resistance status using Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) Index. The HOMA-IR test was developed from “the concept that fasting plasma insulin and glucose levels were determined, in part, by a hepatic-beta cell feedback loop”. Source So essentially it calculates the balance between pancreatic beta cell function, Continue reading >>

Signs Of Insulin Resistance

Signs Of Insulin Resistance

What is insulin resistance? Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas. It allows your cells to use glucose (sugar) for energy. People with insulin resistance have cells throughout their bodies that don’t use insulin effectively. This means the cells have trouble absorbing glucose, which causes a buildup of sugar in their blood. If your blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes, you have a condition called prediabetes caused by insulin resistance. It’s not entirely clear why some people develop insulin resistance and others don’t. A sedentary lifestyle and being overweight increases the chance of developing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. The effects of insulin resistance Insulin resistance typically doesn’t trigger any noticeable symptoms. You could be insulin resistant for years without knowing, especially if your blood glucose levels aren’t checked. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimates that nearly 70 percent of individuals with insulin resistance and prediabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes if significant lifestyle changes aren’t made. Some people with insulin resistance may develop a skin condition known as acanthosis nigricans. This condition creates dark patches often on the back of the neck, groin, and armpits. Some experts believe it may be caused by a buildup of insulin within skin cells. There’s no cure for acanthosis nigricans, but if caused by a specific condition, treatment may allow for some of your natural skin color to return. Insulin resistance increases the risk of being overweight, having high triglycerides, and having elevated blood pressure. Since insulin resistance increases your risk for progressing to diabetes, you may not notice right away if you develop Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

Diatest Insulin resistance is often referred to as pre-diabetes, because it precedes the development of type ii diabetes. What is insulin resistance? Insulin is a polypeptide hormone secreted by the beta cells of the pancreas. One of the major functions of insulin is to stimulate glucose uptake into tissues for utilization. transport of glucose into tissue keeps blood glucose levels within a specific range of ”normal‘ values. with insulin resistance, tissues become resistant to the effects of insulin, which means the pancreas must produce more insulin to maintain normal blood glucose levels. over time, the pancreas no longer produces sufficient amounts of insulin, which results in high blood glucose levels and a probable diagnosis of type ii diabetes. in fact, several prospective studies have concluded that insulin resistance is the best predictor of whether a person will go on to develop diabetes. How does the Diatest breath test for insulin resistance work? Insulin stimulates the uptake of glucose into tissues. approximately 50% of ingested glucose is metabolized to carbon dioxide (CO2) and water. the Diatest breath test measures expired CO2 before and after ingestion of stable c universally labeled glucose (non-radioactive). patients with normal insulin function exhale a greater percentage of CO2 because moreC13 labeled glucose is transported to tissue by insulin. the glucose in tissue is eventually metabolized to CO2 and water and exhaled. insulin resistant patients exhale less CO2 because resistance to the effects of insulin reduces the transport of c labeled glucose into tissues, and therefore Less CO2 is produced. In other words, the Diatest breath test is a functional test for insulin resistance: it measures how well insulin functions at delivering glucose t Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance: What You Need To Know

Insulin Resistance: What You Need To Know

Measuring insulin resistance might be the key to stopping prediabetes from becoming Type 2 diabetes. If you ask the average person on the street to play a word association game with diabetes, the word “fat” will come up sooner rather than later. Links between obesity and Type 2 diabetes are well established. And yet, not all fat people have diabetes, and not all people with diabetes are fat. Like many things connected to diabetes, simple and ubiquitous explanations almost never work. According to the U.S. Center for Disease Control, 100 million Americans are now obese, with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or higher. At the same time, the CDC reports that as many as 80 million Americans were insulin-resistant, and since insulin resistance is a precursor to diabetes onset, the two numbers seem to support one another. The correlation breaks down, however, if one assumes that obesity and insulin resistance are always connected. They aren’t; some 12% of those who are insulin-resistant are thin. Since testing only overweight people isn’t a diagnostic solution, heading off diabetes Armageddon in the future boils down to identifying insulin-resistant people, regardless of weight, say diabetes researchers. Early identification of insulin resistance can have a major impact on the long-term prognosis of diabetes in patients, or help patients avoid the onset of diabetes altogether, but the window for early diagnosis of insulin resistance often is missed. Standard tests such as A1c percentages or fasting glucose won’t always identify the problem in time to allow prevention to work. sponsor How Insulin Resistance Begins Insulin resistance is a metabolic condition that causes the body’s cells to require a higher than normal amount of insulin to convert glucose into energy. B Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Test

Insulin Resistance Test

Insulin is a protein-based hormone that is secreted by the islet cells in the pancreas. When the pancreas senses an increase in blood glucose levels, it releases insulin, which is responsible for putting the glucose into the cells to be used as a type of cellular fuel. Without insulin, the cells would starve from having a lack of energy. If you have insulin resistance, it means that, while the pancreas is putting out insulin, the cells of the body cannot recognize it and the glucose levels rise in the bloodstream. If the blood sugar becomes too high, it means that you have type 2 diabetes or prediabetes. People with polycystic ovarian syndrome and metabolic syndrome also have insulin resistance. No one knows why insulin resistance occurs. It is believed to be somewhat related to being obese or overweight; however, people who do not exercise enough can also develop insulin resistance, even if they are not overweight, The Effects of Insulin Resistance Rarely would one have any symptoms from having insulin resistance, especially if the disease is in its earliest stages. A person can suffer from insulin resistance for many years and might not know it, particularly if the blood glucose level is still normal. Insulin resistance is associated with a skin condition called “acanthosis nigricans”. This is a condition in which dark areas of the skin develop on the groin area, the armpits, and in the back of the neck. Insulin resistance tends to get worse over time so that the person eventually shows elevated blood glucose levels. When this happens, it is called type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance can also cause damage to the blood vessels. This is completely asymptomatic so you don’t usually know you have it until you get complications, such as a stroke or a heart attack. In Continue reading >>

Insulin Lab Test

Insulin Lab Test

WHAT IS AN INSULIN LAB TEST? The Insulin lab test includes a blood test to measure Insulin production. HOW MUCH DOES AN INSULIN LAB TEST COST? $79.00 *Price may vary by location – contact your local ANY LAB TEST NOW® IS FASTING REQUIRED FOR AN INSULIN LAB TEST? Yes, fasting for at least 8 hours is required for the Insulin Test. DESCRIPTION: Insulin is produced by the pancreas and used by the body to transport and convert glucose throughout the body into usable energy. Issues with the pancreas including diabetes or a pancreatic tumor can prevent the pancreas from producing the correct amount of insulin to maintain proper glucose levels. Too much insulin causes hypoglycemia, or low glucose levels, while too little, or resistance to, insulin, which is often caused by type 2 diabetes, leads to extremely high levels of glucose. Either situation can lead to severe health issues. Excess insulin production may be due to an insulin producing tumor (insulinoma) and can cause low glucose levels leading to convulsions or loss of consciousness. Acute or chronic symptoms of low blood sugar include sweating, confusion, blurred vision, hunger, fainting or heart palpitations. Insulin resistance, which is associated with type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, heart disease and polycystic ovarian syndrome (POCS), can lead to extremely high glucose levels in the body. Long term blood sugar levels that are too high cause severe health problems associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes including blindness, neuropathy that can lead to foot and leg amputations and cardiovascular disease. The pancreatic system in those with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes becomes damaged over time and is unable to utilize insulin properly. Known as insulin resistance, this condition can be im Continue reading >>

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