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Insulin Resistance Hair Loss Reversible

Diabetes And Hairloss

Diabetes And Hairloss

It has been established that there are clear links between androgenetic alopecia, (male and female pattern hair loss), metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. Those with diabetes or even pre-diabetic conditions are much more likely to have pattern loss or a diffuse thinning that often accompanies the disorder. In a nutshell, insulin resistance and the resultant pro-inflammatory prostaglandin production, either due to lifestyle, diet or genetics, causes a micro circulatory impairment and collagen rigidification around the hair follicle (fibrosis). Here�s a succinct, well written, ezine article by Mike Harman on diabetes and its relationship to hair loss: "The connection between diabetes and hair loss was established long ago. Diabetes is a hormone related disorder that often leads to hair loss or thinning of the hair. Frequent loss of hair is often considered one of the early symptoms of diabetes, which requires prompt treatment in order to avoid further complications. The growth of hair is affected by diabetes, which gradually leads to thinning of hair. Stress is directly related to diabetes and hair loss, as the disease causes excessive anxiety, which in turn becomes the prime cause of hair loss. Diabetes Leads To Hair Loss: Diabetes occurs when it becomes difficult for the body to metabolize carbohydrates properly. Diabetics are highly sensitive to skin ailments, as their blood circulation and blood sugar levels are impaired. Bruises and small wounds often take a relatively long time to heal; therefore, the recovery rate is comparatively slower and obstructs the re-growth of hair. This causes visible hair reduction, as diabetics cannot maintain the normal cycle of re-growth process. Bacterial and fungal infections on the scalp because of diabetes could also resul Continue reading >>

Top 10 Tips For Pcos Hair Loss | Pcos Crown

Top 10 Tips For Pcos Hair Loss | Pcos Crown

PCOS Hair Loss “I used to have such thick, beautiful hair. Now, it’s so thin and brittle!” “Handfuls of hair come out in the shower and I just cry.” “Is it bad that I take pictures of how much hair comes out each day?” “I’m afraid to comb through my hair because more might fall out!” “Other people think I’m crazy and think that my hair looks fine, but I can notice a difference.” Have any of these thoughts or statements ever crossed your mind? If so, you’re not alone. Many women deal with PCOS hair loss. It is perhaps one of the most difficult PCOS symptoms to deal with, emotionally. Because despite what doctors and your girlfriends or family might be telling you, it hurts, it IS a big deal and you deserve to know how to fix it. I want you to know that there is hope and help. We’re going to be discussing why it happens and how to deal with it…ALL of it’s side effects. Why Am I Losing My Hair? DHT Clogged Hair Follicles PCOS is an endocrine disorder and therefore because of the hormonal imbalances caused by PCOS, many women deal with heightened levels of androgens or testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). High levels of these hormones in women with PCOS cause hair loss, specifically DHT. If you’re thinking that testosterone is a male hormone, you’re right. Us women are supposed to have it in small amounts. In excess, androgens, specifically DHT will latch onto hair follicles and begin to affect the hair, eventually to the point of hair loss. DHT also causes the follicle to stop producing new hair, essentially a DHT clogged follicle is the result. This is called androgenic alopecia. The bottom line here is that excess testosterone converts to DHT and is responsible for hair loss and makes it difficult to regrow hair in women with Continue reading >>

Review Testosterone Therapy In Women: Myths And Misconceptions

Review Testosterone Therapy In Women: Myths And Misconceptions

Abstract Although testosterone therapy is being increasingly prescribed for men, there remain many questions and concerns about testosterone (T) and in particular, T therapy in women. A literature search was performed to elucidate the origin of, and scientific basis behind many of the concerns and assumptions about T and T therapy in women. This paper refutes 10 common myths and misconceptions, and provides evidence to support what is physiologically plausible and scientifically evident: T is the most abundant biologically active female hormone, T is essential for physical and mental health in women, T is not masculinizing, T does not cause hoarseness, T increases scalp hair growth, T is cardiac protective, parenteral T does not adversely affect the liver or increase clotting factors, T is mood stabilizing and does not increase aggression, T is breast protective, and the safety of T therapy in women is under research and being established. Abandoning myths, misconceptions and unfounded concerns about T and T therapy in women will enable physicians to provide evidenced based recommendations and appropriate therapy. Continue reading >>

Pcos And Hair Loss – What Works For Me

Pcos And Hair Loss – What Works For Me

Of the myriad of PCOS symptoms, I find hair loss to be the most difficult to cope with. Thick, radiant hair is a symbol of beauty and femininity. When it seems like you see more hair in your hairbrush and in the bathroom sink or tub than on your head (okay, maybe I am exaggerating a bit here) it can be really depressing. The medical term for PCOS hairloss is androgenic alopecia. Androgenic alopecia in women is due to the action of androgens which most of us with PCOS have an excess of. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is a derivative of the male hormone testosterone (an androgen) is the enemy of hair follicles on your head. DHT appears to be at least partially to blame for the miniaturization of hair follicles in women suffering with androgenic alopecia. Testosterone converts to DHT with the aid of the enzyme Type II 5-alpha reductase, which is held in a hair follicle’s oil glands. Scientists now believe that it’s not the amount of circulating testosterone that’s the problem but the level of DHT binding to receptors in scalp follicles. DHT shrinks hair follicles, making it impossible for healthy hair to survive. I have spent countless hours researching PCOS hair loss solutions. After trial and error, here is what works for me. I just want to preface with the fact that you don’t want to use/take any of the following if you are trying to conceive. Nizoral Shampoo- a potent anti-dandruff shampoo, also helps to block the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). I use this to shampoo most days and leave on for a few minutes before I rinse. You can get this at any drugstore for around $10. Spironolactone (Aldactone) is a potassium-sparing diuretic used to treat high blood pressure and swelling. Spironolactone slows the production of androgens in the adrenal g Continue reading >>

Stop And Reverse High Blood Sugar Related Hair Loss

Stop And Reverse High Blood Sugar Related Hair Loss

9 Parts: ...More Sugar-related hair loss results in androgenic alopecia in both men and women. In men, it's usually referred to as Male Pattern Baldness. Usually this type of balding begins with the thinning of hair at the crown or at the front of the hairline. In women, it tends to be an overall thinning of the hair. Sugar related hair loss is based on the two following scientific premises: Since the year 2000, several studies conducted in Finland, Taiwan, Mexico and Turkey, have confirmed that eating too much sugar causes hair loss. This means that you should avoid eating sugar of all kinds including white sugar, cane sugar, golden sugar, brown sugar, agave syrup, corn syrup and any type of product made from glucose, sucrose, dextrose or fructose. You should avoid eating foods that are converted rapidly into sugar once they are consumed. These are known as high glycemic foods. They cause sugar in the bloodstream to rapidly elevate, which forces your pancreas to produce excess insulin, which in turn throws most of the systems in your body out of whack. This includes the endocrine system, which produces the hormones that determine the rate of hair loss. Research has found that hair loss occurs with the consumption of sugar because: Hair is made of protein and there is no protein in sugar to nourish your hair follicles or hair shaft. Individuals who consume too much sugar do not have as much control of the way their body produces DHT, a hormone that causes balding, or the way it prevents balding. There are many symptoms and physical conditions that can indicate sugar-related hair loss. Symptoms that affect your hair and scalp include: Hair falling out in the androgenic alopecia pattern that usually begins with hair thinning at the top of the head, the crown or along the Continue reading >>

A Patient’s Guide: Management Of Hair Loss In Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

A Patient’s Guide: Management Of Hair Loss In Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Walter Futterweit, MD, MD, FACP, FACE, OBGYN.net Editorial Advisor Clinical Professor of Medicine Division of Endocrinology Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY Infertility, Pregnancy and Birth, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Thinning hair due to the effects of male hormones (androgens) is called androgenic alopecia. It is a major source of psychological distress to women. This male-pattern hair loss is often seen in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), congenital adrenal hyperplasia, and other disorders of male hormone excess. Additional causes may be hormonal changes secondary to a reduction of estrogen levels, which are physiological at menopause, as well as in thyroid disorders. Certain drugs, anemias, nutritional deficiencies, and severe illnesses and infections may be a trigger for diffuse hair loss. Associated with hormonal changes causing the alopecia are genetic and environmental factors which are responsible for the frequent finding of the onset of hair loss at the top of the head (vertex) and the angles of the frontal hair line. In many, the alopecia pattern may start as a triangular thinning, which I have labeled as the “triangle sign”, with gradual progression of hair loss from the midline frontal scalp line towards the vertex and sides of the scalp. In most women with androgenic alopecia the frontal hairline remains intact despite diffuse hair loss. The average number of hairs lost in a day is about 100-150. It should be noted that it may take at least 20-25% of total loss of scalp hair before it may be visibly recognized by the woman. Thus an awareness of excessive hair loss at combing or after washing the hair, usually are the first signs of the onset of alopecia. Transient hair loss (telogen effluvium) may be another cause of hair loss a few Continue reading >>

Pattern Hair Loss

Pattern Hair Loss

Pattern hair loss, known as male-pattern hair loss (MPHL) when it affects males and female-pattern hair loss (FPHL) when it affects females, is hair loss that primarily affects the top and front of the scalp.[1] In males the hair loss often presents as a receding hairline while in females it typically presents as a thinning of the hair.[1] Male pattern hair loss is believed to be due to a combination of genetics and the male hormone dihydrotestosterone.[1] The cause in female pattern hair loss remains unclear.[1] Management may include simply accepting the condition.[1] Otherwise, treatments may include minoxidil, finasteride, or hair transplant surgery.[1] Evidence for finasteride in women, however, is poor and it may result in birth defects if taken during pregnancy.[1] Pattern hair loss by the age of 50 affects about half of males and a quarter of females.[1] It is the most common cause of hair loss. Signs and symptoms[edit] Classic male-pattern hair loss begins above the temples and vertex (calvaria) of the scalp. As it progresses, a rim of hair at the sides and rear of the head remains. This has been referred to as a 'Hippocratic wreath', and rarely progresses to complete baldness.[2] The Hamilton–Norwood scale has been developed to grade androgenic alopecia in males. Female-pattern hair loss more often causes diffuse thinning without hairline recession; similar to its male counterpart, female androgenic alopecia rarely leads to total hair loss.[3] The Ludwig scale grades severity of female-pattern hair loss. Causes[edit] Hormones[edit] Androgens can interact with the Wnt signalling pathway to cause to hair loss. Research indicates that the initial programming of pilosebaceous units of hair follicles begins in utero.[4] The physiology is primarily androgenic, wit Continue reading >>

Does Insulin Resistance Cause Hair Loss?

Does Insulin Resistance Cause Hair Loss?

New research has confirmed the statistics that the processed foods we eat are contributing to hair loss. (Processed foods equate to foods with a high glycemic load since natural foods almost always have low GL) Hair loss and glycemic loads The new research suggests that male pattern baldness could be a clinical marker of insulin resistance. This means the researchers believe that baldness can be used as a visible symptom to diagnose insulin resistance. Glycemic index was originally used as a scale that rates how much foods raise blood sugar levels using glucose as a reference point. However glycemic load is now used as a fairer estimation of the quality of a carbohydrate because it takes into account the glycemic index and amount of carbohydrate in a typical serving. The website www.glycemicindex.com can help you determine the GI of most foods. Insulin resistance means that cells don’t respond the way they are meant to when insulin is released by the body to combat high blood sugar. When we eat foods with high glycemic loads, our bodies digest them too fast, and sugar floods into the blood too quickly. What normally happens is that insulin is released and this tells cells to take up glucose from the blood. It is likely that insulin resistance causes hair loss because the blood sugar in our bodies becomes much more unstable, and our hair simply can’t cope with quick and continuous changes in blood sugar. When we evolved we would never have to cope with such great variations in blood sugar, and our hair is one of the first and also the most visible places that suffer. It’s possible the quick and on-going changes in the chemistry of our blood (like rising and falling blood sugar) interrupt the growth cycle. In a similar way to how plants suffer when the pH and amount Continue reading >>

Insulin And Hair Loss: How Diet Causes Androgenetic Alopecia

Insulin And Hair Loss: How Diet Causes Androgenetic Alopecia

Androgenetic alopecia, or male pattern baldness, is a complicated condition. Despite plaguing men – and women – for thousands of years, it is still not fully understood. The conventional wisdom says that it’s entirely caused by genetics. But new evidence suggests diet may play a role too, with hair loss linked to insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. In this post, we’ll look at how to reverse these conditions and regrow your hair by changing what you eat. Hair loss, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome Interactions between hormones in the body are complicated. A change in the level of one hormone will often lead to changes in levels of other hormones too. But male pattern baldness may tell us something about these complicated interactions in the body. Multiple studies (e.g. this one, this one, and this one) have found that men who start losing their hair at a young age are more likely to develop insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. The current medical understanding of androgenetic alopecia says that the male hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT) binds to hair follicles, causing them to shrink. Over time, the follicle gets smaller and smaller, until it eventually stops producing hair. These three things – DHT, insulin, and metabolic syndrome – are all linked to diet. Certain foods cause insulin levels to rise, which can in turn lead to more available DHT. These same foods also increase the likelihood of developing metabolic syndrome, as we’ll see. Metabolic syndrome Studies (see above) have shown that men who start losing their hair at a young age are more likely to develop metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is the general name given to a cluster of – usually associated – medical conditions. These include: Obesity Hypertension (high blo Continue reading >>

Pcos And Hair Loss, Part 1: Prevalence And Diagnosis

Pcos And Hair Loss, Part 1: Prevalence And Diagnosis

September is PCOS Awareness Month. For several years this blog has had an ongoing series about different aspects of PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) and its treatments. Today let's talk about a tough subject: PCOS and hair loss (alopecia). In our past PCOS series, we have discussed the definition and symptoms of PCOS, how it presents, its testing and diagnosis, and its possible causes. We've also discussed the increased risk for endometrial cancer among those with PCOS. Now we are discussing common treatment protocols for PCOS, and the pros and cons of each. We've already discussed insulin-sensitizing medications like metformin, the TZDs, and inositol. Then we discussed glucose-lowering medications for those who have developed overt diabetes. We have also discussed anti-androgenic medications and progesterone supplements for menstrual irregularity. In addition, we did a 3-part series on birth control pills for PCOS. Now it's time to talk about one of the least-discussed symptoms of PCOS, alopecia (commonly known as hair loss). Today we'll discuss what alopecia is, how it's diagnosed, and what might cause it. In the next post, we'll discuss some of the medical treatments available for it. Finally, we'll discuss some of the cosmetic treatments that women with hair loss may utilize, based on suggestions found on hair loss forums and PCOS boards. If you have personal experience or expertise in any of these areas, please share in the comments section. Don't let other women walk this path alone; speak up and share your ideas. You are welcome to do so anonymously if you prefer. All comments should be respectful. Disclaimer: I am not a medical health-care professional. This information is not medical advice about a health condition or treatment. Consult your healthcare provid Continue reading >>

Does Nutrition Affect Hair Loss? Is There A Hormonal Connection?

Does Nutrition Affect Hair Loss? Is There A Hormonal Connection?

I think if you ask 10 different people, you might get 10 different answers. This definitely is a subject of much debate. My opinion is that nutrition certainly does have some effect on hair loss, having said that I don’t think that genetic hair loss can be reversed or stopped simply by nutrition alone, but it makes for a good adjunct. For myself, I’ve attempted to employ strict nutritional perfection for long periods of time in an attempt to help my hair loss, but it never seemed to really help me, but it possibly could help you because we all all made up so differently and the causes of our hair loss are different as well. You should always try to eat as nutritionally balanced as possible, good nutrition provides for a better more stable and clear mind, which is always helpful when dealing with anything traumatic or stressful, such as hair loss. Also, I see food as a drug, it can have immeasurable unpleasant damaging effects on the body or really great wonderful effects. Ever eat something that causes you to be sleepy, wired, cause an allergy attack or become nauseated? Something is taking place in our bodies when we eat different foods, and the effects are going to vary from person to person. I would never downplay the importance of good nutrition, not just for hair loss, but more importantly for your health. Later in this article I’ll point out the connection between the body’s insulin level and it’s testosterone level. It is a well documented fact that many people with eating disorders such as bulima or anorexia nervosa suffer hair loss as a result of malnutrition. The word malnutrition indicates deficiency for energy, protein and micronutrients (e.g. vitamin A, iodine and iron) either singularly or in combination. One of the effects that malnutrition has Continue reading >>

Hair Loss, Hormones And How To Regain Your Luscious Locks

Hair Loss, Hormones And How To Regain Your Luscious Locks

Want to know the optimal lab ranges to keep your locks luscious and hormones in check? Grab my free guide, Optimal Lab Ranges, to see if your numbers measure up. If there’s one thing in the world that a woman takes seriously, it’s her hair. We cut it, we style it, we love it, we loathe it. Let’s be honest – good hair makes us feel confident and sexy. So what’s a girl to do when those lovely locks start shedding? After giving birth, reaching menopause years or experiencing other hormonal imbalances, it’s not uncommon for women to start losing hair. And while hair loss is a normal process (the American Academy of Dermatology estimates the average person sheds about 50-100 hairs a day), it’s also something that can be remedied by addressing underlying health and hormonal problems. 4 Hormone Horrors that Cause Hair Loss If hormones can zap your energy and steal your sex drive, it’s probably no surprise that they can also turn your tresses into a mess. Here are just a few ways that hormonal issues can cause hair loss: 1. Excess Estrogen. Estrogen, the power player in women’s bodies, is your friend when it’s appropriately balanced. It makes you feel energized, helps stabilize your moods and contributes to a healthy sex drive. Yet too much estrogen, which can be caused by weight gain, perimenopause or toxicity from exposure to endocrine disruptors (which are rampant in our food, water and plastic products), can lead to thinning hair. During and after pregnancy, for example, estrogen levels peak and then dip, causing sudden hair loss for many women. 2. Insulin Issues. Insulin, that helper hormone in charge of regulating blood sugar levels, also affects a number of different body processes, including fat storage, heart health and, you guessed it, hair growth. Continue reading >>

The Plan To Reverse Hair Loss

The Plan To Reverse Hair Loss

Having a bad hair day? Our hair is incredibly important to how we feel about ourselves. But did you know that it’s also a reflection of our health? Common imbalances in our body can impact the health of our hair and the amount of hair we have on the top of our head. As a physician, women come to see me every day with the complaint of hair loss. I am glad they do, because there are many medical imbalances and nutritional deficiencies that can cause hair loss. There is a lot you can do through your diet and lifestyle choices that can impact quality and quantity of your hair. The first three things I evaluate when a woman comes to see me with hair loss are their thyroid, iron levels and blood sugar balance. Having any of these areas significantly out of balance can have a tremendous impact on hair growth. One of the first signs of an underactive thyroid is hair loss. The thyroid is the centerpiece of your metabolism, which impacts the turnover of cells in your body. When someone has an underactive thyroid, their metabolism slows down and hair loss speeds up. There are many nutritional changes that a woman can make to support her thyroid and improve her hair. Additionally, your physician may find that if your thyroid is depressed significantly enough, you may also need thyroid medication to support metabolism and hair growth. The second area you may need to address is elevated blood glucose and inflammation in the body. Elevated blood glucose is a sign that a condition known as insulin resistance is present in the body. Insulin resistance is a prediabetic condition that throws all of your hormones in your body out of balance. As a result, people often feel more tired, gain weight around their belly, and the hair on the top of their head becomes thinner. In addition, this Continue reading >>

Diabetes Hair Loss

Diabetes Hair Loss

There is a definite connection between diabetes and hair loss. Some women are not even aware that they have the condition and a loss of hair can be one of the first signs. On this page I'll take a look at the symptoms of diabetes, why it causes hair loss, and what to do if it's affecting you. NOTE: This information is provided for guidance purposes only and should not be seen as medical advice. You should always discuss ANY concerns about your health with a qualified medical professional. Could Your Hair Loss Be a Sign of Diabetes? According to recent statistics, 24% of diabetes cases go undiagnosed. Data from the National Diabetes Statistics Report 2014 shows that there are 29.1 million Americans with diabetes - but only 21 million people are aware of it. There are lots of different reasons that diabetes causes hair loss, which I will cover later in this article. But it's also worth knowing that thinning hair can also indicate two other related conditions - insulin resistance pre-diabetes Insulin resistance is a precursor to pre-diabetes and BOTH conditions are precursors to type 2 diabetes. More About Insulin Resistance and Pre-Diabetes When insulin levels in the body remain sufficiently high over an extended period of time, the body's sensitivity to the hormone begins to decline. This is called insulin resistance. A difficult condition to reverse, insulin resistance causes symptoms that include high blood pressure, lethargy and hunger. It's a 'vicious circle', because the increased insulin levels and weight gain make the insulin resistance even worse. Eventually it can develop into pre-diabetes, which doctors can identify by increased glucose levels in the blood. Research supports the fact that women with insulin resistance are at risk of hair loss - so it's certainl Continue reading >>

Pcos Hair Loss: Top 25 Best Treatments That Work

Pcos Hair Loss: Top 25 Best Treatments That Work

PCOS Hair Loss Causes PCOS hair loss is just one of many symptoms PCOS causes in women, which include irregular or absent menstrual periods, acne, fertility problems, pelvic pain, patchy and discolored skin, and abnormally excessive body and facial hair. Speaking of hair, another problem is that it can cause hair loss in females. This article will discuss 25 ways to prevent hair loss for those with PCOS. But before we get to that, let’s discuss some other details about PCOS. PCOS is associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, sleep apnea, mood disorders, and endometrial cancer. Its onset is generally due to both genetic and environmental factors; one is at higher risk if they are obese, don’t exercise enough, or have a family history of PCOS. While PCOS doesn’t usually cause death, its related conditions can contribute to a fatality. PCOS currently has no bonafide cure. This article describes the natural PCOS hair loss treatments available. It may be crass, or in some social circles, politically incorrect to admit it, but for many people, women included, physical appearance plays a major role in one’s personal and business success. With the societal expectations regarding the appearance of women, this issue is especially compounded when it comes to women, unfair as it may seem. PCOS hair loss can be a very embarrassing side effect of the syndrome, but it doesn’t have to be. One thing that is not debatable is this: a dramatic sudden deterioration in one’s physical looks due to disease has severe implications for the self-esteem and self-concept of those affected. PCOS, or Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, are one of these disorders, as not only does it drive hard-to-control weight gain, acne outbreaks, and cysts that inhibit infertility, but it can al Continue reading >>

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