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Insulin Reaction Is Also Called

Diabetic Insulin Reaction (child)

Diabetic Insulin Reaction (child)

Children with type 1 diabetes often need insulin shots. But, if the insulin level rises too high, it can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). This condition is called a diabetic insulin reaction. A diabetic insulin reaction can occur if too much insulin is given. It may also occur if the child is more active than usual, eats too little, or is ill. An insulin reaction comes on suddenly. Children with mild reactions may be hungry, have a stomachache, or feel nauseated. They may cry for no reason. They may be shaky, sweaty, and pale. The child can also feel weak or tired, anxious, and confused. The child can act giddy or angry. A child can wake up from sleep with symptoms such as crying out or having a nightmare. A severe reaction can cause seizures and coma. Home care To treat an insulin reaction, first test your child's blood sugar, if possible. Then give your child something to eat or drink that contains 15 to 20 grams of fast-acting sugar. This is to raise the blood sugar. Wait 15 minutes after giving fast-acting sugar, then retest the blood sugar level. If the blood sugar level is still low, give your child another serving of fast-acting sugar. Repeat these steps until the child’s glucose level is 70 mg/dl or above. Contact your child's healthcare provider for advice, if needed. When his or her blood sugar returns to normal, your child should eat a small snack if the next meal or diabetic snack is more than 1 hour away. If a child has passed out, you may give a glucagon injection immediately, if you have one. Do a blood sugar test 15 to 20 minutes after the injection. An insulin reaction that is not treated can affect brain development. Fast-acting sugar products contain 15 to 20 grams of glucose or simple sugars. These include: Glucose tablets or gel (see package Continue reading >>

Insulin Reaction (low Blood Sugar)

Insulin Reaction (low Blood Sugar)

You have been treated for an insulin reaction today. This occurs when insulin causes your blood sugar to go too low (hypoglycemia). It may happen if you take too much insulin. It can also occur from taking your usual amount of insulin but not getting enough food. This can be due to vomiting or loss of appetite. Other causes of low blood sugar include heavy exercise, strong emotions, and alcohol use. Your blood sugar level may also be affected by tobacco, caffeine, and certain medicines, including: Aspirin Haloperidol Propoxyphene Chlorpromazine Propranolol Disopyramide ACE inhibitors Fluoroquinolone antibiotics If you suspect that caffeine may be affecting you, switch to caffeine-free drinks. If you smoke, try to quit. Quitting smoking is one of the most important things you can do to protect your health. If you are taking any of the listed medicines, talk to your healthcare provider about switching to another type. A class of medicines called beta-blockers is used for high blood pressure, rapid heart rate, and other conditions. Beta-blockers may prevent the early symptoms of low blood sugar. If you are taking a beta-blocker, you might not realize that your blood sugar level is getting low. If you are taking a beta-blocker, talk to your healthcare provider about switching to a different class. The beta-blocker class includes: Propranolol Atenolol Metoprolol Nadolol Labetalol Carvedilol Home care During the next 24 hours rest and eat frequent small meals. This will help prevent the return of low blood sugar. Learn the signals your body gives as your blood sugar drops (see below). If symptoms of hypoglycemia return Keep a source of fast-acting sugar with you. At the first sign of low blood sugar, eat or drink 15 to 20 grams of fast-acting sugar. Examples include: 3 to 4 g Continue reading >>

Insulin Reaction Glossary Of Terms

Insulin Reaction Glossary Of Terms

Cell: The basic structural and functional unit of any living thing. Each cell is a small c... Cheek: The side of the face, which forms the side wall of the mouth. The cheekbone is part... Coma: A state of deep, unarousable unconsciousness. A coma may occur as a result of head t... Depression: An illness that involves the body, mood, and thoughts and that affects the way... Diabetes: Usually refers to diabetes mellitus or, less often, to diabetes insipidus. Diabe... Diagnosis: 1 The nature of a disease; the identification of an illness. 2 A ... Dizziness: Painless head discomfort with many possible causes including disturbances of ... Endocrine: Pertaining to hormones and the glands that make and secrete them into the blood... Glucose: The simple sugar that is the chief source of energy. Glucose is found in the bloo... Headache: A pain in the head with the pain being above the eyes or the ears, behind the he... Hypoglycemia: Low blood sugar (glucose). Hypoglycemia may be associated with symptoms such... See the entire definition of Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemic: Relating to hypoglycemia, an abnormally low level of the sugar glucose in th... See the entire definition of Hypoglycemic Hypothermia: Abnormally low body temperature. Someone who falls asleep in a cold temperatu... Injury: Harm or hurt. To harm, hurt, or wound. The word injure may be in physical or emot... Insulin: A natural hormone made by the pancreas that controls the level of the sugar gluco... Liver: The largest solid organ in the body, situated in the upper part of the abdomen on t... Low blood sugar: A low blood level of the sugar glucose. Also called hypoglycemia. Lungs: The lungs are a pair of breathing organs located with the chest which remove carbon... Mouth: 1. The upper opening of the digestive tract, Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Insulin-reaction And Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes: Insulin-reaction And Low Blood Sugar

What is low blood sugar? Hypoglycemia is the term used for when you have too little sugar in your blood. Low blood sugar comes on quickly and must be treated right away by your child, family, or friends. If the low blood sugar continues too long, the brain can be harmed. Because the brain grows very rapidly in the first 4 years of life, it is particularly important to prevent severe low blood sugar in young children. Early treatment helps prevent a more severe reaction. It is very important that the family and other people taking care of your child know the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia. Your child has low blood sugar if the result of a blood sugar test is less than 60 mg/dl or 3.3 mmol/L. Symptoms of low blood sugar usually occur when the blood sugar falls below 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/L). What causes low blood sugar? Low blood sugar occurs when the body doesn't have enough sugar to burn for energy and the level of sugar in the blood falls too low. Frequent causes include: missing a snack or meal doing extra exercise that burns more sugar than usual taking too much insulin giving a shot into a muscle resulting in rapid absorption of insulin giving the wrong amount of insulin drinking alcohol taking a bath or shower or soaking in a hot tub soon after taking a shot of insulin (blood vessels in the skin dilate from the hot water and cause insulin to be rapidly absorbed). What are the symptoms? It is important to recognize low blood sugar as early as possible so that it does not progress to a severe reaction. Symptoms of low blood sugar range from mild to severe. Mild reaction hunger at an unusual time or an upset stomach (nausea) shaky feeling sweating more than usual (often a "cold" sweat) irritable mood. Moderate reaction pale or red face weak or anxious feeling headach Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In Children

Hypoglycemia In Children

What is hypoglycemia in children? Hypoglycemia is when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood is too low. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the brain and the body. The normal range of blood glucose is about 70 to 140 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). The amount blood differs based on the most recent meal. Babies and small children with type 1 diabetes will have different goal ranges of blood glucose levels. What causes hypoglycemia in a child? Hypoglycemia can be a condition by itself. Or it can be a complication of diabetes or other disorder. It’s most often a problem in someone with diabetes. It occurs when there’s too much insulin. This is also called an insulin reaction. Causes in children with diabetes may include: Too much insulin or oral diabetes medicine The wrong kind of insulin Incorrect blood-glucose readings A missed meal A delayed meal Not enough food eaten for the amount of insulin taken More exercise than usual Diarrhea or vomiting Injury, illness, infection, or emotional stress Other health problems, such as celiac disease or an adrenal problem Conditions that cause too much insulin in the body (hyperinsulinism) Tumor on the pancreas that makes insulin (insulinoma) Taking diabetes medicine called sulfonylurea Congenital problems with metabolism Rare genetic disorders Hypoglycemia may also occur in these cases: After strenuous exercise During period of time not eating food (fasting) When taking certain medicines After abusing alcohol Which children are at risk for hypoglycemia? The biggest risk factor is having type 1 diabetes. What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia in a child? Symptoms can occur a bit differently in each child. They can include: Shakiness Dizziness Sweating Hunger Headache Irritability Pale skin Sudden moodiness or behavior ch Continue reading >>

Identifying And Treating An Insulin Reaction

Identifying And Treating An Insulin Reaction

Too much insulin can cause your blood sugar levels to drop. Learn how to identify symptoms of hypoglycemia and treat an insulin reaction at the first sign of trouble. Your body needs insulin to keep glucose from building up in your blood and to help convert it to energy instead. Too much insulin, however, can cause your blood sugar level to plummet — a condition called hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. This insulin reaction usually occurs when you inject too large of a dose of insulin. But hypoglycemia can also occur as a result of taking oral diabetes medications that are intended to increase insulin production or with certain combination pills Hypoglycemia can develop quickly. It's usually mild and can be treated by eating or drinking carbohydrate-rich food. But when you have diabetes, your body isn't as able to respond to sudden shifts in blood sugar levels. If not treated quickly, hypoglycemia can become serious. With severe hypoglycemia, you may become dazed and it can put you at an increased risk for accidents and injuries. For example, you could have a seizure or slip into a diabetic coma. In extreme cases, hypoglycemia can be fatal. Identifying an Insulin Reaction The first symptoms of an insulin reaction occur as the body's regulatory system senses an emergency and releases a rush of adrenaline into the bloodstream, says Robert Ratner, MD, chief scientific and medical officer for the American Diabetes Association. "You have a classic adrenaline rush," Dr. Ratner says. "You become sweaty and clammy. Your heart races. You start to tremble. Those are the classic signs of hypoglycemia." You might also feel nervous, anxious, or irritable. The next wave of symptoms occurs as the insulin reaction reaches the brain. "The brain requires glucose to function. When gluco Continue reading >>

Learning About The Insulin Response

Learning About The Insulin Response

All most people know about insulin is that it has something to do with sugar and diabetes. Insulin is amazing and complicated, and I wanted to learn more about how it works. Human insulin is a hormone composed of 51 amino acids. (How does God think of this stuff?) All animals make insulin, and these insulins are pretty similar. Thirty years ago, most insulin given to people came from pigs and cows. According to Wikipedia, even insulin from some species of fish can be clinically effective in humans. What Does Insulin Do? You probably know that insulin gets glucose into muscle (and several other types of) cells. It does that by coordinating at least four proteins that make a bridge for glucose to cross the cell membrane. This coordination is sometimes called “insulin signaling,” and when the other proteins don’t cooperate, that is called “insulin resistance.” Insulin has more responsibilities. It helps move glucose into the liver for storage as a starch called glycogen. It brings glucose to fat cells to make new fat. It helps get amino acids into cells to create new proteins, and encourages DNA to replicate, so cells can reproduce. Insulin also stops a lot of processes. It stops the liver from releasing glycogen back into the blood as glucose. It stops fat cells from releasing fatty acids for use as fuel. Because it helps build up fats and proteins, and keeps them from breaking down, insulin is called an “anabolic” (body-building) hormone. There’s more to insulin’s work. It regulates body temperature, raising it after meals. It works in the brain to enhance learning and memory. Some people think that too-low levels of brain insulin are a main cause of Alzheimer disease. Insulin also relaxes arteries, allowing more blood to flow through. How is Insulin Ma Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To Insulin Reaction

Must Read Articles Related To Insulin Reaction

A A A Insulin Reaction An insulin reaction occurs when a person with diabetes becomes confused or even unconscious because of hypoglycemia (hypo=low + glycol = sugar + emia = in the blood) caused by insulin or oral diabetic medications. (Please note that for this article blood sugar and blood glucose mean the same thing and the terms may be used interchangeably.) The terms insulin reaction, insulin shock, and hypoglycemia (when associated with a person with diabetes) are often used interchangeably. In normal physiology, the body is able to balance the glucose (sugar levels) in the bloodstream. When a person eats, and glucose levels start to rise, the body signals the pancreas to secrete insulin. Insulin "unlocks the door" to cells in the body so that the glucose can be used for energy. When blood sugar levels drop, insulin production decreases and the liver begins producing glucose. In people with diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin to meet the body's demand. Treatment may include medications taken by mouth (oral hypoglycemics), insulin, or both. The balance of food intake and medication is not automatic, and a person with diabetes needs to be aware that too much medication or too little food may cause blood sugar levels to drop. Interestingly, brain cells do not need insulin to access the glucose in the blood stream. Brain cells also cannot store excess glucose, so when blood sugar levels drop, brain function is one of the first parts of the body to become affected. In an insulin reaction, the blood sugar levels are usually below 50 mg/dL (or 2.78 mmol/L in SI units). Continue Reading A A A Insulin Reaction (cont.) Insulin reactions occur when there is an imbalance of food intake and the amount of insulin in the body. The oral hypoglycemic mediat Continue reading >>

Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance

Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance

What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas, an organ located behind the stomach. The pancreas contains clusters of cells called islets. Beta cells within the islets make insulin and release it into the blood. Insulin plays a major role in metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for energy. The digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates—sugars and starches found in many foods—into glucose. Glucose is a form of sugar that enters the bloodstream. With the help of insulin, cells throughout the body absorb glucose and use it for energy. Insulin's Role in Blood Glucose Control When blood glucose levels rise after a meal, the pancreas releases insulin into the blood. Insulin and glucose then travel in the blood to cells throughout the body. Insulin helps muscle, fat, and liver cells absorb glucose from the bloodstream, lowering blood glucose levels. Insulin stimulates the liver and muscle tissue to store excess glucose. The stored form of glucose is called glycogen. Insulin also lowers blood glucose levels by reducing glucose production in the liver. In a healthy person, these functions allow blood glucose and insulin levels to remain in the normal range. What happens with insulin resistance? In insulin resistance, muscle, fat, and liver cells do not respond properly to insulin and thus cannot easily absorb glucose from the bloodstream. As a result, the body needs higher levels of insulin to help glucose enter cells. The beta cells in the pancreas try to keep up with this increased demand for insulin by producing more. As long as the beta cells are able to produce enough insulin to overcome the insulin resistance, blood glucose levels stay in the healthy range. Over time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes and prediabetes because the bet Continue reading >>

Insulin Reaction

Insulin Reaction

Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia. insulin reaction or insulin shock Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014 Noun 1. insulin reaction - hypoglycemia produced by excessive insulin in the system causing comainsulin shockshock - (pathology) bodily collapse or near collapse caused by inadequate oxygen delivery to the cells; characterized by reduced cardiac output and rapid heartbeat and circulatory insufficiency and pallor; "loss of blood is an important cause of shock"hypoglycaemia, hypoglycemia - abnormally low blood sugar usually resulting from excessive insulin or a poor diet Continue reading >>

Insulin Shock: Warning Signs And Treatment Options

Insulin Shock: Warning Signs And Treatment Options

What is insulin shock? After taking an insulin shot, a person with diabetes might on occasion forget to eat (or eat less than they normally do). If this happens, they may end up with too much insulin in their blood. This, in turn, can lead to hypoglycemia, also called low blood sugar. A serious condition called insulin shock may occur if a person: ignores mild hypoglycemia takes too much insulin by mistake misses a meal completely does excessive unusual exercise without changing their carbohydrate intake Insulin shock is a diabetic emergency. It involves symptoms that, if left untreated, can lead to diabetic coma, brain damage, and even death. How insulin works When we consume food or beverages that contain carbohydrates, the body converts them into glucose. Glucose is a type of sugar that fuels the body, giving it the energy it needs to perform everyday functions. Insulin is a hormone that works like a key. It opens the door in the body’s cells so they can absorb glucose and use it as fuel. People with diabetes may lack enough insulin or have cells that aren’t able to use insulin as they should. If the cells of the body aren’t able to absorb the glucose properly, it causes excess glucose in blood. This is called high blood glucose, which is linked with a number of health issues. High blood glucose can cause eye and foot problems, heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, and nerve damage. Insulin shots help people with diabetes use glucose more efficiently. Taking an insulin shot before eating helps the body absorb and use glucose from the food. The result is a more balanced and healthy blood sugar level. Usually, it works great. Sometimes, however, things go wrong. What causes insulin shock? Having too much insulin in your blood can lead to having too little gluco Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Severe hypoglycemia, or diabetic shock, is a serious health risk for anyone with diabetes. Also called insulin reaction, as a consequence of too much insulin, it can occur anytime there is an imbalance between the insulin in your system, the amount of food you eat, or your level of physical activity. It can even happen while you are doing all you think you can do to manage your diabetes. The symptoms of diabetic shock may seem mild at first. But they should not be ignored. If it isn't treated quickly, hypoglycemia can become a very serious condition that causes you to faint, requiring immediate medical attention. Diabetic shock can also lead to a coma and death. It's important that not only you, but your family and others around you, learn to recognize the signs of hypoglycemia and know what to do about them. It could save your life. Hypoglycemia is a low level of blood sugar. The cells in your body use sugar from carbohydrates for energy. Insulin, which normally is made in the pancreas, is necessary for sugar to enter the cells. It helps keep the levels of sugar in the blood from getting too high. It's important to maintain the proper level of sugar in your blood. Levels that are too high can cause severe dehydration, which can be life threatening. Over time, excess sugar in the body does serious damage to organs such as your heart, eyes, and nervous system. Ordinarily, the production of insulin is regulated inside your body so that you naturally have the amount of insulin you need to help control the level of sugar. But if your body doesn't make its own insulin or if it can't effectively use the insulin it does produce, you need to inject insulin as a medicine or take another medication that will increase the amount of insulin your body does make. So if you need to me Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia: Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia: Low Blood Sugar

Photo: portrait. Caption: Ed Bryant Diabetes mellitus, by definition, is inability to properly process blood glucose. The untreated, out of control diabetic has abnormally high blood sugars, and the diabetic who wishes to keep his or her blood sugars down in the normal range uses diet, exercise, oral medications, and/or insulin to get them there. For whatever reason, sometimes the sugars dip too low, and hypoglycemia results. A "hypoglycemic reaction," also called an insulin reaction, insulin shock, or low blood sugar reaction, occurs when blood glucose drops to a point where the individual becomes confused and disoriented. At what point a person is "low" varies; some health professionals say any blood sugar level below 70mg/dL is hypoglycemic, while others put the "trigger point" at 60mg/dL. Individuals vary, and hypoglycemia can affect both insulin dependent and non insulin dependent diabetics, though type 1s are more at risk. Safety is paramount. Talk to your doctor about where your sugars should be running, to keep you safe. Prevention is the best treatment for low blood sugar reactions! Though the personal "threshold" varies, and some folks can function with their blood glucose down at levels that would leave others disoriented or unconscious, if your sugars stay up in the 70 to 110mg/dL range, a hypoglycemic reaction won't happen. Although exactly what is "normal" for a diabetic in good control varies between individuals, the point is to provide yourself a healthy range, while ensuring a margin of safety against "hypos." "Tight control" means doing the best possible job of keeping your blood sugar fluctuations under control it doesn't mean continuously staying below normal range. Don't just wait for symptoms of a "low" to clue you in all that shakiness, sweatiness Continue reading >>

Is An

Is An "insulin Reaction" The Same As Hypoglycemia?

People who take insulin for their diabetes often experience mild hypoglycemia when they take too much insulin relative to their food intake. As a result, the hypoglycemia that results from taking too much insulin is often called an insulin reaction. These reactions are more likely when people with diabetes are monitoring their blood sugar closely. Continue reading >>

What Is Low Blood Sugar?

What Is Low Blood Sugar?

Blood sugar is considered to be too low if it is lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 4 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). If low blood sugar is not treated right away, you could pass out, have a seizure, go into a coma, or even die. When you have diabetes, it’s important to watch your blood sugar level closely. This is especially important if you are newly diagnosed and are learning how to regulate your medicine (if any), diet, and exercise. Regular testing of your blood sugar, as recommended by your healthcare provider, may allow you to detect and treat low blood sugar before it causes serious symptoms. You may be able to prevent ever having low blood sugar. The medical term for low blood sugar is hypoglycemia. If you are taking insulin, very low blood sugar is sometimes called an insulin reaction or insulin shock. What is the cause? Low blood sugar is usually a side effect of diabetes treatment. It can also result from medicines or other conditions or diseases. When you have diabetes, low blood sugar can be caused by too much insulin or other diabetes medicine. If you are using insulin, it may happen because: You have accidentally used too much or the wrong type of insulin. Your insulin is no longer good because it has expired or was not stored properly. You have an insulin pump that is not working properly. Some other things that can cause abnormally low blood sugar when you have diabetes are: Exercising more than usual Skipping or delaying meals or snacks Having a meal or snack that is too small Dieting to lose weight Not taking diabetes medicines at the right time Side effects of other medicines Drinking alcohol Diarrhea or vomiting Low blood sugar from these other causes is usually not as low and not as dangerous as low blood sugar caused by too much Continue reading >>

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