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Insulin Pump Type 2

Why One Woman With Type 2 Diabetes Uses An Insulin Pump

Why One Woman With Type 2 Diabetes Uses An Insulin Pump

Pumps finely tune insulin to your body's needs, but can require a lot of tinkering.(ISTOCKPHOTO)Insulin pumps are used most often by people with type 1 diabetes, due to their more complicated insulin injection regimen. Only 5% of the more than 5,000 individuals who are members of insulin-pumpers.org, an online community for people interested in insulin-pump therapy, have type 2. So is the pump a good option for type 2 patients? Yes, if they require multiple daily insulin injections and don't mind programming and wearing the pump every day. 'I wanted my freedom' Jan Chait, a 59-year-old freelance writer in Terre Haute, Ind., used to take NPH (an intermediate-acting insulin) and regular insulin, but all the clock-watching was a drag. "I just wanted my freedom," she says. That's why nine years ago she switched to an insulin pump. She is one of a relatively small percentage of people with type 2 diabetes who use this insulin-delivery device. Chait finds the pump easy to use. "I was familiar with them because I had several friends who had pumps, and they always talked about how wonderful it was, the flexibility, I mean the ultimate flexibility. It's almost like not having diabetes anymore," she says. "Not quite, but almost, because you can set the basal rates to your body's natural cycles." For example, some people require less insulin at night; Chait, though, needs more. More about using insulin Consider the pros and cons Still, there are many pros and cons to consider. Advantages include eliminating many individual injections, improving hemoglobin A1C, and delivering insulin more accurately. On the other hand, some people may find it bothersome to be attached to a machine most of the time. And you may need quite a bit of training before you're ready to fly solo. In additio Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps For Type 2 Diabetes: Are You A Candidate?

Insulin Pumps For Type 2 Diabetes: Are You A Candidate?

Have you ever been told: “Sorry but you are not a candidate for an insulin pump”? If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and take long-acting insulin, like Lantus, to cover your basal insulin needs and rapid-acting insulin, like Novolog, to bolus for food and high blood glucose readings, there are very few reasons you are not a candidate for an insulin pump. Today, even people who only take long-acting insulin or mixed insulin like 70-30 may be pump candidates. Many healthcare providers who say you are not a candidate don’t know very much about how insulin pumps work or how to set pump parameters. Understanding how an insulin pump works may help you make an informed choice between insulin injections and pump therapy. The insulin pump can be best understood by looking at how the pancreas of a person without diabetes delivers insulin. For this discussion it is important to understand the difference between insulin delivered by the pancreas and insulin taken to manage diabetes. Exogenous insulin: insulin delivered by the pancreas Endogenous insulin: insulin delivered outside the body (e.g. injections, pump IV) In a person without diabetes, the body regulates the rise and fall of blood glucose in response to metabolic functions like eating, sleeping, stress, illness, etc. The goal all exogenous insulin delivery is to closely simulate this process. There are two main components to exogenous delivering insulin.1 Basal insulin: a background amount of insulin to regulate metabolic functions Bolus insulin: a specific delivery of insulin for food or to lower high blood glucose With insulin injections, long-acting insulin like Lantus is injected once or twice a day to cover the body’s basal insulin needs. In some people with diabetes, this type of basal insulin delivery wor Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Use In Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Pump Use In Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Introduction People with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) often require insulin therapy, especially as beta-cell function declines with the progression of the disease. The current American Diabetes Association (ADA)/European Society for the Study of Diabetes consensus treatment algorithm1 for T2DM includes basal insulin therapy at Step 2 (Tier 1) and intensive insulin at Step 3 (Tiers 1 and 2). Given the increasing amounts of insulin required by people with T2DM and the failure of any single insulin regimen to obtain glycemic control over the long term,2 continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) or insulin pump therapy has been explored as an alternative to conventional or intensive insulin therapy using one or more daily injections. In addition, over one-third of people with T2DM on multiple daily injections (MDI) still do not achieve the ADA hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) goal of <7%.2 The advantage of CSII is the ability to infuse precise amounts of insulin at a continuous basal rate to control glucose when not eating and prandial and correction boluses to cover food intake and out of range glucose values, respectively. When used appropriately, CSII can closely mimic the insulin provided by a normally functioning pancreas.3 There are challenges to widespread adoption of CSII among people with T2DM (Table 1). Most people with T2DM are cared for by primary care healthcare providers who have minimal knowledge and exposure to CSII; most people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) are cared by specialists in diabetes and endocrinology who have significant training and exposure to CSII. In addition, CSII technology may be complex and may be difficult for people with T2DM, who usually receive their diabetes diagnosis at a later stage in life than people with T1DM. Peopl Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Pump Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes

The Simple Truth About Insulin Pump Therapy You have type 2 diabetes, but diabetes shouldn’t rule your life. You want to manage your sugar levels well, but with shots, you must deal with frequent challenges to keep your sugar levels under control. You wish there was an easier way to manage insulin dosing without compromising your health. You’re not alone. MiniMed insulin pump therapy helps you achieve better control by providing convenient insulin delivery that’s easy for you to manage. Only MiniMed insulin pump therapy is clinically proven to reduce A1C better than multiple daily shots for people with type 2 diabetes.4 Studies have shown that A1C reduction can significantly reduce the occurrence of long-term complications.5, 6 With MiniMed insulin pump therapy, you can worry less about your risk for long-term complications, such as: You are a candidate for MiniMed insulin pump therapy if: You are taking three or more insulin injections per day. You may be taking additional medications for your diabetes management, beyond just insulin. Your healthcare provider informed you that your A1C is elevated and your diabetes is not well controlled. You find it challenging to follow your prescribed insulin regimen for diabetes management. What is a pump and how does it work? The MiniMed insulin pump is an external device about the size of a cell phone that you can easily carry on a belt, place inside a pocket or wear under your clothes. The pump contains insulin and delivers it in a continuous and precise flow through a thin, flexible tube called an infusion set. The end of this tube sits comfortably under the skin and is replaced every two to three days. Basal rate You can program your insulin pump to continuously deliver tiny and precise amounts of insulin 24 hours a day. Continue reading >>

In The Works: More Type 2 Insulin Pumps

In The Works: More Type 2 Insulin Pumps

It's no secret that type 2 diabetes is the biggest market for companies creating new D-devices. But until recently, insulin pump manufacturers have focused almost solely on the type 1 population since we're the ones whose lives depend on taking insulin regularly, and many T2s who could benefit from insulin have nonetheless done their best to steer clear of it. We actually know plenty of T2s who use traditional pumps or patch pumps already, but those devices aren't tailored specifically for the type 2 population. Right now, the only T2-focused pump available is the V-Go made by New Jersey-based Valeritas. We told you about this rectangle-shaped patch pump before, as it's been on the market for almost two years now for those type 2s who want to replace daily injections with a once-a-day disposable pump that can give set boluses of 20-40 unit increments. It seems Valeritas is ahead of the innovation curve, as we're currently detecting an explosion of new interest in creating insulin pumps aimed at those living with T2 diabetes. We know of four other insulin pump companies turning their attention to this contingent of the Diabetes Community, and within the next couple of years there are likely to be many more options on the table. JewelPUMP 2 This week marks the 7th Advanced Technologies and Treatments for Diabetes (ATTD) conference that runs from Wednesday through Friday, this year in Vienna, Austria. At that conference, a new patch pump for type 2s is being unveiled. Yes, we're talking about a new version of the cool-looking JewelPUMP first introduced a few years ago. Switzerland-based Debiotech hasn't brought its full-featured JewelPUMP aimed at type 1s to market yet in either Europe or the States, but the company hopes that will happen later this year. Before that initi Continue reading >>

Misconceptions About Insulin Pump Therapy And Type 2 Diabetes

Misconceptions About Insulin Pump Therapy And Type 2 Diabetes

Many people think that if you live with type 2 diabetes and use insulin pump therapy, it means you’ve failed in managing your diabetes. Unfortunately, it’s a misconception that Medtronic Diabetes Clinical Manager, Beth Spencer Kline, MSN, RN, NP-C, CDE, hears too often from patients. Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease, and exercise and eating right is always important, but over time, patients may need to change their insulin regimen to make sure their blood glucose is in a healthy range. Being passionate about type 2 diabetes weight management, co-morbid diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, Beth is here today to address common misconceptions many people have about type 2 diabetes and insulin pump therapy. Umbrellas Don’t Cause Rain: Lessons Learned as a New Healthcare Professional Despite studying how to manage disease in school, most of the learning is on the job. We walk into new jobs, ready to save the world one patient at a time, thinking we have all of the answers, and it’s easy to prescribe medication and make everything better. It doesn’t take long to realize medicine doesn’t work like that. It’s as much of an art as a science. Many seasoned healthcare professionals who work with patients who have diabetes would probably tell you they’ve learned the most about diabetes from their patients. Two of the most important things I’ve learned working with people with diabetes in the last 10 years is diabetes is a disease everyone seems to have an opinion about, and has a lot of misplaced judgment and surrounding myths. I’ll never forget, when I was a new nurse practitioner, I had a patient with type 2 diabetes who was afraid to start insulin due to his misguided fear that taking insulin would cause blindness and the need for dialysis. We had a Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump For Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Pump For Type 2 Diabetes

Use and misuse of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in type 2 diabetes 1Endocrinology and Diabetes Department, CHU Cte de Nacre, Caen Cedex, France 2Division of Internal Medicine, Institute of Endocrinology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel Corresponding author: Yves Reznik, [email protected] . Author information Copyright and License information Copyright 2013 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Progressive hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes results from a progressive -cell failure together with a state of insulin resistance ( 1 ). Insulin deficiency worsens with the natural progression of type 2 diabetes, explaining the escape from oral antihyperglycemic agents and the need for exogenous insulin therapy ( 2 ). The use of external pumps in patients with type 2 diabetes is a recent practice compared with that in type 1 diabetes, and its use is still debated. In only a few countries, such as in France and Israel, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) using an external pump is an alternative in type 2 diabetes that the health authorities have allowed for reimbursement. The rationale for using pump therapy was first suggested by its use in case reports of type 2 diabetes with extreme insulin resistance and poor glycemic control ( 3 6 ). In such patients, insulin was administered transiently by intravenous insulin infusion allowing lower mean glucose level despite a 40% reduction of insulin requirements. The sequential use of 4-week intravenous insulin infusion followed by 1-year CSII in a group of patients with type 2 diabetes pa Continue reading >>

Type 2 Pump Rx

Type 2 Pump Rx

Insulin pump therapy can improve your blood sugar control. Insulin pumps more closely mimic what your body does naturally, so you can enjoy a more flexible lifestyle. Insulin pump therapy is increasingly popular. Because insulin pumps more closely mimic what your body does naturally, you can improve your blood sugar control. With that control comes a more flexible lifestyle. Remember, though, that the pumps still require a lot of input from users. If you are wondering whether you should use a pump or are already on a pump, this section explains: Advanced programming features: How to get the most out of the pump and use all the options Infusion sets: All about the different sets and how to place them Ketones and insulin pumps: Why to watch for ketones and what to do if you have them Travel: Special considerations when using a pump while traveling Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in this website. To find out how much you have learned about Insulin Pumps, take our self assessment quiz when you have completed this section. The quiz is multiple choice. Please choose the single best answer to each question. At the end of the quiz, your score will display. If your score is over 70% correct, you are doing very well. If your score is less than 70%, you can return to this section and review the information. Continue reading >>

The Role Of Insulin Pump Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

The Role Of Insulin Pump Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

1. Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2017 Jan;33(1). doi: 10.1002/dmrr.2822. Epub 2016 Jun 21. The role of insulin pump therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Landau Z(1)(2), Raz I(3), Wainstein J(2)(4), Bar-Dayan Y(2)(4), Cahn A(3). (1)Pediatric Endocrine and Diabetes Unit, E. Wolfson Medical Center, Holon, Israel. (2)Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. (3)Diabetes Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. (4)Diabetes Unit, Wolfson Medical Center, Holon, Israel. Many patients with type 2 diabetes fail to achieve adequate glucose controldespite escalation of treatment and combinations of multiple therapies including insulin. Patients with long-standing type 2 diabetes often suffer from thecombination of severe insulin deficiency in addition to insulin resistance,thereby requiring high doses of insulin delivered in multiple injections toattain adequate glycemic control. Insulin-pump therapy was first introduced inthe 1970s as an approach to mimic physiological insulin delivery and attainnormal glucose in patients with type 1 diabetes. The recent years have seen anincrease in the use of this technology for patients with type 2 diabetes. Thisarticle summarizes the clinical studies evaluating insulin pump use in patientswith type 2 diabetes and discusses the benefits and shortcomings of pump therapy in this population. Copyright 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Copyright 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps 'more Effective Than Injections' For Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Pumps 'more Effective Than Injections' For Type 2 Diabetes

For patients with type 2 diabetes, managing the condition can involve multiple daily injections of insulin. But a new study published in The Lancet suggests that insulin pumps may be more effective for controlling blood sugar levels. This is not the first time a study has protested the benefits of insulin pumps. Last year, Medical News Today reported on a study suggesting that insulin pumps are better than insulin injections for type 1 diabetes. But the team involved in this latest study, led by Prof. Yves Reznik of the University of Caen Côte de Nacre Regional Hospital Center in France, claims theirs is the largest study to date that explores the effectiveness of insulin pumps for type 2 diabetes - the type that accounts for 90-95% of all diabetes cases. Type 2 diabetes is a condition whereby the body is unable to produce or use the hormone insulin effectively, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Over time, high blood sugar levels can cause nerve damage, stroke, and kidney, eye or heart diseases. In some cases, the condition can be managed through diet or blood sugar-lowering medication, such as metformin. But in many cases, a patient may require multiple daily doses of insulin delivered by injection into the abdomen, upper arms, thighs or buttocks. However, Prof. Reznik and colleagues note that around a third of patients that manage their condition with insulin injections have problems achieving the optimal level of blood sugar. With this in mind, the team decided to compare the effectiveness of insulin injections against insulin pumps - small portable, computerized devices that deliver continuous doses of insulin through a catheter places under the skin. Findings 'suggest insulin pumps are a valuable treatment option for type 2 diabetes' For their study, the resea Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everyone needs insulin to live. Insulin is a hormone that helps our bodies use and store the food we eat. People with Type 1 Diabetes no longer make insulin and have to give insulin in order to sustain life. People with Type 2 Diabetes don’t use their own insulin well, and over time can have trouble making enough. So, all people with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes need insulin. When people give insulin injections, they may take 1-2 injections of a long acting insulin every day and 3+ injections of rapid acting insulin for meals and snacks. The typical person with Type 1 Diabetes could take anywhere from 4-7+ injections a day. Many people currently give insulin through an insulin pen or a syringe. But, there is another option, an insulin pump. An insulin pump delivers rapid acting insulin in two ways. First, the pump is programmed to give you insulin every hour throughout the hour referred to basal insulin. Basal, think “base,” is the insulin your body needs even in the absence of food, it is also referred to as background insulin. This basal rate replaces the long acting injection that you take. Second, is bolus, this is the insulin you take for food or to correct a high blood sugar. If you get basal and bolus confused, think “bowl”, as in you eat out of a bowl, to help you remember bolus is for food. Once you are on a pump, all insulin is delivered through the pump and shots are no longer necessary. Components There are a few things necessary to make a pump work. When a pump is shipped to someone: they will also need to send infusion sets, reservoirs, and possibly batteries, depending on your pump. Let’s talk about each component. Infusion Sets An infusion set is the part that is actually inserted into the body and has tubing that conn Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Overview

Insulin Pump Overview

As people with diabetes know, keeping blood sugar levels in a safe range is extremely important. Good blood sugar control not only makes you feel well, but also helps prevent long-term diabetes complications, such as blindness, kidney failure and heart disease. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin, a hormone that helps the body use sugar (glucose), a key source of energy that comes from carbohydrates. If you have type 1 diabetes you must make up for the lack of insulin with insulin therapy. Meanwhile, people with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but their bodies don’t use insulin properly, or they don’t produce enough insulin. Diet, exercise and medication can often work to control glucose levels. However, in certain cases, these measures aren’t enough, and insulin therapy is needed to better control blood sugar levels. While insulin can be given by self-injection, people who take multiple daily injections of insulinmay also consider using an insulin pump. An insulin pump provides continuous delivery of short acting insulin all day long. The insulin pump substitutes the need for long acting insulin. A pump also replaces the need for multiple daily injections with a continuous insulin infusion, and also helps to improve your blood sugar levels. How Do Insulin Pumps Work? Insulin pumps are small, computerized devices that mimic the way the human pancreas works by delivering small doses of short acting insulin continuously (basal rate). The device also is used to deliver variable amounts of insulin when a meal is eaten (bolus). The basal insulin rates are usually set up in your pump with your doctor, and you can have one or multiple basal settings programmed in your pump, based on your needs. You program the amount of insulin for your mealtime bolus di Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy Had Durable Effect In Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Pump Therapy Had Durable Effect In Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Pump Therapy Had Durable Effect in Type 2 Diabetes Insulin Pump Therapy Had Durable Effect in Type 2 Diabetes Insulin pump therapy had a sustained effect in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes. (HealthDay News) Insulin pump therapy is more effective than multiple daily injections for glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism. Ronnie Aronson, MD, from LMC Diabetes & Endocrinology in Toronto, and colleagues compared insulin pump therapy and multiple daily injections in 331 patients with type 2 diabetes . Participants with glycated hemoglobin of 8.0% or greater and 12% or lower were randomly allocated to pump therapy or continued multiple daily injections in a 6-month randomization phase. During a 6-month continuation phase, the multiple daily injections group was switched to pump therapy. The researchers found that the reduction in glycated hemoglobin was significantly greater with pump therapy vs multiple daily injections at the end of the randomization phase (1.1% vs 0.4%; P<.001). This improvement was maintained to 12 months. A 0.8% reduction in glycated hemoglobin was seen for the multiple daily injections patients who switched to pump therapy; the final glycated hemoglobin was identical between the groups. The total daily insulin dose was 20.4% lower with pump therapy than multiple daily injections in the randomization phase, and persisted in the continuation phase. There was a 19% decline in total daily insulin dose in the multiple daily injections group, so that by 12 months the total daily dose was the same in both groups. "Patients with refractory hyperglycemia on a current basal-prandial injection regimen should be considered appropriate candidates for pump therapy, and m Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump For Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Pump For Type 2 Diabetes

Progressive hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes results from a progressive β-cell failure together with a state of insulin resistance (1). Insulin deficiency worsens with the natural progression of type 2 diabetes, explaining the escape from oral antihyperglycemic agents and the need for exogenous insulin therapy (2). The use of external pumps in patients with type 2 diabetes is a recent practice compared with that in type 1 diabetes, and its use is still debated. In only a few countries, such as in France and Israel, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) using an external pump is an alternative in type 2 diabetes that the health authorities have allowed for reimbursement. The rationale for using pump therapy was first suggested by its use in case reports of type 2 diabetes with extreme insulin resistance and poor glycemic control (3–6). In such patients, insulin was administered transiently by intravenous insulin infusion allowing lower mean glucose level despite a 40% reduction of insulin requirements. The sequential use of 4-week intravenous insulin infusion followed by 1-year CSII in a group of patients with type 2 diabetes patients poorly controlled despite very high insulin requirements allowed a dramatic reduction of HbA1c (−3%, −9 mmol/mol), while insulin requirements were reduced by one-third. Such beneficial effects of CSII were attributed to increased insulin sensitivity assessed by the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp study (7). These observations raised the question as to whether insulin continuous administration by a pump device gives an advantage compared with the conventional approach of insulin intensification by multiple daily injections (MDIs). The evidence base is still under debate and will be discussed in this review. Is CSII effecti Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And The Insulin Pump

Type 2 Diabetes And The Insulin Pump

If you have type 2 diabetes and take multiple insulin shots, you may want to ask your doctor about the insulin pump. Insulin pumps are small, computerized devices (about the size of a small cell phone) that allow for a continuous flow of a rapid-acting insulin to be released into your body. The pumps have a small, flexible tube (called a catheter) with a fine needle on the end, which is inserted under the skin of your abdomen and taped in place. The devices can be worn on a belt or placed in a pocket. The insulin pump is designed to deliver a continuous amount of insulin, 24 hours a day according to a programmed plan unique to each pump wearer. The user can change the amount of insulin delivered. Between meals and overnights, a small amount of insulin is constantly delivered to keep the blood sugar in the target range. This is called the basal rate. When food is eaten, a bolus dose of insulin can be programmed into the pump. You can measure how much of a bolus you need using calculations based on the grams of carbohydrates consumed. When using an insulin pump, you must monitor your blood glucose level at least four times a day. You set the doses of your insulin and make adjustments to the dose depending on your food intake and exercise program. Some health care providers prefer the insulin pump for diabetes because its slow release of insulin mimics how a normally working pancreas would release insulin. One large study concluded the insulin pump is a safe and valuable treatment option for those with poorly controlled blood sugar. Another advantage of the insulin pump is that it frees you from having to measure insulin into a syringe. Continue reading >>

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