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Insulin Pump Tips And Tricks

Tips And Tricks For Getting The Most Out Of Your Insulin Pump Infusion Sets

Tips And Tricks For Getting The Most Out Of Your Insulin Pump Infusion Sets

Information & Education About Diabetes & Related Subjects Home Tips and Tricks For Getting The Most Out Of Your Insulin Pump Infusion Sets Tips and Tricks For Getting The Most Out Of Your Insulin Pump Infusion Sets To prevent mishaps with your infusion set, here are some proven techniques that will definitely help you. With more effective skin prep and improved equipment handling, following these dos and donts can help you avoid problems. A good list for making infusion sets stick better, usually starts with the proper skin care. Here are 5 tips for making infusion sets work better for you. When prepping your skin, always go for maximum adhesion. Cleaning your skin properly is the foundation you need for a secure hold. Use an alcohol pad or IV prep wipe. Dont use soaps that leave behind oily residues, which can weaken adhesion. Use an antiperspirant to prevent wetness under the infusion set. Wait ten minutes after spraying on the antiperspirant to let the area dry, and then insert the set. Be sure to use actual antiperspirant, not deodorant, as deodorant contains chemicals to mask scent, which are not needed here, and may irritate your skin. Avoid gels or creams spray antiperspirant is your best bet when you prep. 3. Experiment with various tapes, such as Hypafix or Transpore, and make notes of which brand works best for you. Decide which one works best at work or during sports and use accordingly. Another recommended trick is aimed at preventing tubing from getting caught or disconnected: use a safety loop. That way when it gets caught, you have an extra inch or two as a safety measure before the set is yanked out. Other techniques include studying how and where you insert and recording your results. If your set is getting tangled up or knocked away, you may want to m Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Tips And Tricks - Insulin & Pumps - Diabetes | Healthcentral

Insulin Pump Tips And Tricks - Insulin & Pumps - Diabetes | Healthcentral

This month will mark my two year anniversary of pumping insulin . Living with this little object all day, everyday has been a unique, intimate experience thats yielded a high degree of familiarity and understanding in a relatively short amount of time. In honor of the pump and my anniversary, Id like to share some of my insights, tips, and one handy little hack that make insulin pumping easier and more efficient. The first tip has to do with changing pump sites and insulin reservoirs. During my pregnancy, my doctor asked me about my habits for changing my pump sets. I commented that often my site would still be working well while the reservoir would need to be replaced. Thus, it was rare that I actually changed the entire set: site, reservoir, and tubing at the same time. After some discussion, we concluded that this practice actually allowed for more accurate information regarding whether a new site was working well or not. For example, if you change the entire site all at once, and then experience high blood sugars afterwards, you dont know whether its the site, the reservoir/tubing set, or the insulin thats not working properly. By changing just one component at a time, Im able to zero in on the problem if one should arise. By replacing my site independently from my reservoir and tubing changes, I have noticed that my blood sugars trend higher during the first 3-4 hours after a site change. My assumption is that it takes awhile for the site to settle in just like when a continuous glucose monitor sensor needs several hours to start transmitting accurate blood sugars. I can compensate for this period of less efficient insulin delivery by either eating less carbohydrates, bolusing additional insulin, or allowing for a longer lag time between my insulin delivery and fo Continue reading >>

Help Wanted: Bolus Tips And Tricks

Help Wanted: Bolus Tips And Tricks

I am looking for your fantastic advice for some trouble Ive been having with moderate carb + higher fat meals. My CDEs standard answer for a meal like this is to do a 50/50 combo bolus over 2 hours. Been there, done that. Ive tried a 40/60 split, a 35/65 split, a 60/40 split, whatever, and tried it over 3-4 hours instead of 2. And I dont feel like I can get anywhere. Occasionally, Ill run a temp basal for 2-4 hours after eating and that will sometimes help, but I usually cant avoid a spike no matter what. The usual scenario is this: I will run relatively flat for the first two hours, then will slowly rise, and sometimes rise very quickly (per my cgm) after that. Then the highs cling like an anxiety-ridden toddler to its mother. For hours and hours. I have recently done repeated basal testing, so its not that. I suppose my I:C ratios could be off a bit, but when I eat a meal without a lot of added fat, I dont seem to have the problem. For example: A couple of weeks ago, I had a ham and cheese sandwich for dinner. A 28 g carb roll, 2 thin slices of deli ham, and 2 thin slices of deli cheese. I went to bed at 155 with a correction on board, and must have slept through my cgm alarms, because I zipped right back up after that and was in the 200s all night. I think I took 5 corrections overnight and still wasnt coming down. This will happen anytime I have anything with a moderate/high amount of fat. At this point I am desperate. My CDEs answer was that there must have been another variable, you wouldnt have remained high all night from a sandwich. Except that it happens all the time. I already have several food allergies, so most of the go-tos for low carb are out for me, and for other reasons Im not ready to share, I cant low carb right now. Even a spoonful of peanut butter Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Tips & Advice.

Insulin Pump Tips & Advice.

Bathing and Swimming. Your Animas® insulin pump is completely waterproof up to 3.6 metres for 24 hours and can be worn in the shower or while swimming. To participate in water activities, clip the pump to your swimsuit or place it in a small “sport case”. Or, if you prefer, the pump and most infusion sets can be disconnected for up to one hour. If you plan on using hot tubs, whirlpools or saunas, it is recommended that you remove your pump, infusion set and tubing. Exposure to extreme temperatures could possibly affect the quality of your insulin inside the pump, tubing and set. Always follow your healthcare professional’s individual guidelines when disconnecting your pump. Before and after you disconnect for any length of time, remember to check your blood glucose levels. NOTE: Do not wear you Animas® insulin pump when diving or in water at depths greater than 3.6 metres) Exercise and Sports. There are many options for wearing your pump during exercise and sports activities. During “low-contact” sport activities, such as walking, biking, or aerobics, the pump can be clipped to the waistband. For added security, it can be placed in a “sport case”, or some people even sew pockets into their undergarments to keep it in place. During “contact” sports such as rugby, basketball, or hockey, the pump can be disconnected for up to one hour, although many people prefer to keep it on and tucked under their sportswear. If you choose to disconnect your pump, always follow your physician/healthcare professional’s individual guidelines. Before and after you disconnect for any length of time, remember to check your blood glucose levels. A few things to remember. Pack your insulin carefully so that it is not exposed to extreme temperatures. Pack your pump supplies Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Air Travel: 6 Tips And Tricks!

Diabetes And Air Travel: 6 Tips And Tricks!

Packing is a combination of art and science. I really dont like to check luggage. Besides the cost, there is the added delay when checking in at the airport, the risk of the airline losing the bag, and worst of all, the interminable wait at the conveyor belt upon arrival (you can tell, Im a very patient guy). So Ive become very good at consolidating my stuff. For short flights where small jets with tiny overhead space are common, a canvas duffel-type bag is ideal. That way, you wont have to turn your carry-on bag over for checking at the last minute. For longer flights (or trips that last more than a couple of days), learn to maximize the space in your carry-on bag and personal carry on. These days, the personal carry-on can be almost as large as your carry-on bag; it just has to be able to fit below the seat in front of you. Whether you check a bag or not, be sure to pack two complete sets of everything you need to manage your diabetes for the length of the trip. Two meters with strips & lancing pens, two sets of insulin, two sets of batteries, two bottles of glucose tablets, two sets of pump supplies, and so on. Put one set in your personal item bag, and the other set in your carry-on luggage (or your checked luggage). That way, if one of your bags in lost, stolen or confiscated, you have the other as a fall-back. When it comes to getting through security with minimal hassles, I have one word for you: PRECHECK. If you fly more than once or twice a year, TSAs precheck service is well worth the time and investment. But be sure to enter your precheck ID (also called a KTN Known Traveler Number) when you book your flight, or you may not have access to the precheck service at the airport. Precheck holders at most domestic airports can bypass the long lines and go through Continue reading >>

10 Best Practice Tips For Insulin Pump Care

10 Best Practice Tips For Insulin Pump Care

Properly caring for your insulin pump is important to help protect its longevity. We’ve compiled this list of “Best Practices” for you based on common questions from customers like you. Our devices are made to be durable enough to be part of your everyday life, but like anything, sometimes it’s important to go back to the basics of what works and what doesn’t so that it can last as long as possible. I know, a pump becomes a part of you (I’ve been pumping for almost 13 years!), but these are important good behaviors to keep in mind when using your pump daily. 1. Make Sure Your Hands Are Clean! Avoid exposure to sunscreens, lotions, insect repellents, and household and organic cleaning agents. So if you’re spending the day cleaning or just put lotion on, be sure to wash and dry your hands before handling your pump after using these types of products. 2. Open and Close Your Battery Cap with a Coin Use a thick coin, such as nickel or quarter, to open and/or close your battery cap. Tighten until the slot is horizontal to prevent it from overtightening. Personal tip: I admit, I’ve used a butter knife to open mine (this is a no-no!). One thing that might help is to keep a coin nearby where you store your extra batteries. I recognized I normally change my pump battery in the kitchen while I’m changing my site, which is why it was always more handy to grab a knife from the drawer. Now I have a few quarters stored near my battery and haven’t had any issues. 3. Clean Your Pump with a Mild Detergent When it’s time to clean your pump, wash your hands and use a cloth mixed with mild detergent, such as dish soap, and water, to wipe your pump clean. Do not place your pump under running water or submerge it into any liquid, and avoid cleaning it with household agen Continue reading >>

5 Tips For A Happy Insulin Pump Marriage

5 Tips For A Happy Insulin Pump Marriage

A pump user discovers her relationship with her pump requires much the same attention as a romantic relationship. I’ve found that living with an insulin pump is a lot like being in a marriage. Like most thriving partnerships, it requires a solid investment of time, energy, and patience. It’s taken me some trial and error to stay saddled in a happy, functioning relationship with my pump. From my experience, I want to share a few tips: Make one-on-one time. Setting aside time to program and reassess the carbohydrate ratios, basal settings, and alerts of your pump can relieve a lot of pressure in daily life. Treat it with respect. Even though a pump seems indestructible, it probably wouldn’t appreciate being plunged into a toilet or hurled out the window in a heated rage over false blood sugar alerts. Show a little care and tenderness. Don’t settle. Insulin pump therapy isn’t the perfect match for everyone, and with a handful of pumps on the market, it helps to pinpoint the pros and cons to each. Most companies offer the opportunity to test drive a pump before signing on the dotted line. You’ll know if a pump has potential when you spend some quality time together. Don’t grow complacent. Changing a pump infusion site in a timely manner is pretty crucial for skin tissue health, insulin viability, avoiding infection, and keeping up a healthy routine. Stay connected. Aside from situations where a pump disconnect is intentional (showering, changing sites), you pretty much need to be attached at the hip at all times, even when the pump doesn’t blend in well with evening wear. An insulin pump certainly brings its share of baggage and complications to the relationship. The tubing is prone to getting caught on door handles and seatbelts, and you have to take it eve Continue reading >>

Getting The Best Out Of Your Minimed Pump - Tips & Tricks

Getting The Best Out Of Your Minimed Pump - Tips & Tricks

Getting the best out of your MiniMed pump - tips & tricks in Tips & Tricks , Products tagged with MiniMed 640G , Diabetes management , Insulin pump John Pemberton shares his personal insight around how to get the best out of your MiniMed pump. John has type 1 diabetes and is a Medtronic Health Care Professional, and a registered dietitian. As part of Johns role he works alongside NHS teams to delivers Insulin Pump and CGM training/ Education within the West Midlands. Here are a few practical tips which John has picked up from this own experience: 1. Change your infusion set every 2-3 days To prevent you from forgetting to change your infusion set try this handy tip that works for me. I use the Mio infusion set and I fill my reservoir up with enough insulin to lastjust over 3 days. I am on 30 units of insulin per day so I fill my reservoir up with 100 units of insulin (If using Sure T you would fill up for just over 2 days of insulin) You can programme the pump to sound a 'Low reservoir' alert before your reservoir is empty. You can select one of these warning types: A specified number of units that remain in the reservoir A specified maximum amount of time that remains This alert will show in the status screen. In addition, you can view the last time you changed the reservoir in the status screen (Press the escape button from the home screen) 2. Make sure your insulin is at room temperature before filling your reservoir Where ever you wear your insulin pump, place the insulin vial in this location for 20 minutes before filling your reservoir. For example I put the insulin vial in my left trouser pocket as this is where I wear my insulin pump. 3. Check that your maximum bolus is set at an appropriate level This should be set just above your biggest dose that you have ev Continue reading >>

Diabetes Advocacy...pumping Tips

Diabetes Advocacy...pumping Tips

DISCLAIMER...These are tips that have worked for other pumpers. Please remember to consult your diabetes team before making any changes to your personal regimen. These tips are not meant to replace medical advice. One parent has learned the fine art of dosing for fat by using the Combination Bolus in her daughter's Cozmo insulin pump . She takes the number of carbs (46 g for example) and the number of grams of fat (say 25g). Next she divides the number of grams of fat by the number of grams of carbs to get a ratio of fat to carbs (25/46=.54). You know have a percentage (54%). This is the amount that you bolus on the "back end" You would do a combination bolus for 46g CHO with 45% up front and 55% extended over 2-2.5 hours. The higher the back end number, the further the bolus is extended! The untethered regimen by Dr. Steven Edeleman discusses the idea of using a basal insulin such as Lantus to compensate for extended periods of time when disconnected from the pump. The " Super bolus " borrows from the basal insulin effectively loading more of the insulin up front where you need it. Add up the total of the basal that would be delivered before the food is gone, or for a couple of hours. You would then drop the basal rate to zero for a chosen period of time as that basal insulin was bolused as a single dose. This makes more insulin available right away, when needed most bringing the blood glucose level down sooner, thus taking care of the food that is hitting faster than the bolus normally would. It leaves the latter part of the meal bolus to act in the place of the basal insulin, since the Super bolus took care of the high from the food already and the bolus "tail" is no longer needed to deal with the meal. This works very well for high glycemic index meals. (by Rosanna Continue reading >>

Teenager Insulin Pumping Tips

Teenager Insulin Pumping Tips

° These teen and adult tips were offered by a variety of experience pumpers: ° Want to add extra protection to your pump case? An easy inexpensive way is to take an expired charge card or other plastic card that has expired and insert it into the inside flap on a Velcro pump pak. The card fits perfectly and adds a little more protection for your pump. You may want to use an old library card that's made of plastic if you don't have an expired card. ° With summer months and swimming keeping a site on for 3 days can be tricky. One tip that came in suggest to use Skin Bond made by Smith+Nephew which is like rubber cement for skin. It does make taking old sites off harder, but it does the trick for being able to swim, shower, etc. without them falling out for at least 2 days! ° We have also found that Mastisol a liquid adhesive also works great. You do need to use a detachol to remove the site. We got this right from our pump rep. ° The most important tip is to have a sense of humor, you never know when the pump will alarm in the middle of class or an interview and if you wear it in your bra like many girls it sounds like your chest is alarming!!!!!!!!! ° If you often rush to go to the bathroom (mostly girls because they need to take down their pants) be careful about putting your site in your hip because it will come out if you pull your pants down in a hurry and forget its there. ° Always have extra supplies with you (and reaction treatment) because it will come the time when you don't that you wish you did!!!!!!!!!!! ° Don't use an audio bolus in a loud room- you can easily mess up the amount you are giving yourself or suspend the pump by accident and not realize it!!! ° Make sure you tuck in your pump tubing- little children and kitchen cabinet handles like to p Continue reading >>

10 Tips For Your Insulin Pump | The Loop Blog

10 Tips For Your Insulin Pump | The Loop Blog

Home Education and Information 10 Tips For Your Insulin Pump Posted by Liza Resurreccion On February 16, 2016 In Education and Information Whether youre new to insulin pumps, or have been pumping for most of your life, theres always something new to learn! Here are our top 10 tips. 1. The Bolus Wizard on your insulin pump lets you set up to 8 sensitivity settings throughout the day. Your insulin sensitivity is the amount that your blood glucose level is reduced by one unit of insulin and might vary throughout the day. 2. If you have different schedules on different days (like work days and weekends) which leads to different insulin needs, you can program up to 2 additional basal rate patterns . This allows you to switch from a basal rate on a normal day to different basal rates an instant. 3. If you ever need just a little more insulin for a bolus (ok, lets say a whole lot more), but reached the maximum delivery on your pump, heres how to change the Max bolus setting. 4. A Dual Wave bolus gives you an immediate bolus with the remaining insulin delivered over a set amount of time. This feature is useful for meals with both rapid and slowly absorbed carbohydrates (i.e. a lunch buffet or pizza night). 5. Each of the bars on your battery icon on your pump screen represents approximately 25% of your battery life. Here are more 5 things to learn about the icons on your pump screen. 6. When your battery is in a normal mode, if you hold the B button and press the down arrow at the same time during any active alert your pump light will turn on.Good to know when youre in the dark and your pump starts alarming. 7. Open and close your battery cap with a thick coin, like a nickel or quarter. Tighten until the slot is horizontal to prevent it from overtightening. 8. Theres a taping Continue reading >>

Skiing With An Insulin Pump

Skiing With An Insulin Pump

back to Overview In terms of pumping insulin my colleague Anton is just getting started. But when it comes to skiing, he's a real pro. Now that he’s had some time to experiment on the slopes with his new external pancreas, I wanted to know about his experiences. Here’s the official situation: intense skiing, OmniPod insulin pump, BG Meter (built into OmniPod controller), Dexcom CGM (Continuous Glucose Monitor). Backup supplies? Lantus and NovoRapid pens. Scott: Anton, thanks for sharing your experiences with us! I’m excited to hear about what you’ve learned so far! Have you made many adjustments? Anton: “Everything has been going very well! Like clockwork! I had to experiment with the basal rate, but am very happy with the results so far. I’m used to physical activity and have a good feel for how my body responds to different intensity levels. For me, a significant reduction in basal rate during skiing was just what I needed. Sometimes less than half of my normal rate, depending on intensity. I also found that I need to reduce my basal rate a little bit even after skiing. I usually start my temporary basal rate about a half-hour before the first run. This worked well for me, but it’s sure to be different for everyone, of course.” Scott: Ok, you’ve talked a lot about your basal rate. But what about eating and meal boluses? Anton: “You’re right! Skiing is very demanding and takes a lot of energy! I like a good, hearty breakfast to start my day! Besides the temporary basal rates, I took less insulin for breakfast by increasing my insulin to carb ratio. I found that a typical skiing session amplified (tripled!) the action of my insulin, so I adjusted accordingly. The meal boluses are tricky because too little insulin makes the blood sugar spike quickly Continue reading >>

My 670g Tips And Tricks

My 670g Tips And Tricks

Its been about 2.5 months with my 670G pump. Ive never had such an intense love/hate relationship with a medical device before. When asked if Id recommend the pump or how I feel about, my honest answer is that I have very mixed feelings about it. And I think the most important takeaway is to have realistic expectations if you decide to get this pump. It is far far from perfect, but it has incredible potential. However, there are many and frequent frustrations, and for me, the pump was not only affecting my sleep (which obviously has implications for all areas of your life), it was also affecting my mood. One thing Ive learned over the past 17 years living with a chronic disease is that you have to make it fit into your lifestyle, not the other way around. That doesnt mean you dont make changes to the way you live, but it also means that to get through each and every day, you find ways to fit diabetes into the life you want to live. I have a few diabetes mantras, and one of them is Diabetes does not define you. My health and safety is always my first priority, but within the confines of this pump, Ive found some tricks to get me through each dayso that the pump is not negatively affecting my mood and sleep. Ill stop right here and say that what Im about to tell you is not the way that the pump was designed and intended to work, so if you choose to try any of the tricks below, you do so at your own risk. Im not recommending these for everyone, obviously you know what is realistic or not for your own life and circumstances. But this blog is for sharing my personal experiences so thats what Im doing. 1.Be very careful about when you calibrate. Medtronic seems to have a lot of advice about this, dont calibrate when youre rising or dropping, dont calibrate when theres active Continue reading >>

Tips And Tools For Insulin Pump Use

Tips And Tools For Insulin Pump Use

Insulin pumps can be great tools for managing diabetes in people of all ages, including children, teens, and even infants. Because pumps constantly deliver a low level of “background” insulin, and larger doses need only be taken before meals (or to “correct” unexpected high blood glucose), they can allow a user greater flexibility with respect to meal schedules and food choices than conventional insulin injections. Pumps also deliver more precise amounts of insulin than can be measured with a syringe. And modern pump technology tracks how much insulin has been delivered, when it was delivered, and how much of it is still active in the body, so there’s less of a chance of taking too much and ending up with low blood glucose (hypoglycemia). (Click here for a list of insulin pumps that are currently on the market.) Clearly, all of these characteristics can help a person achieve optimal blood glucose control. However, an insulin pump is only a tool: It can’t think for itself, and it is therefore only as “smart” as the person who is using it. In the hands of a motivated, diligent user, a pump can be a very helpful and precise tool. In the hands of a user who expects the pump to do the work for him, however, it may help to control blood glucose levels no better than any other method of insulin delivery. Even with a pump, it’s still necessary to count the carbohydrates in meals and snacks, match insulin doses to the foods being eaten, monitor blood glucose levels frequently, and make adjustments to meals, exercise, or insulin doses based on monitoring results. Everyone who uses a pump should receive comprehensive training on how to use it. But no matter how much training you receive or how many instruction manuals you read, some issues don’t become apparent Continue reading >>

Tips And Tricks For Experienced Insulin Users

Tips And Tricks For Experienced Insulin Users

If you’ve been an insulin user for many years, then chances are you’re probably well versed in the process. For many people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the day-to-day blood sugar monitoring, insulin injections, and diet restrictions have become second nature. But if you’ve been running on autopilot, perhaps it’s time to reassess your diabetes care plan with the following tips and tricks. Delivery tips A study from the American Diabetes Association says that following certain precautions while using pumps, pens, or syringes can ensure a pain-free, accurate insulin dosing every time. Here are some tips to help you. Air bubbles Air bubbles in a syringe, insulin pen, or the tubing of a pump can decrease the amount of insulin you receive. Some experienced insulin users become complacent after years of injections, but you should never lose sight of checking for air bubbles. Checking before every injection will reduce the chance of your blood sugar swinging too high or too low. If you use a pen, avoid leaving a needle tip on the pen between injections. And don’t forget to prime a pen with two units of insulin before dosing. Painful injections If you notice blood or clear fluid after a painful injection, apply pressure to the site for 10 seconds. Don’t rub. If you think you didn’t get the full insulin dose, check your blood sugar more often in the hours following the injection. If painful injections are common, talk to your endocrinologist or diabetes educator and let them evaluate your injection technique. Bruising If bruising is a problem for you following an injection, ice the site for one minute beforehand. This shrinks the blood vessels. You may also need to change the angle of your injection. Bruising and pain can occur when you hit your muscle instead Continue reading >>

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