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Insulin Pump Price List

Newsflash: Medtronic Launches New Minimed 630g System

Newsflash: Medtronic Launches New Minimed 630g System

A new Medtronic insulin pump is now available in the United States, introducing a new des ign and color-screen as part of a complete makeover to these diabetes devices that have fundamentally looked the same for 30 years! Say hello to the Minimed 630G, which Medtronic announced on Thursday after receiving the FDA's Pre-Market Approval on Aug. 10. This news caught many by surprise, as the California pump-CGM company hadn't previewed this product in advance as they typically do before launches. Instead, they've focused on their forthcoming 670G hybrid closed loop system, expected to be the first-gen commercial Artficial Pancreas system to hit market in 2017. A number of users are actually upset that they weren't warned of this interim product launch, because they've recently purchased new products or upgrades. Others were holding out for the future closed loop system. So we're all wondering: Just what is this 630G that we've heard nothing about before? Remember, Medtronic got FDA approval in September 2013 for its 530G that automatically stops insulin delivery once a user crosses a certain low glucose level. That was step one in moving toward closed loop technology. Next up is their Predictive Low Glucose Suspend (PLGS) features that can anticipate oncoming hypos in advance and shut off insulin to prevent them from happening. That's built into the Minimed 640G system that hit the market outside the U.S. in early 2015. Medtronic ultimately decided it would not pursue bringing that device to the U.S., opting instead to leapfrog that model and focus on getting the first hybrid closed loop 670G to market in 2017. So now, it seems we're getting this 630G as a sort of stop-gap device in between the two D-tech generations. Here's a quick glance at the Minimed 630G: Fresh Design: Continue reading >>

How To Get An Insulin Pump?

How To Get An Insulin Pump?

Hi. Are you on a medical aid? I do not think you will get an insulin pump through department of health – I have not heard of anyone accessing state healthcare that is on an insulin pump. Besides the pump the monthly consumables (what you need to use the pump) are very costly) Contact the companies who manufacture the pumps. Currently Medtronic and Roche in south africa and ask if they have any assistance programs. If you are on medical aid – apply through the medical aid – you will need a motivation from your endo, downloads of your readings, past hba1c readings and whatever other documentation they request. Remember though that you will need your doctor and a trained diabetic nurse who works with insulin pumps to help you with pump set up and monitoring. You also need to be able to carb count before you can even consider using the insulin pump, a dietician familiar with this can teach you. The pump will not miraculously contol your blood sugar levels- it is lots of work and you will need lots of help from your medical team. Its not something you can just get and use without working with your medical team. If not used/ understood properly it will not be effective Continue reading >>

Medtronic 530g With Enlite

Medtronic 530g With Enlite

The FDA approved the Medtronic MiniMed 530G insulin pump with its display of the Enlite continuous glucose monitor in September, 2013. The 530G is the first system in the United States that can automatically stop insulin delivery if the CGM's glucose value falls to a preset level (60-90 mg/dl) AND the wearer doesn't respond to the Threshold Suspend Alarm. This functionality puts the device in the newly created OZO: Artificial Pancreas Device Classification created by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Although the 530G is an early step toward an artificial pancreas, some consumers have criticized Medtronic's marketing of the 530G using this classification, as discussed below. The 530G will be sold as an integrated system, paired with their CGM and its Enlite sensor. Those who want to use the Medtronic pump with a different CGM like the Dexcom G4 or Navigator would order the Revel 523 or 723 pumps that are identical to the 530G other than its display of the Enlite CGM. These pumps do not have threshold suspend. The Enlite sensor is said to be more comfortable, have slightly better accuracy than the older Guardian sensor, and can be worn up to 6 days rather than 3. Medtronic suggests that the sensor be worn on the abdomen only. It comes with a new Enlite Serter that puts the sensor in at a 90-degree angle while hiding the needle from the wearer. Like the Revel 523 and 723 pumps, the 530G uses the same 180-unit and 300-unit reservoirs and infusion sets. Threshold Suspend (TS) is the suspension of basal insulin delivery when a selected low blood glucose threshold is reached. The goal is to minimize time spent in hypoglycemia. The low threshold can be set between 60 and 90 mg/dL. An alarm is sounded when the TS begins to alert the wearer. The low alarm repeats every 20 Continue reading >>

Getting An Insulin Pump

Getting An Insulin Pump

Tweet There is a high level of demand for insulin pumps but currently the UK lags behind other European countries in its provision of insulin pumps. Insulin pumps allow greater opportunity to take control of diabetes but, because they are a more expensive option than injections, eligibility criteria exists to ensure the most suitable candidates have access to insulin pump therapy. Funding options There are two main options for getting an insulin pump: Self funding –whereby you buy the pump and consumables NHS funded –the pump is paid for by the NHS for those meeting eligibility criteria The most common option for getting an insulin pump in the UK is to have one funded by the NHS. Getting an insulin pump privately If you buy the pump privately, you will need to consider the total cost, including the consumables, and ensure you have a health team with a specialism in insulin pumps. You will need to arrange whether you will be able to receive care on the NHS or privately before going ahead with buying an insulin pump privately. Insulin pumps tend to cost between £2,000 and £3,000 and the consumables for an insulin pump, including infusion sets, reservoirs and batteries, can cost around £1,000 to £2,000 a year. The NHS does not operate a scheme in which it funds pumps which have been bought privately. Getting a pump on the NHS The process of getting an insulin pump can vary across different parts of the UK as budgets, the level of demand for pumps and the number of healthcare professionals with experience of insulin pumps can all play a part. The advantage of applying for an insulin pump through the NHS is that you have the chance of getting the pump for free. This for most people outweighs the disadvantages of not knowing whether or when they may qualify for a pump Continue reading >>

Financial Concerns About Insulin Pumps

Financial Concerns About Insulin Pumps

Many concerns arise when patients consider the costs of insulin pump therapy. The following are a few of the most frequently asked questions: What is the cost of a pump? About $6,000 is the average price. How much of the cost will my insurance cover? Most insurance plans provide coverage for insulin pump therapy and diabetes testing supplies under a Durable Medical Equipment (DME) clause. Pump manufacturers’ insurance departments have the expertise to negotiate approval for payment with your insurance provider. If you have a co-payment, the manufacturer will set up a payment plan, if necessary. Medicare and Medicaid plans also provide coverage, but you should check with the plan administrator in your state. What is the cost of supplies? Monthly costs for intensive insulin pump management supplies can range from $250 to $500, depending on your insurance plan and on the frequency of site changes. Here are potential costs for 10 set changes per month (every three days): Needle set Approximately $6.90 per set $69 90-degree insertion cannula Depending on the brand, $10.83 per set or $13.50 per set $108.30 $135 30-degree insertion cannula $11 per set $110 Pump syringes $10 per month $37-$46 Sterile dressings and skin prep $10 per month Example: box of 50 IV prep wipes Some vendor cash prices can be 30%-50% less than billed list price. Ask about payment options and discounts. $32 (billed) $16 (cash) Insulin Depends on coverage/co-pay/amount used. Variable Test strips Minimum of four daily multiplied by cost per strip. Approximately .75 to $1.00 per strip. Usually covered by insurance. $3-$10 per day Prices shown are estimates only. Vendor and manufacturer prices vary and can change at any time. How can we save money on supplies? If you use sites and supplies beyond the recom Continue reading >>

How Much Do Diabetes Supplies/medications Cost In The U.s.?

How Much Do Diabetes Supplies/medications Cost In The U.s.?

While everyone’s diabetes treatment plan, medications, and technology may be different, there is one thing we can all agree on: diabetes is expensive. In two previous posts at The Perfect D, I gave some sense of what the bare minimum of care for a U.S. adult with Type 1 diabetes would be and also financial resources and programs to help with the financial burden of living with diabetes. However, this post is about how much it could cost an adult with Type 1 diabetes if they used the technology and medications that are currently out on the market (and thought of as “the latest and greatest”) and paid out of pocket with no insurance. Research on this topic has shown me that: 1) prices can fluctuate wildly, so it pays to shop around and 2) there is a very big gap (financially, medically, and technologically) between the bare minimum and “surviving” and actually utilizing the tools and latest technology that is out there. So, the hypothetical person for this exercise is a Type 1 adult in the United States who weighs 60kg, just like the other calculation post I did. Ground Rules These prices are accurate on the websites I have referenced for December 1, 2014. They may change, they may add shipping, they may not offer the services, technology, or drugs on their website after this is posted. These prices are not a guarantee. They are to be used as a reference. The listing of prices/websites on this post does not mean that I endorse the company or product or service. I have not listed all the products available on the market for people with Type 1 diabetes. I have listed major ones to give you an idea of major manufacturers’ costs for the products that are available for general public viewing. I did not call any companies and ask for pricing. Why? Because I believe Continue reading >>

Keeping It Real On Medtronic's 530g

Keeping It Real On Medtronic's 530g

There's a lot of fuss and excitement about the newest diabetes device approved for people in the U.S.: Medtronic's long-awaited 530G system and Enlite sensor... But at the same time, there's a significant amount of frustration by PWDs (people with diabetes) and others in the know who feel they're being misled on a number of fronts about this new device. I'm one of them. Let me preface this by saying: Many are very excited about this being a huge step forward in eventually achieving the closed-loop dream. The 'Mine is on that boat, because we feel the 530G's ability to automatically shut off insulin between 60 and 90 mg/dL is a key step forward. However, we (all) have to be honest about what this product actually is and is not -- and the vendor's enthusiasm cannot fuel too-pushy sales pitches and marketing efforts. First off, this device is NOT an artificial pancreas, but rather just one piece of the puzzle required to eventually create one. Unfortunately, Medtronic's been sitting back and riding the PR wave of mainstream media jumping all over that exciting term, without correcting misconceptions. More on that in a moment. Perhaps more importantly for patients themselves, there are some questionable access issues underway: with the 530G systems being shipped starting Oct. 10, the company has decided it will start phasing out stand-alone pumps and no longer offer the older Paradigm Revels to most adult type 1s who have commercial insurance and could be covered for the new device. Huh? A Potential Customer: Me As noted the other day, I'm shopping around for my next insulin pump. Despite being a longtime Medtronic pumper, I got tired of waiting for the 530G and just recently bought the Dexcom G4. And "recently" means that my 30-day return window for the G4 passed just befo Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Price

Insulin Pump Price

Did you get the best insulin pump price? What is the right insulin pump cost on a monthly basis? How do you get the best deal? It can be frustrating to find good information. The answer to these questions depends on your circumstances. Let’s take a look below. IF YOU HAVE INSURANCE Okay, so you want a pump, now here comes the tough part: The insulin pump price. Let’s talk about insurance first. If your doctor finds it medically necessary, and your insurance company accepts his opinion, then you get it for free! The insulin pump cost is nothing. Good stuff. Of course, this assumes there is no deductible associated with your policy. Wahoo! IF YOU DON’T HAVE INSURANCE Now let’s talk about the cost if you have no insurance. Hold on, brace yourself. The cost is approximately $6,000 for most pumps. It gets worse. The ongoing cost of running the pump each month can vary from about $150 to $300. Ouch! So, you don’t have insurance and you don’t have $6,000. What are your options? Most pump manufacturers and/or their suppliers do have programs where you can get the pump for a nominal cost, possibly for free. Why would they do that? You guessed it. They want your monthly maintenance business. Let’s say the cost of running your insulin pump is $225 a month. Take this amount and multiply it by 48 months (4 years) which is roughly the lifespan of the pump. This comes to $10,800. In order to get the lower price (or free) pump, you typically have to commit to purchase their supplies for the life of the pump. Is it wrong to compare this to a pusher who gives you the initial vile of crack cocaine for free, knowing he owns you and your drug habit for life? Yeah, it probably is wrong, but it is a little fun anyway! To see the Latest Insulin Pump Prices click on the link. OTHE Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump

Insulin Pump

First things first – registering with the NDSS When a patient is diagnosed with diabetes, they should register with the Australian Government’s National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS), which is administered by Diabetes Australia. The NDSS provides subsidised insulin pump consumables, including reservoirs and infusion sets. Who is eligible for NDSS subsidies? To be eligible, the patient must be an Australian resident, hold a current Australian Medicare card or a Department of Veteran Affairs file number and should have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner. Several countries also have a reciprocal agreement with Australia. If the patient is visiting Australia, and comes from a country with a Reciprocal Health Care Agreement, they may be entitled to temporary NDSS registration. Please note, different rules apply for patients with Type 2 diabetes, and in most instances, these patients may not be able to access these subsidy programs. However, Medtronic is currently offering a grant on insulin pump consumables for patients with Type 2 insulin dependent diabetes, with the opportunity to save up to 90% on RRP30.This means that pump consumables will cost roughly the same as they do for people with Type 1 Diabetes who can access the NDSS consumable prices. See here for more information. Getting access to insulin The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) covers a considerable proportion of drug and medication costs through Medicare. Patients can get insulin from pharmacies with a prescription (from a GP or Endocrinologist) using the PBS; one prescription is generally 3-6 months’ supply, depending on the patient’s insulin needs. Other subsidy options for Type 1 patients Another option for subsidy assistance for Type 1 diabetes patients is the Type 1 Diabetes Insulin Pu Continue reading >>

How Much Do Diabetes Supplies/medications Cost In The U.s.?

How Much Do Diabetes Supplies/medications Cost In The U.s.?

While everyone’s diabetes treatment plan, medications, and technology may be different, there is one thing we can all agree on: diabetes is expensive. In two previous posts at The Perfect D, I gave some sense of what the bare minimum of care for a U.S. adult with Type 1 diabetes would be and also financial resources and programs to help with the financial burden of living with diabetes. However, this post is about how much it could cost an adult with Type 1 diabetes if they used the technology and medications that are currently out on the market (and thought of as “the latest and greatest”) and paid out of pocket with no insurance. Research on this topic has shown me that: 1) prices can fluctuate wildly, so it pays to shop around and 2) there is a very big gap (financially, medically, and technologically) between the bare minimum and “surviving” and actually utilizing the tools and latest technology that is out there. So, the hypothetical person for this exercise is a Type 1 adult in the United States who weighs 60kg, just like the other calculation post I did. Ground Rules These prices are accurate on the websites I have referenced for December 1, 2014. They may change, they may add shipping, they may not offer the services, technology, or drugs on their website after this is posted. These prices are not a guarantee. They are to be used as a reference. The listing of prices/websites on this post does not mean that I endorse the company or product or service. I have not listed all the products available on the market for people with Type 1 diabetes. I have listed major ones to give you an idea of major manufacturers’ costs for the products that are available for general public viewing. I did not call any companies and ask for pricing. Why? Because I believe Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin pump therapy can give you the better control you want for your lifestyle.1, 2 Technology for Joy & Jake What Is Insulin Pump Therapy? An insulin pump is a small device about the size of a small cell phone that is worn externally and can be discreetly clipped to your belt, slipped into a pocket, or hidden under your clothes. It delivers precise doses of rapid-acting insulin to closely match your body’s needs: Basal Rate: Small amounts of insulin delivered continuously (24/7) for normal functions of the body (not including food). The programmed rate is determined by your healthcare professional. Bolus Dose: Additional insulin you can deliver “on demand” to match the food you are going to eat or to correct a high blood sugar. Insulin pumps have bolus calculators that help you calculate your bolus amount based on settings that are determined by your healthcare professional. Buttons to program your insulin LCD screen to show what you are programming Battery compartment to hold 1 AAA alkaline battery Reservoir compartment that holds insulin A plastic cartridge that holds the insulin that is locked into the insulin pump. It comes with a transfer guard (blue piece at the top that is removed before inserting the reservoir into the pump) that assists with pulling the insulin from a vial into the reservoir. A reservoir can hold up to 300 units of insulin and is changed every two to three days. An infusion set includes a thin tube that goes from the reservoir to the infusion site on your body. The cannula is inserted with a small needle that is removed after it is in place. It goes into sites (areas) on your body similar to where you give insulin injections. The infusion set is changed every two to three days. An infusion set is placed into the insertion device and wi Continue reading >>

Use Of Insulin Pumps In India: Suggested Guidelines Based On Experience And Cultural Differences

Use Of Insulin Pumps In India: Suggested Guidelines Based On Experience And Cultural Differences

Go to: What Is an Insulin Pump? The continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) pump (insulin pump for short) is a pager-sized device that can be connected to the body through an infusion set so as to deliver insulin continuously. It consists of a disposable reservoir for insulin and a disposable infusion set, including a cannula for subcutaneous insertion and a tubing system that connects the insulin reservoir to the cannula. Insulin pump therapy by itself is not a new therapy for diabetes mellitus. It is an alternative delivery mechanism for administration of insulin and is found to be superior to ordinary syringes and insulin pens. When insulin is administered subcutaneously via a properly programmed insulin pump, delivery of insulin is expected to mimic the insulin release pattern of a normal healthy pancreas better than other modalities of insulin delivery. Willingness on the part of the patient is absolutely essential before going on the pump. However, mere willingness to initiate pump therapy does not make a patient a candidate for the same. Other indications mentioned below need to be present if a patient is to be considered for pump therapy. Conversely, if a patient who fulfils one or more of the indications is not comfortable wearing the pump even after due explanation and counseling, he or she should not be put on the pump. In India at present, insulin pumps are usually not reimbursable or covered by insurance, and the patient needs to buy the pump and also the consumables, both of which are currently expensive. Cost of the pump is a one-time expense, but the cost of the consumables is a recurring expenditure. Hence, the family should be aware of the continuing expenditure when they decide to start with insulin pump therapy. If they cannot afford it in th Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Rundown

Insulin Pump Rundown

Choosing an insulin pump doesn’t have to be an overwhelming process. Should you go with a more traditional pump where you can monitor your insulin levels directly? Are you looking for a model that works with a BGM monitor and allows you to administer insulin via a remote? Maybe you need a pump that offers integration with a CGM system. What about size? Color? To use tubes or not to use tubes? Presenting the options so you can find out what pump best fits your lifestyle is our goal. So, with several models on the market, let us help you sort through the choices by taking a look at what’s available and breaking down the various features of each. We’ve separated the pumps into four categories: pumps that incorporate or work with a Blood Glucose Monitor (BGM) and offer Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM), pumps with just CGM capability, pumps with just a BGM, and standalone pumps that don’t work with a BGM or offer CGM. Hybrid Closed-Loop System The 670 G system is the newest member to the Medtronic pump family and the first hybrid closed-loop system. In other ways, it is a like a “basal modulator” where you have to still bolus but it predicts your basal rate. Every 5 minutes, the auto-mode option (hybrid closed-loop) automatically adjusts basal insulin delivery based on your sugar levels to keep you range. It is excellent at catching lows because it stops your insulin dosage 30 minutes before you reach your pre-selected low limits, then it will automatically restart insulin when your levels recover. Possible concerns: excessive alerts and extended menu that needs clearing. Only approved for ages 14+ because it has a total daily dose requirement of at least 8 units a day. Feeling of loss of control of management with closed-loop system. Pumps with BGM and CGM ca Continue reading >>

Minimed 640g System With Smartguard For Managing Blood Glucose Levels In People With Type 1 Diabetes

Minimed 640g System With Smartguard For Managing Blood Glucose Levels In People With Type 1 Diabetes

Next Technology overview This briefing describes the regulated use of the technology for the indication specified, in the setting described, and with any other specific equipment referred to. It is the responsibility of healthcare professionals to check the regulatory status of any intended use of the technology in other indications and settings. The MiniMed 640G system is an integrated sensor‑augmented pump therapy system. It consists of a continuous glucose monitor and an insulin pump. The system uses a disposable glucose sensor (Enlite), which is inserted under the skin of the abdomen by the user using an automatic device supplied with the system, and secured with a small self‑adhesive patch. It continuously measures glucose levels in the interstitial fluid, which lag about 15 minutes behind capillary blood glucose levels measured using a finger prick. The sensor is replaced at least every 6 days. The sensor is attached to a non‑implanted transmitter (Guardian 2 Link), which sends the data wirelessly to the insulin pump or a stand‑alone monitor. The transmitter is approximately the size of a 2 pence piece and lies almost flat against the skin. The insulin pump or monitor displays the glucose data on a screen and can plot trend‑lines. The sensor readings are updated every 5 minutes. The insulin pump, which weighs about 92 g and is 5.3 cm×9.6 cm×2.5 cm, can be clipped to a belt or be carried in a pocket. An insulin reservoir that can hold up to 300 units of insulin is fitted to the pump. An infusion set carries insulin from the reservoir to the body through a subcutaneous catheter. The reservoir and infusion set are changed every 2 to 3 days. The pump delivers a continuous basal rate of insulin needed for normal body functioning. This is a personalised back Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Should I Get An Insulin Pump?

Diabetes: Should I Get An Insulin Pump?

You may want to have a say in this decision, or you may simply want to follow your doctor's recommendation. Either way, this information will help you understand what your choices are so that you can talk to your doctor about them. Get the facts Key points to remember An insulin pump can free you from a strict regimen of meals, sleep, and exercise, because you can program it to match your changing schedule. After you learn how to work with a pump, it can make living with diabetes easier. But it takes some time and effort to learn how to use the pump to keep it working properly and to control your diabetes. Using a pump includes checking your blood sugar many times a day and carefully counting the grams of carbohydrate that you eat. Using an insulin pump can keep your blood sugar at a more constant level so that you don't have as many big swings in your levels. People who use pumps have fewer problems with very low blood sugar. Many insurance companies cover the cost of insulin pumps, but they have strict guidelines that you will have to follow before they will pay. Continue reading >>

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