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Insulin Pump Holiday

Travelling With An Insulin Pump: Your One-stop Guide

Travelling With An Insulin Pump: Your One-stop Guide

With limited experience, travelling with an insulin pump can seem like a worrying and potentially risky task, but I'm here to tell you why it's not. So you've decided you may want to make the switch to a pump, or you already have a pump and are now deciding you want to go on holiday somewhere. So maybe you have some of the following questions ... "Do you have trouble at the airports when travelling with an insulin pump?" "Do you ever just switch back to insulin pens?" "Is it annoying carrying insulin pump supplies?" The answer is...yes, no and maybe! Keep reading... When I travel I always bring an insulin pump and insulin pens with me, and if I am on a long term trip, I will bring a spare insulin pump too. This is for many reasons, one being that I need backup insulin if my pump fails me, and another being there are actually situations in which the insulin pump just won’t cooperate with. This ranges from hot springs, to water parks to scuba diving (I am sure there is more that I am yet to discover!). I hope to one day visit Iceland and embrace the lagoons there, but when in Chile, Bradley and I ventured off into our car and came across a deserted area in the location of a volcano which not only produced breathtaking scenery, but some amazing (albeit ridiculously hot) hot springs! With my particular insulin pump, I am able to take it off for up to half an hour (so when I shower), but if you are chilling in a hot spring for longer than that, you don’t want be jumping in and out to re attach your pump etc, some people will, but I prefer a simple life! It is the same with water parks, my insulin pump isn't waterproof so it is a definite no no in the water, so I always pop my pump in a locker and switch back to insulin pens for a day! Switching back to insulin pens from Continue reading >>

6 Tips Whilst On Holiday With Your Pump

6 Tips Whilst On Holiday With Your Pump

1. HAND LUGGAGE Your hand luggage should include your medications, snacks, pump supplies and the letter from your doctor. This is especially important because your luggage may be lost, or you may have unplanned delays for extended periods of time. Remember that Insulin in checked luggage may be exposed to extreme (often freezing) temperatures. 2. CHECK IN AND AIRPORT SECURITY Insulin pumps are designed to withstand common electromagnetic interference, including some airport security systems. Taking an insulin pump through airport security is quite common. It’s ok to walk through the scanner with your pump on. Do not send your pump through the x-ray machine (where your hand luggage is scanned). Remove pump from body for any airport body scanners. 3. FLYING WITH YOUR PUMP If used correctly your pump can enable you to achieve good glucose control when travelling. You can adjust boluses for inflight meals that come at odd hours. You can also adjust your pump to changes in your normal activity level such as sitting down on a plane for hours which can cause rises in your glucose levels. Click here to see the article on temporary basal patterns If you are asked to turn off your CGM device, you will have a "data gap" when uploading data into CareLink® Personal Software, where information is missing from the period of time when your CGM system was turned off. The new MiniMed® 640G insulin pump alleviates this problem as it has a new flight safe mode – click here to find out more 4. CHANGING THE TIME ON YOUR PUMP You can set your pump to the new destination time at any point during your flight – most people make this change when they arrive at their destination. It is very important, however, that you do change the time to that of your destination, as your basal rate sett Continue reading >>

7 Holiday Diabetes Management Tips

7 Holiday Diabetes Management Tips

Home Education and Information 7 Holiday Diabetes Management Tips Posted by Editorial Team On December 1, 2015 In Education and Information In the midst of all the holiday hustle and bustle, people with diabetes can have a mound of other stresses to contend with, such as blood sugar fluctuations as a direct result of a full calendar. Living with type 1 diabetes for over 25 years, MiniMed Ambassador, previous Medtronic Diabetes Clinical Manager and blogger Regina Shirley, RD, LDN shares 7 tips of how she uses the features on her MiniMed insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor (CGM) to guide her through the holiday season. While Im out holiday shopping with my daughter, my husband is still able to check how Im doing through MiniMed Connect . He gets a text message when my Low Predictive Alert or Threshold Suspend alarm go off, and can call me or send me a text to make sure Im okay. Its comforting knowing someone else is there to help me manage my blood sugars. 2. Monitor Trends with Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) Im able to monitor my sensor glucose trends throughout the day by looking at my pump or my smartphone (using MiniMed Connect). Knowing what my glucose levels are and where theyre going, especially in social settings, really helps me enjoy my time, leaving me less worried about my sugars are doing. After a long day of celebratory activities, Im exhausted at night and am out as soon as my head hits the pillow. When my blood sugar drops, it tends to drop fast and hard. Its nice having the Threshold Suspend feature by my side to take action when I need it. Especially during the times Im too tired to wake up to respond to the alarm. I use the Square Wave bolus when grazing at parties. This feature delivers a bolus evenly over a period of time (20 minutes to Continue reading >>

Important Product Information For Customers:

Important Product Information For Customers:

If you ever see my family at airport security, choose another line. We don’t move quickly. My husband has a prosthetic knee and my son has an insulin pump. Neither provides a fast path through TSA check points. We don’t always fly and we’re fortunate enough to plan family trips several times a year. In the seven years since my son was diagnosed, we’ve learned a few tricks to make traveling with diabetes just a little less stressful. Most important? Keep your sense of humor Go to the bathroom. Go again. Got it? Okay, here’s the rest: Consider changing pump settings. Driving usually means lots of sitting still. If the person with diabetes wears a pump, ask your endocrinologist about adjusting the insulin basal rate. I have an active 8 year old and when we make the nine hour drive to my parents’ house, we’ve raised that basal rate as much as 40‐percent. We usually start an hour before and end an hour after the trip. The Animas pump makes this very easy. Check with your HCP about what might work best for you. Be smart about snacks on the road. We pack a cooler with the high protein, low carb usuals, but those just aren’t as much fun as gas station junk food. So we do indulge a bit. On that 9 hour drive we usually stop once for snacks, once for a real meal and once for JUST GUM, enough already! Try to move. We bring a football so we can get out of the car and run around every couple of hours. We’ve done jumping jacks, run parking lot laps, anything to just move for a few minutes. Even so, Benny almost always runs high if a car trip is more than 4 hours. Keep supplies within reach. You don’t want to be zipping down the highway, finally making good time, and realize you need something in the trunk. I usually pack a small bag with a day or two of diabetes Continue reading >>

Glu : Get Pumped Up With A Pump Vacation

Glu : Get Pumped Up With A Pump Vacation

People with diabetes are often told that they cannot take a vacation from diabetes. But many take a hiatus from some aspects of it. Pump vacations are just thata temporary departure from the everyday, labor-intensive tethering to diabetes. I cherish my insulin pump, but sometimes being attached at the hip for months on end necessitates some time apart. No hard feelings, pump, its just something I have to do for me. And Im not the only one. As a pediatric endocrinologist, many of my patients come to me from time to time to express their desire to be unattached. This request is sometimes triggered by an upcoming real-life vacation, during which going pumpless offers a more robust feeling of freedom from the burdens of everyday life. Others recognize that they are in pump burn-out. Sometimes people start to feel self-conscious about the visibility of their insulin pumps and request extended breaks in favor of shots. Others simply like to switch up what they can in their endless cycle of test, bolus, repeat. I have taken pump vacations for many reasons, but most often it is due to travel. I prefer to leave it behind when embarking on beach trips. Even though my pump is waterproof, I tend to enjoy the sun and the sand a little more when Im not part robot. Cutting the proverbial pump cord is quite easy. You should contact your doctor to discuss the details of your doses but, essentially, the total daily basal dose becomes the long-acting insulin dose and the short-acting insulin carbohydrate ratios and correction factors remain the same. Long-acting insulin (Lantus or Levemir) should be administered 30 to 60 minutes before disconnecting the pump to give it time to kick in, and then youre officially on a pump vacation! Taking a pump vacation after having worn one for some tim Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump On Holiday

Insulin Pump On Holiday

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I realise this subject has been covered a 1000 times and I apologise for asking again but I can't find a specific answer. My daughter sophie wears a minimed pump and has done for 8 months, we are going to Portugal next month and although we have travelled abroad with the injection pens we have not done so with the pump. Sophie is thinking about going back on pen injections for the week. We discussed this with the hospital back in April when sophie was supposed to go to Tenerife for a few days with a friend and her family (this was all booked before she knew she was having the pump). The hospital didn't really like the idea of her going back on injections and the explanation they gave about how to revert back to injections and then back to the pump after sounded so complicated and to top it off they also told Sophie she would feel absolutely dreadful back on pens. The upshot was that Sophie decided not to go on the holiday, which I found rather sad. Anyway, we now find ourselves in the same situation again and I think Sophie will want to go back on injection pens so I again asked the question and received an email from the hospital explaining the procedure. They suggest she reduces the basal rate on the pump for two days and inject half doses of lantus, then when we leave for the holiday to just disconnect the pump and start the 100% lantus and commence injections as before. My questions are, I am wondering if we should go away on the pump and just see how it goes, if Sophie doesn't get along with this we can then switch to pen injections. But will this take 2 days planning as described by the hospital, because if the pump just stopped working (god for Continue reading >>

Holiday Meals And Combination Bolusing With Your Insulin Pump

Holiday Meals And Combination Bolusing With Your Insulin Pump

Pumpkin pie, candied yams, potato latkes, lots of turkey with gravy, holiday cookies, fruitcake, heart cookies and long meals. Have we made you hungry yet? What do these foods make you think of? Hard to manage blood sugars! Fall and winter bring some wonderful holidays and special memories, but they may also bring memories of blood sugar readings you’d rather forget! If you are on an insulin pump though, you can work on better blood sugars by using one of the advanced features: extended or combination bolusing. Some of the meals we eat at this time of year might take longer to eat. Typically, they are also higher in fat and/or protein. Fat slows down digestion and blood sugars can stay high for a longer time. The extended bolus and combination bolus could work more like a pancreas when you eat a meal that goes on for a long time or a big, high-fat meal. How do extended and combination boluses work? Different insulin pumps use different names for extended and combination boluses but they work the same way. Square wave or extended bolus An extended bolus gives the insulin dose over a longer period of time. How does it work? You choose the dose and the time interval to give the bolus. This is best to use if you’re eating over a long period of time or grazing. For example, if a holiday dinner takes two hours to eat, you can determine how many carbohydrates you will eat during that time and deliver the bolus over 120 minutes. You can always give an additional bolus if you eat more carbohydrates than you originally bloused for. This saves you from bolusing when the salad comes out, then five minutes later for bread, then 10 minutes later for the turkey and stuffing. Dual wave or combination bolus This type of bolus gives some insulin right away to cover some carbs at the Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy: To Pump Or Not To Pump Part 2 - Pump Vs. Multiple Injections

Insulin Pump Therapy: To Pump Or Not To Pump Part 2 - Pump Vs. Multiple Injections

I hope after last week’s blog that you are now in the position to make an educated decision about which form of basal/bolus therapy is or is not for you. Only you, your family, and diabetes team can make that decision. In all honesty, I believe that, in the end, it must be up to YOU to decide what will work best with your lifestyle, support network, and personality. Let’s discuss the benefits and disadvantages of the pump and multiple injections. PUMP POSITIVES: 1. No more shots (unless the pump malfunctions, which they do sometimes; or if you have ketones) 2. Less hypoglycemia 3. Gives insulin before and during meal as needed 4. More flexibility of different basal (background) insulin rates depending on the time of day (you may need more insulin between 3 and 7 am, for example) 5. Calculations of insulin can be programmed in your pump–you just tell it how many carbs you are eating and your current blood sugar 6. Ability to extend insulin over a period of time especially when you eat the fun stuff (pizza, ice cream, pasta, etc.) 7. Eventual possibility of combining the pump with a continuous glucose sensor in an effort to mimic an artificial pancreas 8. If there is a problem with high or low blood sugars, generally you can fix it very quickly (extra insulin, temporary basal rates, suspension of pump) 9. Your health care team can obtain insulin information from the pump (which is good for us, but may not be good for you) 10. Cool factor (The pump really does look cool with its different colors, alarms, etc.) PUMP NEGATIVES: 1. Wearing it all the time (you can disconnect when you take a shower or when you are playing football etc., but need to reconnect to give some insulin no longer than an hour) 2. Change the catheter that is inserted under the skin into the subcu Continue reading >>

Guidelines For Temporary Removal Of The Insulin Pump

Guidelines For Temporary Removal Of The Insulin Pump

correction factor (insulin sensitivity factor) is 4.0 the basal rate is 0.60 units/hr until noon correction bolus: 14.8 – 6.0/4.0 = 2.2 units Total dose: 2.4 + 2.7 + 2.2 = 7.3 units, rounded off to 7.0 2- Long term off pump (24 hrs or more): There are 3 options Give long-acting insulin (Lantus or Levemir) as basal, and rapid insulin for boluses Give intermediate-acting insulin (NPH or N) ** call the doctor on-call for this dose Give rapid-acting insulin every 4 hours including overnight, as per the “short term” example Calculate the total daily basal amount of insulin and give as a single dose of Lantus or Levemir. It can be given as soon as convenient. Then continue every 24 hours thereafter. These insulins cannot be mixed with other insulins in a syringe Take rapid insulin for meal, snack and correction boluses The carb ratio’s and correction factors remain the same as for the pump Children who are too young to give their own insulin may need to have a parent go to school to give the lunchtime dose. The basal rate is 0.50 units from midnight to 6:00 a.m., and 0.40 units for the rest of the day until midnight. The total basal is 10.2 units. The dose of Lantus or Levemir will be rounded off to 10.0 units, given once every 24 hours until the insulin pump is resumed. Since Lantus and Levemir are basal insulins, you cannot have a basal rate running when you restart the pump or severe hypoglycemia may result! Restart your basal approximately 18 hours after the last Levemir dose; 22 hours after the last Lantus dose.    If you want to re-start the pump earlier, set the basal rate at 0.00 units/hr until all the Lantus or Levemir has worn off. Extra blood sugar checks will be needed to see how your adjustments are working, especially after the first inj Continue reading >>

Going On A Holiday

Going On A Holiday

Thomas B. Repas, DO, FACP, FACE, CDE, is an endocrinologist, lipidologist and physician nutrition specialist in clinical practice at the Regional Medical Clinic Endocrinology and Diabetes Education Center in Rapid City, SD. Dr. Repas is the former chairman of the professional diabetes advisory committees of the Wyoming and the Wisconsin Diabetes Prevention and Control Programs. He is board certified in the areas of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism, clinical lipidology, internal medicine and nutrition, and is also a certified diabetes educator. Last week a young woman with type 1 diabetes on an insulin pump came for a follow up appointment. Unfortunately, she brought in very few recorded blood glucoses. She had been testing once or twice a day, sometimes not at all. Before I could find out what happened, she asked: "Would it be a problem for me to come off the pump for a while?" Apparently she had been placed on an insulin pump when she was pregnant with her last child. Her doctor had then told her it would improve her diabetes control. Her glycemic control was indeed improved at least initially and then it deteriorated. She admitted that since going on the insulin pump she had "gotten lazy." It was easier for her to give herself a bolus of insulin without thinking about or testing her blood glucose. In her mind, it would be better to go back on a subcutaneous multiple injection insulin regimen "because then I would have to test my blood glucoses every time I gave insulin." "I have no problem with you stopping the pump and switching back to injections," I told my patient. "Just put the pump in a drawer and when you are ready, you can go back on it." Patients may come off of their insulin pumps and go back to injections for a variety of reasons. We call this a "Pum Continue reading >>

Holiday Gift Ideas For Insulin Pump Users

Holiday Gift Ideas For Insulin Pump Users

Holiday Gift Ideas for Insulin Pump Users Need gift ideas? Holiday gift-giving can be a challenge. Some people like surprise gifts, some make must have or wish lists. I dont always know what is on someones list, or if they would enjoy a surprise. If you are an insulin pumper, put these on your holiday wish list. If you know a pumper, these are some good (and practical) gift ideas: Test strips With all the holiday goodies being served, the pump user on your list will most likely be testing blood glucose levels more often this time of year. Supplies can be expensive even if insurance covers most or part of the cost. What is the pumpers preferred infusion set? Contact the pump manufacturers order department and arrange to pay for a box of infusion sets or syringes, cartridges or reservoirs. New item(s) available at Pump Wear, Inc. ( www.pumpwearinc.com ) Accessories Would the pump user appreciate a new pump case or holder with some fashion flair? You wont find these at your local department store. A few online vendors carry a variety of pump cases to coordinate with a wardrobe or to perk up a childs outlook. Clothing Need ways to help your pumping friend secure or hide the pump? Look at the items available from Unique Accessories ( www.uniaccs.com ) and Pump Wear ( www.pumpwearinc.com , (866) 470-PUMP). Shirts, undershirts, pajamas, lingerie, belt packs and jewelry are a few products they carry. Both companies sell items for children and adults. Telephone card or cell phone These are useful in emergencies, for travel, or for teens who need to check in with parents on a regular basis. Gift certificates If creative gift-giving is not your strong suit, dont worry. Your gift recipient can use this wild card gift for almost anything. It doesnt have to be pump related. Your ema Continue reading >>

Taking A Pump Vacation

Taking A Pump Vacation

Right now, I'm on vacation. To be more specific, I'm on an insulin pump vacation. Which, to be honest, it's not much of a vacation (still have the ole diabetes to contend with!). What is a pump vacation? It's taking a break from wearing an insulin pump for short period of time. I'm not switching back to shots permanently, although I do know of people who have done so after taking a pump vacation. Sometimes it's done because absorption isn't working well due to overused skin "real estate"; sometimes it's done seasonally (the freedom to wear dresses and skimpy bathing suits, for example); and sometimes it's done in advance to prevent damage to an insulin pump, like for a rafting trip. Some people even do it every weekend! My pump vacation started kind of by accident. When we last left off, my insulin pump had spontaneously combusted in Arizona while at a family wedding. As it turns out, the exact same weekend that my insulin pump broke, the insulin pump of my friend, Katie Clark, also broke! She signed up for a pump vacation, taking a respite from technology in favor of injections. When my new insulin pump arrived, I decided to take a cue from Katie and delay my pump hook-up a little longer in favor of a pump vacation. With the summer season around the corner, I started thinking that others might be considering a pump vacation and I want to share my experiences thus far. I should note that this is not my first pump vacation. In 2007, I spent four months attempting to do Dr. Steve Edelman's "untethered" regime, but it didn't work as well for me. Going "untethered" means using Lantus and using the insulin pump only for corrections and meal boluses. It's good for people who don't want to wear a "tethered" insulin pump, and who aren't sold on the patch pump either (at the tim Continue reading >>

Diabetes Knowledge - General Information - Diabetes & Travel - Mylife Diabetescare

Diabetes Knowledge - General Information - Diabetes & Travel - Mylife Diabetescare

With the right preparation a short holiday or a long journey is just as feasible for people living with diabetes as it is for non-diabetics. But good planning is important in order to enable you to enjoy as many carefree days as possible. If you are travelling by car there is one thing that is especially important: You must measure your blood glucose level prior to starting your trip and at regular intervals throughout. Your most important goal is to prevent hypoglycaemic emergencies. Fast-acting hypo-aids, such as glucose or orange juice, should always be close at hand. If you are travelling by plane, the most important thing to remember is: Pack all of your diabetes supplies in your carry-on bag because hold luggage can take a different route or get lost. Also, by doing so, the temperature range for the insulin and the blood glucose test strips can be kept more stable In order to avoid hassles at security checkpoints or border controls, have your physician issue you a " medical certificate ". This will certify your need to carry your insulin and diabetes supplies with you. Be sure to take plenty of backup supplies in addition to your normal diabetes supplies. Order your blood glucose test strips, insulin pump accessories, pen needles, etc., in a timely manner from your chemist or mail order supplier. Adjusting your insulin dose when changing time zones If the time difference between your home and your destination is no more than two hours, then it is usually not necessary to make any adjustments. But other arrangements will be necessary if the time difference is considerable. If you continue to administer your mealtime and correction insulin (bolus insulin) as usual, then you must adjust how you administer your delayed-action insulin/basal insulin. In other words, if Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump On Holiday

Insulin Pump On Holiday

D.D. Family Kidney/Pancreas transplant recipient As you know I'm due to start on a pump sometime in the next few weeks, and I will have lots of questions to ask you all when i'm up and running..but i've just booked to go away on holiday in June. I'm going to Menorca for a week with my boyfriend. I don't know what pump i'm getting yet, but I just wondered if any of you could tell me how you manage when abroad with regards to swimming, and sand etc. I'm one of those people that likes to be in and out of the pool all day inbetween sunbathing, and I love the beach...and am worried about how often I can take my pump off for and how frequently, and getting sand inside my pump and breaking it! There seems so much more to think about than with injections! Any advice would be greatly appreciated! You can disconnect and re connect to give missed basal rates. They recommend to take off for an hour and reconnect after the hour is up to give the missed rates. But if your going to be out all day, you may wand to just go back to doing shots of Lantus. You can use the pump with no basal rates to deliver for meals, or you can do that in shots also. It is something that you can talk about with your nurse also. She may have better suggestions. Have fun on your trip when it comes. [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3][COLOR=Magenta]Kris[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT][FONT=Lucida Sans Unicode] D.D. Family Kidney/Pancreas transplant recipient Thanks Kris that's really helpful! i'll ask my nurse about it when I start my pump training x I just keep mine connected when Im on holiday and tuck it in the waistband of my bikini knickers when in and out of the pool and the same when Im at the beach but you can disconnect but remember to take your plug connector so that no water gets in! When sunbathing I place it u Continue reading >>

Observational Study Of Diabetes Management In Type 1 Diabetic School-age Children During Holiday Versus School Days.

Observational Study Of Diabetes Management In Type 1 Diabetic School-age Children During Holiday Versus School Days.

Observational study of diabetes management in type 1 diabetic school-age children during holiday versus school days. Landau Z, et al. J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2013. J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2013;26(11-12):1083-6. doi: 10.1515/jpem-2013-0045. BACKGROUND: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) management requires year-round adherence to treatment regimen. Holidays may present a challenge towards achieving good metabolic control. OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to investigate the effect of holidays on diabetes management of schoolchildren with T1D. METHODS: Observational, case-crossover study of 45 schoolchildren, age range 7-19 years, mean 13.2 3.4 years, followed in a pediatric diabetes clinic. Subjects were stratified by age [<12 years (n=21), >12 years (n=24)] and treatment modality [insulin pump (n=29) or multiple daily injections (n=16)]. Data were downloaded from glucometers and insulin pumps during five non-weekend holidays and five subsequent school days. RESULTS: The mean number of blood glucose (BG) readings was significantly lower (4.4 1.9 vs. 4.8 1.9, p<0.01) and mean BG marginally higher (11.4 2.7 vs. 10.7 3.1 mmol/L, p=0.1) during holidays than during school days in the entire cohort. Children were significantly more adherent to diabetes management than adolescents as expressed by lower mean glycated hemoglobin level (7.7 0.8% vs. 8.6 1.4%, p<0.05), more BG readings per day (p<0.001) and lower mean BG on holidays (p<0.05) and on school days (p<0.01). In pump users, no difference in the mean number of boluses per day and mean insulin units per kilogram per day was observed between holidays and school days. CONCLUSIONS: The management of school-aged children with T1D during holidays was worse than during school days; these finding were more pronounced in adolescents. The diabet Continue reading >>

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