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Insulin Pump For Infants

Insulin Pumps And Children | Accu-chek

Insulin Pumps And Children | Accu-chek

Over the past two decades, insulin pumps have become widely adopted for use in children, including toddlers and infants. In the US, nearly half of all kids with type 1 diabetes use a pump to deliver insulin.1 Is an insulin pump right for your family? Here are a few things to consider: Better blood sugar controlInsulin pump therapy has been shown to help improve A1C levels, the long-term measure of blood glucose control, compared to injections. In addition to helping them feel better day to day, this control can help prevent the long-term health problems associated with diabetes.2 Greater peace of mindResearch shows that pump users are less likely to experience severe hypoglycemia, or extreme highs that led to diabetic ketoacidosis.2 Infusion set changes instead of injectionsThe pump requires a fine needle, or cannula, to be inserted under the skin and changed every 2 or 3 days, compared to 4 or more injections each day. Today's cannulas are very thin and some are made of flexible material, so they're comfortable for even the slimmest users. Precise insulin dosingAn insulin pump can provide very low levels of background insulin throughout the day, as well as mealtime insulin in very small increments.2 Greater flexibility with eating, sleeping and sportsOne of the key reasons families choose insulin pump therapy is the way the pump can adapt to what your child eats, their changing activity levels and how their natural blood glucose levels rise and fall throughout the day and night.3 This can be a real help for those days when kids just won't eat, they want to have a treat at a birthday party or they just can't sit still. This flexibility comes from the 2 ways a pump delivers insulin: Basal insulinSmall doses of fast-acting insulin are given around the clock to help keep Continue reading >>

Use Of Insulin Pump Therapy In The Pediatric Age-group

Use Of Insulin Pump Therapy In The Pediatric Age-group

Consensus statement from the European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology, the Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society, and the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes, endorsed by the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes ADA, American Diabetes Association CSII, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion DCCT, Diabetes Control and Complications Trial DKA, diabetic ketoacidosis EASD, European Association for the Study of Diabetes ESPE, European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology ISPAD, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes LWPES, Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society MDI, multiple daily injection QALY, quality-adjusted life year QOL, quality of life RCT, randomized controlled trial Young patients with diabetes, their families, and their diabetes care providers continue to be faced with the challenge of stri Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Way To Deliver Subcutaneous Insulin To Infants, Children, And Young People With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus?

What Is The Best Way To Deliver Subcutaneous Insulin To Infants, Children, And Young People With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus?

What is the best way to deliver subcutaneous insulin to infants, children, and young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus? What is the best way to deliver subcutaneous insulin to infants, children, and young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus? BMJ 2011; 343 doi: (Published 02 September 2011) Cite this as: BMJ 2011;343:d5221 J W Gregory, professor in paediatric endocrinology 3 1Department of Endocrinology, Alder Hey Childrens NHS Foundation Trust, Eaton Road, Liverpool L12 2AP, UK 2Department of Research and Development, Alder Hey Childrens NHS Foundation Trust 3Department of Child Health, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK Correspondence to: J Blair jo.blair{at}alderhey.nhs.uk Type 1 diabetes is a common disease of childhood affecting approximately 23 000 children and young people in England.1 The daily management of type 1 diabetes is burdensome. However, over a lifetime, long term complications are likely to have the greatest adverse impact on quality of life, and pose a significant economic burden to society and the NHS. The prevalence of long term complications is lowest in those with good glycaemic control using intensive insulin regimes in the form of insulin pump therapy or multiple daily injections.2 A recent review of paediatric diabetes services in the United Kingdom reported that 94% of centres offered intensive insulin regimes, and 78% offer treatment with insulin pump therapy.3 Despite the widespread availability of insulin pump therapy, data published by the National Diabetes Information Service in 2010 reported that only 1812 people aged less than 18 years were treated with insulin pumps in England.4 The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence recommends insulin pump therapy as a treatment option from diagnosis of type 1 Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Infants

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Infants

Diabetes can affect individuals of any age, including infants and children. Knowing that your baby has diabetes can be really frightening. But by learning how to perform glucose testing and give insulin, you can help your child to grow up healthy. The first thing you need to do, though, is to keep your own stress level down. Your baby can sense if you feel anxious, so it is up to you to be as brave as your little one. Types Medical experts say that Type 1 diabetes is the form of the disease most often diagnosed in infants. More commonly known as juvenile onset diabetes, this autoimmune disorder prevents the body from producing enough insulin, a hormone needed so that cells can break down glucose for energy. Type 2, or non-insulin dependent diabetes, can also affect infants. Insulin resistance is the primary cause of Type 2 diabetes. As a result, both insulin and blood sugar levels in the body continue to rise. Certain medical conditions or genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome and Turner syndrome, can cause this type of diabetes as well. Symptoms The American Academy of Pediatrics tells parents to contact their child’s pediatrician immediately if she shows any of the following symptoms. Crankiness, sweating, trembling, paleness and bluish tinge to the lips or fingers are symptoms that an infant might be hypoglycemic. A glucose test should be performed, as treatment may be needed if the infant’s blood sugar is too low. A baby’s brain development requires a continuous supply of glucose. Therefore, parents must carefully manage their child’s diabetes. Likewise, when an infant’s glucose levels climb too high, hyperglycemia means that your infant may not be getting enough insulin in combination with how much you are feeding her. While infants often display no sy Continue reading >>

Giving Insulin To Your Child With Type 1 Diabetes

Giving Insulin To Your Child With Type 1 Diabetes

Injections and finger sticks are part of life for a child with type 1 diabetes. We've got suggestions to make the process easier. Uncomfortable little jabs are now part of your routine, if yours is one of the 15,000 American children diagnosed each year with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Our experts suggest simple ways to reduce the discomfort, and help your child adapt quickly to needles. How insulin works When a child has T1D, the immune system attacks and destroys cells in the pancreas called beta cells. Pancreatic beta cells produce insulin, the hormone we need to turn food into energy. Without enough insulin, the amount of sugar (or glucose) in the blood rises to dangerous levels. This can cause long-term complications such as kidney failure, heart disease, lower-limb amputations, and blindness in adulthood. That's why kids with T1D have blood glucose levels checked throughout the day and night to help keep the sugar levels within target range. Using a lancet, you'll likely prick your child's fingertip for a drop of blood six or more times a day, and place it on a special test strip in a blood glucose meter. Based on that reading, you'll know how much insulin your child needs to keep blood sugar levels in range. Shots and pumps: the basics You can give your child insulin in a few ways, depending on what works best for both of you. The oldest method is through multiple daily injections with a syringe or insulin pen, which is a disposable needle tip placed at the end of a marker-shaped device that contains a pre-filled insulin cartridge. An alternative to injections is an insulin pump, a beeper-sized computerized device often worn on a belt or in a pocket. It delivers an ongoing low dose of insulin through a small tube inserted into your child's body through a needle. The t Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps For Children | Children With Diabetes - Medtronic Diabetes South Africa

Insulin Pumps For Children | Children With Diabetes - Medtronic Diabetes South Africa

How insulin pumps can help your child with diabetes Results of recent studies * show that insulin pumps can be both safe and effective for toddlers and young children, provided that their parents are both knowledgeable about and motivated to use the device. An insulin pump may help make the task of balancing insulin and glucose easier and can also help reduce hypoglycaemia. Many clinical studies * confirm that Type 1 patients of all ages who switch from multiple daily injections (MDI) to insulin pump therapy report improvements in their quality of life and increased satisfaction with their treatment. I realized in the first few hours of learning about an insulin pump that life would be different. It was clear to me that with a pump, my child would have a better life. How the MiniMed 640G insulin pump can help in daily life The MiniMed 640G insulin pump has many features and settings that may be ideal for younger users. The Bolus Wizard takes into account previously administered insulin that is still in the body, so that the bolus calculations are more accurate. A child lock feature that disables pump buttons, so insulin can not accidentally be programmed. A remote control is also available to put parents in sole control. Where can my child keep his or her insulin pump? This is often one of the first questions asked by many parents and children. In fact, the pump can be easily attached to a belt or carried in a pocket. Various pump cases are also available. Insulin pumps and sports? How does that work? There are often questions about wearing the pump during activities such as sports, dance and parties. Usually, the pump can remain attached without interfering in these activities. The pump can be disconnected (for up to 60 minutes) for showers, swimming or intense activi Continue reading >>

Children And Pump Therapy

Children And Pump Therapy

We're dedicated to creating medical devices to help you and your child better manage diabetes. Whether your child was just diagnosed with diabetes or has been managing it for some time, Medtronic is the right place to turn for help. Over 250,000 families who have children with diabetes count on Medtronic and our diabetes products to secure their child's long-term health. In concert with your healthcare professional, we are committed to providing the best products, service, and support for you and your family. How can Medtronic Products Help My Child? It is likely that you and your child regularly seek information that will help you best manage his or her diabetes. While many options are available to children with diabetes, the Medtronic insulin pumps deliver precise, timely insulin doses 24/7, similar to the way a healthy pancreas delivers basal and bolus insulin. What is an Insulin Pump? Like a pancreas, an insulin pump continuously delivers tiny doses of insulin to your child's body, and it replaces the need to give routine insulin injections with syringes or pens. Insulin pumps are not implanted in your child's body. They are small enough to fit in a pocket or on your child's waistband. Is My Child Right for Insulin Pump Therapy? From infants to teenagers, thousands of families every year discover that insulin pump therapy is a better way to manage their child’s diabetes. Pump Compatibility Quiz (True or False) How do you know whether your child is right for pump therapy? Take the following quiz and talk with your healthcare professional about the results. Do you have basic familiarity with diabetes (i.e. what insulin does, what blood sugar levels should be, what hypoglycemia and DKA are and how to treat these problems if they arise)? Do you and your child regularl Continue reading >>

Pilot Study Indicates Insulin Pump Therapy Is Effective For Infants And Preschool Children With Diabetes

Pilot Study Indicates Insulin Pump Therapy Is Effective For Infants And Preschool Children With Diabetes

Pilot Study Indicates Insulin Pump Therapy Is Effective For Infants And Preschool Children With Diabetes BALTIMORE - With proper supervision, toddlers and preschool children with Type I diabetes can safely and successfully use an external insulin pump rather than multiple daily injections to treat their disease, according to a recent study by Duke University Medical Center researchers. However, the scientists emphasized that further research is necessary before treatment guidelines recommend widespread use of pumps by young children. Insulin pumps are small beeper-sized machines that infuse programmed amounts of insulin into the body via a catheter placed through the skin. These pumps are sometimes used in adolescents and adults as an alternative to the traditional injection-based treatment of diabetes, but they are rarely used in young children. Typically, diabetes in infants and toddlers is treated with two to four injections of insulin daily. However, multiple insulin injections cannot always stabilize blood glucose, and young children are at high risk for episodes of severe hypoglycemia (low glucose levels). Severe hypoglycemia can, in some cases, result in coma, seizures, learning disabilities and behavioral disorders. "In young children, food intake and physical activity levels are unpredictable, and it is difficult to administer very low doses of insulin precisely," said Michael Freemark, M.D., chief of the division of pediatric endocrinology and diabetes at Duke. "Moreover, the child is often unable to convey symptoms of low blood glucose to parents and caretakers. These factors make diabetic control exceedingly difficult in this age group and increase the risk of severe hypoglycemia." Freemark is senior author of the study, which was presented today (May 6) at Continue reading >>

Insulin Requirements Differ For Infants With Type 1, Neonatal Diabetes Using Pump Therapy

Insulin Requirements Differ For Infants With Type 1, Neonatal Diabetes Using Pump Therapy

Insulin requirements differ for infants with type 1, neonatal diabetes using pump therapy Kapellen TM, et al. Diabetes Technol Ther. 2015;doi:10.1089/dia.2015.0030 . Infants with type 1 and neonatal diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion have differing basal and prandial insulin requirements that change over time, according to research in Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics. Thomas M. Kapellen, MD, of the Hospital for Children and Adolescents and the University of Leipzig in Germany, and colleagues analyzed data from 168 infants with diabetes treated with insulin pump therapy (58.9% boys) participating in the Prospective Diabetes Follow-up Registry (DPV) in Germany and Austria. Within the cohort, 58 infants had type 1 diabetes (mean age at diagnosis, 45.7 weeks); 67 had neonatal diabetes (mean age at diagnosis, 1.8 weeks); 43 infants had diabetes with unknown antibody status (mean age at diagnosis, 45.7 weeks). Researchers compared basal rate and mealtime bolus insulin requirements. At initiation of insulin pump therapy , researchers found that infants with type 1 diabetes required a median total insulin amount of 0.83 IU/kg of body weight vs. a median total insulin of 7.63 IU/kg of body weight for infants with antibody status unknown diabetes and a median of 0.74 IU/kg of body weight for infants with neonatal diabetes. Basal insulin requirements at diabetes onset were found to be significantly different between infants with neonatal diabetes (median of 0.56 IU/kg of body weight) and infants with type 1 diabetes (median of 0.43 IU/kg of body weight; P = .036). The prandial insulin requirements were also significantly different between infants with neonatal diabetes (median of 0.18 IU/kg of body weight) and infants with type 1 diabetes (median of Continue reading >>

An Infant With Diabetes

An Infant With Diabetes

Annie McMillen is 22 months old. She was diagnosed with type 1, insulin-dependent diabetes at age 12 months, and has had a very rough time since. According to her parents, Brian and Cindy McMillen, Annie's sugars fluctuate from so low they cause "seizures" (as she terms them), to 450mg/dL and higher. She has these convulsion (described by her physician, a pump-using diabetic, as due to extreme hypos) in her sleep, or awake, with little warning. On different days, the same food intake, same exercise, same insulin, same carbs (her mother feeds her by the carb-counting system)—but different results. She currently uses Ultralente and Humalog insulins, but has tried other combinations. As her mother describes it, at midnight, Annie's blood glucose reading may be 330mg/dL, but at 1 a.m. (Ultralente almost over, not enough left to cause a big drop), she wakes in a convulsion—choking and thrashing about. Her mother says it is as if the insulin decides to go into storage, then abruptly releases, acting as if it is peaking, when by rights it should be ending. A blood glucose reading at this time, without fail, indicates severe hypoglycemia, (about 40mg/dL). Her physician has confirmed this reading, so the child is not epileptic. She has even had such convulsions one half hour after eating a full meal. When they happen, her mother says, "I will have to force a medicine syringe in her mouth, containing chocolate syrup, glucose gel, etc, even if she is full... People stare at us and probably wonder what is that woman doing to that poor baby." (Cindy also uses Glucagon injections to treat Annie's lows). Annie's blood is tested six to 12 times a day, and she takes two to four shots (in different injection sites around her body, but not her stomach...) Her mother has had to quit wo Continue reading >>

Infant And Toddler Diabetes

Infant And Toddler Diabetes

The incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus continues to increase with an estimated rise in incidence rates of between 3% and 5% per year.1,2 This increase has been most pronounced in the pre‐school age group.3,4 The rising incidence has been paralleled by the increasing intensity of management of this condition. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) study group demonstrated the importance of intensive diabetes management and subsequent strict glycaemic control, with significant reductions in microvascular complications with small changes in HbA1c.5 However, intensive diabetes management is associated with a potential increased risk of severe hypoglycaemia.6,7 Efforts to achieve near‐normoglycaemia as early as possible after diagnosis should be considered based on the “tracking phenomenon” data which suggest a correlation between metabolic control in the early stages of treatment and that in subsequent years.8 The importance of intensive diabetes management has significant implications for toddlers and infants diagnosed with diabetes and for the children's diabetes services who look after them. This age group has particular features and clinical characteristics which makes their care distinct from that of older children with diabetes. This article will review the main clinical areas in the management of these children. Go to: Epidemiology Oxford data suggest an incidence rate in the UK of type 1 diabetes mellitus in children <2 years of age of about 1:15 000.4 Approximately 4% of children with type 1 diabetes are less than 2 years of age at diagnosis.9 This suggests that there are several hundred children being cared for in the UK and Ireland who were diagnosed at this age. These relatively small numbers must necessarily limit an individual diabetes Continue reading >>

What Role For An Insulin Pump For The Very Young?

What Role For An Insulin Pump For The Very Young?

What Role for an Insulin Pump for the Very Young? Q: What are the indications for use of an insulin pump in very young children (infants and preschoolers)? A: The results of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)1 and the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications2 (EDIC) study provide the rationale for achieving strict glycemic control in all of our patients with type 1 diabetes. These studies demonstrate that intensive management reduces the incidence and progression of microvascular disease in the short term and long term as well. In children--and in particular in the youngest subset of children (ie, infants and toddlers)--the concern has always been about safety, particularly the unknown risks of hypoglycemia on the developing brain. Older studies observed that cognitive problems are more common in children in whom diabetes was diagnosed at a younger age and that hypoglycemic brain damage is the mechanism. More recent studies suggest that hyperglycemia may be just as dangerous to young brains as hypoglycemia, but the limiting factor to diabetes treatment in infants and toddlers has always been fear of hypoglycemia. Insulin pump therapy, in my opinion, is actually safer in this population than injection therapy for several reasons: Large doses of long-acting insulin are avoided, with the attendant unpredictable peaks and variabilities. Basal insulin coverage can be adjusted as needed for exercise, illness, etc. It offers freedom from rigid, inflexible meal schedules and contents (which is particularly important with toddlers). It improves the quality of life for parents, particularly mothers, who typically bear the greatest burden of diabetes care in the youngest patients. Non-randomized prospective studies have clearly demonstrated that p Continue reading >>

Toddlers And Babies On Insulin Pumps

Toddlers And Babies On Insulin Pumps

° Seeing is believing the best way to introduce small children to the pump is to do a pump trial. This is usually done with saline and most pump companies are happy to assist you. I have found that wearing the pump myself (yes even doing the infusion set) gave me a good sense of what my daughter would be experiencing. I started to wear the pump a week before Nikki Tyler, at the age of 3 was scheduled to try it she was very curious at what I was wearing and wanted a pump like mommy. This made putting the pump on her a lot easier because she wanted one like mommy. ° Treat the pumping experience in the most positive of ways: ° I had a goody basket made up with all kinds of fun little items (cost was like 2.00 apiece) I wrapped each one up and had a basket filled. This was the site changing basket Nikki Tyler got to pick out a goody every time we changed her site. This made the actually changing of her site something that she would look forward to instead of dreading. When she actually started to tell me it was time to change her site (she wanted the goody) I knew that we were doing fine. ° One mom I knew even through a “Pumping party" for her daughter. A couple of days after going on the pump the mom invited over family and friends to help celebrate her daughters new adventure. Family and friends all gave her little gifts and items to help her wear her pump. This was a great way for family and friends to also learn more about the pumping experience and share in the adventure. ° The most important part of pumping is to have a sense of humor(you never know when the pump alarm will go off). Right after going on the pump my husband and I went to visit a sick aunt of mine in a nursing home. Immediately upon entering the building Nikki's alarm on the pump went off, being Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin Pump Therapy

Pump Contents Insulin Pump Therapy Why Good Control is Important Pumps vs. Shots Pump Basics Using the Pump Is the Pump Right for You? Kids and Pumps Life on the Pump Wearing Your Pump Pumps in School Getting Started with the Pump Infusion Sets Related Products Links and Resources Insulin Pump Therapy An insulin pump is a small mechanical device, a little larger than a pager that is worn outside the body, often on a belt or in a pocket. It delivers fast-acting insulin into the body via an infusion set -- a thin plastic tube ending in a small, flexible plastic cannula or a very thin needle. You insert the cannula beneath the skin at the infusion site, usually in your abdomen or upper buttocks. You keep the infusion set in place for two to three days (sometimes more), and then move it to a new location. All insulin is delivered through the infusion set. The insulin pump is not an artificial pancreas. Rather, it is computer-driven device that delivers fast-acting insulin (NovoLog, Humalog, or Apidra) in precise amounts at pre-programmed times. Wearing an insulin pump might require more work on your part than traditional injection therapy, especially if you are not used to checking your blood sugar several times a day. You must also learn to use the pump to deliver the extra insulin you require when you eat. The following companies make or sell insulin pumps in the United States: When you consider pump therapy, be sure to contact each company to learn about their product offerings. Insulin pump features vary, and you want to be sure to find the pump that best meets your needs. The number of people using insulin pump therapy to manage their diabetes is growing rapidly; roughly 500,000 people around the world use an insulin pump. Their reasons for choosing the pump are many, Continue reading >>

3 Year Old Going On Insulin Pump - Circle Of Moms

3 Year Old Going On Insulin Pump - Circle Of Moms

All Communities > moms of children with type1 Diabetes > 3 year old going on insulin pump Valerie - posted on 04/07/2010 ( 5 moms have responded ) I'm super excited to say that my 3 year old is fixing to go on an insulin pump. As excited as I am, there's still that part of me that is going into uncharted territory. I have always been right on top of Emily's Diabetes, making sure her numbers are as level as they can possibly be, and we've seen the results of that in her A1C, but this...I know it's gonna be so much easier on her and me, as well. She's been taking 5 shots a day since she was diagnosed at 11 months, so I'm excited and scared all at the same time. I do know beyond a shadow of a doubt that this is going to be good for her. I guess I just need to hear some experiences from other moms with little kids that use insulin pumps, how they dealt with it, if there was any problems with pulling, or having trouble sleeping with it. Just normal concerns I suppose. lol Once again, this is uncharted territory. We were not planning on doing it this soon, but she will be starting school in the Fall, and I want it to be as easy as possible, and I believe this is the way to do it! So, give me some of your experiences with young children and insulin pumps! Continue reading >>

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