diabetestalk.net

Insulin Pump Costs

Financial Concerns About Insulin Pumps

Financial Concerns About Insulin Pumps

Many concerns arise when patients consider the costs of insulin pump therapy. The following are a few of the most frequently asked questions: What is the cost of a pump? About $6,000 is the average price. How much of the cost will my insurance cover? Most insurance plans provide coverage for insulin pump therapy and diabetes testing supplies under a Durable Medical Equipment (DME) clause. Pump manufacturers’ insurance departments have the expertise to negotiate approval for payment with your insurance provider. If you have a co-payment, the manufacturer will set up a payment plan, if necessary. Medicare and Medicaid plans also provide coverage, but you should check with the plan administrator in your state. What is the cost of supplies? Monthly costs for intensive insulin pump management supplies can range from $250 to $500, depending on your insurance plan and on the frequency of site changes. Here are potential costs for 10 set changes per month (every three days): Needle set Approximately $6.90 per set $69 90-degree insertion cannula Depending on the brand, $10.83 per set or $13.50 per set $108.30 $135 30-degree insertion cannula $11 per set $110 Pump syringes $10 per month $37-$46 Sterile dressings and skin prep $10 per month Example: box of 50 IV prep wipes Some vendor cash prices can be 30%-50% less than billed list price. Ask about payment options and discounts. $32 (billed) $16 (cash) Insulin Depends on coverage/co-pay/amount used. Variable Test strips Minimum of four daily multiplied by cost per strip. Approximately .75 to $1.00 per strip. Usually covered by insurance. $3-$10 per day Prices shown are estimates only. Vendor and manufacturer prices vary and can change at any time. How can we save money on supplies? If you use sites and supplies beyond the recom Continue reading >>

Cost Of Insulin Pumps

Cost Of Insulin Pumps

Tweet Insulin pumps are costly items but may be possible to fund for some households. Those considering buying an insulin pump should consider not only the cost of the pump, including the monthly consumables, accessories and insurance but, importantly, how you will receive the required insulin pump centred care. Most people in the UK who have a pump have it funded by the NHS. If you have an insulin pump on the NHS, you may need to cover some of the costs which may include insurance, accessories and, in the case of some pumps, glucose sensors as well. Insulin pump costs The cost of insulin pumps is often between £2000 and £3000. NICE guidance in 2008 records the following costs of insulin pumps: Johnson & Johnson - Animas 2020 - £2600 Medtronic - Paradigm real-Time MMT-522 - £2750 Medtronic - Paradigm real-Time MMT-722 - £2750 Roche - Accu-Chek Spirit - £2375 Deltec Cozmo - £2750 Newer insulin pumps are now available but prices of most pumps have stayed within similar price boundaries. Where can I buy an insulin pump? In the UK, you will need to choose which insulin pump is right for you and then and contact the insulin pump manufacturer. If you do not meet the clinical criteria for having an insulin pump via the NHS and you wish to purchase an insulin pump, you will need to check whether your diabetes clinic is able to and happy to provide all the care you may need. Please note that you should not expect your NHS clinic to necessarily have the resources to cover the care for a patient with a pump bought privately, in which case you will need to arrange diabetes care with a private diabetologist that is qualified to care for people with insulin pumps. It’s important to arrange how you will receive care before you go ahead and purchase an insulin pump. If you are Continue reading >>

Diabetics Can Spend $1,000 A Month Taking Care Of Themselves — And It's Not Just Because Of Insulin

Diabetics Can Spend $1,000 A Month Taking Care Of Themselves — And It's Not Just Because Of Insulin

A paramedic checking the blood sugar levels of a diabetes patient. Beawiharta Beawiharta/Reuters Diabetes, in particular type 1 diabetes, can be an expensive chronic disease to manage. That's being felt as the cost of insulin increases, while at the same time high health insurance deductibles leave families on the hook to cover more of the cost than ever before. It means, in some cases, all the expenses can climb past $1,000 a month. There are two types of diabetes of which nearly 29.1 million Americans have one or the other. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease, in which the body mistakenly kills so-called beta cells that are supposed to make the body's insulin, a hormone that helps people absorb and process the sugar in food. This kind of diabetes can affect any age group, though it's most often diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults. The roughly 1.25 million people in the US who have Type 1 diabetes need to inject insulin to live. Type 2 diabetes, the more common form, is something that develops either based on genetic or lifestyle choices, and doesn't always require that you need to take insulin. But insulin isn't the only thing type 1 diabetics have to keep track of. There are a lot of supplies that come with the diagnosis: there are test strips, which help monitor blood sugar levels there are lancets that are used to draw the blood, not to mention alcohol swabs to clean the area where injections happen. There are also the needles/syringes you need to inject the insulin. There's also a device called glucagon, an emergency drug for diabetics that is kind of like the EpiPen. If a diabetic' blood sugar gets too low and he or she passes out, someone can administer the glucagon to get their blood sugar levels back up to non-emergency levels. Some also choose to use a Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump

Insulin Pump

First things first – registering with the NDSS When a patient is diagnosed with diabetes, they should register with the Australian Government’s National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS), which is administered by Diabetes Australia. The NDSS provides subsidised insulin pump consumables, including reservoirs and infusion sets. Who is eligible for NDSS subsidies? To be eligible, the patient must be an Australian resident, hold a current Australian Medicare card or a Department of Veteran Affairs file number and should have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner. Several countries also have a reciprocal agreement with Australia. If the patient is visiting Australia, and comes from a country with a Reciprocal Health Care Agreement, they may be entitled to temporary NDSS registration. Please note, different rules apply for patients with Type 2 diabetes, and in most instances, these patients may not be able to access these subsidy programs. However, Medtronic is currently offering a grant on insulin pump consumables for patients with Type 2 insulin dependent diabetes, with the opportunity to save up to 90% on RRP30.This means that pump consumables will cost roughly the same as they do for people with Type 1 Diabetes who can access the NDSS consumable prices. See here for more information. Getting access to insulin The Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) covers a considerable proportion of drug and medication costs through Medicare. Patients can get insulin from pharmacies with a prescription (from a GP or Endocrinologist) using the PBS; one prescription is generally 3-6 months’ supply, depending on the patient’s insulin needs. Other subsidy options for Type 1 patients Another option for subsidy assistance for Type 1 diabetes patients is the Type 1 Diabetes Insulin Pu Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everyone needs insulin to live. Insulin is a hormone that helps our bodies use and store the food we eat. People with Type 1 Diabetes no longer make insulin and have to give insulin in order to sustain life. People with Type 2 Diabetes don’t use their own insulin well, and over time can have trouble making enough. So, all people with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes need insulin. When people give insulin injections, they may take 1-2 injections of a long acting insulin every day and 3+ injections of rapid acting insulin for meals and snacks. The typical person with Type 1 Diabetes could take anywhere from 4-7+ injections a day. Many people currently give insulin through an insulin pen or a syringe. But, there is another option, an insulin pump. An insulin pump delivers rapid acting insulin in two ways. First, the pump is programmed to give you insulin every hour throughout the hour referred to basal insulin. Basal, think “base,” is the insulin your body needs even in the absence of food, it is also referred to as background insulin. This basal rate replaces the long acting injection that you take. Second, is bolus, this is the insulin you take for food or to correct a high blood sugar. If you get basal and bolus confused, think “bowl”, as in you eat out of a bowl, to help you remember bolus is for food. Once you are on a pump, all insulin is delivered through the pump and shots are no longer necessary. Components There are a few things necessary to make a pump work. When a pump is shipped to someone: they will also need to send infusion sets, reservoirs, and possibly batteries, depending on your pump. Let’s talk about each component. Infusion Sets An infusion set is the part that is actually inserted into the body and has tubing that conn Continue reading >>

Getting An Insulin Pump

Getting An Insulin Pump

Tweet There is a high level of demand for insulin pumps but currently the UK lags behind other European countries in its provision of insulin pumps. Insulin pumps allow greater opportunity to take control of diabetes but, because they are a more expensive option than injections, eligibility criteria exists to ensure the most suitable candidates have access to insulin pump therapy. Funding options There are two main options for getting an insulin pump: Self funding –whereby you buy the pump and consumables NHS funded –the pump is paid for by the NHS for those meeting eligibility criteria The most common option for getting an insulin pump in the UK is to have one funded by the NHS. Getting an insulin pump privately If you buy the pump privately, you will need to consider the total cost, including the consumables, and ensure you have a health team with a specialism in insulin pumps. You will need to arrange whether you will be able to receive care on the NHS or privately before going ahead with buying an insulin pump privately. Insulin pumps tend to cost between £2,000 and £3,000 and the consumables for an insulin pump, including infusion sets, reservoirs and batteries, can cost around £1,000 to £2,000 a year. The NHS does not operate a scheme in which it funds pumps which have been bought privately. Getting a pump on the NHS The process of getting an insulin pump can vary across different parts of the UK as budgets, the level of demand for pumps and the number of healthcare professionals with experience of insulin pumps can all play a part. The advantage of applying for an insulin pump through the NHS is that you have the chance of getting the pump for free. This for most people outweighs the disadvantages of not knowing whether or when they may qualify for a pump Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin pump therapy can give you the better control you want for your lifestyle.1, 2 Technology for Joy & Jake What Is Insulin Pump Therapy? An insulin pump is a small device about the size of a small cell phone that is worn externally and can be discreetly clipped to your belt, slipped into a pocket, or hidden under your clothes. It delivers precise doses of rapid-acting insulin to closely match your body’s needs: Basal Rate: Small amounts of insulin delivered continuously (24/7) for normal functions of the body (not including food). The programmed rate is determined by your healthcare professional. Bolus Dose: Additional insulin you can deliver “on demand” to match the food you are going to eat or to correct a high blood sugar. Insulin pumps have bolus calculators that help you calculate your bolus amount based on settings that are determined by your healthcare professional. Buttons to program your insulin LCD screen to show what you are programming Battery compartment to hold 1 AAA alkaline battery Reservoir compartment that holds insulin A plastic cartridge that holds the insulin that is locked into the insulin pump. It comes with a transfer guard (blue piece at the top that is removed before inserting the reservoir into the pump) that assists with pulling the insulin from a vial into the reservoir. A reservoir can hold up to 300 units of insulin and is changed every two to three days. An infusion set includes a thin tube that goes from the reservoir to the infusion site on your body. The cannula is inserted with a small needle that is removed after it is in place. It goes into sites (areas) on your body similar to where you give insulin injections. The infusion set is changed every two to three days. An infusion set is placed into the insertion device and wi Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

Not Just for Type 1 An estimated 350,000 people in the United States use insulin pumps today, and about 30,000 of those are believed to have Type 2 diabetes. Surprised? Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease that causes many people who have it to eventually need to use insulin to control their blood glucose levels. Although many people still think insulin pumps are only for treatment of Type 1 diabetes, they can also be useful for some people with Type 2 diabetes. According to Charles H. Raine III, MD, a diabetologist in Orangeburg, South Carolina, who himself has Type 2 diabetes and uses an insulin pump, the criteria for a good pump candidate are the same, no matter what type of diabetes a person has. In general, a good pump candidate has uncontrolled blood glucose, but also has a desire to try for better control of his diabetes, is willing to measure and document food intake and blood glucose levels, and is physically, emotionally, and cognitively able to manage a pump (or has a caregiver who is). Another important characteristic is a willingness to keep appointments with members of his diabetes care team. Insulin pumps are cell-phone-size devices used to deliver preprogrammed and user-adjusted doses of insulin. Depending on the brand and model, they hold between 180 and 315 units of insulin. Most people use rapid-acting insulin — options include insulin lispro (brand name Humalog), insulin aspart (NovoLog), and insulin glulisine (Apidra) — in their pumps, with a few using Regular. Instead of using an intermediate- or long-acting insulin as a background — or basal — insulin, a user simulates the pancreas’s steady release of insulin by programming the pump to automatically give small amounts of the rapid-acting or Regular insulin around the clock, based on Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Should I Get An Insulin Pump?

Diabetes: Should I Get An Insulin Pump?

You may want to have a say in this decision, or you may simply want to follow your doctor's recommendation. Either way, this information will help you understand what your choices are so that you can talk to your doctor about them. Get the facts Key points to remember An insulin pump can free you from a strict regimen of meals, sleep, and exercise, because you can program it to match your changing schedule. After you learn how to work with a pump, it can make living with diabetes easier. But it takes some time and effort to learn how to use the pump to keep it working properly and to control your diabetes. Using a pump includes checking your blood sugar many times a day and carefully counting the grams of carbohydrate that you eat. Using an insulin pump can keep your blood sugar at a more constant level so that you don't have as many big swings in your levels. People who use pumps have fewer problems with very low blood sugar. Many insurance companies cover the cost of insulin pumps, but they have strict guidelines that you will have to follow before they will pay. Continue reading >>

Is My Test, Item, Or Service Covered?

Is My Test, Item, Or Service Covered?

How often is it covered? Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) doesn’t cover insulin (unless use of an insulin pump is medically necessary), insulin pens, syringes, needles, alcohol swabs, or gauze. Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D) may cover insulin and certain medical supplies used to inject insulin, like syringes, gauze, and alcohol swabs. If you use an external insulin pump, insulin and the pump may be covered as durable medical equipment (DME). However, suppliers of insulin pumps may not necessarily provide insulin. For more information, see durable medical equipment. Your costs in Original Medicare You pay 100% for insulin (unless used with an insulin pump, then you pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount, and the Part B deductible applies). You pay 100% for syringes and needles, unless you have Part D. To find out how much your specific test, item, or service will cost, talk to your doctor or other health care provider. The specific amount you’ll owe may depend on several things, like: Other insurance you may have How much your doctor charges Whether your doctor accepts assignment The type of facility The location where you get your test, item, or service Continue reading >>

Comparative Effectiveness And Costs Of Insulin Pump Therapy For Diabetes.

Comparative Effectiveness And Costs Of Insulin Pump Therapy For Diabetes.

Abstract OBJECTIVES: Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), or "insulin pump" therapy, is an alternative to multiple daily insulin injections (MDII) for management of diabetes. This study evaluates patterns of healthcare utilization, costs, and blood glucose control for patients with diabetes who initiate CSII. STUDY DESIGN: Pre-post with propensity-matched comparison design involving commercially insured US adults (aged 18-64 years) with insulin-requiring diabetes who transitioned from MDII to CSII between July 1, 2009, and June 30, 2012 ("CSII initiators"; n = 2539), or who continued using MDI (n = 2539). METHODS: Medical claims and laboratory results files obtained from a large US-wide health payer were used to construct direct medical expenditures, hospital use, healthcare encounters for hypoglycemia, and mean concentration of glycated hemoglobin (A1C). We fit difference-in-differences regression models to compare healthcare expenditures for 3 years following the switch to CSII. Stratified analyses were performed for prespecified patient subgroups. RESULTS: Over 3 years, mean per-person total healthcare expenditures were $1714 (95% confidence interval [CI], $1184-$2244) higher per quarter for CSII initiators compared with matched MDII patients (total mean 3-year difference of $20,565). Compared with matched controls, mean A1C concentrations became lower for CSII initiators by 0.46% in year 2 (P = .0003) and by 0.32% in year 3 (P = .047). CSII initiators also had a higher rate of hypoglycemia encounters in year 1 (P = .002). CONCLUSIONS: For adults with insulin-requiring diabetes, transitioning from MDII to CSII was associated with modest improvements in A1C but more hypoglycemia encounters and increased healthcare expenditures, without significant improvem Continue reading >>

Medtronic 530g With Enlite

Medtronic 530g With Enlite

The FDA approved the Medtronic MiniMed 530G insulin pump with its display of the Enlite continuous glucose monitor in September, 2013. The 530G is the first system in the United States that can automatically stop insulin delivery if the CGM's glucose value falls to a preset level (60-90 mg/dl) AND the wearer doesn't respond to the Threshold Suspend Alarm. This functionality puts the device in the newly created OZO: Artificial Pancreas Device Classification created by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Although the 530G is an early step toward an artificial pancreas, some consumers have criticized Medtronic's marketing of the 530G using this classification, as discussed below. The 530G will be sold as an integrated system, paired with their CGM and its Enlite sensor. Those who want to use the Medtronic pump with a different CGM like the Dexcom G4 or Navigator would order the Revel 523 or 723 pumps that are identical to the 530G other than its display of the Enlite CGM. These pumps do not have threshold suspend. The Enlite sensor is said to be more comfortable, have slightly better accuracy than the older Guardian sensor, and can be worn up to 6 days rather than 3. Medtronic suggests that the sensor be worn on the abdomen only. It comes with a new Enlite Serter that puts the sensor in at a 90-degree angle while hiding the needle from the wearer. Like the Revel 523 and 723 pumps, the 530G uses the same 180-unit and 300-unit reservoirs and infusion sets. Threshold Suspend (TS) is the suspension of basal insulin delivery when a selected low blood glucose threshold is reached. The goal is to minimize time spent in hypoglycemia. The low threshold can be set between 60 and 90 mg/dL. An alarm is sounded when the TS begins to alert the wearer. The low alarm repeats every 20 Continue reading >>

2016 Insulin Pump Comparisons

2016 Insulin Pump Comparisons

Click to go to comparison page: Tandem t-Slim/t-Flex/t-slim G4Roche Accu-Chek Combo Insulet Insulet OmniPod Medtronic 530G With Enlite Animas Vibe Pump System Features in Common: 24-hour toll-free helpline Internal safety checks Child button lock-out Full Training Included Simplified programming Extended bolus options Temporary basal rate options Programmable reminders Downloadable Low battery warning Low insulin warning User-set active insulin time Tandem t:slim, t:slim G4 & t:flex Unique Advantages Potential Drawbacks Bright, full-color touch screen Modern, high-tech appearance Compact, thin dimensions Rapid numeric entry, fastest bolus entry Cartridges hold 300u (t:slim); 480u (t:flex) Can calculate boluses up to 50 units (60 on t:flex) Site-change reminder w/customizable day & time Graphic on-screen history display Carb counting calculator Temp basal up to 250%, 72 hrs Can set duration of insulin action in 1-minute increments IOB & time remaining displayed on home screen Missed bolus reminders customizable by day of week Alert for high temperatures which may spoil insulin Secondary basal programs linked with secondary bolus calculation parameters Web-based download software Compatible w/leur-lock infusion sets Minimal insulin movement with changes in altitude Small buttons can be difficult to activate; screen goes blank if buttons missed 3x Unlock procedure required to perform any programming No integrated clip (must put in a case that has a clip) Tubing connector looks “medical,” can snag on clothing Basal & bolus settings in same time slots; may take several steps to edit Extra confirmation steps with all programming Weak vibrate mechanism No meter link Manufacturer relatively new in pump industry Requires charging 1-2x/week No formal in-warranty upgrade polic Continue reading >>

Health Insurer’s Limit On Insulin Pumps Worries Patients

Health Insurer’s Limit On Insulin Pumps Worries Patients

Stephanie Rodenberg-Lewis wasn’t happy with her insulin pump and finally switched two years ago to another brand. Now her health insurer is pushing her to go back. UnitedHealth Group Inc. has made a deal with device maker Medtronic that will slash options for diabetics who use the portable pumps, which cost thousands of dollars. The move has angered Rodenberg-Lewis and others who will be limited to three pump choices instead of nine. Health insurers, big employers, and other bill payers have been trying for years to rein in costs and improve care by steering clients to certain doctors and hospitals. They’ve also restricted options for some prescriptions and lined up deals for smaller-ticket items like diabetes test strips or items patients don’t chose, like heart stents. Limiting choice for medical equipment that a patient usually selects is uncharted territory. UnitedHealth rivals Aetna and the Blue Cross-Blue Shield insurer Anthem say they haven’t done this. But experts say it could become more common. “It’s unfair,” said Rodenberg-Lewis, 41, a Katy, Texas, elementary school teacher who also has a teenage son with type 1 diabetes. “I have this disease that I did not ask for, did not cause, and now you’re telling me you’re going to make the decision for me (about) the device that keeps me alive?” Insulin pumps are pager-size devices used mainly by people with type 1 diabetes, the kind often found in childhood. These patients can’t make their own insulin, the hormone that turns food into energy. The external pumps make up for that by delivering a steady dose through a tube into the skin or a patch and extra doses at mealtimes Starting July 1, customers on many of UnitedHealth’s plans will only be able to choose between two Medtronic pumps or an Continue reading >>

Touchscreen Meets Insulin Pump In Tandem’s New T:slim

Touchscreen Meets Insulin Pump In Tandem’s New T:slim

“Design is a funny word. Some people think design means how it looks. But of course, if you dig deeper, it's really how it works … To design something really well, you have to get it. You have to really grok what it’s all about. It takes a passionate commitment to really thoroughly understand something, chew it up, not just quickly swallow it. Most people don’t take the time to do that.” Those were the words of the late Steve Jobs in an interview with Wired in February 1996. More than a decade later, Tandem Diabetes Care took this idea to heart with its new t:slim touchscreen insulin pump, which it designed after conducting a remarkable 4,000 in-depth interviews with patients, healthcare providers, and caregivers. Tandem really wanted to get inside the minds of people who take insulin – pumpers and non-pumpers alike. The new pump was approved by the FDA in November 2011 (see new now next in diaTribe #38) and launched just last month. I was able to get trained on the t:slim at Tandem’s San Diego headquarters soon after it launched, and what follows is my experience wearing the device over the past week. So far, three themes have emerged: some clear differences from other pumps, a focus on simplicity and convenience, and an attention to safety. Part One: Differences from Other Pumps Adam’s Favorites iPhone-like touchscreen Rechargeable battery Highly customizable “personal profiles” for insulin delivery From the minute I opened the shipping box, it was clear that the t:slim pump was somewhat different from other pumps I’ve used – included with the pump were a USB charging cable and adapters for both the wall and car. Even the included user manual comes on a credit-card-like thumb drive. But the most obvious difference between the t:slim and other p Continue reading >>

More in insulin