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Insulin Pump And Cgm All In One

Medtrum Introduce A New Tubeless Insulin Pump And Cgm System

Medtrum Introduce A New Tubeless Insulin Pump And Cgm System

Please Note the Medtrum PUmp and CGM system is now available, please find the latest information in our Article on the Medtrum A6 Touchcare System as this particular article is now outdated. Exciting news in the Type 1 Community as a brand new Tubeless Insulin Pump and a new CGM system is set to be launched in the UK by Medtrum. Medtrum are a Chinese company though they have a UK office in Watford. Here is what we know about both systems, so far. MEDTRUM S6 EASYSENSE CGM The first product they are set to launch is their S6 Easysense Disposable CGM System. A company spokesperson informed me this is set to be launched in September 2016. The S6 CGM is set to rival the Dexcom G5 and quite possibly the Freestyle Libre, flash glucose monitoring system. I’m sure many families will be attracted to the product as there are no set up fees. Unlike the Dexcom system where you need to purchase a receiver and the rest of the kit up front. The company describe it as a “pay as you go, monthly format”. As you can see from the image above the S6 sensor and transmitter look very similar to the Dexcom system. This is also a mobile system, so no receiver is required, unlike the Dexcom, where despite the mobile app being widely used, users are still forced to also purchase a costly receiver, which many families find they do not use. Data from the sensor will be viewable on a mobile phone, though there is no information at this stage if that will be for both IOS devices and Android. Just like Dexcom G5 the data can be shared with love ones enabling remote monitoring of your child’s levels. Sensor life is 7 days, though it remains to be seen if the life can be extended on the sensor like you can with other CGM systems. Also highly attractive for users, is the fact that the system offer Continue reading >>

Freestyle Libre – A Nurse’s Review

Freestyle Libre – A Nurse’s Review

My 15 year old daughter and I both started on the Medtronic 670G system in July. With 2 1/2 months of use under our belts, we have had common, yet unique, experiences with the Medtronic 670G tech. As many people report, some magic happens between weeks 3 and 5. There was a turning point in which we both became happier with the results and user interface/ demands. [Our initial experience, one week in, is documented in this piece: A Nurse’s Review: Medtronic 670G Insulin Pump.] Chew on this: I don’t buy juice anymore. This is huge, especially in a household that has two very active people under one roof – that both have T1D. I had the habit, on occasion, of pouring my daughter 3 glasses of juice overnight after a big basketball practice or some crazy family adventure in the mountains. I can thankfully report that this behavior is a thing of the past. Like it or not, midnight picnics are common for those of us living with type 1 diabetes. Our dentists may agree that the 670G may be worth it’s weight in gold with the simple elimination of the sugar bath on our teeth all hours of the day and night. Hands down, the best feature of this pump/ sensor combo is the near elimination of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) – particularly overnight when we are at our most vulnerable. Over the past few months I have put this thing to the test. I trained for and completed a 102 mile bike ride for JDRF Ride to Cure in Loveland, Colorado. I’ve spent a lot of time in the saddle with this sensor and pump over some strenuous miles at higher elevations. My overall impression is quite positive at this point – I have no desire to go back to my previous pump or a pump/continuous glucose monitor (CGM) that don’t speak to one another. Do I have high blood sugars? Yes. Do I get frustrat Continue reading >>

Minimed® 530g System

Minimed® 530g System

Diabetes shouldn't prevent you from living the life you want. Playing in the majors. Taking the stage. Falling in love. MiniMed 530G system with SmartGuard™ technology helps you better control your glucose levels and even takes action for you when you need it – so you can be free to experience life's exceptional moments. Worn on your body, the pump delivers tiny drops of rapid-acting insulin to match your needs. Change your pump tubing only once every two to three days. Bolus Wizard® calculator makes it easier to calculate mealtime insulin and may avoid insulin stacking.1 Set temporary basal rates and patterns around your activities. Get readings every five minutes, right on your pump. Track your glucose levels throughout the day, including the effects of food or exercise. Get alerted when you’re trending high or low, so you can make adjustments – ahead of time. MiniMed 530G system is an insulin pump that’s fully integrated with a glucose sensor to give you advanced diabetes control. It’s the only diabetes management system with SmartGuard™ technology that takes action for you and is proven to reduce your risk of lows*. And by helping you keep your glucose levels stable long-term, MiniMed system can help lower both your A1C and your risk of nerve, eye and kidney problems.2,3,4 A good night’s sleep can mean starting your day refreshed, ready to live the life you want. But when you’re living with diabetes, a restful sleep can sometimes feel out of reach. In fact, up to 75 percent of severe hypoglycemia happens at night.5 SmartGuard technology users experience about half as many nighttime lows* than those using a pump and sensor alone 6. Our exclusive SmartGuard technology mimics some of the functions of a healthy pancreas to provide you with advanced pr Continue reading >>

Review: Medtronic’s Minimed 630g Insulin Pump

Review: Medtronic’s Minimed 630g Insulin Pump

I have used the Minimed 630G Insulin Pump System by Medtronic for the past 30 days. This review is my opinion of the pump, both positive and negative. I have used insulin pumps since I got my first Disetronic H-Tron V-100 in 1994. I got a Minimed 506 pump in 1998 and have been a fan of the Minimed/Medtronic pumps since. Until now. Minimed 630G Insulin Pump System The Minimed 630G Insulin Pump System comes with the pump, the CGM transmitter, and a Contour Next Link 2.4 blood glucose meter. The three devices work well together, once set up right. Medtronic also has an early access program. This lets you buy the Minimed 630G now, and upgrade to the upcoming Minimed 670G in spring of 2017. Receiving the Pump The 630G Pump comes in several boxes. The pump comes in an 8″x10″x2.25″ box that has the pump and several small items like clips, batteries, a manual, and a quick start guide. Another box of the same size has the Contour Next Link 2.4 meter. A second box arrived a few days later with the infusion sets and reservoirs, followed by another box a few days later with the CGM sensors. I got another box a week later with the CGM transmitter. In the past, the local Medtronic trainer would call me to train me on using the pump, with a request not to use it before the training. I normally ignore this request, since I have used Minimed pumps for so long. I do go to these trainings every once in a while, but I was never contact this time. Unusual, considering how new this version of the pump is. Even so, the pump was fairly easy to set up. I also got a pile of 8.5″x11″ manuals. One was a “previous pump users manual” and one was a “pump users manual’. There was a large manual in the box that had everything in it. And another “how to use the CGM” manual. Quite d Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring?

Continuous Glucose Monitoring?

what is continuous glucose monitoring Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) technology enables you to monitor your glucose levels 24 hours a day through a sensor that sends the readings to a MiniMed® insulin pump (or your iphone – learn more). If used with the MiniMed® 640G you get the intelligence of SmartGuardTM to predict when you are approaching a low glucose level 30 minutes in advance and automatically stop insulin delivery. SmartGuardTM will automatically resume insulin delivery when your glucose levels recover1. In essence, CGM provides a more complete picture of your blood glucose levels by giving you early warnings of lows and highs that HbA1C and fingerstick testing alone cannot always identify. In fact, use of CGM has been shown to lower HbA1c levels2 and reduce the time of hypos3. HOW DOES CONTINUOUS GLUCOSE MONITORING WORK? The pump, when combined with the GuardianTM 2 Link transmitter and the enhanced EnliteTM glucose sensor, wirelessly transmits readings to your MiniMed® 640G. The readings are updated every five minutes and appear on the screen in colour. These regular updates can give you a clear understanding of how your glucose levels are tracking. The glucose sensor only needs to be changed every six days. Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump And Continuous Glucose Monitoring System For Use In Children

Fda Approves Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump And Continuous Glucose Monitoring System For Use In Children

Insulin Pump System Offers Children Ages Two and Older an Integrated Solution for Diabetes Management “CGM-enabled systems, like the Animas® Vibe® System, provide patients with a more complete glucose picture, which is acutely important for children since they might not always be aware of the symptoms associated with high or low blood sugars,” said Dr. Brian Levy, Chief Medical Officer, Animas. “The approval of the pediatric indication for Animas® Vibe® System enables parents and caregivers to both deliver insulin precisely, and monitor glucose trends accurately in children as young as age two with one integrated device.” The value of insulin pump therapy has been demonstrated in numerous clinical studies, showing significant improvement in blood glucose control when compared to multiple daily injections. Furthermore, studies have shown that patients who used insulin pump therapy in combination with CGM obtained lower HbA1c levels, relative to patients who used multiple daily injections and self-monitoring of blood glucose.1,2 This greater insight into blood glucose trends helps children with Type 1 diabetes and their parents to make more informed decisions about their insulin needs. In addition to the inclusion of CGM, the Animas® Vibe® System offers a unique combination of features including: Fine-tuned insulin delivery – Equipped with a Swiss-made motor, the Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump offers as low a basal increment as 0.025 U/hr across all available ranges (0.025 U/hr to 25.00 U/hr) and a low bolus increment of 0.05 U across all available bolus ranges (0.05 U to 35.00 U) to adjust and deliver precise increments of insulin, which is acutely important to children and teens given their higher insulin sensitivities. Waterproof durability – The only C Continue reading >>

Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump & Dexcom G4® Platinum Cgm System.

Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump & Dexcom G4® Platinum Cgm System.

Features at a glance: Colour screen, waterproof, CGM-enabled insulin pump. The Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump is the first Dexcom G4® PLATINUM CGM-enabled insulin pump to have a high-contrast colour screen. It delivers rich information, too. Coloured trend arrows and lines show where your glucose is heading and how fast, so you can consider this information, along with the results of fingerstick testing, to help guide therapy adjustments.‡ Unlike other insulin pumps, ours are tested and proven waterproof at 3.6 meters for up to 24 hours.* So you get uninterrupted insulin delivery while swimming or taking a bath, and peace of mind when there’s unexpected contact with water. When used with an Energizer® L91 Lithium battery the Animas® Vibe® System lasts for up to 3-4 weeks.§ Our insulin pumps are compatible with all insulin infusion sets using standard Luer lock connectors, so you are free to find the one that fits you best. Our insetTM II and insetTM 30 are all-in-one infusion sets combining the inserter and infusion set in a single, portable unit. They are a snap to change anytime, anywhere. A masterpiece in precision. The Swiss-made motor of the Animas® Vibe® System can deliver tiny, precise increments of insulin for fine-tuned insulin delivery. The pump delivers a small basal increment (0.025 U/hr) across all the available basal rates (0.025 U/hr to 25 U/hr), to precisely meet your changing needs. Our low bolus increment (0.05 U) helps precisely match insulin with food intake, and corrects high blood sugar readings. Our pumps can calculate a bolus amount to cover the carbs in food (ezCarb), and automatically calculate a correction dose of insulin based on the latest blood sugar reading (ezBG). The Dexcom G4® PLATINUM Sensor is the most accurate in the market Continue reading >>

5. All-in-one Cgm And Insulin Pump From Dexcom And Tandem Diabetes

5. All-in-one Cgm And Insulin Pump From Dexcom And Tandem Diabetes

Earlier this year, DexCom and Tandem Diabetes teamed up to develop a device that hopes to snag a big market share in the diabetes game: a combination continuous glucose monitor and insulin pump. Using Tandem's T:Slim touch-screen insulin pump as a platform, DexCom will bring its CGM knowhow to develop an all-in-one monitor-and-pump combo. And the benefits could be huge. There's just one combination device already on the market (Medtronic's ($MDT) Paradigm), but T:Slim is the world's smallest insulin pump and the only one with touch-screen controls. If DexCom and Tandem can keep the tech small and navigate the 510(k) process, their combination platform could be a hit in the diabetes world. Continue reading >>

2016 Insulin Pump Comparisons

2016 Insulin Pump Comparisons

Click to go to comparison page: Tandem t-Slim/t-Flex/t-slim G4Roche Accu-Chek Combo Insulet Insulet OmniPod Medtronic 530G With Enlite Animas Vibe Pump System Features in Common: 24-hour toll-free helpline Internal safety checks Child button lock-out Full Training Included Simplified programming Extended bolus options Temporary basal rate options Programmable reminders Downloadable Low battery warning Low insulin warning User-set active insulin time Tandem t:slim, t:slim G4 & t:flex Unique Advantages Potential Drawbacks Bright, full-color touch screen Modern, high-tech appearance Compact, thin dimensions Rapid numeric entry, fastest bolus entry Cartridges hold 300u (t:slim); 480u (t:flex) Can calculate boluses up to 50 units (60 on t:flex) Site-change reminder w/customizable day & time Graphic on-screen history display Carb counting calculator Temp basal up to 250%, 72 hrs Can set duration of insulin action in 1-minute increments IOB & time remaining displayed on home screen Missed bolus reminders customizable by day of week Alert for high temperatures which may spoil insulin Secondary basal programs linked with secondary bolus calculation parameters Web-based download software Compatible w/leur-lock infusion sets Minimal insulin movement with changes in altitude Small buttons can be difficult to activate; screen goes blank if buttons missed 3x Unlock procedure required to perform any programming No integrated clip (must put in a case that has a clip) Tubing connector looks “medical,” can snag on clothing Basal & bolus settings in same time slots; may take several steps to edit Extra confirmation steps with all programming Weak vibrate mechanism No meter link Manufacturer relatively new in pump industry Requires charging 1-2x/week No formal in-warranty upgrade polic Continue reading >>

The Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump & Cgm System

The Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump & Cgm System

3 In a clinical trial, the overall mean absolute relative difference (MARD) between sensor readings and YSI values was 13%. In other words, on average Dexcom G4® PLATINUM sensor readings and YSI readings differed by only 13%. From a study of 60 patients using the Dexcom G4® Sensor with a hand-held receiver first calibrated at 1-hour and then approximately every 12-hours following. Similar overall performance has been seen with 1-hour and 2-hour initial calibration. The transmitter and receiver used in the Dexcom G4® Sensor clinical trial were different than those used with the Animas® Vibe® system, but the Dexcom G4® Transmitter and Animas® Vibe® pump function similarly to the transmitter and receiver used in the trial but with a 2-hour initial calibration. The Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump and CGM System is intended for the delivery of insulin and for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for the management of insulin-requiring diabetes. The Animas® Vibe® System’s CGM, which includes the Dexcom G4® PLATINUM Sensor and Transmitter, is indicated for detecting trends and tracking patterns in persons age 2 and older. The system is intended for single patient use and requires a prescription. Contraindications: Insulin pump therapy is not recommended for people unwilling or unable to test their blood glucose four to six times per day, unwilling or unable to see their healthcare professional regularly, or whose vision or hearing does not allow recognition of pump alerts, warnings, and alarms. The Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump must be removed before MRI or CT scan, and the Dexcom G4® PLATINUM Sensor and Transmitter must be removed before MRI, CT scan, or diathermy treatment. Taking acetaminophen-containing medications while wearing the sensor may falsely raise sensor Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems - A Growing Market

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems - A Growing Market

Summary Continuous glucose monitoring systems offer many advantages for diabetics opposed to “traditional” ways of measuring. Potential users are mostly type 1 diabetics that regularly use insulin, but the broader market also consists of type 2 diabetics that need insulin regularly. If insurance companies would cover the costs, it could be a massive catalyst for continuous glucose monitoring systems. If we assume all type 1 diabetics that use an insulin pump will also use a continuous glucose monitoring system, the market could be about $4 billion a year. Diabetes can be called a global pandemic - there are 415 million people affected by it worldwide right now and the number is expected to grow to 642 million in 2040. In 2015 one out of 11 adults had diabetes, in 2040 the number will be one out of 10. High blood sugar is the third highest risk factor for premature mortality, after high blood pressure and tobacco use. In 2015 about 5 million people died from diabetes. As diabetics are producing too little insulin or none at all (depending on the type of diabetes), the most important aspect when talking about diabetes is the constant availability of high quality insulin. The big names in this market are Sanofi (NYSE: SNY), Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY), Merck & Co Inc. (NYSE: MRK) and of course the diabetes giant Novo Nordisk (NYSE: NVO). But aside from the ability to administer insulin the diabetic has to be able to measure his or her blood sugar and in the last decade there have been some very interesting developments in this field. In this article, we talk about the future of blood sugar measurement and take a closer look at that market as well as a possible catalyst for continuous glucose monitoring systems. Why glucose measurement? The bodies of healthy peopl Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everyone needs insulin to live. Insulin is a hormone that helps our bodies use and store the food we eat. People with Type 1 Diabetes no longer make insulin and have to give insulin in order to sustain life. People with Type 2 Diabetes don’t use their own insulin well, and over time can have trouble making enough. So, all people with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes need insulin. When people give insulin injections, they may take 1-2 injections of a long acting insulin every day and 3+ injections of rapid acting insulin for meals and snacks. The typical person with Type 1 Diabetes could take anywhere from 4-7+ injections a day. Many people currently give insulin through an insulin pen or a syringe. But, there is another option, an insulin pump. An insulin pump delivers rapid acting insulin in two ways. First, the pump is programmed to give you insulin every hour throughout the hour referred to basal insulin. Basal, think “base,” is the insulin your body needs even in the absence of food, it is also referred to as background insulin. This basal rate replaces the long acting injection that you take. Second, is bolus, this is the insulin you take for food or to correct a high blood sugar. If you get basal and bolus confused, think “bowl”, as in you eat out of a bowl, to help you remember bolus is for food. Once you are on a pump, all insulin is delivered through the pump and shots are no longer necessary. Components There are a few things necessary to make a pump work. When a pump is shipped to someone: they will also need to send infusion sets, reservoirs, and possibly batteries, depending on your pump. Let’s talk about each component. Infusion Sets An infusion set is the part that is actually inserted into the body and has tubing that conn Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

The MiniMed™ 640G Insulin Pump is a sensor augmented pump (SAP) - the latest type of insulin pump that includes Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) capabilities. An insulin pump that is CGM capable means that you can see and track your glucose levels. By wearing a sensor that sends data to your pump 288 times in a 24 hour period (that’s every 5 minutes), your pump can track your glucose levels and even alert you to a high or low! You will need to wear a small glucose sensor that sits under the skin for up to 6 days at a time. Just like an infusion set cannula, the sensor is easily inserted using an automatic device provided with the system (known as a 'Serter'). The sensor attaches to a small lightweight transmitter* that sends glucose sensor data wirelessly to your insulin pump through advanced radio frequency (RF) wireless technology. The screen on your insulin pump displays the glucose data on screen and plots a trend line of the data so that you can see exactly what your glucose trends are and what may be affecting them. As well as seeing the on-screen display, you can set Alerts on the insulin pump that will sound or vibrate to warn you when you are likely to reach, are reaching or have reached your glucose target limits. Having this information can help you to avoid hypo- or hyperglycaemic excursions, remain within your target glucose levels and help to reduce your HbA1C and achieve better control. What makes the MiniMed 640G System special is the power of SmartGuard™. This is completely unique to this insulin pump and is a major step forward for insulin pump technology. When SmartGuard is switched on, the insulin pump can actually switch off delivery of insulin to prevent you going too low and switch it back on again once sensor glucose levels are back in r Continue reading >>

Common Issues Around Insulin, Insulin Pumps, Cgms And Test Strips

Common Issues Around Insulin, Insulin Pumps, Cgms And Test Strips

9-minute read In this section we’ll discuss “When I was no longer on my parents’ insurance, I chose a new plan. I didn’t realize that none of the plans I could choose from had my insulin covered at the rate I was used to—it was in a higher tier, so I paid more out-of-pocket at the pharmacy. Once I realized this, I found an insulin on a lower tier that worked for me, so the costs went back to what I was used to. Understanding that different insulins are treated differently by my insurance company helped me ask the right questions and get a treatment that suited my condition and my budget.” T1D patient, IL Common Insulin Issues You May Encounter: Tiering Issues – Insurance plans group medications into health insurance tiers that determine patients’ access to and cost for their therapies. You can find this information on the “drug formulary,” a list of covered medicines and their associated tiers. It’s important to know that insurance plans don’t always cover every available insulin, and yours may not be covered. You will need to check the formulary to see whether your insulin is covered and, if so, on which tier. It is important to check this, because it can impact not only your coverage, but also your out-of-pocket costs.Typically, lower tiers include generic or preferred medications, and higher tiers will include non-preferred or brand-name medications and specialty therapies.Lower-tiered medications are also more affordable, with lower out-of-pocket costs than higher-tiered medication. Your insurance company can change the tier your medication is on from one year to the next. If this happens, you will usually be required to pay more for your treatment.If your preferred insulin is not covered, you should apply for an exception. See more informati Continue reading >>

This Diabetes Activist Hacked Her Medical Device And Made An Artificial Pancreas

This Diabetes Activist Hacked Her Medical Device And Made An Artificial Pancreas

Activists are hacking medical devices to free the data. Mark Mann May 23 2016, 12:00pm Image: Alden Chadwick/Flickr Algorithms are boring until your life depends on them. People with Type 1 diabetes use algorithms all day long. They perform mental calculations to manage their blood-sugar levels, which are measured by hand with a finger prick, or with a wearable sensor that fits under the skin. If they stray too far from baseline, the consequences can range from exhaustion and depression, to coma and death. Usually when humans are doing something for which a computer would be much superior, such as performing calculations, a company will jump in and automate it. Algorithms for managing diabetes are no different. Any competent programmer with access to either long-term or real-time glucose and insulin data could start creating customized apps and tools that make life easier for people with diabetes. Advertisement But that's the problem: the data isn't readily accessible. That's why digital health activists like Dana Lewis, who has type 1 diabetes, are hacking into medical devices, to create tools that manufacturers won't. "Most people don't understand that medical device technology is about ten years behind everything else," Lewis, a Seattle-based data analyst, told me over Skype. "It's very frustrating to not get your data from your body out of the device." A woman with a Continuous Glucose Monitor. Image: Intel Free Press/Flickr The first time Lewis, who is 27, hacked into her Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM), a small device that attaches to her body and reads her blood-sugar level every five minutes, all she wanted was to make it louder. The device beeps a warning if her glucose falls or climbs too steeply. She can either increase or decrease her insulin intake with an Continue reading >>

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